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Publication numberUS3734505 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 22, 1973
Filing dateJul 20, 1971
Priority dateJul 24, 1970
Publication numberUS 3734505 A, US 3734505A, US-A-3734505, US3734505 A, US3734505A
InventorsGermanis R
Original AssigneeGermanis R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Board game apparatus
US 3734505 A
Abstract
Apparatus for use in a game by which expertise in exploration and development of ore bodies can be gained in a realistic manner, the apparatus including a board with areas marked out and onto which a number of tiles can be randomly placed, one on each area, there being sets of tiles with differing markings for each set on their back and each set having a different but known number of valuable tiles so that each marked area of the board has a greater or lesser probable value than other such areas of the board. The board areas are dimensioned to receive pegging (claiming) members which have openings dimensioned to receive a tile, the pegging members being marked to designate ownership by a player.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Germanis 1 Ma 22 1973 54 BOARD GAME APPARATUS 1,333,943 6/1963 France ..35 31 G 76 Inventor: R its Germanis Flat 17, Kn 1 a 53 King William Primary Examiner-Delbert B. Lowe Unley Australia Attorney-Albert H. Oldham, Vern L. Oldham and Edwin W. Oldham [22] Filed: July 20, 1971 s 57 AB TRACT [21] Appl. No.: 164,248 1 [30] Foreign Application Priority Data Apparatus for use in a game by which expertise in exploration and development of ore bodies can be July Austraha 968/ gained in a realistic manner, the apparatus including a 52 S Cl 273 R 273/ C 273/135 C board with areas marked out and onto which a 273/136 E 273/137 AB number of tiles can be randomly placed, one on each 51 Int. Cl. ..A63f 3/00 area. there being sets of tiles with differing markings [58] Field of Search ..273/130, 135; 35/31 for each set on their back and each Set having a difr ferent but known number of valuable tiles so that each 5 References Ci d marked area of the board has a greater or lesser probable value than other such areas of the board. UNITED STATE PATENTS The board areas are dimensioned to receive pegging 1 787 521 1/1931 Harrington ..273/135 AC (claiming) members which have Penings dimen' 2:549:708 4 1951 Post ..273 135 AC Sioned receive a tile the Pegging members being marked to designate ownership by a player. FOREIGN PATENTS 0R APPLICATIONS i 4 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures 158,278 1/1933 Switzerland ..273/l35 AC l\ 4 II \KKI & I 111 1; 9 1* e1 IL 1a -r-h|- "H- "Hl \x 11 I I III]! 1 .l- 3: 51am? 1 20,000 j [P I. I F 'K z n ---r4 I qf/l/ j j;\ um X 5 /i\ "I 5, 1115 a; 1 1 1 PATENTEB HAY 2 21973 SHEET 1 [IF 2 LEASEMAP 5555555555 REFERENCE GEOLOGY a mm 0:: :1

SPECIAL TILES LEASES HEB E m m m mm m unn COSTS UEIEIEIEIIIIEIEJD UEJUEJUEIEIEJEIEI [:IEJEIEIEIEIEIEJDCI PATENTEB HAYZ 2 i975 SHEET 2 OF 2 DEMAND INDEX STOCK EXCHANGE APE X PINNACLE SUMM/ T VERTEX ZEN/ TH ZZ===Z====I llll II I BOARD GAME APPARATUS This invention relates to apparatus, by the use of which, the techniques of funding exploration and development of potentially valuable things such as ore bodies may be practiced.

The object of this invention is to provide apparatus by which such practice can be achieved in such a way that it realistically simulates actual conditions and furthermore achieves this in a way which is both simple and therefore can be manufactured economically.

The invention, accordingly, in a widest concept, can be said to reside in apparatus for simulation of exploration and development problems including a board with a plurality of delineated areas, and a plurality of tiles adapted to be randomly placed, one on each area, with one face hidden and being marked so that, in such a position, each can be recognized as having a particular comparable probability that the hidden face has an indication of greater value than the indications of other tiles.

It will be seen that the tiles can be used to represent such things as potential ore bodies of particular values and the probability of this value and the fact that there is some valuable consideration in relation to a particular tile can be judged by the comparable probability indication seen on the tile. A plurality of such tiles, therefore, distributed one on each of the delineated areas would therefore represent a number of undeveloped areas of potential value and the probability of this value is at all times able to be gauged by persons viewing the board. As tiles are developed, that is as progressively each of the tiles is turned over and their value is made known the fewer remaining tiles can be more accurately gauged as to their probability of being of greater or lesser value and so the potential value of the ore bodies and hence any shares that may have been issued in companies that own such ore bodies can be more accurately assessed and so trading of these shares can take place progressively on more definite values as development takes place.

It is preferred that the apparatus includes pegging members arranged to fit on each delineated area with the tile and carrying a marking so as to indicate a claim to that area by a company.

Preferably the delineated areas on the board comprise adjoining squares the tiles being of a size to fit within each square and each pegging member comprising a surround adapted to surround a tile but to fit within the perimeter of each delineated area.

In a preferred form of the invention the tiles are used to represent ore bodies of different value and the board with the various delineated areas represents a geographical area which can be subject to lease so that subject to agreed rules a player may peg a series of tiles thereby claiming areas of known probability in value.

Additional to the apparatus described is provided simulated money, share certificates of each company of whom a player is a representative, and a board on which the value of the shares of a particular company, when the company has gone public, may be quoted and furthermore any calls required and the final value of the shares may all be placed upon the board which is therefore in effect a stock exchange board.

For the description of a particular preferred embodiment reference is now made to drawings attached hereto in which FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a tile and above this in a position so that it is about to peg the area on which the tile is located a pegging member,

FIG. 2 is a board with a number of delineated areas onto each of which a tile can be located establishing a potential and probable value for that particular area;

FIG. 3 is a detail of the board of FIG. 2 but particularly including tiles located on each of the delineated areas of the portion shown and several of the tiles being pegged and FIG. 4 is a stock exchange board wherein the issue value and other information relevant to the public shares of each company can be recorded and trading can occur as desired.

Referring in particular to the drawings and in particular to FIG. 1 a title 1 is planar with a square perimeter and has a back 2 of a selected color and an underneath side 3 either having a value of ore for instance, $20,000-, $40,000, $60,000- or $80,000- or having a direction similar to those that might occur on an exploratory field. Illustrative of such indications there might be included the direction Inept cook poisons crew Pay 5500-- or Tax refund Collect $1,000- or again Lazy field crew Lose $1,000, Government grades tracks Collect $2,000- and so The distribution of value or instructions of lesser value or cost are carefully arranged so that these are gradated and there are accordingly four such sets of tiles, each set with a common color back, each set of tiles being equal in number but including a carefully graded proportion of more valuable indications rather than indications of lesser worth.

In this preferred embodiment there are four sets of such tiles and each set of tiles is considered as being similar to a particular type of geology which is known to be more productive or conversely less productive in certain areas. Accordingly tiles with a black back are referred to as Bonanzite which is described as cashiferous areas of massive mineralization ore-body probability 50 percent. Tiles with a red back are termed Eurekalite" which are states as being of high to medium grade ore bodies of frequent distribution ore-body probability 40 percent, tiles with yellow backs are Dollaritic Formation, medium to low mineralization with some lucrative intrusion ore-body probability 30 percent and finally tiles with a white back are described as Slimchanceite which is described as scattered deposits of unremunerative affinities ore-body probability 25 percent.

Of 25 tiles in each set the following distribution of value is used:

Bonanzite Eurekalite l 3 4 Dollaritic Formation 2 3 3 Slimchanceite 2 2 2 ter of the delineated areas 5 of the board 6 as shown in FIG. 2.

Each of the delineated areas 5 of which there are 100 are squares defined by perimeter lines 7 adjoining each other and include a central portion 8 to locate a tile 1 and located so that a pegging member 4 can fit thereover and thereby conclusively establish the ownership of a particular body for a time. Each of the pegging members 4 has a square outer perimeter 9 and an inner aperture 10 in which the tile 1 is intended to fit. The member 4 is of lesser thickness than the tile 1 so that when the pegging member is over the tile the tile 1 can be independently caught by a players fingers and turned over when, for instance, an ore body is to be explored.

FIG. 3 shows the board with a number of tiles 1 in position on the board and a number of pegging members comprising the surround 4 pegging such tiles 1. As will be seen by FIG. 3 the tiles 1 are randomly distributed but each, because of its different color back, can be assessed in so far as the probability of its upturned value is concerned as compared with other tiles.

FIG. 4, showing the stock exchange board, shows the names of eight companies and adjacent these an area to indicate a par value of shares, a value to which the shares are paid up to and the calls that have been made on these shares. There is furthermore a final value and it would be here that the market value of shares could also be indicated and trading between players can be recorded and the price reached shown.

Alongside there is indicated the actual number and value of valuable indications on each of the sets of tiles so that at all times players as representing companies can estimate the potential value of undeveloped ore bodies on the board.

Whereas differing rules may be used by which the apparatus described can be used to give experience and simulate actual conditions as may occur in stock exchange trading or company formation there is one set of rules which is preferred at the present time but clearly this can be altered without necessarily departing from the concept of the invention.

In the preferred rules therefore a selected number of players as companies each are given a selected sum of money to begin trading and then with the tiles randomly distributed all face downwardly upon the board and located one on each delineated area each player with a selected number of pegging members can purchase the lease to such areas as he selects, the cost of each Bonanzite body being $4,000, the cost of each Eurekalite body being $3,000-, the cost of each Dollaritic Formation being $2,000, and the cost of each Slimchanceite body being $1,000.

The company may then explore any of the areas that it has pegged by the payment for each area of a selected sum of money such as $3,000- and thereby learn whether in fact there is a valuable ore body on that location or whether such exploration results in a liability.

If it discovers an ore body of value it can convert this ore body into cash by raising half the value of the sum shown on the tile and upon raising such half of the value it is supplied with the full value of the indication on the tile in cash and furthermore the value of such ore body is retained as capital assets of the company to be assessed upon the completion of the game for com puting the eventual winner.

if a company as represented by a player cannot raise sufficient money to develop a valuable ore body it can raise such money by going public and issuing shares to other companies as represented by other players involved in the game. If thereafter any cash income results for that particular company a proportion of that income must be paid as a dividend to all shareholders.

As will now be seen the apparatus as described can provide an excellent basis by which simulation of circumstances actually existing in stock exchange practices, company formation and mining development can be achieved and thereby provide excellent training.

What I claim is:

1. Apparatus for the simulation of exploration and development problems to be solved by a plurality of competing players, comprising:

a board having a plurality of delineated areas thereon; and

a plurality of differently marked sets of tiles, each set comprising a group of tiles, the tiles in each of the several groups having on one face thereof different indications of value, and each group or set having a different but known number of tiles with indications of relatively high values, the tiles being of such a nature that when they are placed upon the board, one on each area, with their faces having the different indications of values hidden, the different markings of each of the sets of tiles will give an indication of the particular comparable probability that the hidden face of each tile has an indication of value of greater value than the indications of other tiles.

2. The apparatus as recited in claim 1 which includes a plurality of pegging members of substantially the same peripheral size as the delineated areas of the board, such pegging members having apertures for receivably engaging the tiles placed within the delineated areas, each pegging member being marked or carrying some markings so as to indicate ownership by a player.

3. The apparatus as recited in claim 2 wherein the said delineated areas on the board comprise adjoining squares, the tiles being of a size to fit within each square and each pegging member comprising a surround adapted to surround the tile to fit within the perimeter of each delineated area.

4. Apparatus for the simulation of exploration and development problems comprising a board, delineated areas on the board comprising a plurality of adjoining squares, a plurality of tiles of equal number to the said delineated areas, each tile being planar and having on one face thereof an indication of value and on another face thereof a color by which a comparable probability of the indication of value of each tile as compared with other tiles can be gaged, each tile being of a size such that it will fit within the perimeter of each delineated area, and a plurality of removable pegging members, each pegging member comprising a surround the outer perimeter of which is of a size such that it will fit within the delineated area of each square and adapted to fit around any tile on the delineated area.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1787521 *Jun 21, 1928Jan 6, 1931Charles E FisenneGame
US2549708 *Jul 19, 1946Apr 17, 1951Durrel E PostChance controlled game board apparatus with cards and dice
CH158278A * Title not available
FR1333943A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3892408 *Nov 12, 1973Jul 1, 1975Harlan F EllisEducational game
US3942800 *Apr 9, 1975Mar 9, 1976Dwight HolbrookArcheological game
US5681042 *Jun 7, 1995Oct 28, 1997Dream Makers, Inc.Game board apparatus
US5772207 *Mar 29, 1997Jun 30, 1998Caseila; Stephen J.Board game
US7219895 *Jun 9, 2000May 22, 2007Hutchins Jr Robert HChess game playing array assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/278, 273/282.1, 273/290
International ClassificationA63F3/04
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/0457
European ClassificationA63F3/04K