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Publication numberUS3736627 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 5, 1973
Filing dateNov 2, 1971
Priority dateNov 2, 1971
Publication numberUS 3736627 A, US 3736627A, US-A-3736627, US3736627 A, US3736627A
InventorsSosinski C
Original AssigneeBetts T Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Connector
US 3736627 A
Abstract
An insulation and oxide piercing connector employable, for example, for simultaneously interconnecting a plurality of insulated or oxide coated electrical conductors such as magnet wire, flat conductor, or the like, and comprising a plurality of selectively contoured, multi-surfaced, deflectable ridges suitable oriented on at least one interior surface of the connector and proportioned to engage, pierce, and be deflectably locked within the conductors as the connector is crimped thereabout. The ridges may be either straight or curved and formed to cross-sectionally define, alternatively, a generally truncated right triangle, or selective variations thereof, and may be juxtapositionally arranged in either similarly or oppositely facing groups or pairs. Coupling means may be provided for attaching the connector to a further connector or support member.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 Sosinski [s41 CONNECTOR [75] Inventor: Charles W. Sosinski, Linden, NJ.

[73] Assignee: Thomas Betts Corporation, Elizabeth, NJ.

[22] Filed: Nov. 2, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 194,890

[52] US. Cl ..24/23 W, 24/20, 339/98,

. 339/276 [51] Int. Cl. ..B65d 63/06, HOlr 5/08 [58] Field of Search ..24/22, 23 W, 201W, 24/16 R, 16 PB; 339/97 C, 97 P, 97 S, 99 R, 98, 276

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,800,638 7/1957 Hammell ..339/276 T 3,355,698 11/1967 Keller 339/97 C 3,599,173 8/1971 Bridle ..339/99 R 3,656,093 4/1972 Kinkaid 1 ..339/276 T 1 June 5, 1973 Primary ExaminerJames T. McCall Assistant Examiner-Kenneth J. Dorner A tt0rney David Teschner and Jesse Woldman [57] ABSTRACT An insulation and oxide piercing connector employable, for example, for simultaneously interconnecting a plurality of insulated or oxide coated electrical conductors such as magnet wire, flat conductor, or the like, and comprising a plurality of selectively contoured, multi-surfaced, deflectable ridges suitable oriented on at least one interior surface of the connector and proportioned to engage, pierce, and be deflectably locked within the conductors as the connector is crimped thereabout. The ridges may be either straight or curved and formed to cross-sectionally define, alternatively, a generally truncated right triangle, or selective variations thereof, and may be juxtapositionally arranged in either similarly or oppositely facing groups or pairs. Coupling means may be provided for attaching the connector to a further connector or support member.

12 Claims, 16 Drawing Figures PATENTEUJUB 5 I975 SHEET 1 0F 3 FIG. 2

PATENIEUJUH 51975 3 736 627 SHEET 3 [IF 3 CONNECTOR BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention The invention is directed to the field of connectors and principally to means for electrically joining insulated or oxide coated conductors.

2. Description of the Prior Art Insulation or oxide piercing connectors, according to the prior art, and as exemplified, for example, in US. Pat. No. 3,335,698, isued to J. R. Keller, generally comprised a crimpable base member on which was disposed, or formed integral therewith, a series of generally symmetrically contoured upstanding ribs or protuberances arranged merely to pierce the insulation and contact the conductive portion of an insulated conductor as the connector was crimpably engaged thereabout. The integrity of the resulting connection was often deterimentally affected by the differential in the degree of expansion and contraction between the conductor and the connector in normal use. Where, for example, the connection was subjected to alternating conductive and nonconductive cycles and the come quential heating and cooling resulting therefrom, the ribs were permitted to freely expand and contract within the simple, transversely disposed pockets formed in the conductor, wherein a void or gap would be formed between a rib and the portions of the conductor adjacent thereto, resulting in an incomplete or defective electrical coupling between the conductor and the connector. Additionally, because of the discontinuity of contact between the ribs and the adjacent conductor surfaces, the outer surface of the ribs were amenable to oxide formation thereon, further detrimentally affecting the electrical connection. Prior art attempts to correct the aforesaid problems by providing, for example, deformable lanced protrusions or ridges weregenerally unsuccessful in that such lanced members would tend to buckle or bend under the crimping force applied, prior to their penetration of the oftimes extremely tough insulation coating of the insulated conductors.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The invention overcomes the limitations and difficulties noted above with respect to such prior art devices by providing an insulation and oxide piercing connector which is more effective, reliable, and efficient than such prior art devices. Extending outwardly from at least one interior surface of the connector are a plurality of deflectable, nonsymmetrically formed multisurfaced ridges selectively proportioned to engage, pierce, and be deflected within the conductive portion of one or more insulated conductors impaled on the ridges upon the application ofa suitable crimping force to the connector. The deflection and consequential locking of the ridges within the conductor is accomplished by selectively proportioning and orienting the opposing sides or surfaces of each upstanding ridge so as to cause them to be subjected to unequal forces as the conductor is forcibly urged thereagainst. The resulting differential force generated thereby causes the ridge to be deflectably reoriented from a substantially normal to a generally oblique angular relationship with the longitudinal axis of the conductor upon penetration, resulting in intimate locking engagement therebetween and providing a strong, secure electrical and mechanical connection. The ridges may be juxtapositionally aligned in either similarly or oppositely facing groups or pairs and formed either as linear or arcuate elements. Each ridge is selectively contoured to provide a first surface extending generally normal to the adjacent interior surface of the connector, a relatively short second surface adjoining the first surface and forming the top of the ridge, an either planar, arcuate, or undulate third surface extending slopingly from the second surface towards the adjacent connector interior surface, and a fourth surface interconnecting the third surface of the ridge and the adjacent connector surface. The connector may be constructed in a variety of suitable configurations including, for example, a U, H, or box form, and may be further provided with coupling means such as an apertured tongue extension or the like. It is therefore an object of this invention to provide an improved insulation and oxide piercing connector.

It is another object of this invention to provide a connector for electrically interconnecting two or more insulated conductors.

It is a further object of this invention to provide means for effecting interlocking engagement between one or more conductors and an electrical connector.

It is still a further object of this invention to provide means for electrically interconnecting a plurality of unstripped magnet wires.

It is yet another object of this invention to provide a connector having means for engaging, piercing, and detlectably locking thereto the conductive portion of one or more insulated conductors.

It is yet a further object of this invention to provide a crimpable connector having a plurality of ridges se lectively formed to partially strip the insulation from and be deflectably locked within the conductive portion of one or more insulated conductors.

Other objects and features of the invention will be pointed out in the following description and claims and illustrated in the accompanying drawings which disclose, by way of example, the principle of the invention V and the best mode contemplated for carrying it out.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In the Drawings FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a connector constructed in accordance with the concepts of the invention.

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary perspective view, in section, of a portion of the connector of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the connector of FIG. 1 showing its coupling to a plurality of insulated conductors.

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary elevational view, in section, of a portion of the connector of FIG. 3 showing the manner of engagement of the ridges thereof with the conductive portion of one of the conductors.

FIG. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary elevational view, in section, of an embodiment of a ridge of a connector constructed in accordance with the concepts of the invention.

FIGS. 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 are fragmentary elevational views, in section, of further embodiments of ridges of connectors constructed in accordance with the con cepts of the invention.

FIGS. 1 l and 12 are fragmentary plan views of ridges of a connector constructed in accordance with a further embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 13 is a perspective view of a further embodiment of a connector constructed in accordance with the concepts of the invention.

FIG. 14 is a perspective view, with a side wall partially fragmented, of another embodiment of a connector constructed in accordance with the concepts of the invention.

FIG. 15 is a perspective view of still a further embodiment of a connector constructed in accordance with the concepts of the invention.

FIG. 16 is a fragmentary elevational view, partly in section, showing the locking interengagement of the ridges of FIG. 9 with a typical insulated conductor.

Similar elements are given similar reference characters in each of the respective drawings.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Turning now to FIGS. 1, 2, 3 and 4 there is shown a connector 20 constructed in accordance with the concepts of the invention, which may be formed of preferablyelectrically conducting material such as copper, aluminum and the commonly employed alloys thereof. Although an essentially U-shaped configuration is shown in FIG. 1, other suitable configurations such as those shown, for example, in FIGS. 13, 14 and 15 may be readily employed without departing from the spirit of the invention. Connector 20 comprises a base member 22 folded or otherwise formed in such a manner as to provide three generally planar interior surfaces 24, 26, 28 on which are disposed a plurality of piercing means such as ridges 30. As may be more clearly seen in FIG. 2, ridges 30 are divided into two groups or series A and B wherein the ridges 30 of series A are aligned in similarly facing disposition complementary to the alignment of the similarly facing ridges 30 of series B, each of the series A and B extending generally transversely across the respective interior surfaces 24, 26 and 28 of base member 22 generally normal to the longitudinal axis of connector 20. The alignment of ridges 30 with respect to the longitudinal axis of connector20 may, of course, be varied, as necessary or desirable, to effect other suitable configurations such as those shown, for example, in FIGS. 11 and 12, where there is illustrated, respectively, a plurality of ridges 32 arranged in a V-shaped or herringbone pattern, and a plurality of generally concentrically disposed arcuate ridges 34. Although the ridges. 30 are shown disposed along substantially the entire interior of base member 22, as defined by the surfaces 24, 26, and 28, the arrangement may be appropriately altered or modified wherein said ridges 30 are disposed over either a selected portion of, or the entire area encompassed by, one or more of the interior surfaces of connector 20 or the other embodiments thereof as described heretofore. The ridges may be formed by any one of a number of suitable methods such as milling, rolling, stamping or skiving, in either one or more appropriate operations, to obtain the desired contour. As shown in greater detail in FIG. 2, each ridge 30 comprises, essentially, a first surface 36 extending generally normally outwardly from the adjacent interior surface, which for purposes of illustration, is designated 26, terminating at a first edge 38, forming the back of ridge 30. A relatively narrow second surface 40 extends from the first edge 38 and terminates at a second edge 42, forming the top of ridge 30. A third surface 44, extending slopingly from the second edge 42 towards the interior surface 26 and away from the first surface 36, forms a major portion of the front of ridge 30. Surface 44 terminates at a third edge 46 defining the upper edge of a fourth surface 48 interconnecting the third surface 44 and the base member interior surface 26. The sloping or inclined third surface 44 may be formed substantially fiat, as shown in FIG. 2, or may be suitably formed to define a generally arcuate or undulating configuration, as shown at 50 and 52 in FIGS. 6 and 7, respectively, each of the above-described contours being substantially equally effective for the purposes and uses set forth herein. The second or top surface 40 may be oriented in generally normal planar relationship with the first or back surface 36, as shown in FIG. 2, or may be disposed at an oblique angular relationship therewith, an acute angular relationship being shown at 54 in FIG. 5. The preferably sharp edges 38, 42 of ridges 30 in combination with the top surface 40 defined thereby serve to provide a piercing surface adequately proportioned to enable the ridges 30 to penetrate the relatively tough insulation layer on conductors coated or covered with insulating materials such as Teflon, nylon, baked enamel, or the like. Referring now particularly to FIG. 3, the connector 20 is shown engaged about a plurality of insulated conductors 56 as by crimping or otherwise subjecting the connector 20 to a suitably oriented compressive force to effect a tight closure about the conductors 56. The conductors 56 are thus forced against the ridges 30, causing said ridges 30 to penetrate the outer insulation layer 58 of the conductors 56 and extend into the conductive portion 60 thereof, as is shown in greater detail in FIG. 4. The sloping or inclined surface 44 of ridges 30 is consequently subjected to an offset face tending to bend or deflect the ridges generally down towards the interior surface 26 substantially as shown, to advantageously effect a secure, locking,- mechanical and electrical intercoupling between the ridges 30 and conductors 56. The wedge-like piercing action of the ridges 30, in combination with the deflection thereof, causes a slight elongation of the conductors 56 wherein a portion of conductors 56 displaced by the ridges 30 is urged into an adjacent pocket 62 which is selectively proportioned to accommodate the displaced material. The pockets 62 also serve to provide a chamber in which conductive material 60 of conductors 56 may expand and contract as the connection is subjected to alternating heating and cooling cycles, thus preserving the positive electrical contact initially established therebetween. The enlarged pocket 64 interposed between the two oppositely facing groups A and B of ridges 30 servesto accommodate that portion 66 of the conductors 56 displaced by the deflection of the immediately adjacent oppositely facing ridges 30 in a manner similar to that described above with respect to pockets 62. The degree of penetration and subsequent deflection of the ridges 30 may be selectively controlled by modifying the shape and angular disposition of the third or sloping surface 44 as shown, for example, at 50 and 52 in FIGS. 6 and 7, respectively. The embodiment illustrated in FIG. 6 comprises a generally concave third surface 50 providing a more sharply defined ridge 68 useful for effecting greater penetration of, and deflection within, the associated conductors where necessary or desirable. A combination of the properties of a generally planar and a generally concave third surface may be obtained by utilizing the undulating formed surface 52 shown in FIG. 7.

Referring now to FIGS. 8 and 9 there are shown other arrangements of the ridges 30 of a connector constructed in accordance with the concepts of the int vention. As shown in FIG. 8, the orinetation of the two groups A and B of the ridges 30 of FIG. 2 may be reversed wherein the oppositely facing third surfaces 44 of one group face towards the third surfaces 44 of the other. Or, alternatively, as shown in FIG. 9, the ridges 30 may be disposed in oppositely facing pairs, either in the orientation shown wherein the first surfaces 36 are arranged in essentially spaced, back-to-back alignment, or in a reversed orientation (not shown) wherein the third surfaces 44 of adjacent pairs are arranged in spaced, facing relationship. The manner of conductor penetration and ridge deflection of the arrangement shown in FIG. 9 is shown in detail in FIG. 16. As illustrated, each pair of ridges 30 are caused to penetrate the conductor 56 and be deflected towards one another, thereby encapturing a series of portions such as 68 of the conductor 56 therebetween in a tong-like grip to provide a plurality of unique, interlocked elements, further advantageously enhancing the electrical and mechanical connection so formed. It will of course be readily apparent to those skilled in the art that any one or a combination of the ridge shapes illustrated in FIGS. 5, 6 and 7 and described heretofore may be readily employed in a similar manner without departing from the spirit of the invention. Where there, is pro-' vided a pair of back-to-back interior surfaces such as 68, 70 (FIG. pursuant to an embodiment of a connector such as 72 (FIG. 14), the ridges 30, or any of the aforementioned variations thereof, may be disposed on at least a portion of either one or both such surfaces 68, 70, generally as shown in FIG. 10.

Turning now to FIGS. 13, 14 and 15, there are shown various embodiments of connectors constructed in accordance with the concepts of the invention. In FIG. 13, an apertured tongue portion 74 is shown attached to a U-shaped ferrule portion 76 of a connector 78 to facilitate the coupling thereof to a terminal board or other support member (not shown). The ridges 30, shown disposed over substantially the entire interior surfaces of the ferrule portion 76, may, of course, be suitably provided on selective portions thereof. The double-compartment, box-like, configuration of the connector 72 illustrated in FIG. 14 may be advantageously employed to effect a secure mechanical and electrical coupling between at least two insulated flat conductors (not shown). In FIG. there is shown a further embodiment of a connector 80 comprising a plurality of ridges 82 extending transversely across the interior surface 88 of one of a pair of hingedly coupled arms 84, 86 arranged to receive therebetween and for engagement therewith, one or more conductors such as 90 insertable through an aperture 92 formed within the junction 94 of said arms 84, 86. Extending outwardly from each of the respective arms 84, 86 is an apertured tongue 94, 96, arranged to accommodate a threaded bolt or other fastening device (not shown) for maintaining the arms 84, 86 in closed relationship about the conductors 90 after crimping, permitting further conductors such as 90 to be connected thereto at will, or permitting one or more of the conductors 90 initially coupled thereto to be removed in a subsequent operation, while maintaining the integrity of the initial connection.

The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:

1. An insulation and oxide piercing electrical connector comprising: a base member having at least one interior surface; and at least a first and second series of generally spaced, elongated upstanding ridges disposed on at least a portion of said interior surface; said first series of said ridges being arranged in similarly facing disposition in a first orientation and said second series of said ridges being arranged in similarly facing disposition in a second orientation opposite to said first orientation; each of said ridges being at least partially defined by a first surface extending outwardly from said interior surface generally normal to the plane thereof and terminating at a first edge, a second surface extending from said first edge of said first surface a first predetermined distance and terminating in a second edge, said second surface forming the top of said ridge, a third surface extending slopingly from said second edge away from said first surface and towards said interior surface a second predetermined distance and ter- 7 portion of an insulated conductor disposed thereover as said conductor is crimpably engaged about such conductor.

2. A connector as defined in claim 1 wherein said base member is formed of electrically conductive material.

3. A connector as defined in claim 1 wherein said base member comprises at least two interior surfaces and said ridges are disposed on at least a portion of each of said interior surfaces.

4. A connector as defined in claim 1 wherein at least some of said ridges are aligned substantially transverse to the longitudinal axis of said conductor.

5. A connector as defined in claim 1 wherein at least some of said ridges are generally arcuately formed.

6. A connector as defined in claim 1 wherein said third surface is generally planar.

7. A connector as defined in claim 1 wherein said second series of ridges is oriented in generally oblique angular relationship with said first series of ridges.

8. A connector as defined in claim 1 further comprising means for coupling said connector to a further member.

9. A connector as defined in claim 8 wherein said coupling means comprises a selectively formed protrusion extending outwardly from said base member.

10. An insulation and oxide piercing electrical con nector comprising: a base member having at least one interior surface; and a plurality of generally spaced, elongated upstanding ridges disposed on at least a por tion of said interior surface; each of said ridges being at least partially defined by a first surface extending outwardly from said interior surface generally normal to the plane thereof and terminating at a first edge, a second surface extending from said first edge of said first surface a first predetermined distance and terminating in a second edge, said second surface forming the top of said ridge, a third surface extending slopingly from said second edge away from said first surface and towards said interior surface a second predetermined distance and terminating at a third edge and a fourth surface extending between and interconnecting said third edge and said interior surface, said ridges being proportioned to engage, pierce and be deflected within theconductive portion of an insulated conductor disposed thereover as said connector is crimpably engaged about such conductor, said third surface of at least some of said ridges extending generally arcuately between said second edge and said third edge thereof.

11. An insulation and oxide piercing electrical connector comprising: a base member having at least one interior surface; and a plurality of generally spaced, elongate upstanding ridges disposed on at least a portion of said interior surface; each of said ridges being at least partially defined by a first surface extending outwardly from said interior surface generally normal to the plane thereof and terminating at a first edge, a second surface extending from said first edge of said first surface a first predetermined distance and terminating in a second edge, said second surface forming the top of said ridge, a third surface extending slopingly from said second edge away from said first surface and towards said interior surface a second predetermined distance and terminating at a third edge and a fourth surface extending between and interconnecting said third edge and said interior surface, said ridges being proportioned to engage, pierce and be deflected within the conductive portion of an insulated conductor disposed thereover as said connector is crimpably engaged about such conductor, said third surface of at least some of said ridges being generally undulate.

12. An insulation and oxide piercing electrical connector comprising: a base member having at least one interior surface; and a plurality of generally spaced, elongated upstanding ridges disposed on at least a portion of said interior surface; each of said ridges being at least partially defined by a first surface extending outwardly from said interior surface generally normal to the plane thereof and terminating at a first edge, a second surface extending from said first edge of said first surface a first predetermined distance and terminating in a second edge, said second surface forming the top of said ridge, a third surface extending slopingly from said second edge away from said first surface and towards said interior surface a second predetermined distance and terminating at a third edge and a fourth surface extending between and interconnecting said third edge and said interior surface, said ridges being proportioned to engage, pierce and be deflected within the conductive portion of an insulated conductor disposed thereover as said conductor is crimpably engaged about such conductor, said plurality of ridges being arranged in generally oppositely facing pairs.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2800638 *Jun 12, 1953Jul 23, 1957Amp IncElectric connector
US3355698 *Apr 28, 1965Nov 28, 1967Amp IncElectrical connector
US3599173 *May 21, 1969Aug 10, 1971Electronics Components Ltd AbElectrical connectors
US3656093 *Jan 12, 1970Apr 11, 1972Amp IncElectrical connectors
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3947082 *Dec 16, 1974Mar 30, 1976Thomas & Betts CorporationTooth configuration for an electrical connector
US3989339 *Oct 2, 1975Nov 2, 1976Thomas & Betts CorporationElectrical connector and method of making same
US4192043 *Jan 16, 1979Mar 11, 1980Albert KonradClosure seal and apparatus for applying the same
US4286361 *Aug 11, 1980Sep 1, 1981Mackenzie Donald RHose clamp
US4480889 *Jan 7, 1982Nov 6, 1984Thomas & Betts CorporationAdapter and method for tapping or splicing flat multiconductor cable
US5071363 *Apr 18, 1990Dec 10, 1991Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyMiniature multiple conductor electrical connector
US5109575 *Jun 10, 1991May 5, 1992Signode CorporationToothed seal for hard thermoplastic strap
US5176530 *Sep 25, 1991Jan 5, 1993Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyMiniature multiple conductor electrical connector
US5573306 *May 30, 1995Nov 12, 1996Galloway; Evan M.Non-slip seat belt cover
US6210241Jun 26, 1998Apr 3, 2001Sennheiser Electronic Gmbh & Co KgElectrical contacting of fine wire
US7124956 *May 16, 2002Oct 24, 2006Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V.Product comprising product sub-parts connected to each other by a crimp connection
US7549198 *Jan 31, 2005Jun 23, 2009Illinois Tool Works Inc.Sealed joint devices for securing strap ends together
US20040144848 *May 16, 2002Jul 29, 2004Rainer MollProduct comprising product sub-parts connected to each other by a crimp connection
US20050221691 *Apr 1, 2005Oct 6, 2005Mu-Te LiWire terminal with clamping sections having milled grooves
US20060168768 *Jan 31, 2005Aug 3, 2006Illinois Tool Works Inc.Sealed joint devices for securing strap ends together
US20150041211 *Aug 12, 2013Feb 12, 2015Tyco Electronics CorporationLow resistance insert
CN100561800CAug 15, 2006Nov 18, 2009Dpc株式会社Connector for printed circuit board
EP0889544A2 *May 28, 1998Jan 7, 1999Sennheiser electronic GmbH & Co. KGElectrical thin wire connection
Classifications
U.S. Classification24/23.00W, 439/424, 24/20.00W
International ClassificationH01R4/24
Cooperative ClassificationH01R4/2495
European ClassificationH01R4/24F