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Publication numberUS3738661 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 12, 1973
Filing dateNov 22, 1971
Priority dateNov 22, 1971
Publication numberUS 3738661 A, US 3738661A, US-A-3738661, US3738661 A, US3738661A
InventorsB Moller
Original AssigneeB Moller
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf exercising device
US 3738661 A
Abstract
A golf exercising device is disclosed comprising an arm mounted for rotation and braked during at least the downswing part of the golfer's swing. A golf club handle is mounted on the lower end of the arm. The arm comprises an upper rigid section and a lower section which is flexible in torsion, flexible for movement toward and away from the golfer and rigid in the path of rotation of the arm to transmit force applied by the golfer to the brake. The flexible part of the arm provides a simple and convenient means of accommodating variations in the swing of the golfer. The arm is braked either by an adjustable friction arrangement of parts or by a hydraulic system wherein the flow of fluid through apertures is controlled to provide braking resistance only during the downswing.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Unite States Patent 1 [1 1 1 1 3,738,66i Moller 1 June 12, 1973 GOLF EXERCISING DEVICE [76] Inventor: Bynum W. Moller, P. O. Box 688, Pr'mary Exammer George Marlo County 78028 Att0rney-G. Turner Moller [22] Filed: Nov. 22, 1971 [57] ABSTRACT [21] Appl. No.: 201,222

A golf exercising device is disclosed comprising an arm Related Apphcatlon Data mounted for rotation and braked during at least the [63] Continuation of Ser. No. 53,535; July 9, 1970, downswing part of the golfers swing. A golf club hanabandoneddle is mounted on the lower end of the arm. The arm comprises an upper rigid section and a lower section Cl 9 273/139, 272/79 R, which is flexible in torsion, flexible for movement to- 7 4 ward and away from the golfer and rigid in the path of [51] Int. Cl A63!) 69/36 rotation f th rm to transmit force applied by the Field of Search 1316- golfer to the brake. The flexible part of the arm pro- 272/DlG. 4; 7 192, 190, 188, vides a simple and convenient means of accommodat- 189, 26; 35/29 ing variations in the swing of the golfer. The arm is braked either by an adjustable friction arrangement of References Cited parts or by a hydraulic system wherein the flow of fluid UNITED STATES PATENTS through apertures is controlled to provide braking re- 2,472,065 6/1949 Cottingham 273/191 R Sislance y during the downswing- 3,4l5,523 l2/l968 B0ldt..... 273/190 R X 22 Cl 9 D F. 3,444,729 5/1969 Shobert 273/191 R PATENTED Jill I 2 I973 mum's N wmSQI MERE INVENTOR BYNUMi W MOLL ER ATTORNEY PATENIEO Jim 1 3 sumzor l/ All/II IIY/ m mm30 INVENTOR BYNUM w. MOLLER ATTORNEY PAIENIEU J11!" 2 MU8G3 m MEDQm m MmD m 0Q m wmzmzm v INVENTOR BYNUM W. MOLLER ATTORNEY.

GOLF EXERCISING DEVICE This is a continuation of application Ser. No. 53,535, filed July 9, 1970.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Golf exercising devices of various types are known in the prior art. The simplest type device merely provides a connection between a stationary pivot and the golf club to constrain movement thereof in a generally circular arc, the axis of which is determined by the pivot. These devices do not include brakes to restrain movement of the golf club and consequently are typically equipped with a flexible articulated connection between the golf club and the pivot axis. Exemplary devices of this type are shown in U.S. Pat. Nos. 2,448,904 and 3,400,933. These devices are more properly called practicing devices rather than exercising devices. It will be appreciated that a brake cannot be connected to operate on a rotating member since the drive connection between the golf club and the rotating member is too flexible and consequently results in a lurching or jerky swing.

A second type of golf exercising device is exemplified by the disclosure in US. Pat. No. 2,329,408 and comprises an elaborate mechanism to constrain the golf club for movement in a precise path. In devices of this character, the connection between the golf club and the controlling mechanism must be more or less rigid to allow the controlling mechanism to perform its intended function. In this particular disclosure, there is provided a universal connection between the golf club and the arm while the radial extent of the arm is controlled by the mechanism. Since devices of this type do not have brakes, they are more nearly teaching or practicing devices than exercising devices.

The simplest braked exercising device is exemplified in U.S. Pat. No. 3,462,156 where a club handle is attached to a cord wound on a spring loaded reel. As the golfer swings through the downswing, the spring in the reel is being loaded thereby providing a resistance to golf club movement. A more complex braked golf exercising device is shown in US. Pat. No. 2,472,065 which has the swing characteristics of this invention. This disclosure provides a parallelogram linkage arrangement to accommodate movement of the golf club toward and away from the support during the swing. A universal joint is further provided to accommodate twisting of the golf club with respect to the rotating arm.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is an object of this invention to provide a braked type of golf exercising device which is characterized by substantial simplicity while retaining all of the operational characteristics of more complicated exercising devices.

Another object of this invention is to provide a braked golf exercising device wherein the rotating arm is flexible in torsion, flexible toward and away from the golfer and rigid in the path of rotation of the arm.

In summary, the golf exercising device of this invention comprises a member mounted for rotation about an axis pointed toward the golfer, brake means operating on the rotatable member for restraining rotation thereof at least .during the downswing part of the golfer's swing, an arm carried by the rotatable member defining a path of movement intersecting the arcuate swing path, the arm comprising a first section relatively rigid in the path of movement and perpendicular thereto and a second section relatively flexible in torsion, relatively rigid in the path of movement and relatively flexible perpendicular thereto, and a club handle carried by the arm for grasping by the golfer.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS 1 FIG. 1 is a perspective view of this invention as used by a golfer and showing the ball addressing position;

FIG. 2 is a viewsimilar to FIG. 1 showing the golfer near the top of the backswing;

FIG. 3 is a view similar to FIGS. 1 and 2 showing the golfer at the top of the follow through;

FIG. 4 is a cross sectional view of the upper part of the golf exercising device of this invention showing the DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Attention is directed to FIGS. 1-3 wherein a golf exercising device 10 of this invention is shown in the ball addressing, backswing and follow through positions, respectively. The exercising device 10 comprises as major components a bracket 12 for attachment to a suitable support .14, a member 16 mounted for rotation about an axis 18 pointing toward the golfer, and a brake 20 cooperating between the bracket 12 and the rotatable member 16 for restraining rotation thereof at least during the downswing part of the goifers swing. The exercising device 10 also comprises as major components an arm 22 connected to the rotatable member 16 and defining a path of movement and a golf club handle 24 moved through an arcuate swing path by the golfer.

As shown best in FIG. 4, the bracket 12 comprises a generally U-shaped member 26 having a pair of aligned apertures 28, 30 therethrough. The bracket 12 is secured to the support 14 by suitable fasteners 32, such as nails or screws. It will be apparent that any suitable type support and connection may be provided.

The rotatable member 16 is illustrated as a generally V-shaped member 34 having an aperture 36 through one leg thereof. A stationary bolt 38 extends along the axis 18 through the aligned apertures 36, 28, 30 and is secured in place by a nut 40 having .a handle 42 thereon, the function of which will be more fully explained hereinafter. Extending radially from the bolt 38 is a peg 44 which passes through an opening 46 in the bight of the U-shaped member 26 to prevent rotation of the bolt 38. The other leg of the V-shaped member 34 is provided with suitable apertures 48 which may be threaded to facilitate securement of the arm 22 to the rotatable member 16. The bracket 12 thus mounts the member 16 for rotation about the axis 18.

The bracket 12 may advantageously be adjustable up and down on the support 14 to raise and lower the axis of rotation 18. In addition, the bracket 12 may be adjustable to direct the axis 18 toward the left shoulder of the golfer to promote an inside-out swing. Further more, the bracket 12 may be adjustable upwardly or downwardly to give a more upright or a more flat Swing.

The brake 20 comprises an annular pad of friction material, of the type used to face brake drums and the like, disposed between the bracket 12 and the rotatable member 16. It will be apparent that rotation of the handle 42 to tighten the nut and cause compression of the brake pad will thereby restrain the member 16 against rotation to any desired extent.

The construction of the arm 22 comprises a most important feature of this invention and one embodiment thereof is shown best in FIGS. 4 and 5. The arm 22 comprises a first section 50 for connection to the rotatable member 16 and a second section 52 for attachment to the club handle 24. The arm 22 has a number of characteristics which aid in the construction of a golf exercising device of considerable simplicity. It is well known to those skilled in the art that the arc of a golfers swing is not a true circle but instead varies radially from the axis of the swing and also varies in an axial direction. One of the important characteristics of the arm 22 is its flexibility to accommodate variations in the arc of the golfers swing and yet provide a drive connection between the golf club handle 24 and the rotatable member 16.

This characteristic is achieved by making at least a part of the arm 22 relatively flexible in torsion so that the handle 24 may be twisted and relatively flexible in a direction perpendicular to the path of movement of the arm 22. This latter flexibility allows the golfers hands to move into and out of a plane perpendicular to the axis 18. Since the arm 22 must transmit force from the golfers hands to the brake 20, the arm is relatively rigid in the path of movement of the arm 22.

These detailed characteristics are accomplished in one embodiment of the invention by designing the first arm section 50 to be relatively rigid both in the path of movement of the arm 22 and perpendicular thereto and by designing the second arm section 52 to be relatively flexible in torsion, relatively rigid in the path of movement of the arm 22 and relatively flexible perpendicular thereto. In the embodiment of FIGS. 4 and 5, the first arm section 50 is illustrated as comprising a channel shaped section having flanges 54 and a web 56. The flanges 54 provide substantial rigidity in torsion and substantial rigidity perpendicular to the path of movement of the arm 22. The web 56 with flanges 54 provide substantial rigidity in the path of movement of the arm 22. The second arm section 52 is illustrated as comprising an extension of the web 56 so that the section 52 is relatively flexible in torsion and relatively flexible perpendicular to the path of movement of the arm 22 while having substantial rigidity in the path of movement of the arm 22. In the alternative, the moment of inertia of the section 50 is increased by eliminating the flanges 54 and making the web 56 substantially thicker than the corresponding web of the section 52.

The arm 22 is connected to the rotatable member 16 by the provision ofa plurality of apertures 58 extending through the web 56 so that suitable fasteners may be secured to the threaded openings 48. A plurality of apertures 58 may be provided to allow adjustment of the arm 22 with respect to the rotatable member 16 to accommodate golfers of different height and arm length. The club handle 24 is connected to the arm 22 by the provision of an aperture 60 adjacent the lower end of a second arm section 52. As shown best in FIG. 6, a bushing 62 is positioned in the opening 60 and receives a stub shaft 64 of the handle 24. Retainers 66 are secured to the stub shaft 64 to retain the club handle 24 and the arm 22 in assembled relation. It will be apparent that the bushing 62 and stub shaft 64 allow rotation of the club handle 24 about the axis thereof.

The operation of the embodiment of FIGS. l-6 is be-' lieved apparent. As the golfer begins the backswing, the arm 22 is rotated in the path of movement thereof against the resistance afforded by the brake 20. As the golfer approaches the top of the backswing, the second arm section 52 may twist to accommodate the normal swing of the golfer and may also bow out of the path of movement of the arm 22 to accommodate a normal shortening of the distance between the golfers hands and the support 14. During the downswing, the arm 22 is moved against the resistance provided by the brake 20. The distance between the golfers hands and the support 14 normally increases which variation is accommodated by the flexibility of the second arm section 52. Relative rotation between the club handle 24 and the arm 22 is accommodated by the pivotal arrangement shown in FIG. 6. As the golfer moves the arm 22 into the follow through part of the swing, the flexible second section 52 again accommodates normal variations of the swing path from a purely circular arc. The second arm section 52, despite its flexibility in other directions, affords a continuously acting drive lever from the club handle 24 to the brake 20.

Although the mechanical brake 20 is a convenient and simple means of providing a resistance to the golfer, it has the disadvantage, without further modification, of providing resistance throughout the swing path. To provide a more realistic exercising device, it is desirable to provide resistance only during the downswing part of the stroke.

There are shown in FIGS. 7-9 two embodiments of this invention which meet this criterion. Referring first to FIGS. 7 and 8, there is shown a hydraulic system of retardation 70 for a golf exercising device having as major components a bracket 72 secured to a support 74, a member 76 mounted for rotation about an inclined axis 78 pointed toward the golfer and brake means 80 operating on the rotatable member 76 to restrain rotation thereof only during the downswing part of the golf stroke. An arm 22 of the type shown in the embodiment of FIGS. l-5 may be attached to the rotatable member 76 as will be explained more fully hereinafter.

The bracket 72 is illustrated as comprising a back plate 82 and a first housing 84 secured to the support 74. The housing 84 may be provided with a filling plug 86 for adding hydraulic fluid or other suitable braking liquid to the reservoir 87 provided by the housing 84. The first housing 84 includes an opening 88 which serves as one bearing and which sealably receives the end of the rotatable member 76 as by the provision of a seal 90, such as an O-ring. The bracket 72 also comprises a second housing 92 which is cylindrically shaped and machine finished inside. The second housing 92 is secured to the first housing 84 and includes an opening 94 which serves as a second bearing for sealably receiving the forward end of the rotatable member 76, as by the provision of a seal 96 such as an O-ring. It will be seen that the bracket 72 forms a surplus hydraulic fluid reservoir 87 and mounts the rotatable member or shaft 76 for rotation about the axis 78. As will become apparent, components of the brake 80 retain the shaft 76 from movement out of the housing 92.

The front end of the shaft76 is secured to the arm 22 as by the provision of an adapter 98 having an opening 100 therein receiving the shaft 76. A fastener 102 se cures the shaft 76 in the opening 100. The lower end of the adapter 98 is provided with threaded openings 104 to receive suitable fasteners for securing the arm 22 thereto.

An important feature of the embodiment of FIGS. 7 and 8 resides in the characteristics of the brake means 80. As mentioned previously, it is desirable to provide a golf exercising device in which resistance to rotation occurs only during the downswing part of the golf stroke. To this end, the brake 80 is comprised ofa vane 106 affixed to the shaft 76 in any suitable manner, as by bolting or gluing, operating in a liquid filled cham ber 108 provided by the second housing 92. Also provided in the chamber 108 is a stationary vane 110 secured to the wall of the second housing 92. To allow a relatively easy backswing, the rotatable vane 106 is provided with a passage 112 having a check valve 114 therein to bypass liquid from between the approaching vanes 106, 110 through the vane 106 as the shaft 76 is rotated through the backswing as indicated by the arrow BS. It will be apparent that the check valve may be located in the stationary vane 110 for similar results. The port 116 supplies reserve fluid from reservoir 87 to operating cylinder 108 as it is required due to possible evaporation or leakage.

As the downswing begins, the check valve 114 closes and the vane 106 moves liquid in the chamber 108 through a passage 118 in the vane 110. Since the passage 118 is rather small, there exists a substantial resistance to rotation of the member 76. An adjustment screw 120 preferably extends through the second housing 92 to provide means for adjusting the effective size of the passage 118. It will accordingly be seen that adjustment of the screw 120 alters the resistive or braking force applied to the rotatable member 76.

As the vane 106 approaches the end of the downswing movement, indicated by the arrow DS in FIG. 8, a passage 122 in the rotatable member 76 passes under the stationary vane 110 thereby providing a bypass of liquid from between the approaching vanes 106, 110 around the passage 118. The size of the passage 122 may be selected to eliminate all substantial braking force or substantially reduce the same, during the follow through movement, indicated by the arrow FT in FIG. 8. As the golfer approaches the top of the follow through, the leading portion of the bypass 122 passes under the stationary vane 110 and the movable vane 106 may contact the stationary vane 110 to stop the golfers swing.

It will accordingly be seen that the hydraulic brake provided by the golf exercising device 70 gives a more realistic feel to the golfer using the device. For purposes of convenience, the faces 124 of the vane 106, 110 may be referred to as the backswing faces of the vanes since they approach each other during backswing movement. Similarly, the faces 126 of the vanes 106,

6 may be referred to as the downswing faces of the vanes.

Referring now to FIG. 9, there is shown another golf exercising device 130 made in accordance with the principles of this invention. The golf exercising device 130 comprises as major components a bracket 132 secured to a support 134, a rotatable member 136 mounted in the bracket 132 for rotation about an inclined axis 138, brake means 140 operative on the rotatable member 136 and an arm 22 of the type shown in FIGS. 1-5.

The bracket 132 comprises a housing 142 defining a chamber 144 therein receiving a suitable liquid for operation with the brake 140. A filling plug 146 is provided for filling the chamber 144. The housing 142 is illustrated as a simple cylinder closed at one end by a plate 148 disposed at an angle to the cylindrical axis. The rotatable member 136 comprises a central shaft 150 having spaced circular flanges 152, 154 thereon. Suitable seals 156, such as O-rings, sealably engage the inside of chamber 144 and prevent liquid loss therefrom. The forward end of the shaft 150 is provided with an adapter 159 for connection to the arm 22 in any suitable manner.

The brake 140 is for all practical purposes identical to the brake shown in the embodiment of FIGS. 7 and 9. The brake 140 comprises a vane 160 secured to the central shaft section 150 in any suitable manner and having a passage 162 therethrough. A suitable check valve (not shown) is disposed in the passage 162 to allow fluid flow through the vane 160 during backswing movement of the arm 22 and preventing fluid flow therethrough during downswing movement.

A stationary vane 164 is secured to the housing 142 in any suitable manner and provides a passage 166 therethrough. An adjustment screw 168 is provided to alter the effective size of the passage 166. A port 170 is provided in the flange 152 to allow liquid movement between a chamber 172 defined by the flanges 152, 154 and the reservoir chamber 144. The port 170 may be located immediately behind vane 160 as viewed on golfers down stroke. A bypass opening 174 is provided in the central shaft 154.

Although the device 130 operates in much the same manner as the device 70, construction and assembly thereof is considerably simplified by the provision of the flanges 152, 154 which rotate with the shaft 150 in lieu of stationary parts connected to the casing as in the embodiment of FIG. 7.

There is accordingly provided an improved golf exercising device having all of the advantages of this invention as defined by the appended claims.

I claim: 1. A golf exercising device for constraining movement of a handle moved by an exercising golfer in an arcuate swing path comprising a bracket for attachment to a support; a member mounted on the bracket for rotation about an axis pointed generally toward the golfer;

means operating on the rotatable member for restraining rotation thereof at least during the downswing part of the golfers swing;

an arm carried by the rotatable member defining a path of movement intersecting the arcuate swing path, at least part of the arm being relatively flexible in torsion, relatively rigid in the path of movement and relatively flexible perpendicular thereto; and

a handle carried by the arm for grasping by the golfer.

2. The exercising device of claim 1 wherein the arm comprises a first section relatively rigid both in the path of movement and perpendicular thereto and a second section, the second section being the part relatively flexible in torsion, relatively rigid in the path of movement and relatively flexible perpendicular thereto.

3. The exercising device of claim 2 wherein the first arm section is adjacent the rotatable member and the club handle is fixed to the second arm section.

4. The exercising device of claim 2 wherein the second arm section comprises a piece of material of greater dimension in the path of movement and of lesser dimension perpendicular thereto.

5. The exercising device of claim 4 wherein the first arm section comprises a channel shaped member.

6. The exercising device of claim 2 wherein the first arm section has a larger moment of inertia than the second arm section.

7. The exercising device of claim 1 wherein the restraining means comprises brake means including a member made of friction material; and

means biasing the friction material member and the rotatable member into juxtaposition.

8. The exercising device of claim 1 wherein the handle comprises an elongate member having a longitudinal axis and means mounting the elongate member on the arm for rotation about the longitudinal axis.

9. The exercising device of claim 1 wherein the rotat able member comprises a shaft and the restraining means comprises a rotary hydraulic brake including a housing defining with a shaft a working chamber for receiving a liquid;

a stationary vane in the working chamber and a movable vane therein carried by the shaft for rotation through the backswing, downswing and followthrough to present approaching vane faces to apply a compressive force to the liquid in both directions of rotation, one of the vanes having a restricted passage therethrough for passing liquid in both directions of rotation of the shaft and tending to restrain rotation thereof in both directions;

first bypass means for passing liquid from between the approaching vane faces during the backswing for decreasing the restraining force operative on the shaft and preventing liquid bypass during the downswing and follow-through; and

means for decreasing the restraining force applied to the shaft adjacent the bottom of the downswing comprising second bypass means operative adjacent the bottom of the downswing for bypassing liquid from between the approaching vane faces during the follow-through.

10. The exercising device of claim 9 further comprising a reservoir and means for transferring liquid from the reservoir to the working chamber between the ap- 6 proaching vane faces.

11. The exercising device of claim 9 wherein the housing comprises spaced stationary walls, on both sides of the vanes, having aligned apertures therein receiving the rotatable member and further comprising seal means between the housing walls and the rotatable member for sealing the working chamber.

12. The exercising device of claim 11 further comprising a housing having a reservoir therein defined in part by a first of the stationary walls, the first stationary wall having a port adjacent the backswing side of the stationary vane for transferring liquid between the reservoir and working chamber.

13. The exercising device of claim 9 wherein the rotatable member comprises a central elongate member having spaced flanges thereon on both sides of the vanes and further comprising seal means between the housing and the flanges for sealing the working chamber.

14. The exercising device of claim 9 wherein the second bypass means comprises a passage in the rotatable member, the passage having one end adjacent the downswing face of the movable vane and another end adjacent but spaced from the backswing face of the stationary vane when the stationary vane is at the bottom of the downswing.

15. The exercising device of claim 9 wherein the first bypass means comprises a passage through one of the vanes and a check valve in the passage.

16. A golf exercising device for resisting movement of a club handle grasped by an exercising golfer and swingable through a backswing, downswing and follow through parts of a golf swing, the device comprising a bracket for attachment to a support;

a member mounted by the bracket for rotation about an axis pointed toward the golfer;

brake means operative between the bracket and the rotatable member for restraining rotation thereof substantially only during the downswing part of the swing, the brake means comprising a housing defining with the rotatable member a working chamber for receiving a liquid;

a stationary vane in the working chamber and a movable vane therein carried by the rotatable member for rotation through the backswing, downswing and follow through to present approaching vane faces to apply a compressive force to the liquid in both directions of rotation, one of the vanes having a restricted passage therethrough for passing liquid in both directions of rotation of the rotatable member and tending to restrain rotation thereof in both directions;

first bypass means for passing liquid from between the approaching vane faces during the backswing for decreasing the restraining force operative on the rotatable member and preventing liquid bypass from between the approaching vane faces during the downswing and follow through; and

means for decreasing the restraining force applied to the rotatable member adjacent the bottom of the downswing comprising second bypass means operative adjacent the bottom of the downswing for bypassing liquid from between the approaching vane faces during the follow through;

an arm carried by the rotatable member defining a path of movement intersecting the swing path; and

a handle carried by the arm for grasping by the golfer.

17. The exercising device of claim 16 wherein the housing comprises spaced stationary walls, on both sides of the vanes, having alighed apertures therein receiving the rotatable member and further comprising seal means between the housing walls and the rotatable member for sealing the working chamber.

18. The exercising device of claim 17 further comprising a housing having a reservoir therein defined in part by a first of the stationary walls, the first stationary wall having a port adjacent the backswing side of the stationary vane for transferring liquid between the reservoir and working chamber.

19. The exercising device of claim 16 wherein the rtatable member comprises a central elongate member having spaced flanges thereon on both sides of the vanes and further comprising seal means between the housing and the flanges for sealing the working chamber.

20. The exercising device of claim 16 wherein the second bypass means comprises a passage in the rotatable member, the passage having one end adjacent the downswing face of the movable vane and another end adjacent but spaced from the backzswing face of the stationary vane when the stationary vane is at the bottom of the downswing.

21. The exercising device of claim 16 wherein the first bypass means comprises a passage through one of the vanes and a check valve in the passage.

22. The exercising device of claim 16 further comprising a housing having a reservoir therein communicating with the working chamber through a port located between the approaching vanes during the backswing.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2472065 *Oct 31, 1946Jun 7, 1949Frank Cottingham RufusGolf exercising apparatus
US3415523 *Aug 17, 1966Dec 10, 1968Alvin M. BoldtGolfer's training device
US3444729 *Oct 21, 1966May 20, 1969Samuel M ShobertGolf club swinging apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3926430 *Nov 15, 1973Dec 16, 1975Good Jr Lewis BGolf exerciser device
US4577862 *Jan 30, 1984Mar 25, 1986Sagedahl Steven MIsokinetic exercise apparatus and method
US4592545 *Sep 11, 1984Jun 3, 1986Sagedahl Steven MIsokinetic exercise apparatus and method
US5005836 *Jul 19, 1989Apr 9, 1991Steven NelsonGolf driving and putting exerciser and training aid
US5156402 *May 13, 1991Oct 20, 1992Hart James ESwing training machine
US5178598 *Jun 8, 1992Jan 12, 1993Finch Douglas WExerciser for softball pitchers
US5190511 *Sep 3, 1991Mar 2, 1993Petree Larry GExercise equipment employing fluid resistance suitable for use in spacecraft and other low gravity environments
US5312107 *May 13, 1993May 17, 1994Kordun, Ltd.Golf club swing training and exercise device
US6558302Feb 14, 2001May 6, 2003David H. CluffMuscle training and development device
US6855065 *Jan 17, 2004Feb 15, 2005David Joseph HamiltonCircular arc golf swing guide and method
US6932744 *Jun 12, 2004Aug 23, 2005Richard W. FordPole vault training device
US7121987 *Sep 24, 2003Oct 17, 2006Sharps Chester HGolf exercise device
US7329211 *Sep 21, 2005Feb 12, 2008Kellion CorporationBackswing release handle
USRE37132Dec 17, 1996Apr 10, 2001D. Scott DouglasEnergy absorbing exercising and training machine
WO1988001526A1 *Sep 2, 1987Mar 10, 1988Cooke W A & Sons EngTraining apparatus
WO1993004739A1 *Aug 11, 1992Mar 18, 1993Larry Gene PetreeExercise equipment employing fluid resistance
WO1993025287A2 *Jun 2, 1993Dec 23, 1993Finch Douglas WExerciser for softball pitchers
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/229, 482/112, 482/118
International ClassificationA63B69/36, A63B21/015
Cooperative ClassificationA63B21/1492, A63B69/365, A63B21/015, A63B21/00069
European ClassificationA63B69/36D4M2, A63B21/015