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Publication numberUS3738760 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 12, 1973
Filing dateOct 13, 1971
Priority dateOct 13, 1971
Publication numberUS 3738760 A, US 3738760A, US-A-3738760, US3738760 A, US3738760A
InventorsJ Madeira
Original AssigneePlastic Kote Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Paint touch-up container
US 3738760 A
Abstract
A container adapted to dispense materials from first and second storage chambers. The first storage chamber is defined by a hollow cylindrical body having a sidewall and a bottom wall. A cap is provided for the body and includes an applicator brush. A hollow agitator is disposed within the first chamber about the brush. Ribs or fins project from either the agitator or the cylindrical body sidewall to guide the agitator in its reciprocating up and down movement. The cap further includes a second storage chamber defined by an upper sidewall extending from the cap. A closure member is provided for the cap. In the preferred embodiment the first storage chamber of the container is adapted to receive touch-up paint. The second storage chamber is adapted to receive rubbing compound.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent m1 [111 3,738,760 June 12, 1973 Madeira PAINT TOUCH-UP CONTAINER [75] Inventor: John W. Madeira, Akron, Ohio [73] Assignee: Plastic-Kote Company, Medina,

Ohio

[22] Filed: Oct. 13, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 188,824

[52] US. Cl. 401/4, 401/195 [51] Int. Cl A46b 11/00 [58] Field of Search 401/4, 118-130,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,983,946 5/1961 Edelstone et al. 401/4 3,209,387 10/1965 Lukesch 401/4 3,549,266 12/1970 Vasas 401/122 2,806,239 9/1957 Wittnebert 401/4 Primary ExaminerLawrence Charles Attorney-Fay, Sharpe & Mulholland [5 7] ABSTRACT A container adapted to dispense materials from first and second storage chambers. The first storage chamber is defined by a hollow cylindrical body having a sidewall and a bottom wall. A cap is provided for the body and includes an applicator brush. A hollow agitator is disposed within the first chamber about the brush. Ribs or fins project from either the agitator or the cylindrical body sidewall to guide the agitator in its reciprocating up and down movement. The cap further includes a second storage chamber defined by an upper sidewall extending from the cap. A closure member is provided for the cap. In the preferred embodiment the first storage chamber of the container is adapted to receive touch-up paint. The second storage chamber is adapted to receive rubbing compound.

10 Claims, 10 Drawing Figures SHEEIEUFE PNEWEDJUN 1 2873 l PAINT TOUCH-UP CONTAINER BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This application is directed to a container adapted to dispense a touch-up finish for motor vehicles and the like. More particularly this invention is directed to a dual chambered container adapted to store and dis pense both a touch-up paint and a finishing compound.

It is well known to provide touch-up paints for use in covering scratches and other blemishes in road vehicles, household appliances, furniture and other such products having a quality finish. These touch-up products have usually taken the form of a relatively small bottle having a cap from which is suspended an applicator brush. Other prior art containers have taken the form of aerosol cans from whicch touch-up paint is dispensed.

With greater emphasis placed on quality in automotive, appliance, etc., finishes it is often times desirable to use a rubbing compound after a touch-up paint has been applied for the purpose of removing slight blemishes in the paint surface. Rubbing compounds are commerically available although they are relatively in? convenient to use when packaged in rather'large containers. The touch-up .paint job is usually relatively small. Consequently a user will not normally take the time or trouble to pruchase a separate container of rubbing compound inorder to improve the quality of the touch-up finish.

This application is directed to a dual chambered touch-up container wherein provision is made within the container itself for the storage and dispensing of both paint and rubbing compound.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION tending upwardly to define a second chamber. A closure member is provided for the second storage chamber. A'hollow agitator is disposed within the first storage chamber and is disposed coaxial with the applicator brush. The aforementionedribs extending from the wall of the cylindrical container guide the agitator along a concentric path within the cylindrical container. In some cases the guiding ribs are integral with the agitator as opposed to being integral with the body sidewalLA wiping disc is inserted in the upper portion of the body for the purpose of removing excess paint from the applicator brush.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS A description of the preferred embodiment of this invention will now be made with reference to the accompanying drawing in which:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of the touch-up container of this invention;

FIG. 2 is an elevational cross-sectional view of the touch-up container of this invention taken along line 2--2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a bottom view of the touch-up container of this invention;

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line 44 of FIG.2;

FIG. 5 is an exploded view, partly in section, of the several elements of the touch-up container of this invention;

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view of an agitator element of one embodiment of this invention;

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view of a modification of the container andagitator element of this invention;

FIG. 8 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 8-8 of FIG. 7.

FIG. 9 is a cross-sectional view of an agitator of modified shape.

FIG. 10 is a cross-sectional view of another agitator of modified shape.

PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring more particularly to FIG. 2 there is shown a container 10 including a generally cylindrical hollow body 12 having a sidewall 14 and an integral bottom wall 16. The sidewall 14 and bottom wall 16 together define a first storage chamber 20,

The upper portion of body 12 is provided with threads 22 adapted to receive complementary threads 24 of cap 26.

Cap 26 is defined by a transverse wall 28 extending generally perpendicular to the axis of body 12. A boss 30 is defined on the interior surface of transverse wall 28 and provides a supporting surface for applicator brush 34. As shown in FIG. 2, applicator brush 34 is defined by a generally cylindrical shank member 36 and bristles 38. Shank member 36 is press fitted or otherwise secured within boss 30.

An upper sidewall 40 extends upwardly from transverse wall 28 and together with such transverse wall defines a second storage chamber 44. A closure member 46 having a reduced lip portion 48 is adapted to be pressed into engagement with sidewall 40thus sealing the second storage chamber 44.

Attention will now be directed to the interior of body 12 wherein there is provided a hollow washer shaped agitator 50 having radially extending ribs 52 and an inner wall 54 surrounding applicator brush 34. The combination of the agitator, ribs and sidewall define a plurality of divided flow paths 49, 51, 53. The agitator 50 is thus disposed approximately coaxial'with the ap-- plicator brush 34 so that when the container is shaken the agitator will move up and down about the applicator brush 34. Ribs 52 serve the useful purpose of centering the agitator thus providing a guide for the agitator in its reciprocating path. Without the centering and guiding ribs 52 the agitator will bounce against the brush 34 which tends to bend the shank 36 and fray the bristles 38.

Obviously the guide ribs 52 could be on the inner surfaces of container wall 14 instead of on the agitator 50. In that case the outer surface of the agitator would be cylindrical as shown in FIGS. 9 and 10 which will be discussed subsequently. Obviously the agitator of FIG; 6 could be without fins and would work in the FIG. 7

environment and the agitators of FIGS. 9 and 10 could have fins and would work in the FIG. 2 environment.

In FIG. 6 an enlarged cross-sectional view of the agitator 50 is shown. It will be noted that the cornersof the fins 52 are rounded, both in the plane of FIG. 4 and the plane of FIG. 6. With this design, the preferred embodiment, the fins 52 not only hold the agitator in proper concentric alignment within the container 12 and serve as dividers to cut through the paint pigment but they also scrape the sidewalls 14 of the container. This scraping action and the segmented peripheral flow paths 49, 51, 53 contribute greatly in mixing the stratified pigment with the liquid solvent.

It should be noted that the shape of the fins 52 and the lower frusto-conical surface 56 minimize the surface contact between the container and the agitator. The concave surface of the bottom 16 of the container also helps to minimize surface contact. The need to minimize such contact is obviously the tacky adhering nature and bonding of paint pigment and other paint components.

Modifications of the agitator are shown in FIGS. 9 and 10. In FIG. 9 the agitator 57 is provided with a flat lower surface 58 whereas in FIG. 10 the agitator 59 is provided with V-shaped notches 60. Surfaces 56 and 58 and notches 60 in the modified embodiments of the agitator have been found to improve the mixing characteristics of the agitator under certain circumstances and with some paint mixtures. The agitator surface area is increased by surface 56 and notches 60 thus exposing the agitator to a greater quantity of paint and reducing the likelihood of either the agitator sticking in the bottom of the body 12 or pigments collecting at the bottom of body 12.

Obviously, sticking can also occur at the rib portions. Thus, the rounded rib contact surfaces contribute to minimizing sticking and hang up, whether this be the ribs 52 of FIG. 4 on the ribs 61 of FIG. 8.

The relationship of the agitators to the ribs tends not only to guide the agitator during movement of the container, but also creates mixing of the paint as the agitator acts much like a piston in moving up and down. As the agitator moves toward the bottom wall 16 paint will be extruded upwardly between the ribs through paths 49, 51, 53 thus producing mixing of the pigments in this area of the container.

Turning now to the upper portion of the body 12, there is also provided in the container of this invention a generally annular wiping element in the form of a disc 62 press fitted into the body 12 and abutting the upper In the embodiment of FIG. 2 rubbing compound 72 is in the form of a paste entirely disposed within the closure member 46. A rubbing pad 74 may be confined within the second storage chamber 44 and may be used for the purpose of applying rubbing compound 72 to the painted surface after application thereof.

It should be understood that variations in the packaging of the rubbing compound 72 within the container should be considered within the spirit of this invention. Thus, the rubbing pad 74 could be eliminated altogether and the rubbing compound 72 could be provided in the second storage chamber 44 in powder or semi-liquid form.

end wall of the respective ribs 60 or shoulder 63 of FIGS. 7 and 2, respectively. Wiping disc 62 is provided with an aperture 64 through which the applicator brush 34 is adapted to pass. An edge 65 is defined by the disc 62 such that as the applicator brush 34 is withdrawn from the first storage chamber 20, excess paint may be wiped from the bristles 38 as such bristles are wiped across the edge 65.

The wiping disc 62 not only provides a convenient mechanism for removing excess paint from the applicator brush but such disc also serves to retain paint within the first storage chamber 20 thus tending to seal the paint within its chamber. Disc 62 thus somewhat inhibits large amounts of paint from coming into contact with the area of the engaging threads 22, 24.

Turning now to the materials themselves stored within the container, the first storage chamber 20 is adapted to receive touch-up paint or any similar protective coating. The second storage chamber 44 is configured so as to cooperate with the closure member 46 to define a receptacle for rubbing compound 72.

In the preferred embodiment of the invention as shown in FIG. 2 the exterior of the container 10 generally assumes a missile-like configuration in order to produce an attractive package. To this end fins 76 are provided at the bottom end of the body 12 to simulate the fins ofa missile. Also the closure member 46 is configured so as to simulate the nose cone of a missile.

An exploded view of the several parts of the container of this invention is shown in FIG. 5. From an examination of FIG. 5 the mode of assembly of the container of this invention will become obvious. Thus the agitator 50 is initially disposed within the body 12. Thereafter the disc 62 is pressed into place. Cap 26 is then threaded to body 12. Closure 46 may be secured to the upper portion of the cap.

The invention claimed is:

1. A container adapted to dispense and store materials from first and second storage chambers, said container comprising:

a generally cylindrical hollow body having a sidewall and a bottom wall, said side and bottom walls defining a first storage chamber;

a cap for said body, said cap defined by; a transverse wall, an applicator brush extending from the interior surface of said transverse wall and means to secure said cap to said body with said brush extending into said first chamber;

said cap further including; an upper sidewall extending upwardly from said transverse wall, said upper sidewall and said transverse wall defining a second storage chamber, and a closure member for said cap,

means for agitating liquids dispposed within said first storage chamber, said agitating means being annular with an aperture through its center and with the surface of the aperture circumscribing the brush, said agitating means being axially short relative to the length of said storage chamber and being reciprocal within said storage chamber between the bottom and the cap, said reciprocation being substantially coaxial with the brush,

rib means extending radially of one of the agitating means and the sidewall of the cylindrical body to contact the other for centering the agitating means and preventing the contact between the brush and the agitating means.

2. The invention of claim 1 and further including a generally annular wiping element disposed within said body, said wiping element having a wiping edge surrounding said brush with said cap in place.

3. The invention of claim 2 in which said wiping element is a disc press fitted into said body into the upper end of the container.

mentis a disc press fitted into said body into engagement with the upper surface of said ribs.

7. The invetion of claim 1 wherein the combination of the agitator, ribs and sidewall serve to provide a plurality of divided flow paths through which liquid is extruded during the reciprocation of the agitating means.

8. The invention of claim 1 wherein the inner surface of the bottom wall of the cylindrical body is concave to minimize surface contact with the agitating means.

9. The invention of claim 2 wherein the inner surface of the bottom wall of the cylindrical body is concave to minimize surface contact with the agitating means.

10. The invention of claim 3 wherein the ribs are integral with the sidewall of the cylindrical body and the outer surface of the agitating means is smooth and cylindrical.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2806239 *Jul 8, 1953Sep 17, 1957Dupli Color Products Company IFountain brush with closure cap controlled valve
US2983946 *Feb 17, 1958May 16, 1961Dupli Color Products Company IPaint container assembly
US3209387 *Nov 29, 1963Oct 5, 1965Riz Parfumerie Fabrik G M B HContainer with agitator for nail polish and the like
US3549266 *Oct 2, 1967Dec 22, 1970Bridgeport Metal Goods Mfg CoCosmetic applicator
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4290706 *Jan 30, 1980Sep 22, 1981Kurt Vogelsang GmbhAgitator for cylindrical containes filled with paint or the like
US4685820 *Jun 5, 1985Aug 11, 1987Pittway CorporationApplicator device
US4848947 *Oct 5, 1987Jul 18, 1989Pittway CorporationLiquid applicator device with tilt valve
US5052837 *Aug 14, 1990Oct 1, 1991Yoshino Kogyosho Co., Ltd.Makeup liquid container with applicator
US5192153 *Jun 10, 1991Mar 9, 1993L'orealAgitator assembly for a pasty cosmetic product
US6536978 *Dec 13, 2001Mar 25, 2003Robert LoweryAutomotive paint restoration tool and method
US7037015Jul 27, 2005May 2, 2006Chartpak, Inc.Roller ball pen for pigmented inks
US7182538Apr 27, 2004Feb 27, 2007Cheryl A. GrossoPaint dispensing and storage kit
US7201802Jul 11, 2001Apr 10, 2007Mydata Automation AbApparatus for providing a substrate with viscous medium
US7338225Oct 9, 2006Mar 4, 2008Taylor Jerri LTouch up paint applicator
US7600548Aug 11, 2006Oct 13, 2009Mydata Automation AbMethod and apparatus for applying viscous medium onto a substrate
US7757391 *Jul 11, 2001Jul 20, 2010Mydata Automation AbMethod for applying viscous medium on a substrate
US7931933Aug 14, 2006Apr 26, 2011Mydata Automation AbMethod and apparatus for providing a substrate with viscous medium
US9295316Apr 5, 2012Mar 29, 2016CinqpatsAssembly of container/applicator for a mascara composition
US9314756Dec 8, 2014Apr 19, 2016Kw ContainerPlastic container with internal mixing ribs
US20020014602 *Jul 11, 2001Feb 7, 2002William HolmMethod and apparatus for providing a substrate with viscous medium
US20020015780 *Jul 11, 2001Feb 7, 2002William HolmMethod and apparatus for applying viscous medium onto a substrate
US20050238413 *Apr 27, 2004Oct 27, 2005Grosso Cheryl APaint dispensing and storage kit
US20060275538 *Aug 14, 2006Dec 7, 2006William HolmMethod and apparatus for providing a substrate with viscous medium
US20070137558 *Aug 11, 2006Jun 21, 2007William HolmMethod and apparatus for applying viscous medium onto a substrate
US20130121105 *May 13, 2011May 16, 2013Fillon TechnologiesClosing cover for a container provided with a seal
DE2903401C2 *Jan 30, 1979Mar 27, 1986Kurt Vogelsang Gmbh, 6954 Hassmersheim, DeTitle not available
DE2942994C2 *Oct 24, 1979Sep 10, 1987Kurt Vogelsang Gmbh, 6954 Hassmersheim, DeTitle not available
EP0013721A1 *Dec 5, 1979Aug 6, 1980Kurt Vogelsang GmbHMixing device for cylindrical containers filled with paint or lacquer
EP0745369A2 *May 30, 1996Dec 4, 1996Eli Lilly And CompanyContainers for liquid medicaments
EP0745369A3 *May 30, 1996Mar 26, 1997Lilly Co EliContainers for liquid medicaments
WO2012143646A1Apr 5, 2012Oct 26, 2012CinqpatsAssembly of container/applicator for a mascara composition
Classifications
U.S. Classification401/4, 401/195
International ClassificationA45D34/04, B01F13/00, A46B11/04
Cooperative ClassificationB01F13/002, B01F13/0055, A45D34/048, A45D40/265, A45D2200/1018
European ClassificationB01F13/00K2B, A45D40/26C2, B01F13/00L6, A45D34/04C2S
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 5, 1994ASAssignment
Owner name: FLEET NATIONAL BANK, RHODE ISLAND
Free format text: RELEASE BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:PLASTI-KOTE CO., INC.;REEL/FRAME:006934/0858
Effective date: 19940119
Apr 5, 1994AS17Release by secured party
Owner name: FLEET NATIONAL BANK 111 WESTMINSTER STREET PROVIDE
Owner name: PLASTI-KOTE CO., INC.
Effective date: 19940119
Nov 17, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: FLEET NATIONAL BANK, 111 WESTMINSTER STREET, PROVI
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:PLASTI-KOTE COMPANY, INC.,;REEL/FRAME:004993/0431
Effective date: 19881007
Nov 17, 1988AS06Security interest
Owner name: FLEET NATIONAL BANK, 111 WESTMINSTER STREET, PROVI
Owner name: PLASTI-KOTE COMPANY, INC.,
Effective date: 19881007