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Publication numberUS3734094 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 22, 1973
Filing dateJun 21, 1971
Priority dateJun 21, 1971
Publication numberUS 3734094 A, US 3734094A, US-A-3734094, US3734094 A, US3734094A
InventorsCalinog T
Original AssigneeCalinog T
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Multipurpose esophageal instrument
US 3734094 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Calmog [54] MULTIPURPOSE ESOPHAGEAL INSTRUMENT [76] Inventor: Teodoro A. Calinog, 320 E. North Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15212 [22] Filed: June 21,1971

21 Appl. No.: 155,044

[52] US. Cl. ..128/2.06 E, l28/2.05 S, 128/351,

l28/DIG. 4 [5 1] Int. Cl. ..A61b 5/04 [58] Field of Search ..l28/2.05 R, 2.05 S,

OTHER PUBLICATIONS Schaudinschky et al. Medical & Biological Engineering Vol. 7, pp. 341-343 1969 451 May 22, 1973 Primary Examiner-William E. Kamm Attorney-Brown, Murray, Flick & Peckham [57] ABSTRACT An instrument for integrated monitoring of a patients physical condition includes a suction tube for insertion in his esophagus, the tube being provided with an inlet in one end for stomach fluids and an outlet in its opposite end for connection to a suction machine. A portion of the tube is encircled by an acoustic tube that is spaced from it, although the inner end of the acoustic tube is sealed to the suction tube in a location adjacent to, but spaced from, the inlet end of the suction tube. The outer end of the acoustic tube has an opening through which the suction tube emerges, and an outlet for connection to a sound-monitoring device. The inner end portion of the acoustic tube has lateral openings therein covered by diaphragm means. A plurality of spaced electrode bands encircle the acoustic tube adjacent the sleeve and are connected to wires extending outwardly along the acoustic tube and away from its outer end for connection to a heart-monitoring machine.

3 Claims, 2 Drawing Figures PATEN] E :arr r2 2 m5 M/I/EA/TOR. TEODORO .4. CAL lA/OG em w A TTORNEW.

MULTIPURPOSE ESOPHAGEAL INSTRUMENT ln monitoring a patients physical condition it sometimes is desirable to withdraw fluids, such as liquid and air, from the stomach. This is done by a suction tube. It may also be desirable to record his heart beats and to ascertain the condition of his heart by means of an electrocardiogram or the like. Recording the heart beats and the condition of the heart are generally done by means engaging external surfaces of the patients body.

It is among the objects of this invention to provide a relatively simple instrument that can be inserted in a patients esophagus and that permits the conditions mentioned above to be monitored at simultaneously or in succession.

The preferred embodiment of the invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which FIG. 1 is a side view of the instrument; and

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary longitudinal section.

Referring to the drawings, a flexible suction tube 1 of any desired length, but long enough to be passed down through the esophagus and into the stomach with its outer end protruding from the patients mouth, has a coupling 2 at its outer end for connecting it to a known suction machine. The inner end portion of the tube that will be in the patients stomach is provided with one or more inlets 3, through which liquids and air can be withdrawn by the suction machine.

Encircling the suction tube is a flexible acoustic tube 5 that likewise must extend out of the patients mouth. However, the acoustic tube is considerably shorter than the suction tube and its inner end terminates near the suction tube inlets 3, but far enough away from them to prevent it from extending into the stomach. The major portion of the acoustic tube is spaced from the suction tube to leave a sound passage between them, but the inner end of the acoustic tube is sealed against the suction tube in any suitable manner. The outer end of the acoustic tube is designed to be connected to a sound-monitoring device of known construction, so the tube is provided with an outlet coupling. Although the outlet could be in the side of the outer portion of the tube, in which case the suction tube would extend out of the end, the outlet preferably is formed by the outer end of the tube, in which the coupling 6 is mounted. The outer end portion of the acoustic tube is provided with a lateral opening, through which the suction tube emerges. The wall of the opening snugly engages the suction tube.

To admist heart sounds into the acoustic tube, its inner end portion is provided with a plurality of lateral openings 8 that are covered by diaphragm means to accentuate the sound and also to prevent body fluids from entering the opening. Preferably, the diaphragm means is a flexible sleeve 9 encircling the acoustic tube. The opposite ends of the sleeve are sealed to the tube, with the group of openings 8 between them.

In order to connect this instrument with a heart monitoring machine, such as an electrocardiogram, the inner end portion of the acoustic tube is provided with electrodes that can be wired to the machine. There are at least two electrodes, and preferably three. These electrodes most suitably are in the form of metal bands encircling the acoustic tube. Two of these bands 11 and 12 are located on the tube near the opposite ends of the diaphragm sleeve. The third one 13 is spaced a short distance outwardly from the first two. Joined to each of these bands is a wire 14 that extends out along the acoustic tube and away from its side wall at the outer end portion of the tube. Where the wires leave the tube, they are tightly engaged by it. The wires may extend along between the two tubes or they may be molded into the acoustic tube. The exposed outer ends of the wires are provided with terminals 15 for connection to the heart-monitoring machine.

In using this instrument it is inserted in the esophagus of a patient until the inlets of the suction tube are within the stomach. Then the suction tube is connected to a suction machine, the acoustic tube is connected to a sound-monitoring device and the wires are connected to a heart-monitoring machine. This single instrument therefore serves at least three different functions, all of which can be carried on simultaneously if desired. The instrument itself is relatively simple in construction and is easy to use by a person skilled in the use of esophageal tubes.

According to the provisions of the patent statutes, I have explained the principle of my invention and have illustrated and described what I now consider to represent its best embodiment. However, I desire to have it understood that, within the scope of the appended claims, the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically illustrated and described.

I claim:

1. A multipurpose esophageal instrument for integrated monitoring of a patients physical condition, comprising a suction tube for insertion in a patients esophagus and provided with an inlet in one end for stomach fluids and an outlet in its opposite end for connection to a suction machine, a separate acoustic tube encircling a portion of the suction tube with space between them, the acoustic tube having an inner end sealed to the suction tube in a location adjacent to but spaced from the inlet end thereof, the outer end of the acoustic tube being provided with an opening through which the suction tube emerges, the outer end of the acoustic tube also having an outlet for connection to a sound-monitoring device, the inner end portion of the acoustic tube having lateral openings therein, a diaphragm sleeve encircling said inner portion of the acoustic tube, the opposite ends of the sleeve being sealed to the acoustic tube with said lateral openings between the sleeve ends, a plurality of spaced electrode bands encircling the acoustic tube adjacent said diaphragm sleeve, and a wire connected to each band and extending outwardly along the acoustic tube and away from its outer end portion for connection to a heartmonitoring machine.

2. A multipurpose esophageal instrument according to claim 1, in which said opening in the acoustic tube for emergence of the suction tube is in the side wall of the acoustic tube, the suction tube snugly engages the wall of said opening, and a coupling is connected to the outer end of the acoustic tube for connection to a sound-monitoring device.

3. A multipurpose esophageal instrument according to claim 2, in which there are three of said electrode bands and three of said wires, one band being located close to each end of said diaphragm sleeve, and the third band being spaced outwardly along the acoustic tube from the other two bands.

Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification600/380, 600/581
International ClassificationA61B1/273, A61B1/12, A61B5/042, A61B7/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61B7/023, A61B1/00082, A61B1/2733, A61B1/015, A61B5/0421
European ClassificationA61B1/015, A61B1/00E4H1, A61B5/042B, A61B1/273B, A61B7/02B