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Publication numberUS3735536 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 29, 1973
Filing dateMay 7, 1971
Priority dateMay 7, 1971
Publication numberUS 3735536 A, US 3735536A, US-A-3735536, US3735536 A, US3735536A
InventorsBellasalma G
Original AssigneePlastetics Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bus stop shelter
US 3735536 A
Abstract
The invention relates to a modular building construction such as a bus shelter or the like in which each pair of adjacent spaced uprights carry an H-shaped extrusion providing an elongated upper channel in which an inwardly directed generally horizontal back flange of a molded plastic roof section rests. An elongated extruded retainer element is secured to the cross piece of the H so as to clamp the flange between the cross piece and the retainer with an upwardly and rearwardly extending portion of the retainer helping to support the roof section in cantilever fashion and with gutter-forming elements associated with adjacent edges of a pair of roof sections to carry water away from the shelter roof formed by the sections.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Bellasalma [54] BUS STOP SHELTER [75] Inventor: Gerald J. Bellasalma, West Cald' well, NJ.

[73] Assignee: Plastetics lnc., Fairfield, N.J.

[22] Filed: May 7, 1971 21 App1.N0.: 141,238

[52] US. Cl. ..52/73, 52/16, 52/263 [51] Int. Cl. ...E04b 1/34, E04h 1/12 [58] Field of Search ..52/261, 90, 262,

3,411,251 11/1968 Corry ..52/94 [5 7] ABSTRACT The invention relates to a modular building construction such as a bus shelter or the like in which each pair of adjacent spaced uprights carry an l-l-shaped extrusion providing an elongated upper channel in which an inwardly directed generally horizontal back flange of a molded plastic roof section rests. An elongated extruded retainer element is secured to the cross piece of the H so as to clamp the flange between the cross piece and the retainer with an upwardly and rearwardly extending portion of the retainer helping to support the roof section in cantilever fashion and with gutter-forming elements associated with adjacent edges of a pair of roof sections to carry water away from the shelter roof formed by the sections.

7 Claims, 10 Drawing Figures Pmrzmmmmm SHEET 1 OF 3 INVENTOR. Gera/a Jfiel/asa/ma H7 TORNEYS PATENTEU MAY 2 81975 SHEET 3 OF 3 INVENTOR. @era/dfBe/[asa/md nus s'ror SHELTER BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Various forms of structures such as bus shelters are known in the prior art. Generally these structures require considerable fabrication at the site. They are, moreover, relatively expensive and are not as simple in construction as is desired. They are not readily adapted to being constructed as multiples of a single unit to provide'different sized shelters as required. In addition, owing to the fact that many of them provide relatively dark recesses they are not as safe as is desirable.

I have invented a modular structure such as a bus shelter which overcomes the defects of shelters intended for similar purposes in the prior art. My shelter is readily erectable at the site requiring a minimum of labor. It is simple in construction. It is readily adapted to erection of bus shelters of various sizes as required at different stations. It is inexpensive to construct as contrasted with structures of the prior art. It is safer for persons waiting for a bus or the like than are shelters of the prior art. It is particularly adapted for modular construction of roofs.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION One object of my invention is to provide an improved modular construction which is readily erectable at the site.

Another object of my invention is to provide a modular construction for a bus shelter or the like which is simple.

A further object of my invention is to provide a modular construction for a bus shelter or the like which is relatively inexpensive.

Still another object of my invention is to provide a modular construction for an outdoor bus shelter or the like which is safe.

Yet another object of my invention is to provide a modular roof construction.

Other and further objects of my invention will appear in the following description.

In general my invention contemplates the provision of a modular structure such as a bus shelter or the like in which spaced uprights support an extruded member of generally H-shaped cross section providing an upper recess for receiving an inwardly turned flange at the back of a roof section to permit a retainer to be attached to the H cross bar to clamp the flange between the retainer and the cross bar and so formed as to support the forwardly extending portion of the roof above the flange. If desired, channels may be provided for holding panels in position between adjacent posts. A simple gutter structure is provided between the edges of adjacent roof sections.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In the accompanying drawings which form part of the instant specification and which are to be read in conjunction therewith and in which like reference numerals are used to indicate like parts in the various views:

FIG. I is a perspective view of one form of my modular bus shelter.

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary sectional view of the form of my modular bus shelter illustrated in FIG. I taken along the line 2-2 of FIG. I.

LII

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary sectional view of the bus shelter shown in FIG. I with parts removed to illustrate the back wall construction thereof.

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary sectional view of the form of bus shelter illustrated in FIG. I taken along the line 44 of FIG. 3 and drawn on an enlarged scale.

FIG. 5 is an elevation of the portion of my modular bus shelter illustrated in FIG. d taken along the line 5-5 of FIG. I.

FIG. 6 is a top plan view of one of the roof sections of my modular bus shelter.

FIG. 7 is a side elevation of the roof section shown in FIG. 6.

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary sectional view of the gutterforming arrangement of my modular bus shelter.

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary perspective view illustrating the assembly of a gutter bracket with the back post of my modular bus shelter.

FIG. III is a fragmentary sectional view of a modified form of my modular building construction.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to FIGS. I and 2, my improved modular bus shelter indicated generally by the reference character III includes a plurality of rear uprights or posts 12. In order to mount the posts 112 which may, for example, be hollow, extruded aluminum posts, I first embed stakes 14 in a support I6 made from concrete or the like. In a particular example I may first dig holes which are approximately 9 inches in diameter and 15 inches deep, fill them with concrete and dispose an 18 inch stake or anchor of 1% inch square aluminum in the concrete with 6 inches of the stake or anchor protruding from the upper surface of the concrete 16.

When that has been done, the post or upright I2 is slid over the protruding end of the post and suitable means such, for example, as rivets or bolts 118 or the like may be inserted through the post and through the stake to hold the post in an erect position. If desired the stakes and posts may be pre-drilled with rivet-receiving holes.

The bus shelter illustrated in FIG. I also includes a plurality of front posts or uprights 20 erected in the same manner as that described in connection with the rear posts I2. The structure further may include two side posts 22 similarly erected. In one particular embodiment of my structure the rear posts will be seven and a half feet long and approximately one and three quarters by four inches in cross section. The front posts which are staggered with respect to the rear posts may be nine foot long and one and a half inches square. The two side posts may be eight foot long and one and a half inch square. The spacing between adjacent posts is such as will accommodate panels to be described of such dimensions as will afford a shelter of the desired size.

Referring to FIGS. 1 and 3, each pair of adjacent posts is provided with a frame for receiving a wall panel. Each frame includes a bottom channel 24 which I support by any suitable means such as brackets 25 carried by adjacent posts or uprights. I employ any suitable means such as bolts Zfi or the like for securing vertical frame-forming channels 26 to facing vertical sides of adjacent posts. Each of the frames described hereinabove receives a panel 3t) which may be molded from a suitable plastic so as to provide a transparent protective panel which may or may not be provided with decorative embossing. The side and front panel frames are completed by top channels 31.

Referring now to FIGS. 1, 4 and 5, I secure respective roof-supporting members indicated generally by the reference character 32 between each pair of adjacent rear posts 12. Each of the members 32 is generally I-I- shaped in cross section. I may employ elongated rivets 34 or bolts extending between the lower portions of the vertical legs 36 and 38 and passing through the posts 12 to secure the members 32 to the posts. A channelshaped member 40 secured to the horizontally extending portion 42 of the member 32 is secured thereto by rivets 46. This member 40 serves to receive and retain a boss 48 on the upper edge of each of the rear panels 30.

Referring now to FIGS. 6 and 7, my structure includes a plurality of roof sections, each of which is indicated generally by the reference character 50. Each of the sections 50 is molded as a unitary piece from a suitable plastic and is provided with reinforcing ribs 52 extending in herringbone fashion from the center line of the forward roof portion and extending generally downwardly along the sloping rear portion of the roof section. I provide the rear lower edge of each of the roof sections 50 with an inwardly, generally horizontally extending flange 54. Around the remainder of the periphery of the lower edge of the roof I form a generally inwardly and downwardly extending flange 56 having a lip 58. The inwardly directed flanges 54 and 56 are continuous around the underside of the roof periphery to afford rigidity to the roof section. In addition, the flange 54 provides a means by which the section can be attached to the frame.

Referring again to FIGS. 4 and 5, in installing a roof section in one of the mounting members 32 I insert the rear edge of the section into the elongated channel formed by the upper portions of the legs 36 and 38 so that the flange 54 is generally parallel to the crossbar 44 of the member 32. After having inserted the rear portion of the roof section into the member 32, I insert a retainer 60 having the cross sectional shape of a lazy I. into that space so that the rear portion of the retainer rests on the top of flange 54. Suitable means such as bolts, rivets, screws or the like pass through the horizontal element 44 and into the retainer 60 to hold the retainer in place. Preferably I employ spacer washers 66 around each of the elements 64 in order to prevent cocking of the retainer element. The generally vertical portion of retainer 60 extends somewhat rearwardly and upwardly to a point just below the forwardly and upwardly extending portion of the roof section 50. I bend the upper end 62 of the leg 38 of mounting member 32 slightly forwardly and generally parallel to the forwardly and upwardly extending portion of the roof section 50 so that the roof section is securely held in position. From the structure just described it will be appreciated that each of the members 32 extends between a pair of adjacent posts as does each of the clamps 60. In this manner each roof section is firmly held in position on the rear supports and in a simple and expeditious manner.

Referring now to FIGS. 8 and 9, the form of my structure illustrated in FIG. 1 further includes respective brackets 68 which extend from the rear toward the front of the shelter at each pair of abutting rear posts 12. Each of the brackets 68, which may be cast from aluminum or the like, is formed with a rear mounting flange 72 provided with openings to permit rivets 74 to secure the bracket to the back posts 12. A double flange 76 at the front of the bracket permits that forward end to be secured to the adjacent corners of a pair of adjacent roof sections by means of rivets or the like (not shown). The base of the bracket 68 extends forwardly and upwardly from the rear posts toward the front of the shelter. I employ any suitable means such for example as rivets 82 to secure respective gutterforming, double channels 60 to the base 70 of the bracket 68. Each of the channels includes an outer wall 84 which may be bent slightly inwardly in the course of installation as indicated by the broken lines in FIG. 8 so as to be generally parallel to the flange 56 of the roof section. Channels 80 include intermediate walls 86 bent so as to be generally parallel to the bent portions of the outer walls 84 and include inner walls 88 adjacent the boss 78 on the base 70. Each of the outer walls 84 and intermediate walls 86 form a first channel for receiving the flange 56 and the downwardly extending lip 58 of the associated roof section. The intermediate wall 86 and the inner wall 88 form a channel which acts as a gutter to receive water from the roof sections 50 and to carry it downwardly and rearwardly toward a post 12. I form each post 12 with an opening 90 leading from the end of the gutter into the interior of the post so that the posts themselves serve as leaders for the gutters to carry away rain running down the gutters. Holes in the posts 12 adjacent ground level may be provided to permit water to flow out.

While the gutter-supporting brackets may afford a modicum of support to the edges of adjacent roof sections, owing to the reinforcing flange extending around the underside of the periphery of each of the roof sections 50 and owing to the manner in which the rear edge of each of the roof sections is supported, the roof sections are mounted generally in cantilever fashion and no additional support is required. However, it may be desirable to secure the forward portion of the roof to the upper end of each of the front post 20 by means such as a fitting 92 to prevent excessive vibration of the roof section under the influence of wind or the like.

Referring now to FIG. 10, I have shown an example of modular construction employing a plurality of my roof sections 50. In the arrangement shown therein a plurality of triple-channel base elements 94 are secured to a concrete slab 98 for example by means of bolts 96 or the like. Each extrusion 94 has a central channel 100 which is adapted to receive a plurality of spaced columns 102 of extruded aluminum or the like which are secured in the base channel by any suitable means. Each of the extrusions 94 further includes an outer channel 100 which receives the lower edge of a plurality of panels 106 of exterior siding. Interior channels 108 on the extrusions 94 receive panels 110 of interior side material of any suitable type known to the art.

The structure shown in FIG. 10 includes a plurality of upper extrusions indicated generally by the reference character 112 the central portion of each of which is of the same form as are the extrusions 32 to permit them to receive the outboard edges of the roof sections 50 in the manner described hereinabove in connection with FIG. 4. The retainers 60 are concealed from view in FIG. 10. The outboard edge of the extrusion I12 further is formed with a downwardly opening channel I 14 adapted to receive the upper edges of the panels 106. The outboard edge further is formed with an upwardly opening channel 116 forming a gutter which may be used to carry away precipitation. The inner side of the extrusion 112 is provided with a downwardly opening channel 118 for receiving the upper edges of panels 110. An inwardly directed flange 120 on extrusion 112 may form a support for a suspended ceiling or the like.

I provide the structure shown in FIG. with a ridge extrusion 122 formed with respective channels 124 and 126 for receiving the inner edges of each of the roof sections 50. It will readily be appreciated that adjacent edges of two sections 50 may be provided with brackets 58 supporting the gutter structure described in connection with FIGS. 8 and 9. in the form of my construction illustrated in FIG. 10, I have provided a simple modular roof structure which may be erected in an expeditious manner. By the use of only two roof sections 50 across the width of the FIGURE illustrated in FIG. 10, I may form a foot span. The structure may be made as long as desirable.

In order to erect the bus shelterindicated generally by the reference character 10 I first dig 11 holes for the reception of the concrete 16 which is to support the stakes 14. By way of example, the four rear postholes may be spaced 4 feet apart and the three front postholes spaced 4 feet apart with the front holes aligned with locations generally midway between adjacent rear holes. The spacing between the line of front and rear holes may be 4% feet and the side postholes may be, for example, 2 feet ahead of the rear posthole line. When that has been done all of the posts 12, 20 and 24 are erected in the manner described above in connection with FIG. 2. When the posts have been erected the brackets 25 are secured in place and the bottom frame channels 24 are secured to the brackets. Next, the side frame channels are attached to the posts by means of rivets or the like 28 and the side, back and front panels are slid into the frames. The side and front panel frames may then be completed.

Next a roof mounting member 32 is secured between each pair of adjacent back posts and the brackets 68 are secured to the back posts. When that has been done the double channel forming members are secured to the brackets 68. Next, the roof sections 50 are positioned in place with the flange 54 thereof in the members 32. Retainers 60 are secured to the horizontal portions 44 of members 32 by bolts or rivets 64. Channels d0 may be applied to hold the rear panels in place. Finally, the walls 84 are bent inwardly so as to be generally parallel to the roof flange portions 56.

It will be seen that I have accomplished the objects of my invention. I have provided a modular shelter construction which is especially adapted for use in bus shelters or the like. It is readily erected and assembled at the site. By use of my modular construction the size of the shelter may either be small or relatively large. My shelter is easily maintained. It is durable and requires a minimum of maintenance. Owing to the fact that it employs hollow extrusions it may readily be wired for light or telephone or heat. It is safe in that it provides shelter while at the same time not forming dark, dangerous recesses. It is so formed that it will readily carry away water from the roof thereof.

It will be understood that certain features and subcombinations are of utility and may be employed without reference to other features and subcombinations. This is contemplated by and is within the scope of my claims. It is further obvious that various changes may out departing from the spirit of my invention. It is, therefore, to be understood that my invention is not to be limited to the specific details shown and described.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim is:

1. In a shelter, an assembly including a unitary relatively rigid self-supporting roof section formed with an inwardly directed flange along the rear edge thereof, a bracket having a horizontal portion elongated in the direction along said rear edge, means for supporting said bracket in an elevated position, a clamp elongated along the direction of said rear edge, and means for securing said clamp to said horizontal bracket portion with said flange between said clamp and said horizontal portion to mount said roof section on said supporting means in cantilever fashion with the front edge thereof free.

2. A shelter as in claim 11, in which said roof section is formed of synthetic resin.

3. An assembly as in claim 1 in which said roof section is formed with a generally forwardly and upwardly extending portion adjacent said flange, and in which said bracket comprises an upwardly extending rear leg having an upper forwardly inclined portion overlying said roof portion.

4. An assembly as in claim 1 in which said roof section is formed with a generally forwardly and upwardly extending portion adjacent said flange and in which said clamp comprises a first portion generally parallel to said bracket portion and a second portion extending generally upwardly and rearwardly toward and closely adjacent to the underside of said forwardly and upwardly extending roof portion.

5. An assembly as in claim 1 in which said roof section is formed with a generally forwardly and upwardly extending portion adjacent said flange, and in which said bracket comprises a leg extending upwardly from said horizontal portion and having a forwardly inclined portion overlying said roof section portion, and in which said clamp comprises a first portion generally parallel to said bracket portion and a second portion extending generally upwardly and rearwardly from said base toward and closely adjacent to the underside of said roof portion below the inclined portion of said bracket leg.

6. An assembly as in claim 1 in which said bracket is formed with a downwardly opening channel, and in which said bracket supporting means comprises spaced posts having upper ends located in said channels and means for securing said ends in said channel.

7. An assembly as in claim 1 in which said roof section is formed with a generally forwardly and upwardly extending portion adjacent said flange, and in which said bracket is generally H-shaped in cross section to form an upwardly opening channel having a front wall and a rear wall to form a downwardly opening channel, said rear edge of said roof being located in said upwardly opening channel with said flange generally parallel to said base, an upper portion of said rear wall being forwardly inclined to overlie said upwardly and forwardly extending roof section portion, and in which said clamp comprises a portion extending generally upwardly and rearwardly toward and adjacent to the underside of the forwardly and upwardly extending roof portion below said inclined rear wall portion, and in which said supporting means comprises spaced posts having upper ends located in said downwardly opening bracket channel and means for securing said ends in said channel.

i t 1* it I?

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2013330 *May 26, 1933Sep 3, 1935Hans H DoeRoofing
US2557775 *May 2, 1947Jun 19, 1951Daniel YanchoMetal awning
US3411251 *Oct 24, 1966Nov 19, 1968Southeastern Tool & Die CompanCombined facia and roof panel hold down means
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4903455 *Feb 8, 1988Feb 27, 1990Veazey Robert MPanel for a window well cover and the like
US5649395 *May 30, 1996Jul 22, 1997Durham; Timothy H.Solar energy bus shelter
US6685172 *Feb 21, 2001Feb 3, 2004Wayne Herbert JolliffeLaminated plastic barrier fence
US6748703 *Oct 25, 2000Jun 15, 2004Lohr IndustrieWaiting and boarding disembarking station for urban public transport
US8272175Oct 18, 2010Sep 25, 2012Darlene Williams-PradesSecure modular shelter apparatus
US20100325999 *Jun 29, 2009Dec 30, 2010Ravi K DevalapuraContinuous Insulation Envelope For A Building
USD734869 *Dec 18, 2012Jul 21, 2015Odebrecht Transport Participações S/ABus shelter
USD739955 *Dec 18, 2012Sep 29, 2015Odebrecht Transport Participações S/ABus shelter
USD740960 *Dec 18, 2012Oct 13, 2015Odebrecht Transport Participaçöes S/ABus shelter
USD740966 *Dec 18, 2012Oct 13, 2015Odebrecht Transport Participações S/ABus shelter
USD740967 *Dec 18, 2012Oct 13, 2015Odebrecht Transport Participações S/ABus shelter
USD747816 *Dec 18, 2012Jan 19, 2016Odebrecht Transport Participações S/ABus shelter
USD754362 *Dec 18, 2012Apr 19, 2016Odebrecht Transport Participações S/ABus shelter
USD755987 *Dec 18, 2012May 10, 2016Odebrecht Transport Participações S/ABus shelter
USD782068 *Aug 17, 2015Mar 21, 2017Otima-Concessionaria De Exploracao De Mobiliario Urbano S.A.Bus shelter
EP2141295A3 *Jul 1, 2009Feb 1, 2012G.R.P.Canopies LimitedStructural element
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/73, D25/56, 52/263, 52/16
International ClassificationE04H1/12
Cooperative ClassificationE04H1/1211
European ClassificationE04H1/12B1