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Publication numberUS3738763 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 12, 1973
Filing dateJun 3, 1971
Priority dateJun 3, 1971
Publication numberUS 3738763 A, US 3738763A, US-A-3738763, US3738763 A, US3738763A
InventorsGlesmann H
Original AssigneeBid Well Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Concrete finishing machines
US 3738763 A
Abstract
A concrete finishing machine movable longitudinally of a roadway, or the like, with a concrete-surfacing unit movable back and forth transversely of the roadway, with movement of the machine and of the surfacing unit capable of being selectively either manually or automatically controlled.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 Glesmann 1111 3,738,763 June 12, 1973 4] CONCRETE FINISHING MACHINES 3,255,681 6/1966 Heltzel 94/44 1 Invenwn Herberwchasm", Omaha, Nebr- 31312112; 211323 RZESZJJII: 13131111113322 [73] Assignee: Bid-Well Corporation, Canton, S. 3,541,931 11/1970 Gcdberson 94/45 R [22] June 1971 Attorney-Johnston, Root, OKeefie, KeiLThompson [21] App]. No.: 149,523 & Shurtleff [52] U.S. Cl. 404/119 [57] ABSTRACT [51] Int. Cl. E0lc 19/22 [58] Field of Search 94/44, 45, 39, 46 A mmb'e a roadway, or the llke, wlth a concrete surfaclng umt movable back and forth transversely of the roadway,

[56] References Cited with movement of the machine and of the s'urfacing UNITED STAT-Es PATENTS unit capable of being selectively either manually or au- 2,603,l32 7/1952 Miller 94/45 R tomatically controlled,

2,334,717 11/1943 Long 94/45 R 2,957,396 10/1960 Bederman 94/45 R 24 Claims, 18 Drawing Figures 255 o 9 C 30 44 C 6/ 0 K2 1 f 1| s1 1/ "1. 11. 111., a 1... 01L 1111 a 6 l0 8 7 P 30 3b 4 7 PATENTED 3.738.763

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1 CONCRETE FINISHING MACHINES BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to concrete finishing machines, and, more particularly, to concrete finishing machines which are particularly well adapted for use on roadways and bridge decks, and the like.

It is a primary object of the present invention to afford a novel concrete finishing machine.

Concrete finishing machines of the general type to which this invention pertains have been heretofore known in the art, such as, for example, machines of the type shown in S. P. Bidwell US. Pat. No. 3,208,361, issued Sept. 28, 1965; Murray A. Rowe, et al. US Pat. No. 3,528,348, issued Sept. 15, 1970; J. A. Borges U.S. Pat. No. 3,270,634, issued Sept. 6, 1966; and H. W. Godbersen US. Pat. No. 3,450,011, issued June 17, 1969. It is an important object of the present invention to afford improvements over such machines heretofore known in the art.

Another object of the present invention is to afford a novel concrete finishing machine of the type embodying a surfacing unit movable back and forth across a roadway, or the like, to be paved, wherein the speed of travel and direction of travel of the surfacing unit transversely to the roadway may be controlled in a novel and expeditious manner.

An object ancillary to the foregoing is to enable the direction of travel and speed of travel of such a surfacing unit to be selectively controlled automatically, manually, or both, in a novel and expeditious manner.

Yet another object of the present invention is to afford a novel concrete finishing machine of the type embodying a surfacing unit movable back and forth across a roadway, or the like, and which machine may be moved longitudinally of a roadway in anovel and expeditious manner.

An object anicillary to the foregoing is to enable the movement, the direction of travel and the speed of travel of such a machine along a roadway, or the like, to be controlled in a novel and expeditious manner.

A further object of the present invention is to afford a novel concrete finishing machine of the type embodying a surfacing unit movable back and forth across a roadway, or the like, and wherein the skew of the surfacing unit relative to the direction of travel thereof may be automatically controlled in a novel and expeditious manner.

Other and further objects of the present invention will be apparent from the following description and claims and are illustrated in the accompanying drawings which, by way of illustration, show a preferred embodiment of the present invention and the principles thereof and what I now consider to be the best mode in which I have contemplated applying these principles. Other embodiments of the invention embodying the same or equivalent principles may be used and structural changes may be made'as desired by those skilled in the, art without departing from the present invention and the purview of the appended claims.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In the drawings:

FIG. I is a front perspective view of a concrete finishing machine embodying the principles of the present invention, with the machine disposed in operative position over a roadway;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary end elevational view of the machine shown in FIG. 1, looking in the directon of the arrows 2-2 in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged, fragmentary, elevational view of a portion of the frame of the machine shown in FIG.

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along the line 44 in FIG. 1, showing the surfacing unit of the machine shown in FIG. 1 in elevation;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary, top plan view of the surfacing unit shown in FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is an end elevational view of the surfacing unit shown in FIG. 4;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary, detail sectional view taken substantially along the line 7-7 in FIG. 5;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary, side elevational view of a portion of the machine shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 9 is a side elevational view of a controller mechanism embodied in the machine shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary end elevational view of the controller mechanism shown in FIG. 9, looking in the direction of the arrows 10-10 in FIG. 9;

FIGS. 11, 12 and 13 are each fragmentary, somewhat diagrammatic perspective views of various portions of the controller mechanism shown in FIG. 9;

FIG. 14 is a fragmentary detail sectional view taken substantially along the line 14- 14 in FIG. 9;

FIG. 15 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the control console shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 16 is a fragmentary, somewhat diagrammatic top plan view of the control view of the control console shown in FIG. 15;

FIG. 17 is a diagram of one of the hydraulic circuits embodied in the machine shown in FIG. 1; and

FIG. 18 is a diagram of another hydraulic circuit embodied in the machine shown in FIG. 1.

DESCRIPTION OF THE EMBODIMENT SHOWN HEREIN A concrete finishing machine 1, embodying the principles of the present invention, is shown in the drawings to illustrate the presently preferred embodiment of the present invention. The machine 1 is shown in FIG. 1 disposed in operative position over a section 2 of a concrete roadway.

The machine 1 embodies, in general, an elongated trusswork or frame 3 on which is mounted a surfacing unit 4, which is movable longitudinally of the frame 3, with a control console 5 mounted on the frame 3 from which an operator may control operation of the machine l. The frame 3 is adapted to extend transversely of the roadway 2 being finished, and the machine 1 is adapted to be moved lengthwise of the roadway in a direction transverse to the length of-the frame 3.

In the arrangement of the machine 1 shown in FIG. I, upright, horizontally extending supports 6 and 7 are positioned on opposite sides of the roadway 2 and extend lengthwise thereof, the upper edges of the supports 6 and 7' being adapted to operatively receive a pair of bogies 8 and 9 and a pair of bogies 10 and 11, respectively, mounted on opposite ends of the frame 3,

to enable the frame 3 to be moved along the supports 6 and 7.

The supporting unit 4 is mounted on and suspended from the frame 3, FIGS. 1 and 4-6. It includes an elongated carriage 12, having an upper housing 13a and a lower housing 13b. The lower housing 13b is rotatably suspended from the upper housing 13a for horizontal pivotal movement relative thereto. A substantially horizontally extending, elongated concrete-smoothing member in the form of an elongated cylinder 14 is journaled in and suspended from the lower portion of the lower housing 13b and is movable therewith, as will be discussed in greater detail presently.

Two elongated conveyor screws or augers 15 and 16 are disposed forwardly of the front end of the cylinder 14, at opposite sides thereof, in substantially horizontal uniplanar, spaced relation to each other, FIGS. 4 and 5. The helical blades 17 of the conveyor screws 15 and 16 are so constituted and arranged that rotation of the screws 15 and 16 during operation of the machine 1 is effective to rotate the blades 17 in such direction that material engaged thereby tends to move toward the space between the conveyor screws 15 and 16 as well as longitudially outwardly along the conveyor screws 15 and 16 away from the cylinder 14. With this construction, as is true of the machine shown in the Rowe, et al. US. Pat. No. 3,528,348, which issued Sept. 15, 1970, engagement of the conveyor screws 15 and 16 with concrete material during movement of the concrete-smoothing member 14 in either transverse direction, is effective not only to move the engaged material outwardly longitudinally of the screw 15 or 16, but is also effective to move the material inwardly to a position wherein the two screws 15 and 16 tend to confine it between them, and both screws are effective to move the material longitudinally outwardly ahead of the remainder of the surfacing unit 4.

The carriage 12 of the surfacing unit 4, FIGS. 4 and 6, has two outwardly projecting, horizontally spaced rollers 18 mounted on respective ends thereof in such position that in the assembled machine 1, the rollers 18 are disposed in position to be supported by, and ride along, the inner edges of elongated tracks 19 and 20 disposed on opposite sides of the frame 3, to thereby support the surfacing unit 4 for movement longitudinally of the trusswork 3. The tracks 19 and 20 are supported from the sides of the frame 3 by vertically adjustable hangers 19a and 20a, FIGS. 4 and 8, so that the level of the tracks 19 and 20 at various points along the frame 3 may be adjusted.

A pair of holddown rollers 21 are mounted on each of the ends of the carriage 12 below the respective pair of upper rollers 18, FIGS. 4 and 6. The rollers 21 are disposed in such position that when thecarriage 12 is supported on the side rails 12 and 20, the rollers 21 are disposed in abutting engagement with the lower faces of the adjacent side rails 19 and 20 in position to hold the rollers 18 downwardly against the side rails.

The lower housing 13b of the carriage 12 of the surfacing unit 4 is rotatably supported from the upper housing 13a by a pin or bolt 22 mounted in and extending through braces 23 and 24 extending transversely across the lower portion of the upper housing 13a and the upper portion of the lower housing 13b, respectively, along the transverse center lines thereof, FIGS. 4 and 5. An elongated brace 24 is secured to and projects forwardly from the brace 24 on the lower housing 13b, and has an ear 26 projecting therefrom, FIG. 5. An actuating cylinder 27 having a housing 28 and a piston 29 is mounted in the lower portion of the housing 13a. The piston 29 is pivotally secured to the ear 26 by a rod 30 which extends downwardly from the piston 29. The end of the cylinder 28, remote from the rod 30 is connected to a mounting block 32 attached to one side rail of the housing 13a. Hydraulic lines 33 and 34 are connected to respective ends of the housing 28. As will be discussed in greater detail hereinafter, the'lines 33 and 34 are connected to suitable control mechanism in a manner effective to selectively cause the piston 29 to move inwardly or outwardly relative to the housing 28 to thereby cause the lower housing 13b to correspondingly rotate in a clockwise or counterclockwise direction on the pin 22, as viewed in FIG. 5, relative to the upper housing 13a and thus cause the concrete finishing member 14 and the conveyor screws 15 and 16 to be correspondingly moved. With this arrangement, the concrete finishing member 14 and the screws 15 and 16 may be skewed into desired position. Normally, preferably the cylinder 14 and the screws 15 and 16 are so positioned relative to the main carriage 12 during movement of the surfacing unit 4 along the frame 3 that the front end of the cylinder 14 slopes rearwardly away from the direction of travel of the surfacing unit 4 so as to insure movement of loose concrete therealong toward the front of the machine 1, so that it is deposited forwardly of the cylinder 14 on a portion of the roadway which has not been finished.

Each of the bogies 8-11, FIGS. 1 and 2, includes a substantially rectangularly shaped frame 35 having two wheels 36 and 37 rotatably mounted in respective ends thereof in position to ride upon the upper edges of the vertical supports 6 and 7 on which the respective bogies are disposed. Vertical supporting members 38 project upwardly from each of the bogies 8-11 and are mounted on the frame 3 in position to support the latter above the bogies 8-11. The supporting members 38 may be of any suitable type well known in the art, but, preferably, are of the adjustable type shown in my copending application for US Pat., Ser. No. 77,423, filed Oct. 2, 1970.

The supporting members 38 on the bogies 8 and 9 at the left side of the machine 1, as viewed in FIG. 1, preferably are stationarily secured to the frame 3, adjacent the outer end thereof, by suitable means such as, for example, welding. The supporting members 38 on the bogies 10 and 11, at the other end of the machine 1, are movably mounted on the frame 3 for movement longitudinally thereof to thereby permit adjustment of the spacing of the bogies 10 and 11 from the bogies 8 and 9 to accommodate various widths of roadways, and the like.

A frame 39 projects inwardly from the upper end portion of the supporting member 38 on each of the bogies 10 and 11, FIG. 2, and two wheels 40 and 41 are rotatably mounted on the upper and lower end portions of the inner edges of each of the frames 39. The wheels 40 and 41 are disposed in position to roll along the upper and lower surfaces, respectively, of upper and lower track members 42 and 43 secured to the upper and lower edges of the side members 44 and 45, respectively, of the frame 3 of the machine 1. With this construction, the bogies l0 and 11 may be moved toward and away from the bogies 8 and 9 to accommodate various widths of roadway, and the like, and each of the bogies 10 and 11 is held against lateral displacement from the frame 3 by the engagement of the respective pairs of tracks 42 and 43 between the respective pairs of wheels 40 and 41.

The machine 1 also embodies adjustable connections between adjacent ends of adjacent longitudinal sections 3a of each side of the frame 3, whereby the slope and contour of the frame 3 above the roadway may be adjusted. Each adjustable connection between the adjacent sections 30 of the frame 3 embodies a hinge 3b below the lower portions thereof, FIG. 3, and bolts 3c extending through flanges 3d and 3e on the upper edges of adjacent ends of the frame sections 3a. Nuts 3f and 3g are mounted on each bolt 3c on opposite sides of each flange 3d and 32, FIG. 3, in position to move the upper edges of the adjacent ends of the frame sections 3a toward and away from each other and thereby pivot the frame sections 3a around the hinge 3b. With this construction, the position of the frame sections may be varied relative to the roadway 2 to therey adjust the crown of the roadway 2.

The bogies 9 and 11 are identical in construction, except that they are mirror images of each other. Each includes a hydraulicallly actuated motor 46 mounted in the frame 35, as shown in the bogie 11 illustrated in FIG. 2. Each includes a drive sprocket 47 mounted on the motor 46, and an endless chain 48 trained over the sprocket 47 and over sprockets 49 and 50 secured to the bogie wheels 36 and 37, respectively. An idler sprocket 51 is adjustably mounted in the frame 35 of each of the bogies 9 and 11 by a pin and slot mounting 52 in such position that adjustment of the position of the idler sprocket 51 is effective to adjust the tension of the chain 48. The motors 46 are of the reversible type so that operation thereof is effective to move the corresponding end of the machine 1 either forwardly or rearwardly along the roadway being paved.

The other two bogies 8 and 10 are also identical to each other in construction, except that they are mirror images of each other. They also are the same in construction as the bogies 9 and 11 except that they do not embody any of the drive mechanism 46-52 thereof, the bogies 8 and 10 merely being idler bogies wherein the wheels 36 and 37 thereof are freely rotatable at all times.

The machine 1 is of a type which embodies a drive mechanism for moving the machine 1 along a surface to be paved, such as the roadway 2, and for moving the surfacing unit 4 longitudinally of the frame 3 of the machine. A separate drive mechanism is afforded for rotating the cylinder 14, the augers 15 and 16, and actuating the skew cylinder 27. Control mechanisms are embodied in the machine 1 whereby the driving of various components thereof may be selectively controlled either manually or automatically, as will be discussed in greater detail presently.

The driving mechanism of the machine 1, for moving it longitudinally of the roadway 2 and moving the surfacing unit 4 transversely to the roadway 2, includes a suitable power source such as a gasoline engine 53, FIGS. 16 and 18, mounted in the control console 5, FIGS. 1 and 16. The engine 53 is operatively connected to a pump 54 by which a suitable working fluid such as, for example, hydraulic fluid, may be fed from a reservoir 55 through a normally closed circuit to various motors and other actuating devices as will be described in greater detail hereinafter.

A controller mechanism 253 is mounted on an inwardly projecting supporting member 254, FIGS. 9 and 10, in a housing 255, FIG. I, mounted on and projecting outwardly from the end of the frame 3 of the machine 1 adjacent to the bogies 8 and 9.

A sprocket wheel 56, FIGS. 9 and 14, is rotatably mounted on another supporting member 254 disposed in the housing 255 in parallel relation to the supporting member 254, and a hydraulic motor 57 is secured to the sprocket wheel 56 in driving relation thereto. The sprocket wheel 56 is disposed in vertically extending position, and an endless chain 58 is trained thereover to afford upper and lower passes 59 and 60, respectively. The chain 58 extends from the sprocket wheel 56 to the other end 61, FIG. 1, of the machine 1 and is trained over an idler sprocket wheel 62 in the end 61 of the machine 1, as shown diagrammatically in FIG. 18. The lower pass 60 of the chain 58 is connected to a plate 62, which is secured to and projects upwardly from the upper housing 13a of the carriage 12, so that movement of the pass 60 longitudinally of the frame 3, upon actuation of the motor 57, is effective to correspondingly move the surfacing unit 4.

It will be remembered that a pump 54 is afforded in the control console 5 for driving the bogie drive motors 46 and the carriage drive motor 57 in a normallly closed hydraulic circuit. A separate hydraulic circuit is afforded for effecting skewing of the surfacing cylinder 14 and for driving the cylinder 14 and the augers 15 and 16. This latter circuit includes a pump 63, FIGS. 5 and 17, mounted in the upper housing 13a of the carriage 12. A suitable source of power such as, for example, a gasoline engine 64 is operatively connected to the pump 63 for driving the latter, and the pump 63 is connected to a reservoir 65 mounted in the upper housing 13a.

Two hydraulic motors 66 and 67 are mounted in the rear end portion of the lower carriage 13, FIGS. 4 and 6, each having a sprocket wheel 68 and 69, respectively, mounted thereon. A sprocket 70, FIGS. 4 and 6, is mounted on the rear end of the cylinder 14 in uniplanar relation to the sprocket 69. Similarly, two sprockets 71 and 72 are mounted on the rear ends of the shafts 15a and 16a of the augers 15 and 16, rexpectively, in uniplanar relation to each other and to the sprocket wheel 68.

An endless chain 73 is trained over the sprocket wheels 69 and to afford a driving connection between the motor 67 and the cylinder 14, FIGS. 6 and 17. Similarly, an endless chain 74 is trained over the sprocket wheel 68 and the sprocket wheels 71 and 72 to afford a driving connection between the motor 66 and the augers 15 and 16. In this instance, it is to be observed that the chain 74, which passes around the sprocket wheel 68 also passes aroudnd the sprocket wheel 72, but is held in engagement with one side only of the sprocket wheel 71 by two idlers 75 so that rotation of the sprocket wheel 68 is effective to rotate the augers l5 and 16 in opposite directions relative to each other.

The motors 66 and 67 and the skew-cylinder 27 are connected into the hydraulic circuit which includes the pump 63, and the operation thereof is controlled separately from that of the bogie drive motors 46 and the carriage drive motor 57, which, it will be remembered, are connected into the hydraulic circuit which includes the pump 54, as will be discussed in greater detail hereinafter.

The controller mechanism 253, FIGS. 9-14, includes a cam plate 76 supported by rollers 77, 78 and 79 on a track 80 disposed on one face of the supporting member 254, which is disposed in the housing 255 in longitudinally extending relation to the length of the frame 3, FIGS. 9 and 10. A tension coil spring 82 has one end secured to the supporting member 254 by a bolt 83, and the other end 84 ofthe spring 82 is hooked to the cam plate 76 in position to yieldingly urge the cam plate 76 to the left, as viewed in FIG. 9. A stop plate 85 is mounted on the track 80 at the left of the cam plate 76, and the cam plate 76 is normally held in abutting engagement therewith by the spring 82.

Two elongated, substantially straight rods 86 and 87 are slidably mounted in supporting members 88 on the face of the cam plate 76 remote from the supporting member 254 in horizontally extending, substantially parallel relation to each other. Each of the rods 86 and 87 has an enlarged head 89 on the left end thereof, as viewed in FIG. 9, which is engageable with the cam plate 76 when the rods 86 and 87 are moved to the right, to thereby limit movement of the rods 86 and 87 to the right. Adjustable abutment members in the form of bolts 90 are threaded into the other ends of the rods 86 and 87, in axial alignment therewith, for a purpose which will be discussed in greater detail presently.

It will be remembered that the chain 58, which is attached to the carriage 12, is trained over a sprocket wheel 56 disposed in the housing 255, and extends longitudinally of the frame 3 of the machine 1. The positioning of the chain 58 in the machine 1 is such that it is disposed between the rods 86 and 87, with the upper pass 59 being disposed closely adjacent to the upper rod 86 and the lower pass 60 being disposed closely adjacent to the lower rod 87, FIG. 9. Two abutment members 91 and 92 are removably mounted on the upper and lower passes 59 and 60, respectively, of the chain 58 in position to abuttingly engage the heads 89 on the rods 86 and 87 when the respective passes 59 and 60 move a sufficient distance to the right, as viewed in FIG. 9, during operation of the machine 1.

It will be remembered that the lower pass 60 of the chain 58 is connected to the carriage 12 of the surfacing unit 4. Therefore, rotation of the chain 58 around the sprocket 56 in a direction wherein the upper pass 59 is moved to the left, as viewed in FIG. 9, away from the controller mechanism 53 is effective to cause the lower pass 60 to move to the right and thereby cause corresponding movement of the surfacing unit 4 along the frame 3 of the machine 1. Reverse movement of the chain 58 is effective to move the stop 91 toward the controller mechanism 53 and to move the lower pass 60 of the chain 58 and the surfacing unit 4 to the left, as viewed in FIG. 9. The stops 91 and 92 are adjustable along the chain 58, and when the machine 1 is in operation, the stops 91 and 92 are disposed in such position on the chain 58 that they are effective to actuate the controller mechanism 253 and thereby automatically slow down, stop and reverse the movement of the surfacing unit 4 at each end of its path of travel, as will be discussed in greater detail presently.

The cam plate 76 has a concave cam surface 93 on the top edge thereof, the surface 93 extending upwardly to the left from the right edge of the cam plate 76, as viewed in FIG. 9, and terminating in a substantially flat, horizontally extending cam surface 94 at the other edge of the plate 76. A variable flow divider valve 95 is mounted on th supporting member 254 inwardly of the cam plate 76 and has a control shaft 96 projecting outwardly toward the cam plate 76. An actuating lever 97 is secured to the outer end of the control shaft 96, FIGS. 9 and 10, and has a roller 98 mounted on the lower end portion thereof in position to ride upon the cam surfaces 93 and 94.

It will be seen that when either one of the stops 91 or 92 on the chain 58 is moved to the right, as viewed in FIG. 9, so as to move the head 89 on the rod 86 or 87 into abutting engagement with the cam plate 76, and such movement to the right, is then continued, it is effective to move the cam plate 76 to the right along the track against the urging of the spring 82. During such movement of the cam plate 76, the roller 98 on the actuator lever 97 rides upwardly along the cam surface 93 onto the flat or dwell cam surface 94 to thereby cause actuation of the flow divider valve 95. As will be.

discussed in greater detail presently, such movement of the actuating lever 97 is effective to slow the movement of the surfacing unit 4 along the frame 3.

A reversing valve 99 is mounted on the side of the supporting member 254 remote from the cam plate 76, FIGS. 9, 10 and 12. The actuating mechanism 100 thereof includes a pivotally mounted link 101 having a longitudinally extending slot 102 in the free end thereof, FIG. 12. A substantially upright lever 103, disposed on the same side of the supporting member 254 as the reversing valve 99, is secured at its lower end to a rod 104 rotatably mounted in the supporting member 254, and extending therethrough. Another lever 105 is secured to the rod 104 on the side of the supporting member 254 remote from the lever 103. The lever 105 is disposed in uniplanar relation to the slide rods 86 and 87, which are disposed above and below, respectively, the rod 104. The lever 105 is so disposed relative to the cam plate 76 that, when the cam plate 76 has been moved by either of the stops 91 or 92 to its furthest position to the right, as viewed in FIG. 9, the lever 105 is abuttingly engaged with the abutment members on both of the rods 86 and 87, the one not engaged by a stop 91 or 92 being free to slide to the left, as viewed in FIG. 9, into position to be engaged by the other stop upon reverse movement of the surfacing unit 4.

It will be remembered that when either of the stops 91 or 92 is disposed in such abutting enagement with the cam plate 76, the rod 86 or 87 engaged thereby is moved to its extreme position to the right on the cam plate 76, and the other stop 92 or 91 is disposed in spaced relation to the cam plate 76. Thus, it will be seen that when the stops 91 and 92 are alternately engaging the cam plate 76 the rods 86 and 87 are alternately correspondingly being moved to the right thereby so that they are alternately moved into abutting engagement with the upper and lower portions, respectively, of the lever 105 to thereby cause the lever 105 to alternately be rotated in a clockwise and counterclockwise direction, respectively, around the longitudinal axis of the rod 104. Such movement of the lever 105 is effective to correspondingly rotate the rod 104 and the lever 103.

A pin 106 is mounted in the upper end of the lever 103 and extends into the slot 102 in the link 101 on the reversing valve 99. The oscillating movement of the lever 103 caused by the alternate engagement of the rods 86 and 87 of the lever 105 is effective to move the pin 106 in the slot 102 into position to operate the actuating mechanism of the reversing valve 99 and reverse the flow of hydraulic fluid therethrough. Preferably, the reversal of the valve 99 is afforded by a snapacting mechanism which includes a compression coil spring unit 107, FIGS. 9 and 10, having an upper end pivotally mounted on the side of the supporting member 254, remote from the cam plate 76, by a pin 108, and a lower end pivotally attached to the pin 106.

Operation of the snap acting mechanism is such that during oscillation of the lever 103, as the pin 106 moves from one end of the slot 102 toward the center of the slot 102, it is moved against the urging of the spring 107. At the center of the movement of the pin 106 from one end of the slotl02 to the other, the lever 103 and the spring 107 are disposed in dead center position relative to each other, and continued movement of the lever 103 causes movement past this dead center position to thereby cause the pin 106 to be snapped into the other end of the slot 102, continued movement of the pin 106 causing the link 101 on the reversing valve 99 to be moved in the direction of movement of the pin 106.

A manual control lever 109 is afforded at the control console of the machine for manually controlling the speed of operation of the surfacine unit 4 and, if desired, for manually reversing the direction of travel of the surfacing unit 4. In its normal, at-rest position, the lever 109 is disposed in a vertically extending, intermediate position, as shown in FIG. 13.

A slide 110 is slidably mounted on the supporting member 254, inwardly of the cam plate 76, for movement left and right relative to the member 254, as viewed in FIG. 9, by pins 111 extending through slots 112 in the slide 110. The lever 109 is movable to the left and right, as viewed in FIG. 9, from its aforementioned intermediate position, and is operatively connected to the slide 110 for correspondingly moving the latter by suitable coupling mechanism such as a pushpull cable 113 of a type well known in the art.

The slide 110 has two ears 114 and 115 disposed opposite two pins 116 and 117, respectively, mounted on the lever 97 and projecting into a slot 118 in the slide 110, the ears 114 and 115 being normally horizontally spaced from the pins 116 and 117, on opposite sides thereof, as shown in FIGS. 9 and 13. The pins 116 and 117 are disposed on opposite sides of the shaft 96 so that movement of the slide 110 to either the left or the right, from the intermediate position thereof as shown in FIGS. 9 and 13, is effective to move the ear 114 or 115 into abutting engagement with the pins 116 or 117, respectively, in a direction which is effective, upon continued movement of the slide 110 to rotate the lever 97 and shaft 96 in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in FIGS. 9 and 13. Thus, it will be seen that movement of the lever 109 to either the left or the right, as viewed in FIG. 13, from its intermediate position is effective to rotate the shaft 96 in a direction effective to actuate the flow divider valve 95 in a manner to effect slowing of the movment of the surfacing unit 4 in the same manner as heretofore discussed with respect to movement of the cam surfaces 93 and 94 relative to the roller 98, and as will be discussed in greater detail presently.

A link 119 is connected at one end by a pin 120 to the upper end of the lever 105, FIGS. 9 and 13. The other end of the link 119 is connected to the slide 110 by a pin 121 mounted in an elongated slot 122. The slot 122 preferably is of such length that when the lever 109 is in its aforementioned intermediate position, and the lever 97 is disposed in its normal at-rest position shown in FIG. 9, the pin 121 is disposed in one extreme end portion or the other of the slot 122. With this construction, movement of the slide by the lever 109 in the direction that the slot 122 extends from the pin 121 to a position-wherein the flow divider valve 95 has been actuated by the ear 114 or the ear to a position to fully stop movement of the surfacing unit, if effective to move the pin 121 to a position wherein the pin 106 in the snap-acting mechanism for the reversing valve 99 is moved just short of dead center position. Thus, continued movement of the slide 110 by the lever 109 in the aforementioned direction will be effective to move the pin 121 into position wherein the snap-acting mechanism is actuated to thereby actuate the reversing valve 99.

It will be seen that with this construction, if it is desired to both stop and reverse the movement of the surfacing unit 4, the lever 109 may be moved from its intermediate position in a direction effective to immediately start moving the pin 121. On the other hand, if it is desired to merely slow or stop the movement of the surfacing unit 4, the lever 109 may be moved in the reverse direction from its intermediate position to thereby merely move the slot 122 along the pin 121 and thus not actuate the reversing valve 99.

As will now be discussed in greater detail, with the machine 1 constructed in the manner shown herein, movement, speed of movement and reversal of movement of the surfacing unit 4 longitudinally of the machine frame 3, as well as speed of movement and reversal of the drives for the bogies 9 and 11 may be automatically or manually controlled from the operators station at the control console 5; and operation of the cylinder 14, the augers 15 and 16 and the skew cylinder 27 may be controlled from the carriage 12 of the surfacing unit 4.

CONTROL OF THE OPERATION OF THE CARRIAGE 12 AND THE BOGIES 9 AND 11 In addition to the lever 109, four other levers 123, 124, 125 and 126 are positioned at the control console 5, FIG. 15, for controlling movement of the surfacing unit 4 and the bogies 9 and 11.

The levers 123-125 project upwardly through slots 127, 128 and 129, respectively, in a forwardly projecting panel 130 of the console 5, and each is movable through its respective slot 127-129 through an inter mediate position, in which it is shown in FIG. 15 be tween a full forward position (nearest to the operator) and a full rearward position (furthest from the operator). The fourth lever 126 is rotatably mounted at one lever 123 affords an actuating lever for a main control valve 133 for the hydraulic circuit for the carriagedrive motor 57 and the drive motors 46 for the bogies 9 and 11, FIG. 18, the valve 133 being connected to the pump 54 by a line 135; the levers 124 and 125 are actuating levers for valves 136 and 137 connected to the motors 46 of the bogies 9 and 11, respectively; and the lever 126 comprises an actuating lever connected to a variable flow divider valve 138 which affords speed control for the bogies 9 and 11.

CARRIAGE OPERATION In the normal automatic, paving operation of the carriage 12, the lever 109 is disposed in its middle position, as shown in FIG. 13, to thereby free the lever 97 for control by the cam plate 76. Also, the lever 123 is disposed in full rearward position, to thereby place the automatic portion 139 of the valve 133, FIG. 18, in the circuit. With the engine 53 running, pump 54 is driven thereby to thereby feed working fluid from the reservoir 55, FIG. 18, through a line 140, the pump 54, the line 135, the passageway 133a in the valve 133, the line 136, the flow divider 95, and the line 140 to the reversing valve 99. When the reversing valve 99 is in its furthest left position, as viewed in FIG. 18, fluid flow continues from the line 140 through the passageway 99a, the line 141, the motor 57, the line 142, the passageway 99b, the line 143, and a filter 144 back to the reservoir 55. If, during such operation, the reversing valve 99, shown in FIG. 18, is adjusted to the right, the flow from line 140 would be through passageway 99c, the line 142, motor 57, line 141, passageway 99d, line 143, and filter 144 back to reservoir 55, thus reversing the operation of the motor 57.

It will be remembered that stops 91 and 92, FIG. 9, are attached to the passes 59 and 60 of the chain 58 in position to engage rods 86 and 87 on the cam plate 76 as the carriage 12 nears the end of its travel along the frame 3 in a respective one of its directions of travel. When this occurs, the respective rod 86 or 87 is moved through its supports 88 on the cam 76 into position wherein the head 89 thereof is disposed in abutting engagement' with the adjacent edge of the cam 76, thereby disposing the other end of the respective rod 86 or 87 in outwardly projecting relation to the cam 76. Thereafter, continued movement of the stop 91 or 92 is effective to shift the cam 76 to the right, as viewed in FIG. 9, along the track 80, FIG. 12. Such movement of the cam 76 is effective to rotate the lever 97 in a counterclockwise direction, thereby actuating the flow divider valve 95 and slowing the movement of the carriage 12 along the frame 3 as will be discussed in greater detail presently.

In addition, this movement of the cam 76 to the right, as viewed in FIG. 9, is effective to move the rod 86 or 87, which is engaged by the stop 91 or 92, respectively, into abutting engagement with the adjacent edge portion of the lever 105 to thereby rotate it and the shaft 104, and thus correspondingly rotate the lever 103, FIG. 12. This rotation of the lever 105 is effective to push the other of the rods 87 or 86, respectively, into position wherein it projects to the left, as viewed in FIG. 9, so that it is disposed in position to be operatively engaged by the other stop 92 or 91, respectively, during the next movement of the carriage 12 in the reverse direction.

The aforementioned rotation of the lever 103 is effective to move the pivotal connection 106 between the upper end of the lever 103 and the spring 107 along the slot 102 in the link 101 of the reversing valve 99, FIG. 12, into position wherein the lever 103 and the spring 107 move past their dead-center position, at which time the spring 107 is effective to snap the pin 106 along the slot 102 into position to actuate the reversing valve 99 and thereby reverse the flow of hydraulic fluid through the carriage drive motor 57 and thus reverse the direction of travel of the carriage 12 and surfacing unit 4 along the frame 3.

It wil be remembered that movement of the cam plate 76, FIGS. 9 and 11, is effective to rotate the lever 97 and rod 96 to thereby actuate the flow divider valve 8. With respect to this, when the cam 76 is disposed in normal, unactuated position, as shown in FIG. 9, with the roller 98 on the lower end of the lever 97 disposed at the lowermost portion of the cam surface 93, the shaft 96 is effective to hold the flow divider valve in position wherein all of the flow from the line 136, FIG. 18, is into the line 140, so that the carriage motor 57 is operating at maximum speed. As the carriage 12 nears the end of its travel in one direction, and either the stop 91 or the stop 92 causes the cam 76 to be moved to the right, as viewed in FIG. 9, the roller 98 is moved upwardly along the cam surface 93 to thereby cause the lever 97 to rotate in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in FIG. 9. This is effective to shift the flow divider 95 so that progressively greater flow of hydraulic fluid is diverted from the line 136 away from the line and into the line 145, FIG. 18, from whence it flows through the line 146 to the flow control valve 138.

It will be remembered that the flow control valve 138 is manually actuated by the lever 126, FIGS. 15 and 18, to control the speed of the bogies 9 and 11. In its off position, wherein the lever 126 is disposed at its most forward position, hydraulic fluid in the line 146 flows through the valve 138 into the line 147, and from there through the line 148, the line 149, the line 143, and the filter 144 back to the reservoir 55. In this position of the valve 138, no fluid passes therefrom to the valves 136 and 137, and, therefore, the bogie motors 46 are not driven.

When the valve 138 is in any on position, which is any position rearward of the aforementioned most forward position of the lever 126, and fluid flows into the line 146, fluid may flow from the line 146 through the valve 138 into both the line 147 and the line 150. The amount of flow into each of the lines 146 and depends upon the position of the lever 126, the flow into the line 150 increasing as the lever 126 is moved rearwardly, that is, away from the operator, who is stationed on a platform P forwardly of the console 5.

When the levers 124 and 125 are in their intermediate positions, as shown in FIG. 15, the valves 136 and 137 are disposed in their intermediate or off positions, as shown in FIG. 18. When the valves 136 are thus disposed in of position and flow is diverted by the valve 138 from the line 146 into the line 150, the hydraulic fluid continues through the lines 151, 152, 148, 149, and the filter 144 back to the reservoir 155. During such operation, the bogie motors 46 are not driven and the machine 1 is stationary. As will be discussed in greater detail presently, the valves 136 and 137 each have two other positions, namely, forward and reverse, and when either of the valves 136 or 137 is disposed in either of these latter positions, during diversion of hydraulic fluid into the line 150, the bogie motor 46 connected to such an actuated valve is driven by the flow of fluid therethrough to thereby move the machine 1.

In the operation of the machine 1, the diversion of flow from the carriage motor 57, by reason of the actuation of the lever 97 by movement of the cam 76 to the right, as viewed in FIG. 9, becomes progressively greater as the roller 98 moves upwardly along the cam surface 93, until when, at the end of the movement of the carriage in the one direction, at which time the roller 98 is disposed on the substantially straight, horizontal cam surface 94, the movement of the carriage 12 along the frame 3 is very slow, being, preferably, in the nature of l to 2 feet per minute. Thus, it will be seen that when the reversing valve 99 is actuated by the pin 106 in the slot 102 at the end of the travel of the surfacing unit 4 across the roadway 2 in one direction, thereby reversing the operation of the carriage motor 57, the reversal of the carriage 12 and the surfacing unit 4 is effected substantially immediately and with relatively little shock to the machine.

It will be remembered that in the automatic operations of the machine 1, wherein reversal of the direction of drive of the carriage 12 is controlled by acuation of the cam 76 by the stops 91 or 92, the hand lever 109, FIGS. 13 and 15, is disposed in intermediate position. Movement of the lever 109 either to the left or theright of its intermediate position is effective to correspondingly move the slide 110 and thereby, through engagement of either the ear 114 or the car 115 with the pin 116 or 117, respectively, cause the lever 97 to rotate in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in FIGS. 9 and 13. Such rotation of the lever 97 actuates the flow divider valve 95 to divert hydraulic fluid away from the line 140, and, therefore, away from the carriage drive motor 57 to thus slow operation of the latter.

This movement of the lever 97, by movement of the slide 110 to either the left or right, is in the same direction as when the roller 98 is raised by the cam surface 93 on the cam plate 76, and, therefore, is effective to move the roller 98 away from the cam surface 93. Thus, if desired, the lever 109 may be used to slow movement. of the carriage l2 and the surfacing unit 4 along the machine frame 3 during automatic operation of the machine 1, such movement of the lever 109 being effective to merely raise the roller 98 away from the cam surface 93 so that movement of the lever 109 between the intermediate position thereof and full stop position, in either direction, is effective to control the speed of movement of the carriage 12. Of course, movement of the lever 109 to its full stop position in either direction is effective to completely stop the flow of fluid from the line 136 into the line 140 and thereby completely stop operation of the carriage drive motor 57.

It will also be remembered that movement of the control lever 109 from its intermediate position past its stop position in either direction is effective to actuate the link 119, and affords a manual operation for reversing the travel of the surfacing unit 4 along the frame 3. However, it will be remembered that such movement of the lever 109 is effective to reverse the direction of travel of the surfacing unit 4 only if the movement of the lever 109 is in such direction as to cause the pin 121 to be moved by reason of its engagement with an end of the slot 122, and movement of the lever 109 in the other direction is ineffective to cause reversal of movement of the carriage 12. Thus, it will be seen that the lever 109 affords a manual control which may be moved in either direction to slow or stop movement of the carriage 12, but which must be moved in the proper direction in order to reverse movement thereof.

BOGlE OPERATlON It will be remembered that during operation of the machine 1, when the flow divider 95, FIG. 18, is in position to divert part of the flow of hydraulic fluid from the line 136 away from the line and into the line and thus to the flow control valve 138, if the latter is in an onposition, at least a portion of the flow from the valve 138 passes into the line 151 connected to the bogie control valves 136 and 137.

If, during this time, the bogie control valve 136 is dis posed in forward position, wherein the lever 128 is in full rearward position, the flow from the flow control valve 138 passes through the line 150, the passageway 136a in the bogie control valve 136, the line 153, motor 46 of the bogie 9, the line 154, the passageway 136b in the bogie control valve 136, and the line to the bogie control valve 137. If the latter is in off position the fluid flows directly from the line 151 to the line 152 and thus back to reservoir 55, as previously explained. However, if the valve 137 is in forward position the fluid flows from line 151, through the passageway 137a in the bogie control valve 137, the line 155, the drive motor 46 of the bogie 11, the line 156, the passageway 137b in the bogie control valve 137, into the line 152 and from there back to the reservoir 55.

Also, it will be seen that when flow of fluid is diverted by the valve 138 into the line 150, if the valve 136 is disposed in reverse position, wherein the lever 124 is disposed in full forward position, the flow from the line 150 is through the passageway 136C in the valve 136, the line 154, the motor 46, the line 154, the passageway 136d in the valve 136 to the line 151, to thereby reverse the flow of fluid through the motor and thereby drive the bogie 9, and therefore, the left end of the machine 1, as viewed in FIG. 1, in a reverse direction. Similarly, when the hydraulic fluid is flowing into the line 150, and, therefore, into the line 151, if the valve 137 is disposed in reverse position, wherein the handle 125 is disposed in full forward position, the flow from the line 151 is through the passageway l37c, the line 156, the motor 46 of the bogie 11, the line 155, the passageway 137d in the valve 137, into the line 152 and from there back to the reservoir 155, to thereby drive the bogie l1 and, therefore, the right end of the machine 1, as viewed in FIG. 1, in a reverse direction.

From the foregoing it will be seen that when fluid is being fed from the line 146 through the flow control valve 138 into line 150, each of the bogie control valves 136 and 137 may be independently controlled by the manually operated levers 124 and 125, respectively, to hold the respective bogie 9 or 11 stationary, to move it forward, or to move it rearwardly. Also, it will be seen that by adjusting the setting of the lever 126, the valve 138 may be correspondingly actuated to thereby feed a greater or lesser amount of fluid into the line 150 and thereby increase or decrease, respectively, the speed of either one or both of the bogies 9 and 11 being operated.

Also, it will be remembered that during automatic" operation of the machine 1, the flow divider valve 95, controlling the speed of operation of the carriage drive motor 57 is actuated by movement of the cam plate 76 to feed a portion of the hydraulic fluid in the line 136 into the line 145, and, therefore, through the line 146 into the flow control valve 138. Thus, by setting the valve 138 to an on" position, fluid may be automatically fed from the line 146 through the valve 138 into the line 150 for actuation of either one or both of the bogie motors 46 at each reversal of the carriage 12. Thus, if desired, the machine 1 may be advanced automatically at each reversal of the movement of the surfacing unit 4, such movement of the machine 1 taking place during the entire movement of the roller 98 up and down the cam surfaces 93 and 94, during which time the valve 95 is operated to divert at least a portion of the fluid from the line 136 into the line 145. The speed of the operation of either or both of the bogie motors 46 may be controlled by proper adjustment of the lever 126 so that the amount of movement of the machine 1 effected by actuation of the bogie motors 46, or either of them, during the period of time in which the flow divider valve 95 feeds hydraulic fluid from the line 136 into the line 145, during each reversal of movement of the carriage 12 may readily be controlled.

OPERATION OF DRUM 14 AND AUGERS 15 AND 16 Operation of the auger drive motor 66 and the drum drive motor 67, FIGS. 4, 6 and 17, is controlled by a manually operable control valve 157, FIG. 17, connected by a line 158 to the pump 63. The valve is disposed in the upper housing 13a of the carriage 12, and when it is in on position, and the engine 64 is operating to drive the pump 63, hydraulic fluid flows from the reservoir 65 through the line 159, the pump 63, the line 158, the passageway 157a in the valve 157, the line 160, the auger drive motor 66, and the line 161 to a reversing valve 162, FIGS. 5 and 17. When the reversing valve 162 is adjusted to its left position, as viewed in FIG. 17, the hydraulic fluid flows from the line 161 through the passageway 162a in the valve 162, the line 163, the drum drive motor 67, the line 164, the passageway 162b in the valve 162, the line 165, the line 166, and the filter 167 back to the reservoir 65. When the reversing valve 162 is adjusted to the right, as viewed in FIG. 17, it is effective to reverse the flow of oil through the drum drive motor 67, the passageway 1620 connecting the line 161 to the line 163, and the passageway 162d connecting the line 164 to the line 165.

Actuation of the reversing valve 162 is controlled by tension on the chain 58, which moves the surfacing unit 4 back and forth across the roadway 2. It will be remembered that the lower pass 60 of the chain 58 is secured to a plate 62 which projects upwardly from the upper housing 130 of the carriage 12, FIGS. 4, 5 and 7. Another plate 168 is mounted on the upper housing 13a of the carriage 12, and the plate 62 is slidably mounted on the plate 168 by pins 169 secured to the plate 62 and extending through elongated slots 170 in the plate 168, FIG. 7. With this construction, it will be seen that as the tension of the lower pass 60 of the chain 58 on the plate 62 is reversed, at each reversal of the direction of movement of the carriage 12 and the surfacing unit 4, the pins 169 slide from one end of the respective slots 170 to the other prior to the chain 158 becoming effective to move the surfacing unit 4 in the reverse direction.

The reversing valve 162 is mounted in the upper housing 13a of the carriage 12 at the side of the plate 168 remote from the plate 62. A lever 171, which is attached to the plate 62 extends through a slot 172 in the plate 168 into position to operatively engage the actuating arm 173 of the reversing valve 162. Reciprocation of the plate 62 the length of the slots 170 relative to the plate 168 is effective to move the lever 171 longitudinally of the slot 172 and thereby effect the actuation of the reversing valve 162 necessary to reverse operation of the cylinder drive motor 67, and, therefore, reverse the direction of rotation of the cylinder 14.

From the foregoing it will be seen that, in the operation of the machine 1, rotation of the cylinder 14 is automatically reversed upon each reversal of the direction of movement of the surfacing unit 4 along the machine frame 3. The direction in which the cylinder 14 is driven by the motor 67 is such that the lower surface of the cylinder 14 is rotated across the top of the concrete engaged thereby in the direction of movement of the surfacing unit 4 relative to the concrete, so as to afford an effective smoothing action.

Whereas the cylinder drive motor 67 is reversed, upon each reversal of the direction of movement of the surfacing unit 4, the auger drive motor 66 is driven in the same direction at all times during operation of the machine 1. As previously described with respect to operation of the cylinder drive motor 67, illustrated in FIG. 1, when the valve 157, FIG. 17, is in on position and the engine 64 is operating, to drive the pump 63, fluid flows from the reservoir 65 through the line 159, the pump 63, the line 158, the passageway 157a in the valve 157, the line 160, the auger drive motor 66, and the line 161 to the reversing valve 162. From the reversing valve 162 the fluid returns to the reservoir 165 through the same lines as heretofore discussed with respect to operation of the cylinder drive motor 67. Thus, it will be seen that the motor 66 is driven in the same direction at all times during operation of the pump 63, with the valve 157 in on position.

It will be remembered that the chain 74, for driving the augers 15 and 16, passes over one side of the sprocket wheel 71 connected to the auger 15 and the other side of the sprocket wheel 72 connected to the auger 16 so that the augers 15 and 16 are driven in opposite directions relative to each other. Preferably, the direction of rotation of the augers l5 and 16 is such that the upper surfaces thereof are moving outwardly away from the cylinder 14 during operation of the machine 1.

Also, it will be remembered that the helical blades 17 of the augers 15 and 16 are so constituted and arranged that during operation of the machine 1, rotation of the augers l5 and 16, which are disposed forwardly of the cylinder 14, moves the material engaged by the augers forwardly away from the cylinder 14.

During operative movement of the surfacing unit 4 across the roadway 2, or the like, the excess concrete engaged by the leading longitudinal surface of the cylinder 14 tends to move forwardly therealong and around the front end of the cylinder 14, and to accum ulate with the unfinished concrete disposed ahead of the machine 1, and which concrete is to be smoothed by the member 14 during the next stroke of the surfacing unit 4, which is in the reverse direction across the roadway 2.

However, in the operation of the machine 1, such accumulation of excess concrete material along the front end of the cylinder 9 is prevented by the conveyor screws 15 and 16, the screws 15 and 16 being driven by the motor 66 during all such operative movements of the concrete-smoothing member 14. With this construction and operation, the excess material flows around the front end of the cylinder 14 and is engaged by the conveyor screw or 16, which is disposed most closely adjacent to the leading longitudinal surface of the cylinder 14 during the particular stroke of the surfacing unit 4 across the roadway 2. As this occurs, the material is fed inwardly toward the other of the conveyor screws 16 or 15, and is fed longitudinally outwardly away from the cylinder 14 by both of the screws 15 and 16, where it is added to the supply of concrete material to which the concrete-smoothing member 14 will be advanced for the next stroke thereof, in the opposite direction, longitudinally of frame 3.

During such operation of the machine 1, when the surfacing unit 2 reaches the longitudinal edge of the roadway surface 2 toward which it is moving, the flow divider valve 95 is actuated to slow movement of the carriage, and the reversing valve 99 is actuated to reverse the direction of movement of the carriage. At this same time, the frame 3 may be moved forward longitudinally of the roadway 2 by operation of the bogie motors 46, and the carriage 12 and the surfacing unit 4 may then be driven by the motor 57, but in the reverse direction, to move the surfacing unit 4 in the reverse direction across the roadway 2. During each such movement of the surfacing unit 4 transversely to the length of the roadway 2, the augers 15 and 16 are effective to feed the aforementioned excess concrete material forwardly away from the cylinder 14.

It will be remembered that a skew cylinder 27, FIG. 5, is connected between the upper housing 13a and the lower housing 13b of the carriage 12. in position to rotate the oscillating housing 13b on the shaft 22 relative to the housing 13a to thereby adjust the amount of skew of the cylinder 14 and the augers 15 and 16 relative to the roadway 2. The cylinder 27 is connected by the lines 33 and 34 to the lines 163 and 164, respectively, connected between the cylinder drive motor 67 and the reversing valve 162, FIG. 17. With this arrangement it will be seen that reversal of the flow of hydraulic fluid through the lines 163 and l64and, therefore, through the motor 67, which is effective to reverse the rotation of the cylinder 14, is also effective to reverse the pressure-like connection of the lines 33 and 34 and thus reverse actuation of the cylinder 27. Therefore, the cylinder 27 is effective to automatically reverse the skew of the cylinder 14 and the augers 15 and 16 upon each reversal of the direction of rotation of the cylinder 14 during operation of the machine 1. As previously mentioned, the skew of the cylinder 14 and the augers 15 and 16 preferably is such that the leading longitudinal surface of the cylinder 14 in engagement with the concrete being finished slopes forwardly of the ma chine l in a direction which is opposite to the direction of travel of the surfacing unit 4 along the frame 3, so that excess concrete engaged by the cylinder 14 tends to flow forwardly therealong.

It is to be observed that, in the operation of the machine 1, movement of the surfacing unit 4 along the frame 3 may be manually stopped, and either one or both of the bogies 9 and 11 may be actuated to move the machine 1 along the roadway under manual control. This may be accomplished by the operator moving the lever 123 on the valve 133 into full forward position, to thereby vshift the valve 133 into position wherein the passageway 1330 is connected between the lines and 146, and the passageway 133d is connected between the lines 136 and 149, FIG. 18. With the valve 133 disposed in such position, and with the engine 53 operating to drive the pump 54, hydraulic fluid is fed from the reservoir 55 through the line 140, the pump 54, the line 135, the line 1330, the check valve 200, the line 146, the flow-divider valve 138, and the line to the bogie control valves 136 and 137. Actuation of the bogie control valves 136 and 137 is effective to move the bogies 9 and 11, respectively, in forward or reverse direction, as previously described. Also, adjustment of the position of the lever 126 of the flow divider valve 138 is effective to control the speed of operation of the bogies 9 and 11, as previously described. During such operation of the bogies 9 and 11, flow from the control valves 136 and 137 continues through the line 152, the line 148, the line 149, and the filter 144 back to the reservoir 55.

From the foregoing it will be seen that the present invention affords a novel concrete finishing machine.

Also, it will be seen that the present invention affordsa novel concrete finishing machine movable along a roadway, or the like, to be finished, and with a surfacing unit adapted to be moved transversely to such a roadway in a concrete-finishing operation, with movement of the surfacing unit, including the reversal thereof, and movement of the machine, both being antomatically controlled, if desired.

In addition, it will be seen that the present invention affords a novel concrete finishing machine which may be automatic in operation, as previously mentioned, but which also, if desired, may be operated and controlled manually.

In addition, it will be seen that the present invention affords a novel concrete finishing machine of the aforementioned type, wherein the skew of the surfacing unit may be automatically adjusted in a novel and expeditious manner during operation of the machine.

Also, it will be seen that the present invention affords a novel concrete finishing machine which is practical and efficient in operation and which may be readily and economically produced commercially.

Thus, while I have illustrated and described the preferred embodiment of my invention, it is to be understood that this is capable of variation and modification, and I therefore do not wish to be limited to the precise details set forth, but desire to avail myself of such changes and alterations as fall within the purview of the following claims.

I claim:

1. a concrete finishing machine comprising:

a. an elongated supporting frame adapted to travel in a direction transverse to the length thereof,

b. a surfacing unit mounted on said frame for movement longitudinally thereof,

c. means operatively connected to said surfacing unit for moving the latter longitudinally of said frame,

d. means operatively connected to said first mentioned means for slowing movement of said unit along said frame and reversing the direction of movement of said unit along said frame, and

e. means operatively connected to said second men.-

tioned means, for control thereby, for moving said frame transversely a predetermined distance upon each such reversal of movement of said unit.

2. A concrete finishing machine as defined in claim.- 1, and in which a. said first mentioned means comprises a hydraulic motor operatively connected to said unit, and

b. said second mentioned means comprises a flowdivider valve operatively connected to said motor, and

c. said third mentioned means comprises 1. wheels operatively connected to said frame, and 2. another motor (a) operatively connected to said wheels for rotating the latter, and (b) operatively connected to said valve. 3. A concrete finishing machine as defined in claim 2, and in which a. said second mentioned means includes a reversing valve operatively connected between said first mentioned motor and said flow-divider valve.

4. A concrete finishing machine as defined in claim 2, and in which a. said third mentioned means includes another flowdivider valve operatively connected between said first mentioned flow divider valve and said other motor.

5. A concrete finishing machine as defined in claim 1, and in which a. said first mentioned means comprises a hydraulic motor operatively connected to said unit, b. said second mentioned means comprises 1. a reservoir for holding a supply of working fluid and operatively connected to one side of said motor,

2. a flow-divider valve operatively connected to another side of said motor, and

3. pumping means operatively connected between said reservoir and said valve for pumping working fluid from said reservoir to said valve, and

c. said third mentioned means comprises hydraulic motor means operatively connected to said valve and said reservoir.

6. A concrete finishing machine as defined in claim 5, and in which a. said motor means comprises two hydraulic motors,

and

b. said third mentioned means includes two valves operatively connecting said last mentioned motors in parallel between said flow-divider valve and said reservoir.

7. A concrete finishing means comprising a. an elongated supporting frame b. a surfacing unit mounted on said frame for movement longitudinally thereof,

c. an elongated member operatively connected to said unit and extending longitudinally of said frame,

d. means operatively connected to said elongated member for reciprocating the latter longitudinally of said frame and thereby moving said unit back and forth along said frame,

e. control means operatively connected to said first mentioned means and operable through a cycle of operation effective to first slow the operation of said first mentioned means, then reverse the direction of operation of said first mentioned means, and then increase the speed of operation of said first mentioned means to thereby first slow the movement, then reverse the direction of movement, and then increase the speed of movement of said unit longitudinally of said frame, and

f. means operatively connected to said elongated member and movable thereby into position to actuate said control means through said cycle of operation during movement of said surfacing unit longitudinally through said frame in each direction.

8. A concrete finishing machine as defined in claim 7, and in which a. said last mentioned means comprises two members attached to and carried by said elongated member in spaced relation to each other.

9. A concrete finishing machine comprising a. an elongated supporting frame b. a surfacing unit mounted on said frame for movement longitudinally thereof,

c. an elongated member operatively connected to said unit and extending longitudinally of said frame,

d. means operatively connected to said elongated member for reciprocating the latter longitudinally of said frame and thereby moving said unit back and forth along said frame,

e. control means operatively connected to said first mentioned means and operable through a cycle of operation effective to first slow the operation of said first mentioned means, then reverse the direction of operation of said first mentioned means, and then increase the speed of operation of said first mentioned means to thereby first slow the movement, then reverse the direction of movement, and then increase the speed of movement of said unit longitudinally of said frame,

f. means operatively connected to said elongated member and movable thereby into position to actuate said control means through said cycle of operation during movement of said surfacing unit longitudinally through said frame in each direction,

g. said first mentioned means comprising a hydraulic motor,

b. said control means comprising 1. valve means operatively connected to said motor,

2. a cam movable back and forth between two positions and operatively connected to said valve means for actuating the latter upon such movement of said cam, and

3. means for moving said cam from one to the other of said positions, and

j. said third mentioned means being disposed in position to engage said cam and move the latter from said other position to said one position.

10. A concrete finishing machine comprising a. an elongated supporting frame b. a surfacing unit mounted on said frame for movement longitudinally thereof,

0. an elongated member operatively connected to said unit and extending longitudinally of said frame,

d. means operatively connected to said elongated member for reciprocating the latter longitudinally of said frame and thereby moving said unit back and forth along said frame,

e. control means operatively connected to said first mentioned means and operable through a cycle of operation effective to first slow the operation of said first mentioned means, then reverse the the direction of operation of said first mentioned means, and then increase the speed of operation of said first mentioned means to thereby first slow the movement, then reverse the direction of movement of said unit longitudinally of said frame,

f. means operatively connected to said elongated member and movable thereby into position to actuate said control means through said cycle of operation during movement of said surfacing unit longitudinally through said frame in each direction,

g. said first mentioned means comprising a hydraulic motor,

h. said control means comprising 1. a flow-divider valve (a) operatively connected to said motor, and (b) having an actuator movable from one position to another and from said other position to said one position to thereby decrease and increase, respectively, the speed of operation of said motor, 2. a cam (a) movable in one direction and in the opposite direction along a path of travel (b) having a cam surface operatively engaged with said actuator, and (c) operable 1'. to move said actuator from said one position to said other position upon movement of said one direction from a first position to a second position along said path of travel, and 2'. to permit said actuator to move from said other position to said one position upon movement of said cam in said other direction from said second position to said first position along said path of travel, and

i. said third mentioned means being engageable with said cam to move the latterin said one direction.

11. A concrete finishing machine as defined in claim 10, and in which a. said control means includes 1. a reversing valve operatively connected between said flow-divider valve and said motor, and

2. means operatively connected to said cam and said reversing valve for actuating said reversing valve and thereby reverse the operation of said motor upon reciprocation of said cam between I said second position and a third position disposed on the side of said second position remote from said first position.

12. A concrete finishing machine as defined in claim 11, and

a. which includes meansfor moving said frame transversely to the length thereof, and

b. in which said last mentioned means comprises hydraulic motor means operatively connected to said flow-divider valve on a side thereof remote from said first mentioned hydraulic motor.

13. A concrete finishing machine as defined in claim 11, and in which a. said elongated member has two passes extending longitudinally through said frame, and

b. said third mentioned means comprise two stop members mounted on respective ones of said passes in position to engage said cam for moving it in said one direction upon reciprocation of said surfacing unit longitudinally along said frame.

14. A concrete finishing machine as defined in claim 13, and in which a. said control means includes 1. spring means operatively connected to said cam in position to urge said cam in said other direction.

15. In a concrete finishing machine of the type embodying an elongated frame supported at each end by wheels for movement of the frame transversely to the length thereof, a surfacing unit reciprocable along said frame, a chain connected to said unit, hydraulic motor means operatively connected to said wheels for rotating the latter and thereby moving said frame transversely, and other hydraulic motor means operatively connected to said chain for reciprocating said chain and, therefore, said unit longitudinally of said frame,

a. a controller mechanism for controlling the movement of said surfacing unit and said wheels,

b. said controller mechanism comprising 1. a supporting member 2. a cam movably mounted on said supporting member for reciprocation relative thereto along a path of travel,

3. means operatively connected to said cam for yieldingly urging said cam toward one position at one end of said path of travel,

4. a flow-divider valve mounted on said supporting member and having an input means and two output means,

5. one of said output means being operatively connected to said first mentioned hydraulic motor means, and the other of said output means being operatively connected to said other hydraulic motor means 6. an actuator on said valve and movable (a) from one position wherein it is effective to connect said input means to said other output means and entirely disconnect said input means from said one output means,

(b) along a path of travel through a plurality of intermediate positions wherein it is progressively effective to disconnect said input means from said other output means and to connect said input means to said one output means,

(c) to another position wherein it is effective to connect said input means to said one output means and totally disconnect said input means from said other output means, and

(d) from said other position along said path of travel to said one position,

7. means engageable with said cam for moving said cam along said path of travel thereof against the urging of said yielding means,

8. said cam being engageable with said actuator for moving said actuator along said path of travel thereof from said one position toward said other position thereof during said movement of said cam against the urging of said yielding means,

9. means operatively connected to said actuator for yieldingly urging said actuator toward said one position thereof,

10. a reversing valve operatively connected between said flow-divider valve and said other hydraulic motor means, and

11. actuator means operatively connected to said cam for actuating said reversing valve and revers-- ing the connection between said flow-divider valve and said other hydraulic motor means upon movement of said cam from said one position

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3874806 *Jul 27, 1972Apr 1, 1975Cmi CorpApparatus for grooving pavement
US4068970 *May 3, 1976Jan 17, 1978Cmi CorporationConcrete finishing machines
US4289421 *Jun 11, 1979Sep 15, 1981Sampey William PConcrete road paving assembly
US4314773 *Dec 21, 1979Feb 9, 1982Allen Engineering CorporationHigh density concrete placer
US4572704 *Feb 16, 1984Feb 25, 1986Allen Engineering CorporationHigh density concrete placing and finishing machine
US4708520 *Jan 30, 1987Nov 24, 1987Cmi CorporationConcrete finishing machine with adjustable auger unit
US4775262 *Jul 21, 1987Oct 4, 1988Cmi CorporationConcrete finishing machine with vibrating compactor unit
US4822210 *May 6, 1988Apr 18, 1989Rotec IndustriesConcrete finishing machine
US5791815 *Jun 21, 1996Aug 11, 1998Cmi CorporationVibrating compactor assembly for use with a concrete finishing machine
US5988939 *Jun 27, 1997Nov 23, 1999Allen Engineering Corp.Universal bridge deck vibrating system
US6116006 *May 27, 1999Sep 12, 2000Deere & CompanyHydraulic system for a detachable implement
DE4229692A1 *Sep 5, 1992Mar 10, 1994Moebius Josef BauRepairing road surface of concrete slabs etc. - involves lifting road surface section, filling with liq. concrete, and lowering surface section by gravity, or compression.
Classifications
U.S. Classification404/119
International ClassificationE01C19/22, E01C19/29
Cooperative ClassificationE01C19/29
European ClassificationE01C19/29
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jan 21, 1992ASAssignment
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Free format text: RELEASED BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:BOATMEN S FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF OKLAHOMA;REEL/FRAME:005984/0364
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Owner name: COMMERCIAL BANK, N.A.
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Free format text: ;ASSIGNORS:CMI CORPORATION;CMI INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION;CMIOIL CORPORATION;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:004281/0001
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Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:CMI INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION;CMI CORPORATION;CIMOIL CORPORATION;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:004280/0861
Effective date: 19840301
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Owner name: BANK OF AMERICA NATIONAL TRUST AND SAVINGS ASSOCIA
Owner name: BANK OF PENNSYLVAIA
Owner name: COMMERCIAL BANK,N.A.
Owner name: CONTINENTAL ILLINOIS NATIONAL BANK AND TRUST COMPA
Owner name: FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION AS RECEIVER
Owner name: FIDELITY BANK N A.
Owner name: FIRST NATIONAL BANK AND TRUST COMPANY OF OKLAHOMA
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Owner name: NORTHERN TRUST COMPANY, THE
Owner name: REPUBLICBANK DALLAS,N.A.