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Publication numberUS3739681 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 19, 1973
Filing dateNov 17, 1972
Priority dateNov 17, 1972
Publication numberUS 3739681 A, US 3739681A, US-A-3739681, US3739681 A, US3739681A
InventorsDunlop J
Original AssigneeDunlop J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Finger pick for stringed musical instruments
US 3739681 A
Abstract
A finger pick comprising the conventional string-actuating part of sheet material and tapering conformation; and extending in opposite directions from the base of said tapering part means for securing the pick to the player's finger tips in the form of annular wings. Segments of the outer edges of said wings, i.e., the edges opposite the side where the string-actuating part is located, are flared outwardly with respect to the center line of the annulus defined by said wings to reduce discomfort to, and tiring of, the fingers during use of the pick formerly caused by the outer edges of the wings cutting into the back of the player's fingers in reaction to the force applied to the strings of the instrument through the string-actuating part of the pick.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Dunlop I FINGER PICK FOR STRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS [76] Inventor: James Dunlop,126 Dartmouth Place, Benicia, Calif. 94510 [22] Filed: Nov. 17, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 307,484

Moores 84/322 v Primary Examiner-Richard B. Wilkinson Assistant Examiner-Pat Salce Attorney-Kurt A. Tauchen 7] ABSTRACT A finger pick comprising the conventional stringactuating part of sheet material and tapering conformation; and extending in opposite directions from the base of said tapering part means for securing the pick to the player's finger tips in the form of annular wings. Segments of the outer edges of said wings, i.e., the edges opposite the side where the string-actuating part is located, are flared outwardly with respect to the center line of the annulus defined by said wings to reduce discomfort to, and tiring of, the fingers during use of the pick formerly caused by the outer edges of the wings cutting into the back of the players fingers in reaction to the force applied to the strings of the instrument through the string-actuating part of the pick.

3 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures Patented June 19, 1973 FINGER PICK FOR STRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS The present invention relates to finger picks for musical instruments, i.e., devices worn on the finger tips of players of guitars, banjos, mandolinas and the like to actuate, i.e., depress or pluck, the strings of such instruments. Such finger picks are usually made of sheet material, such as sheet metal, and comprise a fingerreceiving part for attachment to the players fingers, and a string'actuating part for depressing or plucking the strings of the instrument. The latter part is usually of tapering conformation, and the part for attachment to the player's fingers may have the form of two arcuate or annular wings that project in opposite directions from opposite sides of the base'of the tapering stringactuating part.

The finger-receiving wings of the described device have to be fairly tight to safely retain the device on the players fingers during play. The present invention is based upon the discovery'that during prolonged use the outer edges of these wings, i.e., edges on the side opposite to where the tapering stringactuating part projects, cut into the players fingers under the reaction of the force applied to the strings of the instrument through the string-actuating part, causing discomfort and even pain which tire the player prematurely.

It is an object of my invention to arrange the fingerattaching means of picks, of the type here under consideration, in such a manner that they do not tire the player.

More specifically, it is an object of my invention to provide finger attachment means for picks, of the type referred to, that do not cut into or cause any other discomfort to the players fingers even after prolonged hard use of the pick.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a finger pick for musical instruments, that may easily and painlessly be slipped into position on the players fingers.

These and other objects of the present invention will be apparent from the following description of the accompanying drawing which illustrates a preferred embodiment thereof and wherein:

FIG. 1 is an enlarged perspective of a finger pick embodying my invention viewed from a point in front of the pick and showing the players finger in phantom lines; and

FIG. 2 is another enlarged perspective of the finger pick of my invention viewed from a point at the rear of the pick.

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary cross section through the pick taken across line 3 3 of FIG. 1 and viewed in the direction of the arrows associated with said line.

In accordance with the invention the outer upper edge, or segments of the outer upper edge of the annu-- lar part for attachment of the pick to the players fingers isflared outwardly to a slight degree (with respect to the center line of the annulus defined by said part) to form a shallow lip. Thus, when the annular attachment part of the pick is pushed backwardly onto the players finger under the reaction of the force applied to the strings of the instrument through the string actuating part of the pick, the outer edge ot the finger attachment partcannot bite into and cause discomfort or pain to the players finger.

Having reference to the drawing, the numeral 10 identifies the body portion or pick proper" of the pick which is made of a suitable sheet material such as a sheet of plastic material but preferably sheet metal, such as a sheet of silver nickel alloy. It is of tapering conformation and in practical use underlies the players finger tip with its point 12 projecting a limited distance beyond the players finger tips, as shown in FIG. 1. To attach the pick removably to the players finger tips, annular or arcuate wingsl4a and 14b project in opposite directions from the base l5 of the conical body 10 to form a split annulus or sheath into which the player's finger may he slipped and which fits snugly over'the players finger. Openings 16 may be provided in the body portion 10 of the pick and its annular wings 14a and 14b to increase the resilient flexibility of the device and admit air to the finger tip of the player thus reducing the tendency of the finger tip to perspire during the effort of the play. For the player to use the device effectively in depressing the strings of instruments such as guitars, mandolinas, banjos and the like, the device must fit the finger rather tightly, and in response to the pressure exerted by the players fingers upon the strings of the instrument during play, the outer edge of the annular wings 14a and 14b of the device, i.e., the edge of the annular attachment means of the device on the side opposite to where the tapering body portion 10 of the pick is located, bites into the back of the players fingers. In time this is a source of discomfort and may even be painful; in any case it causes premature tiring of the players fingers during prolonged performances. In accordnace with the invention, therefore, the outer edges of the annular wings 14a and 14b of the pick which overlie the backs of the players fingers, are slightly flared outwardly with respect to the center axis of the annulus defined by the wings 14a and 14b, as shown at 18a and 18 b, so that they cannot cut into the backs of the players finger tips but form shallow lips that bear gently against the players fingers in response to-the pressure brought to bear against the strings of the musical instrument by the pick proper 10 of the device of my invention. In addition the outwardly flared lip 18a and 18b along the outer edges of the annular attachment means of the pick of my invention act as a funnel that makes it easier and more comfortable for the player to slip the pick upon his finger tips. As shown in the drawing, the outwardly flare lips 18a and 18b along the outer edge of the annular wings 14a and 14b of the device of my invention are preferably located along the segments of the outer wing edges close to the end edges 20a and 20b thereof, but they may extend along the total circumference of the outer wing edges and may reach into the end edges 20a and 20b of said wings.

I claim:

1. A finger pick for stringed musical instruments such as guitars, mandolinas and banjos comprising a stringoperating part of tapering conformation, having a point and a base, and extending in opposite directions from said base annular wings for attachment of the pick to the player's finger, said wings having inner edges on the side of said tapering string-depressing part, outer edges on the opposite side and end edges between said outer and inner side edges, segments of said outer edges being flared outwardly with respect to the center line of the annulus defined by said wings.

2. A finger pick according to claim ll wherein said outwardly flared edge segments are located adjacent to and extend over into said end edges.

actuating part and outer edges on the opposite side, segments of said outer edges being flared outwardly with respect of the center axis of the annulus defined by said finger attachment means, to form shallow lips.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US471221 *Oct 7, 1891Mar 22, 1892 Paper-delivering tip
US842920 *Mar 13, 1906Feb 5, 1907William ThedorfPick.
US1787136 *Jul 30, 1928Dec 30, 1930Beauchamp George DPick for stringed musical instruments
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4395932 *Feb 4, 1982Aug 2, 1983Perry A. MillsStringed instrument pick
US4879940 *Oct 3, 1988Nov 14, 1989Pereira Mark LPick for stringed musical instruments
US4899557 *Sep 26, 1988Feb 13, 1990Marcus SchwartzStable fingernail ring
US5323677 *Apr 13, 1993Jun 28, 1994Knutson John APick for plucking stringed musical instruments
US5648622 *Jan 18, 1996Jul 15, 1997Storey; David C.Pick for a stringed musical instrument
US6008442 *Feb 5, 1999Dec 28, 1999Reidenbach; Bryan L.Pick with wear indicator
US6335477 *Mar 30, 1999Jan 1, 2002Frederic Smith MillerMusical instrument picks and novel methods of use
US7375268 *Feb 1, 2006May 20, 2008H. G. “Rusty” ThornhillMachine with which stringed instruments will be picked or plucked
US7718874 *Feb 25, 2009May 18, 2010Ka C. CheokGuitar pick
US8764898May 25, 2012Jul 1, 2014George Wayne HobbsAdhesive composition for the non-permanent adhesion of finger and thumb picks for the play of stringed instruments
CN102568448A *Feb 28, 2012Jul 11, 2012赖德龙Finger playing piece
WO2002031808A1 *Oct 10, 2001Apr 18, 2002King Michael LPick for use in playing stringed instruments
Classifications
U.S. Classification84/322, 984/123
International ClassificationG10D3/00, G10D3/16
Cooperative ClassificationG10D3/163
European ClassificationG10D3/16B