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Publication numberUS3735629 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 29, 1973
Filing dateJun 11, 1970
Priority dateJun 11, 1970
Also published asCA924966A, CA924966A1, DE2129072A1, DE2166238A1
Publication numberUS 3735629 A, US 3735629A, US-A-3735629, US3735629 A, US3735629A
InventorsE Paramonoff
Original AssigneeStandun
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for forming one piece metallic can bodies
US 3735629 A
Abstract
A horizontally movable ram is mounted on a main frame longitudinally reciprocal in a forward working stroke and a rearward return stroke through a rotating crankshaft drivingly connected to the ram by a plurality of pivot arms, the pivot arms being specifically arranged for longitudinally moving the ram at a reduced comparative speed directly approaching and following the ram stroke rearward reversal than directly approaching and following the ram stroke forward reversal permitting an increased period of time for feeding of metal parts to be engaged and worked by the ram. The ram is mounted on the main frame through hydrostatic-type pressurized oil film bearing assemblies with the ram being supported at a rearward location by combined horizontally extending and vertically extending constantly pressurized and flowing oil films with a more forward portion of the ram being additionally peripherally supported by a cylindrical constantly pressurized and flowing oil film. The apparatus die pack may include an initial redraw die and a series of ironing dies, each of said dies including a die ring resiliently retained for limited radial movement and also adjustment alignment, as well as arranged in the particular die for selective removal out of its particular die assembly by pivoting of a cover plate without complete removal of the die assembly from the die pack. Additionally, the ironing die assemblies each include a fluid distribution ring longitudinally adjacent the die ring thereof and preferably removable therewith as an assembly arranged to tangentially distribute a circumferentially moving ring of liquid across the distribution ring ram opening providing lubrication and cooling for the dies and metal parts being formed.
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llnite States atent 1191 Paramonoff 1 May 29, 1973 APPARATUS FOR FORMING ONE ABSTRACT PIECE METALLIC CAN BODIES A horizontally movable ram is mounted on a main {75] Inventor: Elpidifor Paramonoff, Los Angeles, frame longitudinally reciprocal in a forward working C lif stroke and a rearward return stroke through a rotating crankshaft drivingly connected to the ram by a plurali- [731 Asslgnee: standun Compton Cahfty of pivot arms, the pivot arms being specifically ar- [22] Filed: June 11 1970 ranged for longitudinally moving the ram at a reduced comparative speed directly approaching and following PP N05 ,430 the ram stroke rearward reversal than directly approaching and following the ram stroke forward reversal permitting an increased period of time for feeding (g1 ..72/349, 72/422,;30242]; of metal parts to be g g and worked y the ram.

. The ram is mounted on the main frame through of Search y yp pressurized bearing assem 450; 308/5 R blies with the ram being supported at a rearward location by combined horizontally extending and vertically References Cited extending constantly pressurized and flowing oil films with a more forward portion of the ram being addi- UNITED STATES PATENTS tionally peripherally supported by a cylindrical con- 3,663,072 5 1972 Cvacho ..308/5 R stantly pressurized and flowing Oil film. The apparatus 3,466,951 9/1969 Greenberg ..30s 5 R i p k y include n initial redraw die and a series 3,582,159 6/1971 Uhtenwoldt ..308/5 R of ironing dies, each of said dies including a die ring 3,635,532 1/1972 Zerbola resiliently retained for limited radial movement and 3,270,544 9/1966 Maeder et al.. also adjustment alignment, as well as arranged-in the 2,664,191 12/1953 May ..72/347 particular die for selective removal out of its particu- 3,030,744 4/1962 Mueller lar die assembly by pivoting of a cover plate WithOUt 3,127,955 4/1964 Macks ..308/5 complete remgval of the die assembly from the die ack. Additionall the ironing die assemblies each in- FOREGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS Elude a fluid distiibution ring longitudinally adjacent 876,171 8/1961 Great Britain ..308/5 the die ring thereof and Preferably removable 310,935 1/1956 Switzerland ..308/5 therewith an assembl arranged Ian .entially 702,5s4 1/1954 Great Britain ..308/5 mbme a crcumferemla y mvmg lqud acmss the distribution ring ram opening providing lubrication and cooling for the dies and metal parts being formed.

PATENIEWQQIQH 735529 sum 01 [1F 11 V INl liN'I' /k.

EL PIDIFOF? PARAMONOFF 4 BYMAHONEY HORNBA KER 4 AND SCH/0K A TTORNEYS PATgmmLtYzslm 7 5,5 9

sum 02 0F 11 FIG. 4.

INVENTOR. ELPlD/FOR PARAMONOF F "IVIAHONEY, HORNBAKER AND SCH/CK b J [m ATTORNEYS PATENT'LL 3.735.629

sum 03 SF 11 FIG. 5.

IN VEN TOR. E L PIDIFOR PARA MONOFF MAHONEY, HORNBA KER AND SCH/CK ATTORNEYS PATENIflH-HYZSIUYS 3 735,629

FIG. 2/.

I NVENTOR. ELP/DIFOR PARAMONOFF BYMAHONEY, HORNBAKER AND S CHICK ATTORNEYS PATENT'LU B 32m US UP 11 IN VENTOR. ELPIDIFOR PARAMONOFF BYMAHONEY, HORNBAKER AND SCH/CK ATTORNEYS PATENTLO W 3,735,629

sum 11 0F11 L. J INVENTOR. ELPIDIFOR PARAMONOFF --*--1 BYMAHONEY,HORNBAKER AND SCH/CK ATTORNEYS APPARATUS FOR FORMING ONE PmCE METALLIC CAN BODIES BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to an apparatus for forming one piece metallic can bodies and more particularly, to such an apparatus which may include reciprocal ram acting through a die pack incorporating multiple ironing dies, and sometimes incorporating an initial redraw die, for forming one piece metallic can bodies from previously formed cup-like metallic parts. Even more particularly, the principles of the present invention may include any one or all in combination of a novel mechanical drive for the reciprocal ram arranged for high speed ram movement during a working portion thereof and reduced speed ram movement during a part feeding portion thereof, hydrostatic-type bearing support for the reciprocal ram wherein the ram movements are supported on constantly pressurized and flowing, thickened oil films for maximum movement accuracy and minimum wear, and a novel arrangement of die pack assembly having improved die mounting providing sufficient die lubrication and cooling throughout the working operation with convenient die accessibility for maintenance without disturbing the remainder of the die pack assembly.

Various prior forms of apparatus for forming one piece metallic can bodies have heretofore been provided, all of which have necessarily required the use of a reciprocally movable ram movable through a relatively long forward working and rearward return stroke through multiple stages or ironing dies in order to in crease the axial or longitudinal length of a cup shaped metal part in order to produce a finished metallic can body. Obviously, unless multiple ironing stages are incorporated in a single apparatus, the various progres sive ironing stages must be accomplished singly, thus the requirement of the extensive ram stroke. To even further increase the problems involved, particularly where the starting cup-like metallic Parts to be ironed into finished can bodies are formed of metals which are more difficult of drawing and ironing, it is sometimes desirable to include with the multiple ironing stages comprised of the multiple ironing dies, an initial redraw stage to thereby even further increase the over-all die pack assembly length and the necessary reciprocal strokes of the ram.

Consequently, three major problem areas have been encountered in the construction of apparatus of the type herein involved. A first major problem area is the manner of drive of the reciprocal ram, that is, exactly how to reciprocally drive the ram over its extensive forward working and return stroke at maximum lineal speeds of predetermined uniformity while still permitting sufficient time during such ram movement for the feeding of cup-like metallic parts into a working position from which the various working oPerations can subsequently follow. Another maJor problem area is exactly how to support the ram during its reciprocal movements while still maintaining repeated trueness of movement with minimum wear for maximum quality of finished can bodies. Still another problem area is that of the die pack assembly wherein sufficient redraw and ironing die support must be maintained while still incorporating proper die and metal part lubrication and cooling, all in a die pack assembly of a convenient form 1 permitting the maximum ease of periodic maintenance inspections and replacements.

Two general types of ram drive have heretofor been incorporated in various of the metallic can body forming mechanisms, hydraulic drive by hydraulic cylinder systems sometimes including mechanical drive elements therewith and pure mechanical drive solely by a crankshaft and pivotal mechanical linkages. Both of these prior forms of drive have included certain advantages and certain disadvantages, keeping in mind that the over-all goal is maximum speed with a predeterminability of uniformity in movement matched against a sufficient allowable time element during portions of the ram stroke during which the cup-like metallic parts to be ironed or redrawn and ironed may be fed into the proper working position for engagement by the ram to carry out the working operations.

With the ram hydraulic drive, whether or not me chanical drive portions are included therewith, it is possible, with relatively complicated hydraulic controls, to gain relatively high ram speeds during the working operations, while still reducing the ram speeds during the portions of the ram strokes wherein the cup-like metallic part feeding must take place. Driving the ram hydraulically, however, results in sufficiently varying uniformity of ram movement due to hydraulic fluid unavoidable temperature changes and leakage that the quality of the finally produced metallic can bodies can vary over a considerable range. Thus, scrap losses can be extensive and particularly unless the mechanism involved is maintained at peak maintenance preciseness and adjustment.

With the use of mechanical drives in such mechanisms for the reciprocal ram movements, and considering purely the ram movements without introducing the problems of part feeding, relatively high ram speeds can again be obtained and, assuming proper ram movement guiding is maintained by frequent bearing maintenance, constant uniformity of ram reciprocal movement for maximum finished can body quality can likewise be obtained. Introducing the problem of timing for cup-like metallic part initial feeding, however, serves to greatly reduce the possible ram speed during both the feeding and working operations. That is, with mechanical ram drive in the previous can body forming mechanisms, the ram speeds have been of substantially uniform cycle throughout each of the working and return strokes. As a result, the speed of the working stroke is the same as the speed of the return stroke and the speed of the working operation is necessarily limited by the timing required for accomplishing the feeding operation since with mechanical drive it has heretofor been impossible to alter the ram cycling speeds during the feeding operation from that produced during the working operation.

In the second major problem area, that of bearing support for the ram over the relatively long reciprocal strokes required for multiple stage ironing operations, and even including the initial redrawing operation, during which the ram must be extended or projected within the dies over a long unsupported distance, the ram bearing support in the prior can body forming mechanisms has been an operational speed limiting factor if frequent failures and maintenance interruprions for bearing replacements are to be avoided. Again, in the carrying out of multiple redraw and ironing operations on one piece metallic can bodies with the thin metal wall thicknesses involved, little bearing wear in ram guiding movement can be tolerated if the necessary trueness, quality and completed part surface finish is to be maintained. Furthermore, it is fundamental that bearing wear and maintenance problems multiply or increase disproportionately for only slight increases in speed. Thus, the various forms of ram bearing supports in the prior mechanisms have been a greatly limiting factor for the practical operation thereof and have greatly limited the speed of operation from that that would be considered most desirable.

In the die pack areas of the can body forming mechanisms, the third general problem area, proper die and metal part lubrication and cooling must be maintained and this despite the inherent problems presented with the increased ram speeds during ram and metal part movement through the various dies. Also, not only must the mechanisms providing the proper lubrication and cooling be properly integrated within the die pack, but both the cooling mechanisms and the working portions of the dies themselves must be properly securely mounted within the die pack for withstanding the high speed ram operations with the resulting maximum required trueness and quality of produced can bodies. Still at the same time, despite this required provision of proper lubricating and cooling mechanisms with proper support for such mechanisms and the various multiple dies within the die pack, all of the combined elements must be relatively easily accessible at the individual die stages, as well as the total individual die stage assemblies, for efficient servicing and required replacement under minimum time conditions unless along down time delays are to be encountered.

OBJECTS AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is, therefore, an object of this invention to provide an apparatus for forming one piece metallic can bodies wherein the reciprocal ram performing the working operations is mechanically driven to gain inherent advantages of such mechanical drive, yet through a unique form of mechanical linkage by pivotal motion transfer arms between the crankshaft and reciprocal ram, a reduced comparative speed of ram reciprocal movement and movement reversal is obtained directly approaching and following the ram stroke rearward reversal for part feeding than the ram speeds directly approaching and following the ram stroke forward reversal for completion of the ram working operation. According to certain of the principles of the present invention, the pivot arms between the crankshaft and the ram are uniquely connected and arranged producing a longer effective driving pivot arm extension during the forward portions of the ram strokes than during the rearward portions thereof so as to produce higher over-all ram speeds during such forward portions and reduced over-all ram speeds during such rearward portions. Thus, maximum speed of operation is maintained during the working and partial return portion of the ram strokes, yet reduced ram speed is maintained during the required part feeding portions of the ram strokes, thereby effectively controllably varying the ram speeds to gain maximum speed of operation while still gaining the predicted uniformity of ram movement inherent in the mechanical drive thereof.

It is a further object of this invention to provide an apparatus for forming one piece metallic can bodies wherein the main bearing support for the reciprocal ram permits extremely high ram stroke speeds with maximum trueness but virtually free of wear problems resulting in minimum maintenance and downtime losses. According to certain other of the principles of the present invention, the main bearing support for the reciprocal ram is formed by a unique construction of hydrostatic-type pressurized oil film bearing assembly preferably including multiple spaced, generally vertically and generally horizontally reacting pads acting against corresponding slide surfaces with continuously pressurized and continuously flowing thickened oil films distributed therebetween maintaining the pad surfaces spaced from the slide surfaces and pressure oil film supporting the ram aligned both vertically and horizontally during the ram reciprocal movements. Also preferably, the cooperating pad and corresponding slide surfaces are arranged producing force components, taking into account weight, for balancing the ram both vertically upwardly and vertically downwardly for proper captive horizontal reciprocal movements of the ram, while at the same time, the cooperating pad and corresponding slide surfaces are arranged producing force components to accomplish the necessary transverse guiding of the ram.

It is still a further object of this invention to provide an apparatus for forming one piece metallic can bodies wherein a unique form of hydrostatic-type pressurized oil film bearing assembly may be mounted at a forward portion of the stationary ram supporting elements on the apparatus and acting directly against a peripheral surface of the ram in order to give the greatest possible support for the ram rearwardly of the die pack and permit a maximum ram stroke despite the necessity of the ram projecting forwardly an extended free distance while moving through the multiple redraw and ironing die stages. Different from the previously discussed main hydrostatic-type pressurized oil film bearing assemblies, this forward hydrostatic-type pressurized oil film bearing assembly preferably includes a sleeve mounted stationary on the main frame of the apparatus having an inner surface at all times telescoping parts of the reciprocally movable ram and with said inner surface having a plurality of pressurized oil inlets opening through such inner surface and against a peripheral surface of the ram. A constant flow of constantly pressurized oil is forced through the sleeve oil inlets directly against the ram peripheral surface so as to maintain the sleeve and ram surfaces spaced apart pressure oil film supporting the ram during the ram reciprocal movements and again permitting the ram high stroke speed with maximum trueness and virtual freedom from wear.

It is also an object of this invention to provide an apparatus for forming one piece metallic can bodies incorporating a unique die pack assembly wherein maximum die lubricating and cooling liquid distribution is maintained for efficient die and working part lubrication and cooling despite the increased ram speeds. According to this portion of the principles of the present invention, a particular form of fluid or liquid distribution ring is incorporated in each of the stages of the ironing die assemblies, preferably ahead or rearwardly of each of the ironing die rings with the distribution ring having an inlet opening or openings arranged for directing a flow of lubricating and cooling liquid tangentially into the center opening of the distribution ring through which the ram passes. This tangential flow of lubricating and cooling liquid creates a unique form of lubricating and cooling liquid circumferentially moving ring across the distribution ring ram opening thereby insuring the complete distribution of the liquid over the metal part being worked and into the particular ironing die ring during the ram movement through that particular stage of ironing die assembly.

It is still an additional object of this invention to pro vide an apparatus for forming one piece metallic can bodies incorporating a unique form of die pack assembly wherein each of a plurality of individual ironing die assemblies, preferably including an initial redraw die assembly, are each axially registerable with various die assembly spacers axially therebetween so that the overall die packassembly may be assembled and disassembled at will and during each reassembly will always, due to the cooperative registry between the various die pack components, reassemble in exact axially alignment. The various individual die rings are radially adjustably aligned in their individual die ring assemblies and with this registry between the various individual die ring assemblies and their intermediate spacers, the over-all die pack assembly may be disassembled, one die ring assembly axially from its adjacent spacer and adjacent die ring assembly, and reassembled without disturbing the individual die ring radial alignment within any of the individual over-all die ring assemblies, thereby accomplishing maintenance operations in a minimum of time and avoiding the tedious multiple dowel pin alignments between the various die ring assemblies and spacers as has been required in the prior constructions. Still in addition, in each individual die ring assembly, both the individual die ring and the beforementioned liquid distribution ring are preferably secured in a surrounding centering ring, the radial alignment of such centering ring accomplishing the radial alignment of the die ring, and this subassembly in each die ring assembly may be separately removed from the die ring assembly by removal of a covering plate permitting removal of such subassembly without disturbing the remainder of that individual die ring as sembly within the over-all die pack assembly, again reducing maintenance time and expense to a minimum.

Other objects andadvantages of the invention will be apparent from the following specification and the accompanying drawings which are for the purpose of illustration only.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIGS. 1 and 2 are perspective views of an embodiment of the apparatus for forming one piece metallic can bodies of the present invention looking from opposite forward side portions thereof and showing the over-all assembled apparatus;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged, fragmentary, vertical sectional view looking in the direction of the arrows 3-3 in FIG. 2 and showing a part of the ram drive;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary, horizontal sectional view looking in the direction of the arrows 4-4 in FIG. 3;

FIGS. 5 and 6 are fragmentary, vertical sectional views looking in the direction of the arrows 5-5 and in the direction of the arrows 6-6, respectively, in FIG. 4;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged, fragmentary, somewhat side elevational view primarily of the ram carriage, ram guide assembly and rearward portion of the horizontally reciprocal ram, including a side elevational view of the redraw die assembly and positioning means therefor;

FIG. 8 is an enlarged, fragmentary, vertical sectional view looking in the direction of the arrows 8-8 in FIG. 7 further illustrating the ram carriage and ram reciprocal support;

FIG. 9 is a view similar to FIG. 8 looking in the direction of the arrows 9-9 in FIG. '7;

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary, top plan view with certain parts removed looking in the direction of the arrows 10-11) in FIG. 7;

FIG. 1 1 is a fragmentary, vertical sectional view looking in the direction of the arrows 11-11 in FIG. 10;

FIG. 12 is a view similar to FIG. 11 but showing a more forward portion of FIG. 11 with a portion of the cup-like metal part feeding mechanism positioned relative to the redrawing die and redrawing die pad, a cuplike metallic part in initially fed position with the redrawing die pad in forward working position within the cup-like metallic part, the forward end of the ram entering the redrawing die pad approaching the bottom wall of the cup-like metallic part and the redrawing die ring spaced forwardly of the redrawing die pad;

FIG. 13 is an enlarged, fragmentary, top plan view looking in the direction of the arrows 13-13 in FIG. 2 primarily showing the die pack portion of the apparatus with the cup-like metallic part feeding mechanism added and with a part therein ready for but not yet engaged by the redrawing die pad, the initial redrawing die ring assembly, a plurality of progressive ironing die ring assemblies, a stripper assembly and a bottom forming die assembly;

FIG. 14 is a fragmentary, vertical sectional view looking in the direction of the arrows 14-14 in FIG. 13 and showing the individual die ring assembly axial registry in the over-all die pack assembly;

FIG. 15 is an enlarged, vertical sectional view looking in the direction of the arrows 15-15 in FIG. 14 and showing an elevation of one of the ironing die ring assemblies;

FIG. 16 is a vertical sectional view looking in the direction of the arrows 16-16 in FIG. 15;

FIG. 17 is an enlarged, vertical sectional view taken from FIG. 14 and more clearly illustrating the stripper assembly portion of the die pack assembly of FIG. 14;

FIG. 18 is an enlarged, vertical sectional view looking in the direction of the arrows 18-18 in FIG. 16 and showing the fluid distribution ring assembly in end elevation;

FIG. 19 is an enlarged, fragmentary, vertical sectional view taken from FIG. 1 l and principally illustrating the forward hydrostatic-type pressurized oil film bearing sleeve forwardly supporting the reciprocal rarn;

FIG. 20 is a fragnentary, end elevational view of the bearing sleeve assembly of FIG. 19 looking in the direction of the arrows 20-20 in FIG. 19;

FIG. 21 is an enlarged, fragmentary sectional view looking in the direction of the arrows 21-21 in FIG. 20;

FIG. 22 is an exploded, perspective view of the ram mounting assembly and main bearing support showing the pressurized oil supply for the hydrostatic-type pressurized oil film bearing pads thereof;

FIGS. 23 through 27 are somewhat diagrammatic views illustrating progressive stages of movement of the reciprocal ram through the die pack assembly during the working portion of the ram movement and the redrawing, ironing and bottom forming of a cup-like metallic part resulting in a finished one piece metallic can body, the individual die ring assembly axial registry also being shown; and

FIGS. 28 through 31 are somewhat diagrammatic views of the metallic can body forming apparatus show ing progressive stages of movement of the ram drive and the reciprocal ram.

DESCRIPTION OF THE BEST EMBODIIVIENT CONTEMPLATED:

An embodiment of the over-all assembly of the apparatus for forming one piece metallic can bodies incorporating the principles of the present invention is illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2 and, except as hereinafter specifically pointed out, is formed of generally standard components and standard materials appropriate for performing the functions required. The main drive for the can body forming apparatus is supplied by an electric drive motor 40 through a usual variable speed drive 42, both of which are mounted at an upper portion of a main frame generally indicated at 44, the variable speed drive in turn through usual belting driving a flywheel (not shown) mounted on a main drive shaft 46. The foregoing driving elements constitute a part of a ram mechanical drive assembly generally indicated at 48 which, with a ram support and guide assembly generally indicated at 50 and a die pack assembly generally indicated at 52 constitute the major working portions of the apparatus, each of which will be described in detail below.

RAM MECHANICAL DRIVE ASSEMBLY Referring for the moment to FIGS. 1 through 6, the ram mechanical drive assembly 48 further includes the main drive shaft 46 projecting transversely into the interior of the main frame 44 and mounting a pair of spaced drive gears 54 which are operably engaged with a pair of spaced bull gears 56. A crank arm 58 is secured to each of the facing sides of the bull gears 56 projecting radially of that particular bull gear with radially outer ends of the crank arms mounting an axially extending crank pin 60 therebetween. The rearward end of a transfer arm 62 is rotatably connected to the crank pin 60 axially between the crank arms 58 and the forward end of the transfer arm is rotatably connected to an axially extending connecting pin 64 mounted intermediate and preferably generally midway of the generally vertically extending length of a bifurcated drive arm 66.

The lower end of the drive arm 66 spaced below the connection of the transfer arm 62 thereto is pivotally mounted on the main frame 44 and the upper end of the drive arm spaced above the transfer arm is pivotally connected to the rearward end of a drive rod 68. The drive rod 68 extends generally longitudinally forwardly into an intermediate portion of a slide assembly 70 forming a part of the ram support and guide assembly 50 as seen, for instance, in FIG. 10, the slide assembly being shown in FIG. 22 removed from the apparatus, all of which will be hereinafter described more in detail. For purposes of present discussion, it is sufficient to state that the slide assembly 70 is forwardly and rearwardly longitudinally reciprocal on the main frame 44 and at the forward end thereof secures the rearward end of a longitudinally extending and likewise longitudinally forwardly and rearwardly reciprocal ram 72 which is cylindrical in configuration.

Thus, now also referring to the diagrammatic showing in FIGS. 28 through 31 and considering the center mounting of the bull gears 56 and therefore the crank arsm 58 on stub-like crankshaft 74 as shown in FIG. 5, it is seen that the crankshaft 74 in its rotation drives the crankarms 58, which crankarrns are connected through a plurality or series of pivot arms, the transfer arm 62, drive arm 66 and drive rod 68, to the ram 72 for producing generally horizontally reciprocal forward and rearward movement of the ram. Also considering, and again as will be hereinafter described more in detail, that the forward portions or to the right as shown in FIGS. 28 through 31 of the reciprocal strokes of the ram 72 are the working portions thereof and the rearward portions or to the left as shown in FIGS. 28 through 31 are the part feeding portions thereof, it will be seen that the ram stroke working portions are at a higher rate of speed than are the part feeding portions thereof due to the particular connecting and arrangement of the pivot arms between the crankshaft 74 and the ram 72. During the forward of rotation or right side rotation around the crankshaft 74 of the crank arms 58, the forward end of transfer arm 62 is extended further from the radial outward end of the crank arms increasing the leverage on the drive arm 66 so as to increase the speed thereof, whereas in the rearward (left side) 180 of rotation of the crank arms, the effective lever arm to the drive arm 66 is shorter due to the doubling of the crank arms 58 on the transfer arm 62, thereby reducing the effective lever arm movement to the drive arm 66 and therefore the ram 72.

Furthermore, as can be clearly seen from FIGS. 5, 6 and 28 through 31, with the crank arms 58 secured for rotation with the crankshaft 74 and the transfer and drive arms 62 and 66 pivotally connected thereto, it is obvious that the forward movement of the ram 72 from the ram stroke rearward reversal toward the ram stroke forward reversal is in a particular changing speed pattern of movement which is the same, but exactly reversed, in the ram movement from the forward reversal back to the rearward reversal. This is to say, with the particular pivot arm connection, from the slower rearward reversal, the ram is moved forwardly in a particular changing speed pattern to the faster forward reversal and then begins and carries through an exact reversal of this changing speed pattern of movement from he forward reversal back to the rearward reversal, always being the same for a constant speed of the crankshaft 74.

As is more clearly shown diagrammatically in FIGS. 28 through 31, in FIG. 28, the drive arm 66 is in its rearrnost pivoted position drawing the ram 72 to its rearrnost position and it is seen that the transfer arm 62 is at its rearrnost point of rotation by the crankshaft 74 thereby constituting a minimum length lever arm. In FIG. 29, the drive arm 66 and ram 72 have moved forwardly and the transfer arm 62 is entering its forward 180 of rotation about the crankshaft 74 so that the effective lever arm to the drive arm and ram has increased in length from the FIG. 28 position and will continue to increase in length. In FIG. 30, the transfer arm 62 has reached its maximum forward position moving the drive arm 66 pivotally to its forwardmost position and likewise the ram 72, whereas in FIG. 31, the transfer arm and ram are moving rearwardly and the effective lever arm thereon in decreasing and will continue to decrease until it reaches the position shown in FIG. 28.

With this unique drive connection to the ram 72, the ram moves at a higher rate of speed during the forward working portions of the ram strokes and at a slower relative speed during the rearward part feeding portions of the ram strokes. Despite the drive to the ram 72 being purely mechanical, therefore, a high rate of ram speed is maintained during the forward portions and reversal of the ram forward and rearward reciprocal stokes, yet the ram moves at a relative reduced speed during the rearward portions and reversal of the ram strokes. This provides the ram strokes during the working portions thereof possible at maximum speed and reduced time while still providing slower speed and increased time during the ram stroke part feeding portions, the latter requiring such increased time for proper part positioning.

RAM SUPPORT AND GUIDE ASSEMBLY According to the broad principles of the present invention, the ram support and guide assembly provides both vertically and horizontally reacting force components for supporting the ram and its support or mount longitudinally movable in the reciprocal strokes, said force components preferably effectively reacting in all degrees of vertical and horizontal. The particular embodiment illustrated includes the ram support and guide assembly 50 as best seen in FIGS. 7 through 12 and FIGS. I9 through 22. Furthermore, the major portion of the ram support and guide assembly 50 is formed by a main hydrostatic-type pressurized oil film bearing assembly principally comprised of the previously mentioned ram slide assembly 70 and a transversely spaced pair of stationary slides or slide plates 76 best seen in FIGS. 7 through 16, while an auxiliary portion of the ram support and guide assembly 50 is formed by a forward hydrostatic-type pressurized oil film bearing assembly principally comprised of a stationary bearing sleeve 78 best seen in FIGS. 19 and 20 mounted within and secured stationary to the main frame through a cylinder and bearing assembly 80. As

previously stated, the rearward extremity of the ram 72 is secured to and movable with the slide assembly 70 projecting longitudinally forwardly from a forward surface thereof, such securement being obtained through an adjustable collar assembly 82.

The ram slide assembly 74) is shown removed from the apparatus in FIG. 22 and without the ram 72 mounted thereon, such assembly including a particularly formed ram support and guide assembly 50 mounting a plurality of sets of vertically spaced, vertically upwardly and downwardly acting bearing pads 86, and sets of transversely spaced, horizontally oppositely acting bearing pads 88. As shown, each of the vertically acting bearing pads 86 has a horizontal annular face surface 90 surrounding a central oil inlet 92, and each of the horizontally transversely acting bearing pads 38 has a vertical annular face surface 94 surrounding a central oil inlet 96, the oil inlets each being connected through a pressurized oil system 98 downwardly through a pivotal oil supply linkage MM) and an oil pressure pump 1102 (FIGS. 1 and 2) to a source of oil supply. As is also shown, the vertically acting bearing pads 66 of each set are positioned with the upper pad acting downwardly and the lower pad acting upwardly, there being transversely aligied vertically acting bearing pad sets spaced transversely outwardly from the longitudinal axis of the ram 72 at each of the forward and rearward extremities of the slide assembly frame 64. Also, the horizontally transversely acting bearing pads 88 of each of forward and rearward sets thereof include one pad acting oppositely outwardly from either side of the slide assembly frame 84.

As shown in FIGS. 7 through 10, the slides or slide plates 76 are secured stationary on the main frame 44, there being two transversely uniformly spaced apart throughout the longitudinal extents thereof and each presenting a transversely inwardly and longitudinally extending, upwardly facing horizontal surface 164i and downwardly facing horizontal surface 106, such horizontal surfaces terminating transverely inwardly in longitudinally extending and transversely inwardly facing vertical surfaces 166. Thus, as shown generally, for instance, in FIG. 10 and particularly in FIG. 9, the slide assembly is longitudinally slidably mounted on the slide plates 76 with the horizontally facing surfaces 96 of the vertically downwardly acting bearing pads 86 adjacent the slide upwardly facing horizontal surfaces 104 and the horizontally facing surfaces 90 of the vertically upwardly acting bearing pads 86 adjacent the slide downwardly facing horizontal surfaces 106 with the vertically facing surfaces 94 of the horizontally transversely outwardly acting bearing pads 88 adjacent the slide transversely inwardly facing vertical surfaces 108 so as to capitivate the slide assembly 70 for guided horizontally slidable movement longitudinally along the slide plates 76. At the same time, during such movement longitudinally forwardly and rearwardly of the slide assembly 70 along the slide plates 76 and carrying the ram 72 longitudinally forwardly and rearwardly therewith, constantly pressurized and constantly flowing oil is directed from the various bearing pad oil inlets 92 and 96 creating a constantly pressurized, thickened oil film between the various facing bearing pad and slide plate surfaces suspending the slide assembly 70 slidably movable along the slide plate 76.

In the unique form of the hydrostatic-type pressurized oil film bearing assemblies of the present invention as created by the coacting slide assembly 70 and slide plates 76 just described, and as is true of the somewhat similarly acting forward hydrostatic-type pressurized oil film bearing assembly formed in part by the bearing sleeve 78 as will be hereinafter described, there is a constantly pressurized and constantly flowing oil film created from outside oil pressure at all times between each of the slide assembly bearing pad and slide plate facing surfaces actually oil film suspending, and as a consequence of a particular pad and slide plate surface positioning and oil pressure regulating, creating a selfcentering of the slide assembly 70 on the slide plates 76, which prevents any possible metal to metal contact despite the obvious horizontal and transverse loads supported by such oil films. Furthermore, this oil film suspension is not dependent on relative motion between the coacting and facing surfaces of the slide assembly 70 and the slide plates 76, but will rather be present whether the coacting and facing surfaces are stationary or moving relative to each other. This hydrostatic-type pressurized oil film suspension between the coacting and facing surfaces should be differentiated from the usual form of hydrodynamic bearings wherein a thickened film of oil is dependent on the movement and speed between the coacting and facing surfaces and wherein a decrease in the relative speeds between the surfaces will cause a sinking of the oil film causing at least periodic metal to metal contact.

Further in the present unique form of hydrostatictype pressurized thickened oil film assemblies herein involved, the oil pressures to the various oil inlets are regulated to obtain preferably substantial self-centering of the slide assembly 70 horizontally longitudinally movable along the slide plates 76. Furthermore, in the particular embodiment shown, the clearance between the coacting and facing surfaces of the bearing pads 86 and 88 and the slide plates 76 is preferably in the order of two thousandths inches and the oil film pressure constantly maintained by constant flow is in the order of 600 to 800 pounds per square inch at the bearing pad and slide plate surfaces. With hydrostatic-type pressurized thickened oil film bearing assemblies of this form, a greater clearance between the coacting and facing surfaces will create a softer, less load supporting bearing where as a lesser clearance between such surfaces will create a stiffer bearing, but in any case, different from the conventional hydrodynamic bearings involved with sinking oil films and metal to metal contact, with the hydrostatic'type oil bearings of the present invention, there will always be an oil film suspension between the various coacting and facing surfaces regardless of motion or the usual clearances.

More particularly to the construction of the bearing pads 86 and 88 of the ram slide assembly 70, as shown, for instance, in FIG. 22, each of the pad surfaces 90 and 94 is a raised flat surface forming a quite broad raised flat surface area which surrounds and terminates inwardly in a recessed oil inlet area having either the oil inlet 92 or 96. Also, as clearly shown in FIG. 22, the portions of the ram slide assembly 70 outwardly of the peripheries of the pad surfaces 90 and 94 are recessed due to the raising of such pad surfaces. With the relatively broad and flat pad surfaces 90 and 94, the surface areas thereof being far greater than the individual oil inlet areas thereof, and with these pad surfaces being raised and isolated from the remainder of the ram slide assembly 70, these pad surfaces with the beforedescribed pressurized oil films thereon form the sole support for the ram slide assembly 70 on the main frame slide plates 76 and insure that the hydrostatictype pressurized thickened oil films will be the only bearings between the ram slide assembly 70 and the main frame slide plates 76 during movement therebetween as described.

Thus, the ram support and guide assembly 50 including the slide plates 76 and the vertically and horizontally transverely acting bearing pads 86 and 88 effectively provide force components effectively reacting in all degrees of vertical and horizontal by combining the reaction forces of the various opposed horizontal and vertical surfaces and despite the fact that in this particular embodiment such surfaces are only generally straight horizontal and vertical.

The forward hydrostatic-type pressurized oil film bearing assembly for supporting the ram reciprocally movable forwardly and rearwardly horizontally along the main frame 44 in the ram forward and rearward strokes, as hereinbefore stated, includes the bearing sleeve 78 which is mounted stationary on the main frame in the cylinder and bearing assembly 80, said cylinder and bearing assembly being positioned on the main frame forwardly of the forward and rearward movement of the hereinbefore described slide assembly and partially overlying the forward termination of the slide plates 76 as can be seen generally in FIGS. 7 and 10. As is particularly shown in FIGS. 1 1 and 19, the bearing sleeve 78 is secured at the rearward portion of the cylinder and bearing assembly 80 at all times telescoping an axially or longitudinally intermediate portion of the ram 72, the ram being longitudinally forwardly and rearwardly slidable relative thereto and hydrostatic-type pressurized thickened oil film supported thereby during such movement. The particulars of formation of the bearing sleeve 78 with its constant pressun'zed oil supply and exhaust are shown in FIGS. 19 through 21, a portion of the ram 72 being shown in phantom lines in its positioning through the bearing sleeve in FIG. 19.

As shown, the bearing sleeve 78 is hollow cylindrical having four equally circumferentially spaced and axially or longitudinally elongated oil inlet openings or slots radially therethrough and opening radially in wardly against a periphery 112 of the cylindrical ram 72. An oil inlet conduit 114 is formed through the cylinder and bearing assembly 80 to each of the oil inlet slots 110 for providing a supply of pressurized oil from the previously described pressurized oil system originating at the oil pressure pump 102 (FIGS. 1 and 2), and a pair of oil outlet conduits 116 are formed from just forwardly of the bearing sleeve 78 rearwardly through the cylinder and bearing assembly as best seen in FIGS. 20 and 21. In the preferred form shown, the oil inlet slots 110 extend axially or longitudinally a majority of the axial or longitudinal length of the bearing sleeve 78.

Thus, during the horizontally forwardly and rearwardly reciprocal movements of the ram 72, intermediate portions of the ram are supported on hydrostatictype pressurized thickened oil films of the same general characteristics as discussed relative to the main bearing assembly formed by the slide assembly 70 and the slide plate 76, in this forward bearing assembly, the pressurized oil constantly flowing and constantly pressurized flowing through the oil inlet conduits 114, through the oil inlet slots 110 against the ram periphery 112 and outwardly through the oil outlet conduits 116, thereby providing a unique bearing support spaced forwardly of the main bearing support for the ram 72 in its relatively long longitudinal extension forwardly through the die pack assembly 52 in the ram forward and rearward reciprocations. The forward hydrostatic-type pressurized oil film bearing assembly including the bearing sleeve 78, therefore, likewise effectively provides force components efiectively reacting in all degrees of vertical and horizontal by continuing the opposed vertical and horizontal forces from the sleeve slots 110 against the ram periphery 112 to additionally support the ram 72, despite the fact that in this particular embodiment such forces are only generally direct vertical and horizontal.

As is also shown in FIG. 19, the cylinder and bearing assembly 80 includes a wiper seal assembly 118 forwardly of the bearing sleeve 78 and the forward ends of the oil outlet conduits 1 16 for separating the pressurized oil supply to the bearing sleeve from cooling and lubricating liquids supplied to the die pack assembly 52 and necessarily covering the ram periphery 112 during the travel of the ram reciprocally through the die pack assembly.

Referring particularly to FIGS. 7 through 12, a further important part of the cylinder and bearing assembly 88 is formed by pairs of transversely spaced upper and lower air cylinder assemblies generally indicated at 120 each including a cylindrical air piston 122, with the air pistons being forwardly and rearwardly reciprocal in such assembly and being shown forwardly extended in FIGS. 7 and 10 through 12. A transversely extending forward hold down plate 124 is secured to the forward end of the air pistons 122 and has a forwardly projecting, hollow cylindrical draw pad 126 secured thereto, said draw pad being axially or longitudinally aligned with the ram 72 and receiving the ram telescopically therethrough during the forward and rearward reciprocal movements of the ram, all for a purpose to be hereinafter described. The air pistons 122 are urged forwardly extended by a constant supply of pressurized air to thereby urge the forward hold down plate 124 and the draw pad 126 forwardly, and the rearward movement of the air pistons telescoped rearwardly within the cylinder and bearing assembly 811 is controlled by two pairs of transversely spaced, upper and lower pull rods 128 forwardly connected to the hold down plate 124 spaced outwardly of the air pistons and extending rear wardly above and beneath the slide plates 76 as best seen in FIGS. 7 through 18.

The rearward ends of the pull rods 128 are secured to a rear crosshead 131) which is forwardly and rearwardly slidable on guideways 132 mounted on the main frame 44, and on a forward surface of the rear crosshead adjacent the connections thereof to the pull rods are four bumpers 134 rearwardly aligned with four oil actuated shock absorbers 136 projecting rearwardly from and movable with the previously described slide assembly 70 of the main ram bearing assembly. Thus, as the slide assembly 711 of the ram main bearing assembly moves forwardly moving the shock absorbers 136 forwardly away from the bumpers 134, the air pistons 122 of the cylinder and bearing assembly 80 will move the forward hold down plate 124 and the draw pad 126 to their forward extended positions as shown, and as the slide assembly moves rearwardly ultimately engaging the shock absorbers 136 rearwardly with the bumpers 134 on the rear crosshead 1311, the pull rods 128 will be moved rearwardly withdrawing or rearwardly telescoping the pistons into the cylinder and bearing assembly and rearwardly withdrawing the draw pad 126. As will also be hereinafter described more in detail, the timing of the movement of the ram 72 and the forward movement of the draw pad 126 is such that the draw pad moves forwardly ahead of the leading or forward end of the ram so that the draw pad first forwardly positions followed by the forward end of the ram moving forwardly therethrough.

DIE PACK ASSEMBLY As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the die pack assembly 52 is mounted on the main frame 44 forwardly of the ram support and guide assembly 58 for receiving the ram 72 horizontally reciprocally forwardly and rearwardly through a major portion thereof, the particulars of the die pack assembly being best seen in FIGS. 13 through 18. As shown in FIGS. 13 and 14, the die pack assembly 52, starting at the rearward or left end and moving axially or longitudinally toward the forward end, includes a redraw die ring assembly 138, a register ring 140, a first ironing die ring assembly 142, a spacer ring 144, a second ironing die ring assembly 146, a spacer ring 148, a third ironing die ring assembly 158, a spacer ring 152 and a stripper assembly 154, all of which are secured axially or longitudinally stacked, one axially or longitudinally adjacent the next. The die pack assembly 52 also includes a doming or bottom forming die assembly 156 spaced axially or longitudinally forwardly from the stripper assembly 154 on supports 158 and forming the forward termination ofthe die pack assembly.

The redraw die ring assembly 138 supports a redraw die ring 160 and the first, second and third ironing die ring assemblies 142, 146 and 151) support first, second and third ironing die rings 162, 164 and 166 respectively, all of said die ring assemblies being similar by the inclusion of mechanism for centering the various die rings for proper axial or longitudinal alignment with the centerline of the ram 72. Also, all of the die ring assemblies are preferably formed with a particular construction permitting selective upward removal of a portion of the assembly including the particular die ring thereof after pivoting of a cover for access at the upper portion of the die pack assembly 52 without complete disassembly thereof, and at least the first, second and third ironing die ring assemblies 142, 146 and 150 are formed with a particular fluid distribution ring therein for the distribution of cooling and lubricating liquids during the operation of the apparatus.

For illustrating such die ring assembly construction,v

the second ironing die ring assembly 146 is illustrated in detail in FIGS. 15, 16 and 18, and includes a main body 168 supporting axially spaced wear rings 172 axially between which is vertically slidably supported the assembly of an outer centering ring 174 telescoping a cooling and lubricating fluid distribution ring 176 secured at the rearward portion thereof and the second ironing die ring 164 resiliently mounted through a resilient O-ring 178 at the forward portion thereof. As shown, the assembly of the centering ring 174, fluid distribution ring 176 and resilient O-ring 178 is vertically slidably supported in the main body 168 and is accessible for removal by pivoting of cover 181) along with centering screw mechanism 182 therein, said cover being retained in working closed position during operation of the apparatus by hand screws 184 removably secured downwardly into the main body 168. Thus, when maintenance operations are required on the particular die ring or the particular fluid distribution ring where included, it is merely necessary to selectively release the hand screws 184 and pivot the cover open for slidable removal of the assembly of, in this case, the centering ring 174, the fluid distribution ring 176 and the second ironing die ring 164 for free access to the die ring and fluid distribution ring, the assembly being replaced in working position by a mere reversal and refastening of the hand screws 184.

The fluid distribution ring 176 is, of itself, a unique formation giving vastly improved cooling and lubricating liquid distribution over the periphery of the ram 72 as it moves longitudinally therethrough and as carried to the various die rings by such ram movement. As shown in FIGS. 16 and 18, the fluid distribution ring 176 includes an inner annular portion 186 having an inner diameter spaced larger than the periphery of the ram 72 and an outer annular portion 188 spaced outwardly from said inner annular portion forming an annular fluid channel 1% therebetween which is closed axially rearwardly by the rearward of the wear rings 172 as seen in FIG. 16. Cooling and lubricating liquid is fed to the fluid channel 190 by a fluid inlet 192 and preferably a pair or more of equally circumferentially spaced, tangential openings 194 are formed through the inner annular portion 186 and open tangentially into the center opening thereof so that the cooling and lubricating liquid passing interiorly of the fluid distribution ring 176 flows therein in a tangential direction circumferentially around the center opening of said ring producing a circumferentially moving annulus or ring of cooling and lubricating liquid sometimes virtually centrally closed, through which the ram 72 passes insuring a complete and total coverage of said ram and proper distribution to the various die rings, as well as over the particular metal part being formed and as will be hereinafter described.

As shown in FIGS. 13 and 14 and in enlarged detail in FIG. 17, the stripper assembly 154 of the die pack assembly 52 also includes centering screw mechanisms 196 which bear inwardly against a two piece retainer ring 198 having an inner axially or longitudinally extending, but radially or transversely outwardly angled cam surface 200, that is, the surface angling from a lesser diameter rearwardly toward the third ironing die ring assembly 150 to a great diameter forwardly toward the doming or bottom forming die assembly 156. A limit ring 202 is positioned partially outwardly in the retainer ring 198 and extends inwardly of the inner cam surface 200 projecting into outwardly opening, circumferential slots 204 of a plurality of stripper segments 206. The stripper segments 206 have outer cam surfaces 208 oppositely matching the inner cam surface 200 of the retainer ring 198, forwardly inwardly angled inner surfaces 210, and in their plural assembly form an inwardly rearwardly angled, annular slot 212 receiving a garter spring 214.

The arcuate lengths of the stripper segments 206 are such that when the segments are normally rearwardly positioned radially inwardly aligned with the retainer ring 198 as shown in FIG. 17, the segments circumferentially abut and the inner diameter formed by the inner surfaces 210 thereof is at a minimum. When, however, a metallic part passes therethrough from rearwardly to forwardly thereof having an outer diameter larger than said segment minimum inward diameter, these segments move forwardly and outwardly along the retainer ring inner cam surface 200 as permitted by the garter spring 214 so as to increase in inner diameter and permit the passage of the larger diameter metallic part therethrough. Upon the larger diameter metallic part passing forwardly beyond these stripper segments 206, the segments are immediately urged rearwardly along the retainer ring inner cam surface 200 to a lesser diameter so that when the metallic part is attempted to be moved reversely rearwardly through the opening formed by the stripper segments, the segments will engage the same, all for a usual stripping purpose as will be hereinafter more clearly explained.

The final portion of the die pack assembly 52 is formed by the doming or bottom forming die assembly 156 spaced forwardly of the stripper assembly 154 as shown in FIGS. 13 and 14. The bottom forming die assembly 156 again includes centering screw mechanisms 216, but more importantly centrally mounts a bottom forming die 218 which faces centrally, axially or longitudinally rearwardly and rearwardly presents an arcuately domed working surface 220. The domed working surface 220 of the bottom forming die 218 is received in a recess (not shown) at the forward end of the ram 72 when the ram reaches its forward maximum travel through the die pack assembly 52 in its forward stroke as will also be hereinafter explained more in detail.

Another important feature of construction of a major part of the die pack assembly 52 is the fact that all of the redraw die ring assembly 138, the first ironing die ring assembly 142, the second ironing die ring assembly 146, the third ironing die ring assembly 150 and the stripper assembly 154 all axially or longitudinally register with their respective intermediate register and spacer rings 140, 144, 148 and 152, respectively. That is to say, all of the redraw, first ironing, second ironing, and third ironing die ring assemblies 138, 142, 146 and 150, and the stripper assembly 154 have either axially opening recesses or axial projections, either full circular or annular axially or longitudinally meeting with their respective intermediate register and spacer rings 140, 144, 148 and 152 so that each of the die ring assemblies and this stripper assembly is in full axial registry with all others of said die ring and stripper assemblies in the over-all die pack assembly 52 permitting quick disassembly of the die pack assembly for access to any part thereof and the reassembly will again bring all individual assemblies into the exact same axially or longitudinal alignment, one with the other and the various centering screw mechanisms in each assembly need not be disturbed. The only dowel pin connection required within the die pack assembly 52, therefor, is an individual dowel pin projecting between the various assemblies and their adjacent register or spacer ring to prevent rotation therebetween as will be hereinafter described more in detail, but such dowel pins not serving any axial or longitudinal alignment function as has been required with multiple dowel pins in the prior constructions.

Referring more particularly to FIGS. 14 and 23 through 27, the redraw die ring assembly 138 is provided with an exactly centered, circular recess 222 receiving a major part of the register ring 140 axially, in perfect fit and registry, therein, the remaining portion of the registry ring axially toward the first ironing die ring assembly 142 being received in a similar circular, exactly centered and exactly fitting recess 224 of the first ironing die ring assembly 142. Projecting oppositely from the first ironing die ring assembly 142 axially toward the spacer ring 144 is an exactly centered, annular projection 226 received axially into an exactly fitting and exactly centered annular recess 228 of the next axially adjacent spacer ring 144. An anti-rotation dowel pin 230 is positioned axially between the register ring 140 and the first ironing die ring assembly 142 while a dowel pin 232 is similarly received between the first ironing die assembly 142 and the spacer ring 144, the latter dowel pin 232 projecting from the area of the fust ironing die ring assembly forming the annular projection 226 and into the area of the spacer ring 144 within the annular recess 228.

The spacer ring 144 has an axially opposite annular recess 234 exactly axially aligned, but oppositely axially facing from the annular recess 228 receiving an exactly matching annular projection 236 of the second ironing die ring assembly 146, an axially opposite and axially aligned annular projection 238 of the second ironing die ring assembly 146 being received exactly

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Classifications
U.S. Classification72/349, 72/449
International ClassificationB21D24/00, B21D51/26
Cooperative ClassificationB21D24/00, B21D45/065, B21D51/26
European ClassificationB21D45/06C, B21D51/26, B21D24/00
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Sep 14, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: SEQUA CORPORATION
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:SUN CHEMICAL CORPORATION, A CORP. OF DE.;REEL/FRAME:004770/0239
Effective date: 19870507
Aug 22, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: SUN CHEMICAL CORPORATION, 200 PARK AVE., NEW YORK,
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:STANDUN, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004162/0118
Effective date: 19830718
Owner name: SUN CHEMICAL CORPORATION, A DE CORP.,NEW YORK
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:STANDUN, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004162/0118
Aug 22, 1983AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: STANDUN, INC.
Effective date: 19830718
Owner name: SUN CHEMICAL CORPORATION, 200 PARK AVE., NEW YORK,