Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3737227 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 5, 1973
Filing dateSep 20, 1971
Priority dateSep 20, 1971
Publication numberUS 3737227 A, US 3737227A, US-A-3737227, US3737227 A, US3737227A
InventorsHarter J, Rosenburgh N
Original AssigneeEastman Kodak Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Print border control apparatus
US 3737227 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[451 June 5, 1973 United States Patent [1 1 Harter et al.

I ass/74 x .........35s/74'x floss 12o x 3,627,411 12/1971 Nagel 2.782.678 2/1957 Taylor...... 3,484,165 12/1969 Denner.t............

Primary Examiner-Samuel S. Matthews Assistant Examiner-Fred L. Braun ester, N.Y.

Attorney-W. H. J. Kline and Cyril A. Krenzer [57] ABSTRACT Photographic printing apparatus for making varying Sept. 20,1971

[21] Appl; No.2 181,686

[22] Filed:

size prints with adjustable border settings, the various print sizes corresponding to different magnifications. The apparatus utilizes a two stage print paper advance mechanism continually referenced to horizontal and vertical optical center lines, whereby the sequential exposures of varying size including their respective 48 N52 3.0 a 4 "G 5 MMO 4 l n u 5 "5 mmfi mmhm ""c r. n a Ne Us .L h f C d td UhF 1.1] 2 -00 555 [[1 i i borders are contiguous. The two stage advance also [56] References cued permits simplified marking of the print paper for subsequent cutting operations.

UNITED STATES PATENTS 9 Claims, 11 Drawing Figures 3,488,119 Dixon et al. ..............L.............355/74.

PATENTEDJUH 5 m SHEET 1 BF 6 5 VACUUM SOURCE JAMES E. HARTER NORMAN .1. nosavaunsn mvm'on BY M K 4 v arromvsvs PATENTEDJUN 5191s sum 2 or 6 JAMES E. HARTER NORMAN J. ROSENBURGH ATTORNEYS PATENTEDJUH 5|975 3.737227 SHEET 30F 6 JAMES E. HARTER NORMAN J. ROSEVBURGH ATTORNEYS PATENTEDJUM 5191a 3.737.227 SHEET all! 6 l/ I I75 JAMES E. HARTER NORMAN .1. ROSENBURGH mvEmoRs BY W wa w. kg

ATTORIGEYS PATENIEUJUM 5 I975" FIG. 7

SHEET 5 UF 6 JAMES EHARTER NORMAN .1. ROSENBURGH ATTORNEYS WWW sum 3.737.227

- SHEET ear 6 JAMEs E. HARTER NORMAN .1. nossuauncn rronnsvs Reference is hereby made to commonly assigned, copending U.S. Pat. application, Ser. No. 181,685 entitled, Paper Advance And Marking Mechanisms For Photographic PrintingApparatus, filed in the names of James E; I-Iarter and Norman J. Rosenburgh on Sept. 20, 1971.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates generally to printing apparatus and more particularly to improved mechanisms for use in commercial photographic printing apparatus.

In the professional, commercialand industrial photographic printing industry, it is often desirable to have printers which handle several widths of printing paper,

which is capable of producing prints of various sizes OBJECTS AND SUMMARY OFTI-IE INVENTION Accordingly, it is a principal object of this invention to provide photographic printing apparatus having improved border control capability.

Another object of the inventionis toprovide photographic printing apparatus having continuously variable border control capabilityrelatively independent of print size.

According to one aspect of the invention, at least one optical center line as'determined by-theprojection of the image on the print area is established and'maintained fixed. A two stage paper advance mechanism is used which always places the center of the :print area to be exposed on theoptical center line for-exposure purposes and places the trailing edge of the exposed print on the center line subsequent to exposure. A differential gear mechanism operates to varythe relative v advance of each of the two stages of advance to yield the variable border as desired, but in a manner such that the sum of the two stages of advance stays constant once the print size has been determined.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF TH DRAWINGS FlG. 1 is a perspective view of a photographic printer in which the invention finds utility;

FIG. 2 is a schematic representation of a print paper supply and take-up system used in the present invention;

FIG. 3 is a segmental view in perspective of one embodiment of a two stage print paper. advance and conpaper marking slot with respect to the horizontal optical centerline of the apparatus; 1

FIG. 6 is a diagrammatic representation of two rows of print exposures of differing dimensions;

FIG. 7 is a segmental view in perspective of the lateral movement control apparatus in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 8 is a partial segmental view in perspective of an alternate embodiment of lateral movement control apparatus in accordance with the present invention; and

FIG. 9 is a view in section of the control drive shaft taken along line 9-9 of FIG. 8.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to FIG. 1, the printing apparatus therein shown includes a cabinet 11 which includes within it the paper drive mechanism along with the paper supply and take-up rolls. In the front of the cabinet is a composing screen 13 which, while not shown, is movably mounted and when lowered would reveal the printpaper to be exposed within a border control area as dete'nnined by horizontal masks 12 and 14 and vertical'masks 16 and 18. Attachedto the'front of the cabinet 11' is a carriage guide 15 upon which is mounted the lens carriage l7 and the transparency holder and light source 19 which is connected to the lens'car'riage by a light-tight baffle 21. A control panel 23 may be located adjacent the carriage guide. In the general operation of such a system, light from the source 19 passes through the transparency and through the lens contained in the lens carriage 17 and is focused on the composing screen 13. The operator will set the magnification desired and in general compose the picture to include of course proper focusing, and then will set the-controls required to expose the desired number of prints. Subsequently, the screen 13 is removed from in front of the cabinet 11 and the light from the light source 19 is illuminated for a period of time to affect exposure of the print paper which is in the position behind the area formerly occupied by the composing screen 13. Subsequent exposures are made by suitably advancing the print paper through the opening in the cabinet 11in accordance'with techniques to be later described.

Referring next to FIG. 2, there is shown diagrammatically a side view of a paper supply and take-up system which could be used in accordance'with the present invention. The paper 29 isxtaken from the supply spool 31 passed between a first castored and gimbled pressure roller 33 and a drive roller 35. Paper'is then fed over supply loop 37 in front of a vacuum. platen 39 and passes between a second pressure roller 41 and a second driveroller .43. Since the present system is described in thecontext of horizontally disposed'printing tween the drive roller 43 and the pressure roller 41, the

advance of the printing apparatus. The masks 61 and 63 are slidably mounted on suitable rails and are driven by cables 65 and 67, cable 65 passing over a first roller 69 and a second roller 71 fixedly mounted to shafts 73 and 75, respectively. Simiarly, cable 67 passes around rollers 77 and 79, affixed to the shaft 73 and 75, respectively. The cables are connected on each side to both the top mask 61 and the bottom mask 63, in a manner such that a clockwise rotation of the shaft 73 causes the space between masks to open and a counterclockwise rotation of the shaft 73 causes the space between the mask to close. Centered on the opening between the two masks 61 and 63, is the horizontal optical center line of the printing apparatus 81, and as will become apparent in the ensuing description, the optical center lines are the absolute references for the paper advance control.

The print paper 83 is advanced by means of a drum 85 mounted on the shaft 87. The shaft 87 is driven by a motor 91 which is connected thereto by a brake/- clutch 89. Mounted on the shaft 87 for relative rotation with respect thereto are two drum advance mechanisms 93 and 95. Mounted adjacent each drum advance mechanism on the shaft 87 is a rotatable arm 96, 97 which is connectable to a clutch mechanism 98,99,

which may be, for example, a magnetic clutch.

Mounted on each of the drum mechanisms 93 and 95 is a stop 100, 101. The arms 96, 97 are maintained in contact with the stops 100, 101 by biasing springs 102, 103.- Suitably mounted in association with the drum advance mechanism are switches 105, 107 adapted to be contacted by the arms 96, 97 when the arms rotate about the shaft 87 to energize the brake/clutch 89, turn off the motor 91 and release the clutches 98,99.

Spaced from shaft 87 is a shaft 109 having mounted thereon a differential 111 which includes gears 113 integral with drums 115 and 117 on each side thereof. The gears 113 may be, for example, a spider gear and planetary gear. The differential 111 with its associated drums 115 and 117 is operative in a manner such that initial motion by the turning of the knob 119 will impart uniform motion in the same direction to the drums 115 and 1 17. However, if the initial motion is imparted to one of the drums 115 or 117 in a given angular direction, the opposite angular motion will result via the gears 113 to the other of the drums 117 or 115. At one end of the shaft 109 which is mounted a control knob 119 and at the other end of the shaft is mounted a calibration gear 121. The calibration gear is connected to a counter indicator 123 via a gear 125. interposed between the shaft 109 and the shaft 87 are a pair of gear mechanisms 127 and 129 which are operative to control the borders of the print area. Each of the mechanisms includes a pinion gear 131 which engages with a rack gear 133 which is affixed to a slide device 135 having two pulleys mounted thereon. It will be seen that knob 137 operates on the gear mechanism 127 to control the top-border of the exposure to be made while the knob 139 operates gear mechanism 129 to control the bottom border of the exposure to be made.

A cable 141 interconnects the various shafts in the following manner: beginning with the drum 117 the cable passes up and over the drum 93 down and around a first pulley on the gear mechanism 129, up and over a guide 143 to a drum 145 on the shaft 73. After proceedi'ng around the drum 145 on the shaft 73, the cable proceeds down around a first pulley on the gear mechanism 127 then up and around the drum 95, down around a guide 147, over to and around the drum 115 on the shaft 109. From there the cable proceeds up and around a second pulley on a gear mechanism 127 and down and around a guide 149, and up to a second pulley on gear mechanism 129 and back to the drum 117 on the shaft 109. Absent any external forces the drums 93 and 95 on the shaft 87 would be free to rotate either therewith or thereabout. However, the cable 141 holds the drums 93 and 95 in a fixed position about the shaft.

In operation, the mask spacing. is first established by adjusting the control knob 119. For example it can be seen that as the control knob is turned in a clockwise direction, then through the action of the differential mechanism 111 and the cable 141, the shaft 73 through the movement of the drum 145 will also be rotated in a clockwise direction. This in turn rotates the drums 69 and 77 in a clockwise direction, which increases the opening between the edges of the masks 61 and 63. Conversely, to close the opening between the masks, the knob 119 is rotated in a counter-clockwise direction.

As the mask spacing is established by the control of the knob 119, it can also be seen that the drums 93 and 95 have motion imparteclto them via the cable 141, the motion of these drums beingopposite to the angular motion of the shaft 109. As the drums 93 and 95 rotate counterclockwise, the distance between the stops 100, 101 and the switches 105, 107 increases, so that when either of the magnetic clutches 98, 99 is energized, it will travel through a larger angle. This is equivalent to a larger rotation of the drum 85 mounted on the shaft 87, the drum 85 imparting vertical motion to the print paper 83. The diameters of the drum 93 and are calibrated to relate the rotation of the drum 85 and to the opening between the masks 61 and 63. In a preferred mode of operation, the angular displacement between the arms 96, 97 biased to the stops 100,101 by the springs 102, 103 and the switch 107, corresponds to one-half of the print length in the vertical direction. Thus, energization of the motor 91 rotates the shaft 87 clockwise until one of the arms 96, 97 contacts its respective switch 107, 105. At this point the brake/clutch 89 is energized to stop the motor 91 and the arm is released from its clutchmechanism 98,99 and returns to its stop 100, 101. The rotation of the shaft 87 during this operation has advanced the print paper one-half of the print width.

The exact operation of the system may be more clearly understood by reference to FIG. 4 which depicts the various stages of advance of the print paper in a vertical direction. In FIG. 4A, the top line of the print area is placed in alignment with the horizontal optical center line 81. At this juncture a cut mark 151 may be placed on the edge of the paper to facilitate subsequent cutting of the prints Then for example,,the motor 91 and the magnetic clutch 98 associated with drum 93 may be energized which results in the rotation of the shaft 87 until such time as the'arm 96 contacts the switch 107 which is effective to energize the brake/- clutch 89, turn off the motor 91 and release the clutch 98. This rotation of the shaft 87v has moved the print paper so that the top edge 153 has been moved vertically one-half the distance of the print length so that the entire print area 155 is centered about the horizontal optical centerline 81 as shown in FIG. 48.. At this juncture the print paper is exposed by projectingthe light from the light source through the transparency on the lens system' onto the print area 155. Upon comple-- tion of the print exposure, the motor 91 and the magnetic clutch 99 associated with the drum 95 are energized which will again result in the movement of the print paper one-half of the vertical print length as shown in FIG. 4C, resulting in the bottom edge of the exposed print area 157 lying on the horizontal optical centerline 81, which coincides with the top edge of the next print to be taken. At this juncture, another 'cut mark 159 is made on the print paper, and, if desired, the size of the print area can be changed by manipulation of the knob 119 before the next advance takes place for the exposure of the subsequent prints. It can be readily seen that prior to the setting of any print sizes, the leading edge of the subsequent print always lies along the horizontal opticalcen'ter line.

To better understand how the advance mechanism of the present invention facilitates the placing of cut marks along the vertical edges of the print paper, reference is made to FIG. 5 wherein there is shown the print material 161 moving in the direction indicated over the drive roller 163. The print paper is cut away to show substantial portion of the platen 167 and the horizontal optical centerline of the system 165. The horizontal and vertical border masks are not shown, but would normally be in the system. A slot 169 is located slightly below the horizontal optical centerline 165 and this slot provides an opening for a marker such as a disc marker to be selectively pressed against the back side of the print paper 161. The marking is accomplished at the time that the leading edge of the print to be made is in alignment with the horizontal optical centerline 165. Therefore the distance 171 between the horizontal optical centerline and the slot 169 is constant regardless of the print dimension, so that as the print paper is later fed into a cutting machine the cuts are always made a predetermined distance away from the print mark on the back of the print paper. While the composing screen is not shown in FIG. 5, it is preferable that during the marking operation the composing screen be moved up in position over the slot opening to provide a backing for the print material, thereby resulting in a more uniform and legible mark on the back of the print paper'.

In addition to providing control over the print material as it moves in a vertical direction, control is also desirable as the paper is moved in the horizontal direction. For example, as depicted in FIG. 6 it may be desirable to first print a row 173 of four equal sized prints and then print a row 175 of two prints of differing size. For example, if 16 inch wide print paper is used, the

first row of prints 173' might be 4 X 5 inch prints and the second row 175 could be 8 X 10 inch prints. It will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art that the apparatus described functionally in FIG."3 for'controlling movement in the vertical direction could be easily modified to similarly control movement of the print paper in a horizontal direction. On the other hand there are certain aspects of movementin the vertical direction which differ from movement in the horizontal direction. For example, the width of the paper is relatively small when compared to the overall length of the paper roll so that some means for detecting the end of the paper width must be available. Also, in general, it

would not be desirable to change the print size for each row of prints in a horizontal direction. In this regard the mechanisms for controlling motion in the vertical direction maybe somewhat simpler than those required to control the advance in the horizontal direction.

One system which provides these capabilities in the take-up spool 189, the vacuum platen 191, a drive' roller 193, a drive motor 195 and a transport drive motor 197 which is connected to a rack gear 199 and a pinion gear 201. The drive motor 195 and the drive roller 193 are obviously simplified versions of the vertical drive mechanisms shown and described in conjunction with FIG. 3, and are shown here only to provide functional completeness of the Figure. Mounted on either side of the paper 203 as it passes over the vacuum platen 191 are first and second actuator switches 205 and 207 respectively. The switch 205 is adjusted after the paper is mounted in the system to indicate the beginning edge of the print paper and the switch 207 is moved approximate the opposite edge of the paper to indicate the end of the paper width.

The drive control mechanism includes a shaft 209 having fixedly mounted thereon two drive drums 211 and 213, and attached to one end of the shaft is a control or adjustment knob 215. A second shaft 217 suitably mounted within the system has loosely mounted thereon first and second drive control'mechanisms 219 and 221. Firmly affixed to one end of the shaft 217 is a drum 223. A first cable 225 is connected to the transport assembly 181, passes around guides 227, 229, and 231 over and around the drum 223 and is connected to a weight 233. The vertical border control masks 235 and 237 are mounted 'in a slide 239 and are affixed by means of clamps 241 and 243, respectively, to a second control cable 245 which is an endless cable. Cable 245 passes around the drum 211 over to and around the drum 221, thence to a guide 249 over to and through the clamp 241 connected to the mask 235, around a guide 251 to the second clamp 243 affixed to the mask 237, around guides 253 and 255 to and through a switch 257, passes around another guide 259 andreturns to the drum 211 via a guide 261. A third cable 275 interconnects drive drum 213 with the drum 219. The drums 219 and 221 are equivalent to the drums 93 and of FIG. 3, each including an arm 262, 263, a clutch mechanism 264, 265, a stop 266, 267 and biasing-means 268, 269. Also located proximate each of the drums are switches271 and 273, respectively. The operation of the apparatus of FIG. 7 is similar in many respects to the operation of the apparatus controlling the vertical advance as described in conjunctionwith FIG. 3. The knob 215 controls the setting of the opening between the vertical masks 235 and 237. If the knob is turned in a clockwise direction, the spacing between the masks-is increased and is decreased if the knob is turned in a counterclockwise direction. At the same time by way of the action of the drums 211 and 213, the drive control drum mechanisms 219 and 221 are adjusted through the turning of the knob at 215. As the shaft 209 is rotated in a clockwise direction, the stops 266, 267 are displaced 'by a greater angle from the switches 271 and 273, respectively. Once'the spacing of the vertical mask has been effected, then the drums 219 and 221 control the lateral motion of the transport assembly 181. In'the preferred embodiment asshown the radius of the drum 211 is one-half the radius of the drum 213, so that drum 221 will advance the transport mechanism only one-half the distance it is transported via control of the drum 219. The drum of the transport assembly 181 in a lateral direction is controlled by the motor 197 via the rack and pinion gears 199 and 201, respectively. To initiate the lateral motion, the righthand edge of the print paper is moved until it lies in alignment with the vertical optical centerline 275 of the apparatus. This is sensed by the switch actuator 205 making contact with a switch 277 suitably mounted in the structure. Once the right edge of the print paper is in alignment with the vertical optical centerline, the border controls and print sizes can be adjusted by the manipulation of the knob 215 as explained above. At this juncture the motor 197 is actuated which in turn activates the magnetic clutch 265 associated with the drum 221. The motor via the rack and pinion gear moves the transport assembly 181 to the right thereby imparting motion also to the cable 225 which causes rotation of the shaft 217. The shaft rotates until the arm 263 on the drum 221 contacts the switch 273, which deactivates the motor 197. At this point the center of the print area to be exposed will be in alignment with the vertical optical centerline 275 of the apparatus. Thus it can be seen that the activation of the motor and energization of the drum control 221 has moved the paper a distance approximating one-half of the print area to be exposed. Once the print has been exposed, the drive motor is again activated and this time the drum 219 has its magnetic clutch 264 energized. This drum is configured via its control drum 213 to advance the paper a full print width to the right before deenergization of the drive motor 197. Therefore in this embodiment once the print size has been determined for a lateral row of prints, only the first paper advance is a one-half advance; thereafter all of the advances are the full paper width and correspond to a full exposure.

The step by step advances of the transport assembly 181 to the right continue until such time as the switch 257 contacts the switch actuator 207. At this juncture the machine recognizes that there is insufficient paper width remaining in that row to yield another print, whereby the motor 197 is energized to return the transport assembly to the left direction until the switch 205 contacts the stop 277. Then the motor 197 is deactivated and the vertical advance system is energized as described in FIG. 3 to advance the paper to the next row for set-up and subsequent exposure of the prints.

The foregoing discussion has been concerned primarily with the situation where no border has been introduced onto the finished print. In order to understand how border dimensions can be added to the print, reference is made first to FIG. 3. In the following it will be assumed that the overall print dimensions have been introduced into the system through the adjustment of the mechanism via knob 119. As mentioned previously the differential 113 with its drums 115 and 117 are rotated as a unit when the control knob 119 is turned. However, when the knob is fixed in position, then rotation of either drum 115 or 117 in one direction will result in the rotation of the other drum in the opposite direction. In controlling the borders, the knob 137 is used to control the upper border dimension of the print and the knob 139 controls the lower borderdimension of the print. To introduce a top border dimension, the knob 137 rotates the pinion gear 131 engaged with rack gear 133 that is affixed to the slide device 127 and a clockwise direction to drive the slide assembly downward. This will rotate the first advance control drum in a counterclockwise direction and increase the angle through which the switch actuator arm 97 of this drum assembly rotates. Shaft 73 in turn rotates in a counterclockwise direction which will move the top and bottom masks 61 and 63, respectively, toward each other reducing the space between them. Through the action of the differential 113 in the apparatus, the control cable 141 rotates the second advance control drum 93 clockwise so as to reduce the angle through which its switch actuator arm travels. However the total distance moved through the actions of both drums 93 and 95 remains constant once the setting of knob 119 is fixed. Also it can be seen that the masks 61 and 63 remain centered about the optical centerline 81.

To introduce the bottom border dimension, the control knob 139 is similarly rotated in a counterclockwise direction driving the assembly 129 upward, which in turn rotates the second paper advance drum 93 counterclockwise to increase the angle through .which its switch actuator arm will rotate. At the same time the cabling through the differential 113 rotates the first paper advance drum 95 clockwise to reduce the angle through which its actuator arm rotates. At the same time the cabling has rotated the shaft 73 counterclockwise to further reduce the separation between the top and bottom masks by the desired amount. As mentioned previously once the borders have been introduced, it is not the mask separation that determines the print size, but rather the total angular displacements to be affected by rotation of the drums 93 and 95 and the two stage advance control of the apparatus.

A similar differential can be introduced into the configuration of FIG. 7 to set the left and right hand border dimensions as desired. It is noted that such a configura tion would then permit the introduction of independently variable borders on all four sides of the print areas. In many cases it is recognized that only equal and opposite border dimensions will be required for the top and bottom and similarly equal and opposite borders will be required for the left and right hand border areas. In such instances it is not required to have the differential mechanism of FIG. 3, but rather the apparatus could utilize the controls as shown in FIG. 8.

The system includes a pair of masks 281 and 283 connected by a cable 285 to a drum 287 which is mounted on a shaft 289. A half advance drum 291 and a full advance drum 293 are connected by cables 295 and 297 respectively to drums 299 and 301 also mounted on the shaft 289. The calibrated control knob 303 is mounted on the end of the shaft 289, and the shaft is coupled by a cable 305 over a roller 306 to an indicator counter 307, which might, for example, be a back lighted, calibrated mylar. strip; This apparatus provides a simplified approach in which the differential 113 and the'slides 127 and 129 of FIG. 3 are eliminated. Also, only one paper advance control drum is needed because the first and second advances are al' ways equal. The paper masks 281 and 283 are driven directly by the drum 287 which is attachedto the main control knob 303 by a shaft 289. Bearing mounted and free to rotate on the shaft 289 are the control drums 299 and 301 for the half advance and full advance configurations respectively. Mounted on the shaft 289 be,- twe en the drums 287 and 299, is a friction lock device 309, which in effect acts as a clutching mechanism as to be explained further. In the configuration of FIG. 8, the actuation arms and biasing springs, etc. normally associated with the drums 291 and 293 are omitted for the sake of simplicity, but it will be readily apparent in the matter in which they operate.

In order to set the print dimension using this configu ration, the print width or length dimensions as the case may be, are established by rotating the knob 303 which in turn moves the cables 285, 295 and 297 to set the print width opening between the masks 281 and 283 and rotates the drums 291 and 293 the required distance. Then to introduce equal and opposite border dimensions, the knob may, for example, be pressed inward releasing the shaft from the drums 299 and 301 but via the friction lock device 309 still enabling rotation of the shaft 287 to suitably adjust the opening between the masks 281 and 283 for the desired equal and opposite border dimensions. When this apparatus is used to control print dimensions and the lateral dimension, the first lateral advance for a roll of exposures across the width of the paper is always one-half the width of the print to be cut from the roll of paper but subsequent lateral advances will always be the full width of the print. This means that the angles for the drums 291 and 293 are constant for a given physical 2 print dimension and the only thing which must change for border control is the physical separation between the photographic masks 281' and 283 as described above. 1 1

FIG. 9 illustrates one configuration theshaft 289 of FIG. 8 may take. The shaft consists of a hollow cylindrical section 313 having integral with it the drum drives 299 and 301, which may have their cable driving surfaces slightly sloped to prevent loss of the cable therefrom. An indicator dial 317 may also be integral with the unit. The mask drive drum 287 is connected to an internal shaft 311 which passes through the opening in the outer shaft 313. The knob 303 is attached to the other end of the shaft 311. A spring 315 is positioned between the knob and the end of the shaft 311 in a fashion such that the friction lock device 309 maintains a frictional contact between the outer shaft 313 and the inner shaft 311. However, when the knob 303 is pushed inward, the friction lock device 309 is disengaged such that the shaft 311 will rotate inside the shaft 313 without rotating the outer shaft itself. This prevents the independent adjustment of the border control via rotation of the outermost drive wheel 287. v,

The invention has been described in detail with particular reference to preferred embodiments thereof, but it will be understood that variations and modifications can be effected withinthe spirit and scope of the invention.

We claim: 1. In an adjustable masking mechanism foran image forming apparatus, the combination comprising: an image plane having at least one reference centerline;

at least one pair of masks oppositely disposed about said centerline, each mask of said at least one pair of masks being equidistant therefrom;

first control means operative to establish the overallimage dimension relative to said centerline; A second control means operative to establish a border along at least one of said masks of said at least one pair of masks, said second control means comprising a plurality of adjustment mechanisms corre sponding to each of said masks, each of said adjustment mechanisms being independently operable to establish an independently variable border along its respective mask, cooperating with said first control 5 means to establish the spacing between said pair of masks;

material adapted to have an image formed thereon;

and 1 feed means operative in response to said first control means to provide a dimension of material established thereby in position proximate said pair of masks, as determined by said second control means cooperating with said first control means, whereby uponformation of an image on said material, a border as determined by said second control means is established. a

2. The invention according to claim 1, wherein said at least one reference centerline comprises a first reference centerline, and said at least one pair of masks comprises a first pair of masks oppositely disposed about said first centerline, each mask being equidistant there-from, additionally comprising: 7

a second reference centerline in said image plane, 5 said second reference centerline being perpendicular to said first reference centerline; I

a second pair of masks oppositely disposed about said second centerline, each mask being equidistant therefrom;

I third control means operative to establish the overall image dimension relative to said second centerline; and

fourth control means operative to establish a border along at least one mask of said second pair of masks, said fourth control means cooperating with said third control means to establish the spacing between said second pair of masks, said feed means being additionally responsive to said third and fourth control means to supply material of dimensions established thereby in position in the area defined by the opening established by said first and second pairs of masks.

3.'The invention according to claim 2 wherein said fourth control means additionally operates to establish a border along the other mask of said second pair of masks, the two borders along the masks being of equal size.

4. The invention according to claim 2 wherein said fourth control means comprises third and fourth adjustment mechanisms corresponding respectively to the first and second masks of said second pair of masks, each. of said adjustment mechanisms being independently operable to establish an independently variable border along its respective mask.

5. ln photographic printing apparatus including a print plane adaptedto receive paper for printing, a transparency holder and a light source adapted to be directed through a film transparency in the holder for projection onto the print plane, lens apparatus interposed between said transparency holder and said print plane operative to focus the image of said transparency on said print plane, horizontal and vertical pairs of masks disposed in said print plane over the print paper thereby defining the area of the print paper to be exposed and print paper feed mechanism to move the print paper in the print plane, improved border control apparatus comprising:

first control means operative to set the vertical drive of the print paper feed mechanism to thereby define the length of the print area to be exposed;

second control means operative to set the horizontal drive of the print paper feed mechanism to thereby define the width of the print area to be exposed;

first adjustment means operative to set the pair of horizontal masks to establish top and bottom print borders for said print area; and

second adjustment means operative to set the pair of vertical masks to establish side print borders for said print area.

6. The invention according to claim 5 wherein said first adjustment means includes third and fourth controls operative to set independently variable top and bottom print borders, respectively.

7. The invention according to claim 5 wherein said second adjustment means includes third and fourth controls operative to set independently variable left and right print borders, respectively.

8. The invention according toclaim 5 wherein said first adjustment means is operative to set equal top and bottom print borders. a

9. The invention according to claim 5 wherein said second adjustment means is operative to set equal left and right print borders.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3980407 *Jan 17, 1975Sep 14, 1976Electromask, Inc.Shutter plate movement
US4135810 *Aug 29, 1977Jan 23, 1979Agfa-Gevaert AgMethod and system for automatically matching the format of the projected image of an original to the format of the copying material
US4234251 *Mar 29, 1979Nov 18, 1980Dainippon Screen Seizo Kabushiki KaishaAutomatic picture masking device
US4324488 *May 19, 1980Apr 13, 1982Pako CorporationFloating edge-follower bordered paper mask
US4325630 *Mar 7, 1980Apr 20, 1982Dainippon Screen Seizo Kabushiki KaishaAutomatic masking device including an aperture extension means
US4400084 *Dec 7, 1981Aug 23, 1983Durst (U.K.) LimitedPhotographic exposure masks
US4547065 *Sep 27, 1983Oct 15, 1985Kis FranceDevice for simultaneously printing and developing photographs
US4568180 *May 2, 1984Feb 4, 1986Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.Print mask device
US4754308 *Aug 3, 1987Jun 28, 1988Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.Photograph printing apparatus
US4806983 *Nov 20, 1987Feb 21, 1989Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.Masking device for use in photographic printing
US4857962 *May 10, 1988Aug 15, 1989Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd.Masking device for use in photographic printing
US5442419 *Jun 2, 1994Aug 15, 1995Noritsu Koki Co., Ltd.Paper mask device
US6002468 *Feb 12, 1998Dec 14, 1999Hicks; RayPhotographic printer
DE3416237A1 *May 2, 1984Nov 8, 1984Fuji Photo Film Co LtdVergroesserungskassette
EP0106773A1 *Sep 29, 1983Apr 25, 1984Kis Photo IndustrieDevice for developing and printing photographs simultaneously
Classifications
U.S. Classification355/74
International ClassificationG03B27/58
Cooperative ClassificationG03B27/587
European ClassificationG03B27/58W