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Publication numberUS3733852 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 22, 1973
Filing dateJul 14, 1972
Priority dateJul 14, 1972
Publication numberUS 3733852 A, US 3733852A, US-A-3733852, US3733852 A, US3733852A
InventorsJohnson L, Zachariae B
Original AssigneeJohnson L, Zachariae B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ornamental construction of safety pins and beads
US 3733852 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Johnson et a1.

ORNAMENTAL CONSTRUCTION OF SAFETY PINS AND BEADS Inventors: Lu Wanna M. Johnson, 7515 E. Hubbell, Scottsdale; Barbara L. Zachariae, PO. Box 136, Young, both of Ariz.

Filed: July 14, 1972 Appl. N0.: 271,805

U.S. Cl ..63/2, 63/4, 24/87 R, 59/80, 161/7 Int. Cl ..A44c 25/00 Field of Search ..63/2, 3, l; 161/7, 161/13; 24/87 C, 87 R; 59/80, 81

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1/1923 Hartmann ..63/2 2/1930 Ridabock ..63/2 10/1930 Deans ..24/87 R 1 51 May 22,1973

3,549,465 12/1970 Skelley ..161/13 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 123,494 9/1901 Germany ..24/87R 396,860 4/1909 France ..63/2

Primary Examiner-F. Barry Shay AttorneyWilliam H. Drummond [57] ABSTRACT A novel hobby-craft construction for costume jewelry is provided. The construction consists of recurring units of common safety pins. Each recurring unit consists of two or more parallel safety pins arranged so that the ends of the pins in each unit are adjacent the ends of the parallel pins of the next unit. Transverse linking pins join the ends of the parallel pins of one unit to the ends of the parallel pins in the next unit. Ornamental beads are selectively strung on the needle shafts of the longitudinal and transverse pins.

1 Claim, 6 Drawing Figures n-eo ge-oee M9 -10 10;

Patented May 22, 1973 Q2 0 03 w s2 3 ORNAMENTAL CONSTRUCTION OF SAFETY PINS AND BEADS This invention relates to a hobby-craft construction.

More particularly, the invention concerns a hobbycraft craft construction for costume jewelry made from perforated ornamental beads and safety pins.

In another respect, the invention relates to a technique of making costume jewelry which can be carried out by relatively unskilled hobbyists which yields many hours of pleasure and which results in aesthetically pleasing pieces of costume jewelry such as necklaces, bracelets, earrings, medallions, watchbands, belts, etc.

Many familiar techniques have been used for making costume jewelry from ornamental beads. The novel hobby-craft construction for ornamental jewelry provided by the present invention is disclosed in the following description taken in conjunction with the drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 depicts a necklace made in accordance with a simplified embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2, 3 and 4 illustrate the steps of making the necklace of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 illustrates another more complex embodiment of the invention; and

FIG. 6 illustrates various shapes and sizes of beads which can be employed in practicing the various embodiments of the invention.

Briefly, in accordance with the invention, a hobbycraft construction for costume jewelry made from perforated ornamental beads and safety pins is provided. The beads may be selected from any of the common and usual types which generally comprise a small shaped body having an aperture therein for stringing the beads on a wire, thread or other elongate support. The safety pins which are employed in practicing the invention are of the common and usual type constructed of a resilient wire bent back on itself so as to form a spring, a guard or sheath on one of the free ends and the other free end being sharpened and adapted to be received in the guard or sheath when the pin is closed. The guard or sheath has an aperture, and the spring at the other end of the pin forms another aperture, both apertures being somewhat larger in diameter than the resilient wire used to form the pin. For convenience herein, the end of the pin having the guard or sheath will be referred to as the head" and the other end of the pin will be referred to as the spring. The sharpened end of the resilient wire will be referred to as the needle shaft.

The invention comprises a construction which includes longitudinally recurring units of parallel longitudinally extending safety pins, the ends of the pins in each of said units being disposed adjacent the ends of the pins in the next-adjacent unit. A linking pin extends transversely across and between each of the longitudinally recurring units. The needle shaft of each linking pin passes through the ends of the parallel pins of one of the recurring units and the ends of the parallel pins in the next-adjacent unit. Perforated ornamental beads are strung on the needle shafts of selected ones of the longitudinal and transverse pins.

For purposes of clarity, the drawings illustrate extremely simplified embodiments of the invention. However, using the principles disclosed, of constructing recurring units including larger numbers of pins in each unit and arranging the recurring units in varying configurations, one can construct exceedingly complex and aesthetically appealing pieces of costume jewelry.

FIG. 1 illustrates a simple necklace made in accordance with one embodiment of the invention, comprising alternating recurring units A and B.

The A unit consists of three longitudinally extending pins 10, each having ornamental beads 11 strung on the needle shaft thereof. The lowermost pin 10a, in addition, has two pendant pins 12 strung on the needle shaft which passes through the spring ends of the pins 12.

The B unit comprises two longitudinal pins 13 having beads strung on the needle shafts thereof. The A and B units are joined by transverse linking pins 14, the needle shafts of which pass through the heads of the pins of one unit and the springs of the pins in the nextadjacent unit.

Suitable clasp members 15 and 16 are provided at the terminal ends of the necklace.

FIGS. 2, 3 and 4 illustrate the steps in assembling the necklace of FIG. 1. As shown in FIG. 2, all of the pins 10, 12 and 14 are prepared first by stringing beads 11 on the needle shaft 17 of the pin and then closing the pin. Next, as shown in FIG. 3, the lowermost pins 10a of the A units are prepared by alternately stringing beads 11 and the springs of the pins of FIG. 2 onto the needle shaft of the pin and then closing the pin.

The pins of FIGS. 2 and 3 are then joined to form the recurring A and B units as shown in FIG. 4 by passing the needle shafts of the linking pins 14 alternately through the adjacent heads and springs of the pins 11 and 13 in the adjacent A and B units and then closing the pins 14.

FIG. 5 illustrates another recurring unit formed by two longitudinal pins 17 and 18 and two linking pins 19 and 20. The needle shafts of the longitudinal pins 17 and 18 receive alternate beads 21 and pins 22. The pins 22 are provided with beads strung on the needle shafts thereof in the manner shown in FIG. 2. By varying the color or size of the beads, or both, one can produce various patterns such as the P, as shown in FIG. 5.

FIG. 6 illustrates a conventional safety pin having a head 23, a spring 24 and a needle shaft 25. As illustrated, the beads may vary in shape and size, e.g., a small spherical bead 26, an elongate cylindrical bead 27 and a larger bead in the form of an oblate spheroid 28.

Obviously, beads of many other shapes could be used and the beads may be of various colors to produce interesting and attractive patterns. Interestingly, unless a piece of costume jewelry constructed in accordance with the invention is examined very closely, it is not at all apparent that the materials of construction include safety pins. From the standpoint of ease of construction and appeal to experienced hobbyists, it is extremely important to note that no tools or materials of construction are necessary to form costume jewelry in accordance with the invention except the ornamental beads and safety pins.

Having described the invention and the preferred embodiments thereof,

We claim:

1. A hobby-craft construction for costume jewelry made from perforated ornamental beads and safety pins, each said pin having transverse apertures at its opposite ends said construction comprising a. longitudinally recurring units of said pins in parallel longitudinally extending relation, the ends of the pins in each of said units being disposed adjacent the ends of the pins in the next-adjacent unit with said apertures aligned;

b. one of said pins being a linking pin extending transversely across and between each of said longitudi- 5 nally recurring units, the needle shaft of said linking pin passing through said apertures of the longitudinally extending parallel pins in each of said reand linking pins.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4679392 *Jun 13, 1986Jul 14, 1987Nakagawa CorporationProcess for producing a garland chain
US6357260 *Mar 22, 2000Mar 19, 2002Bath & Body Works, Inc.Scented bracelet kit
US6378334 *Feb 24, 2000Apr 30, 2002Valerie HectorJewelry articles including small beads arranged in designs in decorative framework
US6442972 *May 24, 2001Sep 3, 2002James G. WatsonColor coded concept for articles of jewelry and clothing
US6477861 *Aug 22, 2001Nov 12, 2002Daniel J. PottickBeaded ornament and arrangement for and method of making same
US6739935 *Jan 25, 2001May 25, 2004Breakey B.V.Toy article
US6769270 *Mar 20, 2001Aug 3, 2004Korabet TakessianDetachable pendant mounting
US6908065 *May 30, 2003Jun 21, 2005Gregory Ritchie3-dimensional bead process
US7040120 *Apr 1, 2003May 9, 2006Hunter Roxanne MFlexible piece of jewelry
US7322214Sep 14, 2006Jan 29, 2008Ignatowski Patricia MConvertible eyeglass retainer/jewelry article
US7406840 *Jul 31, 2002Aug 5, 2008Brancato Theresa MMulti-function jewelry chain primarily for supporting an upper torso garment
US7444801 *Aug 4, 2005Nov 4, 2008Avraham RozenvasserMethod of weaving links and resulting product
US8425274Mar 30, 2010Apr 23, 2013Susan J. RatcliffSectional bra system and accessories
US8763357 *Jul 1, 2013Jul 1, 2014Cheska ArnoneInterchangeable jewelry method using individual beaded links
US20030110798 *Jan 27, 2003Jun 19, 2003Ignatowski Patricia M.Three-piece convertible eyeglass retainer/jewelry article
US20030141327 *Oct 17, 2002Jul 31, 2003Barbara CruiseMultiple interchangeable carrier attachment system
US20030233845 *Apr 1, 2003Dec 25, 2003Hunter Roxanne M.Flexible piece of jewelry
US20040007017 *Jul 14, 2003Jan 15, 2004Michelle FlahertyNecklace with detachable necklace strands
US20040020240 *Jul 31, 2002Feb 5, 2004Brancato Theresa M.Multi-function jewelry chain primarily for supporting an upper torso garment
US20040134229 *Nov 6, 2003Jul 15, 2004Oliver David CharlesInterconnected strings of beads
US20050235694 *Apr 20, 2004Oct 27, 2005Hunter Nicolette TNecklace/bracelet extender
US20060032208 *Aug 4, 2005Feb 16, 2006David RosenwasserMethod of weaving links and resulting product
US20100223954 *Sep 9, 2010Kyung Jung KimOrnament With Attachable Decorative Elements
US20100257658 *Oct 14, 2010Schwietz-Flauto Jennifer AFashion scarf with removable embellishments
US20130091894 *Oct 12, 2011Apr 18, 2013Annelise BrownInterchangeable and customizable jewelry system and method of use
US20130232657 *Mar 7, 2012Sep 12, 2013The Cannon CorporationFlexible Article of Apparel
Classifications
U.S. Classification63/37, 59/80, 63/4, 24/356
International ClassificationA44C11/00
Cooperative ClassificationA44C11/002
European ClassificationA44C11/00B