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Publication numberUS3739161 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 12, 1973
Filing dateDec 10, 1970
Priority dateDec 22, 1969
Also published asDE2063177A1, DE2063177B2
Publication numberUS 3739161 A, US 3739161A, US-A-3739161, US3739161 A, US3739161A
InventorsH Gross, S Gross
Original AssigneeGross Cash Registers Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cash registers and other accounting machines
US 3739161 A
Abstract  available in
Images(9)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Gross et a1.

[ June E2, 1973 CASH REGISTERS AND OTHER ACCOUNTING MACHINES [75] Inventors: Henry Gross; Samuel Gross, both of London, England [73] Assignee: Gross Cash Registers Limited, London, England [22] Filed: Dec. 10, 1970 [21] App]. No.: 96,829

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Dec 22, 1969 Great Britain 62,227/69 [52 US. Cl. 235/156, 235/145 R [51] Int. Cl G061 7/38, G06c 7/06 [58] Field of Search 235/156, 159, 160,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,253,132 5/1966 Pendleton 235/168 3,267,436 8/1966 Alpert et a1 340/1725 3,281,794 10/1966 Townsend 340/1725 3,294,960 12/1966 Townsend 235/160 ABSTRACT The disclosure relates to an apparatus for calculating and indicating number values applied thereto including input means in the form of a keyboard having a plurality of key members arranged in rows and columns wherein the key members in at least two of the columns are operable both to enter values into the apparatus and to cause the apparatus to perform simultaneously one operative cycle of calculation and indication of re sult, one of these columns corresponding to a series of whole numbers while the other corresponds to the same numbers plus a fraction or a higher order number; indicator means including indicator element, and means for actuating one of the indicator elements similarly for operation of corresponding keys in said two columns; the apparatus including at least one further column of numbers for entering higher values without effecting cycling.

15 Claims, 11 Drawing Figures PAIENTEDJUNI 2l973 3, 739,161

SHEET 1 O 9 PAIENIED 3.739.161

sum 2 or 9 Fla. 2. U3 &

; KEYBOARD MATRIX KEYBOARD CONTROL 51 TICKET [2 DRIVER FUNCTION 34 39 DECODER 1 CLUTCH DRIVER r r370 STORE FERR/TE CONTROL STORE r I I .36 152 2527 32 TIM/N6 RESULT DISPLAY BUFFER DRIVERS PATENTED JUN 1 2 I975 SHEET 6 [IF 9 Y RING COUNTER SHEH 8 BF 9 OUTPUT AND KEYBOARD CIRCUIT 1 L ATOR OSCIL- X- RING 119' COUNTER PAIENIEU Jum 21915 AND AND

CASH REGISTERS AND OTHER ACCOUNTING MACHINES This invention relates to apparatus for calculating and indicating information data. Such apparatus is gen erally to be found, for example, in the form of cash registers, adding machines, accounting machines, bookkeeping machines, desk calculators. The indication provided by such machines is effected by visual indicator means and/or a print-out mechanism which, for example, produces a printed ticket.

The main object of the present invention is to enable an operator to more speedily enter successive items.

According to the present invention we provide an apparatus for calculating and indicating number values applied thereto including input means in the form of a keyboard having a plurality of key members arranged in rows and columns wherein the key members in at least two of the columns are operable both to enter values into the apparatus and to cause the apparatus to perform simultaneously one operative cycle of calculation and indication of result, one of these columns corresponding to a series of whole numbers while the other corresponds to the same numbers plus another numerical item i.e., a fraction or a higher order number; indicator means including indicator elements, and means for actuating one of the indicator elements similarly for operation of corresponding keys in said two columns and for actuating another of the indicator elements to show said other numerical item; the apparatus including at least one further column of numbers for entering higher values without effecting cycling.

Thus for example one column may be suitable for entering numbers 1 to 9 representing pence while the adjacent column can enter 1% to 9%. If desired two other columns can be arranged for entering to 19 and 10% to 19%. Alternatively or additionally, the first column may be 1 to 9 and the next column 10, 11,12,13, l4, l5, 16, 17, 18, 19, i.e. the same numbers prefixed by the higher order number 1. A third column may be added so that the keys represent 20 to 29 so that the keyboard includes cycling keys for all numbers from 1 to 29. All the keys in these columns are arranged to effect cycling of the apparatus to indicate the value entered and to print-out this value and/or other information such as change computation.

A constructional form of apparatus made in accordance with the invention will now be described by way of example with reference to the accompanying diagrammatic drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the keyboard of a cash register made in accordance with the British decimal monetary system and suitable for use with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of some essential parts of the cash register made in accordance with the invention;

FIGS. 3 and 4 are elevational views of certain parts shown in perspective in FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a simplified view of the electronic circuits;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of an alternative form of keyboard suitable for the dollar monetary system;

FIG. 7 is a table of some typical functions;

FIG. 8 is a table showing how functions are to be effected;

FIG. 9 is an electronic circuit indicating the way of carrying out the functions;

FIGfl0 briefly illustrates the electronic connections for sending a signal to the ticket issuing means; and

FIG. 11 illustrates the ticket printing and issuing devices.

The keyboard shown in FIG. 1 consists of 10 columns of key members in the form of keys 15 15A, viz:

lst Column: A single key marked 15A. This key will be arranged to effect cycling of the machine so as to give an indication to the shopkeeper and to the customer of various required pieces of information and (in this example) also to print the information.

2nd Column. This consists of a single key for a halfpenny.

3rd Column. This has nine keys marked 1 to 9 respectively for pence and all arranged to effect cycling of the machine.

4th Column. This has nine keys marked one and a half to nine and a half respectively for pence and half pence and again all arranged for cycling the machine.

5th Column. This has nine keys marked in tens 10 to for pence and these will not cycle the machine in this example.

6th Column. This has nine keys marked 1 to 9 none of which effects cycling.

7th Column. This has nine non-cycling keys marked 10 to 90.

8th Column. This has nine keys marked I to IX to show different types of information to be stored, e.g. different types of products. All these marks will be shown on the indicator and printed on a strip and/or ticket.

9th Column. This has nine keys operating in a manner similar to the keys of column 8.

10th Column (last) has a key Z for clearing totals, a key X for sub-totals, e.g. sub-totals of a days taking of any selected assistant, a key C for credit, a key T for indicating the shop assistant, four keys which may be marked with selected products, e.g., petrol, oil, cigarettes, etc., used only for indicating and printing, and a key A/T for entering the amount tendered which is arranged so that by pressing key 15A and A/T for example will cause the register to cycle twice, first to show the amount tendered and then to show the change due to the customer.

Each key is mounted on a vertical plunger 16 which is urged up to its normal position by a spring 17 and is guided by a rod 18 located in a slot 19. The plunger is held in its depressed position by a rod or bail 20. The rods 20 are all retracted by means not shown at the initial part of a cycling operation whereupon the springs 17 restore the keys to the upper normal positions.

Each plunger 16 carries a small magnet 24' which when the plunger is depressed acts on a reed switch 25 and causes an electric signal to be sent to the electronic calculating and control means to be described via a multicore cable 27 and socket connector 28 The connector 28 will be connected with a plug connector 29 (FIG. 5) which conducts signals to a keyboard control circuit 30 and electronic calculator device 31A, 31B, 31C, 31D and 31E, consisting ofa function decoder, arithmetic unit, store control, ferrite store and result buffer respectively, the multicore output from which leads to the series of display control and driver devices 32, ticket issuing and driver device 33 and clutch control and driver device 34. The devices 32, 33, 34 are connected respectively with socket connectors 36, 37, 38.

The operation of a live-key causes the apparatus to examine the keyboard matrix. Before the apparatus can complete its action, and cause the mechanism to operate, certain keyboard matrix conditions must be satisfied.

Typical examples of these conditions are tabulated in FIG. 7 to be described.

The FUNCTION DECODER 31A contains the equivalent of the table FIG. 7 in the form of logic elements of known type and decides how to perform the functions. If the function decoder is unable to interpret the keyboard matrix sensibly, the machine will fail to cycle, and must be cleared by the operator prior to reentering information on the keyboard. The decoder 31A emits digital coded signals e.g. a key in the 4th column would be indicated byl0l followed by the appropriate digital code for the whole number.

The decoded function controls the ARITHMETIC UNIT 31B and the STORE CONTROL 31C. The store control reads from the FERRITE STORE 31D the totals that have to be processed. This information (from the ferrite store) is transferred to the arithmetic unit, where the keyboard amount is added to the totals in turn.

The resultant totals are then committed to the ferrite store for retention, again by the store control 31C.

At the same time the relevant information is transmitted to the RESULT BUFFER 31E.

Successful completion of the above processes cause the clutch solenoid 103 (FIG. 2) to operate.

This solenoid initiates the mechanical cycle, and during part of the mechanical cycle the display solenoids (to be described) are operated, resulting in a display of the information requested by the keyboard.

The required keys are cleared by the cycling of the apparatus, ready for the next operator action.

The form of store used is ferrite core storage and has sufficient capacity to contain the amount of cash in 18 totals, where each amount could be up to99,999.99%.

This storage media (i.e., ferrite cores) is very convenient and is frequently used when non-volatile properties are required. Known precautions are taken to ensure that the information stored is not destroyed or corrupted, when the electricity supply is removed, whatever the reason for supply interruption.

It is possible to read from the store, and not restore the information and this is referred to as Grandtotalling or destructive-read-out, this being known ferrite store technique.

When the information is to be examined and then restored, the process is called sub-totalling or nondestructive-read-out. Operation of keys X and A will cause a sub-total to be indicated and printed.

The Z key performs destructive read-out of Grandtotalling operations on particular totals, e.g., shop assistant totals.

A grand total of a category, for example, is performed by Z and the category required.

The socket connectors 36, 38 will be connected respectively to plugs 40 (FIG. 3) and 42 (FIG. 4). The connector 37 will be connected to a plug (not shown) which controls an electromagnetic device for controlling the feeding of the ticket paper and for operating a ticket severing device.

FIG. 2 shows the general assembly of the indicators and power driven means for operating them. They comprise a series of indicator drums of which only one is shown at 45 with its operating means and two others are generally indicated at 46, 47. Print wheels are also provided one of which is shown at 49.

Drum 45 is one of a set of drums visible to the shopkeeper and 47 is one of a similar set visible to the customer. The two sets are geared together. Thus the drums 45, 47 may carry the indications S/T LIST and Total and the print wheel 49 carry the same indications.

Each drum carries a pinion 50 in mesh with a gearwheel 51. The gearwheel 51 has a series of pinions 52 in mesh with it, of which only one is shown. The series of pinions 52 are carried on a series of spindles of which one is indicated by the line 54 and each of these spindles carries pinions 53, 55, which drive the drum 47 and print wheels 49, through gearwheel 56 and pinions 57.

A pinion 59 in mesh with gearwheel 51 is geared to a toothed element in the form of a circular disc 64 having peripheral teeth except for an edentate portion 65. Thus the disc 64 is permanently geared to the corresponding indicator drums and print wheels. These discs 64 could, if desired, be replaced by a linear rack with suitable modification of other parts. All the discs 64 are engaged at their edentate portions by a rod or bail 66 which is mounted on a pair of sector shaped plates 67,68 which are pivotally mounted on a spindle 70 that I also carries the discs 64. The plates 67, 68 are provided with studs 71, 72 angularly offset from the bail 66 which studs enter slots 73, 74 in arms 75, 76. These arms are pivotally mounted at their lower ends on a spindle 78. Between their ends the arms are provided with rolls 80,81 engaged by cams 82, 83 on a camshaft 85. The camshaft 85 carries a plate 86 (FIG. 4) fixed to it on which a pawl 87 is pivotally mounted, this pawl being urged towards the shaft 85 by a spring 88. Surrounding the camshaft 85 is a sleeve on which is fixed a gearwheel 90 and a dog clutch plate 91 having dog clutch notches 92. The gearwheel is constantly driven by gears 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, the latter being fast on the spindle of an electric motor 98 (FIG. 2). The pawl 87 has a dog 100 which can enter into any one of the notches 92 whereupon the pawl and its plate 86 are rotated carrying the camshaft round also. The clutch pawl 87 is normally held disengaged by a control pawl 101 which can be depressed to release the pawl 87 by the armature 102 of a solenoid 1103. The solenoid 103 is connected by the connector 42 to the electronic control device. Thus when the pawl 87 is released the camshaft is rotated through one revolution whereupon it is stopped because the pawl 101 will have returned to its normal position (by a spring 104) in which it causes pawl 87 to disengage and serves as an abutment against which a projection 105 on plate 86 engages to stop the plate 86 and the camshaft.

Rotation of the camshaft through one revolution is term cycling of the register. During the initial part of a cycle the rods 20 are all withdrawn from the plungers so that the keys are all restored by the springs 17 to their normal positions. Then the cams 82, 83 raise the arms 75, 76 whereupon the bail 66 engages the discs 64 at the ends of their edentate parts and moves them to their zero positions, together with the indicator drums and print wheels. Over the next part of the cycle the bail moves back thereby permitting the toothed discs with the indicator drums and print wheels to move successively through their number values by means of springs 106 until they are arrested in positions corresponding to the required information. The arresting of the toothed discs is effected by means of pawls 107 op erated by the armatures 108 of solenoids 109 which are connected by multicore cable 110 and plug 40 to the electronic calculating device.

The modified form of keyboard shown in FIG. 6 is for use with a dollar currency. The first column is the same as FIG. 1. The second column of FIG. 1 (half-penny key) is omitted. The second column (1 to 9) of FIG. 6 is the same as the third of FIG. 1 and the third column of FIG. 6 is similar to the fourth column of FIG. 1 but instead of representing the numbers I to 9 plus a half, the keys serve for the numbers 1 to 9 preceded by the tens figure 1. Thus the values I to 9 in both second and third columns of FIG. 6 must control the same indicator drum and the same print wheel. All the keys in the second and third columns are arranged to cycle the machine. The fourth column covers to 90 cents. If desired, the 10 key could cycle the register. The other keys do not cycle the machine.

The fifth and sixth columns serve for l to 9 and 10 to 90 dollars and are non-cycling keys. The seventh, eighth and ninth columns are the same as the eighth, ninth and tenth columns of FIG. 1.

The electronic calculating and control device is largely based on known principles of memory storage and read-out (e.g., Logical Design of Digital Computers by Montgomery Phister, Jr., published by John Wiley & Sons Inc. see Chapter 9). A complete illustration of the entire circuitry is therefore unnecessary. A general description will, however, now be given.

FIG. 7 shows basically by way of example what the circuitry is required to accomplish. The area K represents keyboard and extends over vertical columns representing keys on the keyboard. Thus A1 Cash, A2 Category i.e., all keys in the 8th column A3 Shop Assistant (i.e., all keys in the 9th column), A4 Z, A5 X, A6 Amount Tendered, A7 Credit, A8 Key A.

The area B1 covers a vertical column representing Functions which can only be carried out with cycling of the apparatus when the keys indicated in the corresponding horizontal lines are operated. Thus B2 LIST BOTH, B3 LIST BOTH (CREDIT), B4 SUBTO- TAL, B5 AMOUNT TENDERED, B6 X CATEGORY.

Under the heading Functions are the names of various functions to be carried out before a cycling operation occurs. The function cannot be performed unless all the conditions indicated in the horizontal rows are existing, whereupon the cycling of the machine can take place. In the horizontal rows 1 means that the key must be down and 0 means that the key must be up. List Both" means that the machine will not cycle by operating the LIST key or a live amount key unless a key is activated in each of the Category and Shop Assistant columns. Similarly with other functions.

FIG. 8 shows a scanning and memory store system wherein there are five memory stores A, B, C, D, E, and three scanning operations, viz. Scan 1, Scan 2, Scan 3, which are effected successively. C1 Scan 1 (Operator Function), i.e. the apparatus scans for the items in the top horizontal line, viz. C2 LIST BOTH, C3 LIST BOTH CREDIT, C4 SUBTOTAL, C5 AMOUNT TENDERED, C6 CHANGE DUE which automatically follows by a second cycling of the machine from C6, C7 AUTOMATIC if B is negative which will be described later, C8 X Category. Because C6 or C7 automatically follow C1-C5 they are not shown in FIG. 7.

Area Dl covers SCAN 2, D2 A Store KEY BOARD Amounts, D3 B Store CUSTOMERS TO- TAL, D4 C Store MACHINE TOTAL, D5 D Store CATEGORY TOTALS, and D6 E Store SHOP ASSIS- TANT TOTALS.

Area E1 is SCAN 3, E2 A Store, E3 B Store, E4 C Store, E5 D Store and E6 E Store, F DIS- PLAY and G DISPLAY with destruction of memory store information.

At the end of Scan 2, it is known whether the result of calculations on B Store is to be negative or not. If the result is not negative then Scan 3 follows normally. If, however, the result proves to be negative, then the instructions shown under Column C7 are automatically selected during Scan 3. During the particular instruction (FIG. 8, Column C7, Row E3) labelled H, a negative marker is inserted.

Prior to Scan 1 there are pre-scans which continuously search the keyboard for an operated live key. On finding a live key nothing happens until the end of the complete scan. On reading the end of a complete scan containing a live key, a signal is sent within the logic which starts Scan 1.

Scan I serve to scan the keyboard to detect which keys indicated by the top horizontal line of FIG. 7 have been depressed. Scan 1 thus detects which of the functions indicated in the left hand vertical column of FIG. 7 are to be carried out. Certain interlocks are provided so that the apparatus will not cycle if the operator presses wrong keys, e.g., two keys of the same column. The second Scan scans the five memory store systems and, in effect, for C2 adds the keyboard indicated amount to the store totals. For the next vertical column C3 represented by the key marked (FIG. 8) (indicating refund) the scanning provides signals which leave the A store unchanged, deducts the A store from the B store, leaves the C store unchanged, adds the A store to the D store and leaves the E store unchanged. Similarly for all the other columns. FIG. 8 shows only some of the vertical columns and the other (X credit, X shop assistant, and etc.) will be obvious.

The third scanning (Scan 3) automatically follows Scan 2, e.g., having scanned the items in column C2 the remaining items in that column are scanned in Scan 3. Scan 3 provides signals which on cycling by the key 15A causes A store to be displayed by the indicator drums and to be printed, and leaves the other stores unchanged. Similarly, for the other columns as indicated. The reference G means that the store is read-out destructively, i.e., the store is restored to zero.

If at the end of Sean 2 the result is negative, Scan 3 takes the alternative form shown in column C7.

The general nature of the keyboard control 30 and part of the function decoder 31A will now be described with reference to FIG. 9 including means required for transferring whole numbers from two columns (1 to 9 and the l to 9 parts of column 10 to 19) to the same solenoid such as 109 to determine the position of the corresponding whole-number drum such as 45 and also for transferring the halfpenny from the composite key column containing halves as well as the single halfpenny key to the solenoid such as 109 which determines the position of the halfpenny drum 45. FIG. 9

shows part of the keyboard matrix 115 connected by lines 27 (corresponding to 27 in FIG. to the keyboard control 30.

The apparatus has a clock to synchronize all actions, and in this apparatus an oscillator or multivibrator 116 forms the basis of the clock. A series of pulses is produced by the multivibrator and particular pulses are fed to a ring counter 117 marked X. Every time the counter 117 overflows, a pulse is fed to another similar counter 118 marked Y.

Output lines 119 from the counter 117 are connected via transistor switches 121 to the horizontal rows of the matrix 115 and the output lines 122 from counter 118 are connected via transistor switches 120 to the columns of the matrix 115. The switches 120 and 121 are connected to a keyboard output circuit 124 such that when a switch 25 in the matrix 115 is closed a circuit is established through the circuit 124 when the corresponding switches 120, 121 are closed. The outputs from 117 and 118 are used to determine information paths through the switching elements 25.

The clock system of the machine is continuously running and because of this the keyboard matrix 115 is continually scanned. When a switch 25 at the intersection of a column and a row is conducting, there is a complete signal path and an output is produced.

The ring counters are of well known conventional type. By monitoring the output it is possible to determine which switches 25 are closed, and which are not.

When the operator sets the keys, the last one must be a cycling key i.e., if the last key is not a cycling value key he must finally operate key A to cause cycling. The columns of cycling keys are termed live columns.

In setting the keyboard, the logic circuit ignores all signals until one is sensed in a live column.

This initiates the logic functioning of the apparatus. Various checks are made on the sequence of signals to determine the validity of the keyboard settings, i.e., if

two keys are depressed in the 1 to 9 column the apparatus will not cycle and the operator must reset the keys and start again.

The keyboard output circuit presents a signal to the main logic of the machine via line 125 when an external continuous circuit is detected as described through a switch 25.

The X-ring counter 117 has output signals in two forms, one (119) is used to drive the keyboard switching circuit 121, and the second is in coded form on four lines 126, 127, 128, 129. The lines 125, 126, 127, 128, 129 lead to the function decoder 31A. The code present on the outputs 126, 127, 128, 129 is in the form 8, 4, 2, 1. When there is an output from the keyboard, and if columns A or B are selected by the Y-ring counter 118, then the code is staticized by the four bistable elements 130.

At the appropriate time during SCAN 1 this staticized information 01-08 is committed to the ferrite store 31D via lines 1308. The bistables 130 are then reset, so that they may be used to staticize further information.

The binary coding is fed by lines 126-129 to AND gates 130A connected to the four bistables which are of the type known as type RS. Output column signals from columns A and B are fed at A1 and B1 to an OR gate 132which in turn feed signals to the AND gates A. In this manner corresponding whole numbers from columns A and B are fed to the bistables 130.

Similarly, signals from columns A and C are fed at A2, C1 to AND gates 140, 141, which in turn are connected to an OR gate 142 which feeds a signal for one halfpenny to the store 143 whether it comes from column A or column C.

To display the keyboard information, the ferrite memory referred to earlier is read-out and the relevant information is transferred to the display buffer 31E (FIG. 5).

This buffer is of the type known as Content Addressable Memory described in Content Addressable and Associated Memory Systems A survey by A.G.I-Ianlon, I.E.E.E. Transactions on Electronic Computers, Vol. EC15, No. 4, pages 509-521.

Information is stored in this buffer in coded form binary-coded decimal code, the code being in sympathy with the positions of the characters on the print wheels.

On completion of the logic arithmetic, the logic causes the clutch solenoid 103 to be actuated.

This in turn initiates one revolution of the display and printing mechanism. Synchronized to the movement of the display wheels is a timing disc 151 (FIG. 2) and when each character is in a position to be displayed, a signal is generated by the timing disc and sensed by a sensing element 153.

These signals are sent by line 152 to a suitable timing counter circuit 152A which generates a code. The code is transmitted to buffer 31E which compares them with the codes stored in the display buffer, and for each position where this particular code is found stored, one of the solenoids 109 is actuated.

The above code comparison occurs for every character position on the drums.

The information displayed is that dictated by the last keyboard settings in conjunction with the information already in the logic and is retained until the next cycle of the apparatus. For example in FIG. 8 under C2, at position E2 is shown the word display. This means that the keyboard settings were as B2 in FIG. 7 and meant list both; and list both in FIG. 8 means, do the calculations shown but display the contents of A store. From D2 (FIG. 8) it is seen that A store is the keyboard amount. In this example therefore, the amount just entered on the keyboard is the amount displayed. Similarly C4 (FIG. 8) displays the customers total.

Signals from all other keys are transferred in similar manner through gates and memory stores such as 132, 130.

The ticket printing and issuing devices are illustrated in FIGS. 10 and 11. Within the function decoder 31A there is logic circuit to establish that it is necessary to perform a task called ticket-issue. Referring to FIG. 7 row B5 for example, then the function Amount Tendered will require a ticket to be issued. This requirement is decoded by normal means using logic elements, and provided that the resultant calculation is satisfactorily completed, then a signal is transferred via plug 37 to operate the ticket issue mechanism.

The ticket driver device 33 (FIG. 5) receives a signal from the function decoder when all appropriate systems are in order. Thus in FIG. 10 connections 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168 carry signals representing Cash keys operated, Category, Shop Assistant, Z, X, Amount Tendered, Credit, 15A, Change due respectively. These signals are fed through an AND gate 170 to the Ticket Issue Driver 33 which then sends a signal to operate the ticket printing and operating means. Thus all keys, 161, 162, 163, 164, 166, should signal to indicate no keys depressed and the other lines should signal all of these keys depressed.

The meaning of change-due (168 on FIG. 11) is that the customer has offered either enough, or more than enough, money to pay the bill.

The signal from 33 is sent to a solenoid 172 (FIG. 11), the armature 173 of which engages a lever 174 which is urged in one direction by a spring 175 and actuated in the other direction when the solenoid is energized.

A shaft 178 is driven during cycling of the machine and carries a guillotine-operating cam 179 fixed to it. The shaft also carries a rotary member fixed to it on which is fixed a driven pin 180, and two cams 182, 183 fixed together and mounted freely on the shaft 178. The cam 182 is a ticket drive cam and the cam 183 is a printing platen drive cam. Between the cams 182, 183 and pivoted thereon is a pawl 185. When the solenoid 172 is energized the lever 174 tilts and a projection 187 thereon is removed from one end of pawl 185 so that it swings and brings its other end into the path of the drive pin 180 whereupon the two cams 182, 183 are rotated.

Cam 182 operates a lever 190 pivoted at 191 and connected to a rack 192 which drives a ticket driving roll 193 to drive the ticket strip 194.

The cam 183 engages a roll 196 carried by a lever 197 which actuates a rod 198 engaged by a cam element 200. The rod 198 carries a projection 201 which knocks up a roll 202 on an arm 203. The arm 203 is limited in its lower position by stop 203A and carries a rod 204A which passes up through a hole in an arm 204 which carries a printing platen 205. The rod 204A is bent over and down to carry a stop 204B which limits the upward movement of the arm 204. A spring 204C between arm 204 and the rod 204A urges arm 204 up to the stop 204B. The rod 198 is shown in its uppermost position in which the cam pin 200 has cammed the rod 198 out to bring the projection 201 free from the pin 202. The arms 203, 204 are thus lifted up and then dropped so that the platen presses the ticket 194 against print wheels 206.

The guillotine cam 179 is engaged by a roll 207 on an arm 208 so as to push this up on every revolution of the shaft 178. The arm 208 is mounted on a pivot 210 which also carries an arm 211. Pivoted on the arm 211 is a pawl 212 which has a roll 213 engaged by a projection 214 on the lever 174. The pawl 212 also has a projection 215. The arm 208 is moved up and down without moving the arm 211 until the projection 214 releases roll 213 on pawl 212, whereupon the projection 215 moves into the path of a roll 216 on the arm 208. The next upward movement of the arm 208 causes roll 216 to drive the pawl 212 and the arm 211 up. The arm 211 operates a pawl 218 which drives a guillotine (not shown) along the plane indicated by the broken line 220 to sever the ticket from the strip.

The use of composite keys 1 to 9 and 1% to 9% or 1 to 9 and 11 to l9 which are all live or cycling keys forms the subject of our British Pat. application No. 62227/69.

It is to be understood that the present invention can be used in apparatus not provided with such double columns of live keys.

The apparatus is not limited to cash registers and may be applied to other apparatus such as accounting machines, adding machines, bookkeeping machines and desk calculators, with or without visual indicating means and/or print-out mechanisms.

Conveniently, the above apparatus may be modified to operate without the push-button or key members. For example, the input information data may be applied by inserting a card having the input information data provided thereon in the form of magnetized characters, the magnetized parts of the card being used to effect electromagnetic coils for example to provide an input into the electronic circuitry. Alternatively, shade distinguishable characters may be used. Punched card data or other forms of data can also be used.

Thus by the present invention we have provided a machine which may be operated in a very fast manner due to the elimination of an operator movement, e.g., for any sale whose value is between V; and 9% (or if desired even higher values) a single operation of a key will effect the entire transaction. Thus whereas, for example, in certain known machines the entry of 9% would require depression of three keys, this can all be accomplished in accordance with the present invention by depression of a single key.

If desired the calculating mechanism may be mechanical instead of electrical.

We claim:

1. 1n apparatus for indicating number values applied thereto and effecting computations from said values and indicating the results thereof comprising input means in the form of a keyboard having a plurality of key members arranged in columns wherein two of the columns are corresponding columns such that the key members in one of the two columns corresponds to a series of whole numbers and the key members in the other of these two columns corresponds to the same series of whole numbers plus an additional numerical item and the key members of at least one further column represents higher values than said two corresponding columns, indicator means including a series of indicator elements, power operable actuating means which control operation of the indicator elements, a start device which initiates operation of said actuating means, stop means for stopping said actuating means after said actuating means has actuated the indicator elements, one of said indicator elements serving as a common indicator element to indicate the said whole numbers of both said corresponding columns, another of said indicator elements indicating said additional numerical item, electronic means responsive to said input means, controlling the actuating means and the indicating means to thereby determine the indicating conditions of the indicator elements according to the values of the key members which have been actuated including (a) controlling said common indicator element according to the whole number values of the keys in said two corresponding columns and (b) controlling another indicator element according to the said additional numerical item, and means for actuating said start device upon operation of any key member in said two corresponding columns, all other whole number amount key members being ineffective to operate the start device.

2. Apparatus as claimed in claim 1, wherein one of said two columns is arranged for entering numbers 1 to 9 representing pence while the adjacent column can enter 1% to 9% pence; said key members further including a one half-penny key member which-also actuates the start device and said another of said indicator element controlled by said actuating means according to the additional numerical items in the keys of the adjacent column and by the halfpenny key.

3. Apparatus as claimed in claim 1, having two other columns of key members arranged for entering 10 to 19 and 10% to 19% all operating the start device and operating the actuating means to control the same two indicator elements and the key members of both of these columns causing the actuating means to control a third indicator elements for tens.

4. Apparatus as claimed in claim 3, wherein a third column of cycling key members represents 20 to 29 which operate the actuating means to control the same indicator element as the key members of the first and second columns.

5. Apparatus as claimed in claim 1, wherein the key members of one of said two corresponding columns represents 1 to 9 while the other column is 10 to 19 and all these key members operate the start device and operate the actuating means to control two indicator elements viz. one element for items 1 to 9 and the other element for the tens.

6. Apparatus as claimed in claim 1, wherein the key members of a third column represents 10 to 90 key members of which the 10 key operates operation of the start device.

7. Apparatus as claimed in claim 1, having successive columns I to 9 and ll to 19, all key members of which operate the start device and two other successive columns 1 to 9 and 10 to 90 all key members of which inhibit operation of said start device.

8. Apparatus as claimed in claim 1, having successive columns 1 9 and 1% to 9% the key members of which operate the start device and three successive columns 10 to 90,l to9, and 10 to 90 the key members of which inhibit operation of said start device.

9. Apparatus as claimed in claim 1 wherein the actuating means includes an electric motor, and the start device is an electromagnetic device and a clutch controlled by said device and associated with said electric motor to operate the indicator elements; said actuating means including electronic calculating means producing electric signals controlling the condition of the indicator elements; means being provided for producing signals upon actuation of the key members which signals control the operation of the electronic calculating means.

10. Apparatus as claimed in claim ll, having a key other than value keys which causes operation of said start device.

11. Apparatus as claimed in claim 1, having keys for categories of selected items, said actuating means including means for calculating totals of any of these categories separately and operating the indicator elements accordingly.

12. Apparatus as claimed in claim 1, wherein the actuating means includes electronic means which comprises a memory store, logic gating system providing input signals to the memory store, means for sending row code signals to the gating system, and means for sending control signals to the gating system from the key members of said two corresponding columns containing'the same set of numbers, whereby either key of the same number in said two columns can store this number in the same memory store.

13. Apparatus as claimed in claim 1, wherein the electronic means totals the items applied to the keyboard and a said key member is provided for operating the start device whereby the total signals from the electronic means control the indicating elements to indicate totals.

14. Apparatus for indicating number values applied thereto and for effecting computations from said values and indicating the results thereof comprising input means in the form of a keyboard having a plurality of key members arranged in columns wherein two of the columns are corresponding columns such that the key members in one of the columns corresponds to a series of whole numbers and the key members in the other. of these two columns corresponds to the same series of numbers plus an additional numerical item and the key members of at least one further column represents higher values than said two corresponding columns, means responsive to said key member for producing electrical signals, electronic means receiving said electrical signals and emitting signals corresponding to the operated key members, including emitting the same signal for the same whole number derived from either of said two corresponding columns and a different signal for said additional numerical item, a series of indicator systems indicating the items corresponding to the operated keyboard member, and means actuated by said emitted signals for controlling the indicator systems to condition them to show the values corresponding to the actuated keyboard members whereby said indicator systems show the same indication for the same key members of either of said corresponding columns and another indication for the additional numerical item.

15. Apparatus for indicating number values applied thereto and for effecting computations from said values and indicating results thereof comprising input means in the form of a keyboard having a plurality of key members arranged in columns wherein two of the columns are corresponding columns such that the key members in one of the columns corresponds to a series of whole numbers and the key members in the other of these two columns corresponds to the same series of numbers plus an additional numerical item and the key members of at least one further column represents higher values than said two corresponding columns, means for producing electric signals upon operation of any of the key members, indicator means including a series of indicator elements, power operable actuating means including a mechanism which controls actuation of the indicator elements, a start device operated by an said electrical signal for initiating operation of said actuating means, first stop means for stopping said actuating means after said mechanism has actuated the indicator elements, one of said indicator elements serving as a common indicator element to indicate the said whole numbers for both said corresponding columns, another of said indicator element indicating said additional numerical item, a plurality of second stop means for stopping the movement of the indicator elements in their positions corresponding to the key members that have been operated, said plurality of second stop means being a common stop means serving to control the key member in either of said two corresponding columns, said electronic means sending start signals to said start device upon operation of any key in said two corresponding columns and sending signals to said second stop means consequent upon operation of any key members representing values.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3920979 *Oct 19, 1973Nov 18, 1975Jack S KilbyElectronic check writer
US3973113 *Sep 19, 1974Aug 3, 1976Goldsamt Alan BElectronic calculator for feet-inch-fraction numerics
US4064398 *Mar 18, 1975Dec 20, 1977Canon Kabushiki KaishaElectronic calculator
US4081859 *Jun 4, 1976Mar 28, 1978Goldsamt Alan BElectronic calculator for feet-inch-fraction numerics
US4100603 *Dec 16, 1976Jul 11, 1978Joseph Lyndon BoydFeet, inches and sixteenths adder
US4744044 *Jun 20, 1986May 10, 1988Electronic Teacher's Aids, Inc.Hand-held calculator for dimensional calculations
US4860233 *Oct 22, 1985Aug 22, 1989Pitchford Leonard JDedicated foot/inch calculator
US5623433 *Mar 11, 1996Apr 22, 1997Redin; Jaime H.Extended numerical keyboard with structured data-entry capability
Classifications
U.S. Classification705/25, 235/145.00R, 708/142
International ClassificationH03M11/20, G07G1/10, G06F3/02, G06C7/06, G06C11/02, G07G1/00
Cooperative ClassificationH03M11/20, G07G1/0018, G06Q20/20, G07G1/10, G06C7/06
European ClassificationG06Q20/20, G07G1/00B, G07G1/10, H03M11/20, G06C7/06
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jun 3, 1983AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: CAR GUARD COMPANY LIMITED THE, A BRITISH COMPANY
Effective date: 19830328
Owner name: CHUBB CASH REGISTERS LIMITED REED HOUSE, 47 CHURCH
Jun 3, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: CHUBB CASH REGISTERS LIMITED REED HOUSE, 47 CHURCH
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:CAR GUARD COMPANY LIMITED THE, A BRITISH COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:004132/0735
Effective date: 19830328
Owner name: CHUBB CASH REGISTERS LIMITED REED HOUSE, ENGLAND
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:CAR GUARD COMPANY LIMITED THE, A BRITISH COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:004132/0735