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Publication numberUS3740037 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 19, 1973
Filing dateJun 11, 1971
Priority dateJun 12, 1970
Also published asDE2129113A1
Publication numberUS 3740037 A, US 3740037A, US-A-3740037, US3740037 A, US3740037A
InventorsBono E De
Original AssigneeBono E De
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Board game apparatus
US 3740037 A
Abstract
A stock market board game apparatus wherein a playing piece board is marked with a playing piece path along which playing pieces are moved in accordance with the throws of dice or the like. The playing piece path is divided into areas some of which bear indicia that the area corresponds to a respective stock, and others of which bear indicia that a shares-price indicator be moved along a shares-price indicator path. The apparatus includes a shares-price board marked with shares areas equally spaced in columns, each column corresponding to a respective stock, and a share-price list for each column, each list having marked thereon, at spacings equal to the spacing between the share areas in their columns, indications of the price of a share. The prices at one end of each list are higher than at the other and the shares-price indicator path is divided into areas bearing indicia as to movement of the lists in relation to their respective columns so varying the shares prices.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

de Bono 1451 June 19, 1973 BOARD GAME APPARATUS Primary Examiner-Delber t B. Lowe [76] Inventor: Edward de Bn0,4l North Road, Anomlfy Anhur Dowell and Arthur Whilttesford, Cambridge, England Dow: [22] Filed: June 11, 1971 57 ABSTRACT [21 1 Appl. No; 152,153 A stock market board game apparatus wherein a play- 1 I ing piece board is marked with a playing piece path 9 along which playing pieces are moved in accordance [30] Forelgn Applicauolf P nonty Data with the throws of dice or the like. The playing piece June 12, i970 Great Britain 28,674/70 path is divided into areas some of which bear iii-dicia i that the area corresponds to a respective stock, and [52] 273/134 A 273/134 273/134 B others of which bear indicia that a shares-price indica- [51] Int. Cl. A63f 3/00 be moved along a Shares pric,e indium)r path The [58] Field of Search... 273/134, 135 apparatus i d a h i board marked with shares areas equally spaced in columns, each column [56] 1 References C'ted I corresponding to a respective stock, and a share-price I .UNlTED STATES PATENTS list for each column, each list having marked thereon, 1,760,287 /1930 Schippers.L..l 273 135 c at spacings 6(will to the Spacing between the Share 2,794,642 6/1957 areas in their columns, indications of the price of a 3,058,747 /1962 Nemetsky et al. 273/134 AD share. The prices at one end of each list are higher than 3,556,528 l/l97l 1 Spiring 1. 273/ 134 AC at the other and the 5hares price indicator path is di- FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS vided into areas beariag'indicia as to movement of the 915,550 1/1963 Great Britain 273 134 AC hsts m to respectwe'wlum' "arymg I the shares pr1ces.

8 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures INDEX INDEX TA MQVES lNSUR. MOVES BONUS 1 PREMlUM 2 I;

' NDE start allstocks MGM allstocks TWA diygggds IBM llstocks euu= allstocks {pg g 3 5 for up up up up 22 g? down down down down i 1% gt max 2 1 1 2 passes l l l 2 1 M L EXPENSES R Q I p 6 mom mlaalalaaauom 2 l2 GULF allstod s allstocks IBM tax TWA allstocks MGM allstocks a each kid 1 down down down MOVES pay as'ind gx' MOVES 2 dlvldend passes 2 l v 3 2 INDEX $500 MOVES LEGACY PASS PATENIED JUN 1 9 ms Fly. 2.

sum a or a IBM DIV. $50

GULF

DIV. $40

FORD

DWL$3O TWA DIV. $10

MGM

vcnlor PATENIEDJUN I 91973 3 (40, 037

SHEET 3 BF v3 I I00 I00 I00 I00 I50 I40 I30 I H0 200 I80 I60 I40 I20 250 220 I90 I60 I .50 LOO 310 240 I MGM TWA FORD GULF IBM In 40mm! M BOARD GAME APPARATUS This invention relates to board game apparatus. In particular the apparatus is intended for use in a game in which dealings on the stock-market are simulated. The object of the game is to make simulated fortunes by buying and selling stocks.

Apparatus in accordance with the invention comprises the combination of:

A playing piece board marked with a playing piece path which is divided into areas and around which playing pieces may be moved in accordance with throws of a die or the like, at least some of the areas containing or indicating respective instructions to a player whose playing piece lands thereon;

a shares price board marked with share-areas equally spaced in columns, each column being associated with a respective stock and a share price list for each column, each list having marked thereon at spacings equal to the spacing between the share-areas in their columns indications of the price of a share, the arrangement being such that a price list may be placed on the shares price board adjacent to its column of corresponding share areas with each of the areas adjacent to a respective price indication; and

chance selection means enabling chance selection of instructions relating to the positions of the price lists on the shares price board.

The chance selection means preferably is so arranged as to create periods during which the shares prices tend to increase, and other periods during which they tend to decrease, and in this case preferably comprises a share-index piece path, which may be marked on the playing piece board, the said path being divided into areas so that a share index piece may be moved around the path in accordance with instructions contained in or indicated by said some of the areas of the playing piece path.

Other areas of the playing piece path indicate that a player whose piece lands thereon must make a transaction involving a respective stock.

Preferably other areas of both the playing piece path and the shares index piece path indicate that payments should be made by or to one or more players.

In playing the game a number of share-tokens (which may be included in theapparatus) representing the respective shares are placed on each of the share-areas. The price of the share-tokens in each share area is indicated by the respective share price list. A player clearly will wish to buy stock as cheaply as possible, and as the shares on a lowest price area become exhausted it will be apparent that a player wishing to buy further of the same stock will have to buy at a higher price as indicated by the shares price board. Thus the price of shares tends to increase in accordance with the demand therefor.

The maximum number of share-tokens available on each share area is set in accordance with the number of players. A player wishing to sell stock will clearly wish to sell at the highest price he can obtain and he may do this by replacing share-tokens on the highest priced corresponding share areas which'l'iave not the maximum number of share-tokens thereon. In this way the price of shares tend to fall as shares are sold.

The share prices further vary as the shares price lists are moved in accordance with the chance selected instructions (preferably from the share index price path).

The apparatus preferably also includes playing and shares index pieces and a supply of token money.

One embodiment of the invention will now be described by way of example with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a plan of a playing board marked with a playing piece path and a shares index piece path;

FIG. 2 is a plan of a shares price board; and

FIG. 3 is a plan view of five shares price lists for use with the shares price board of FIG. 2 but drawn to a smaller scale.

The playing board shown in FIG. 1 is marked around its periphery with an outer closed path 2 which is divided into rectangular areas. Some of these areas contain instructions to a player whose playing piece lands thereon; others of the areas contain instructions as to the movement of a share index piece which must be obeyed each time a playing piece lands thereon; and yet others of the areas are coloured but otherwise unmarked. In the drawing visually distinguishable surfaces of the otherwise unmarked areas are represented by respective types of hatching lines.

FIG. 2 illustrates a shares price board which is marked with columns of coloured, but otherwise unmarked, share areas. Each column of share areas corresponds to a respective stock which is identified at the foot of the column where a corresponding dividend is also indicated. The share areas are equally spaced in their respective columns and the colour of the areas of each column corresponds to one of the colours of the coloured areas of the playing board. At the start of play a stack 3 of stock units is placedon each of the shares areas on the shares price board.

FIG. 3 illustrates a set of five shares price lists; one corresponding to each of the columns of shares areas and identified by a corresponding; name at the foot of the list. Each list is marked with a series of shares prices at spacings equal to that between the corresponding shares areas (shown to different scales in the drawings). Each of the lists has a common starting price, $100, and is marked with a starting mark 4 comprising a black line positioned just above the $l00 price.

Referringagain to FIG. 1 it will be seen that inside the playing piece path 2 is marked a closed shares index path 6 which is also divided into rectangular areas. With the exception of the area marked start for index the areas each contain an instruction to be obeyed when the shares index piece falls thereon as a result of being moved in accordance with the instructions in playing piece path areas. The majority of these share index areas contain instructions regarding the movement of one or more shares price lists relative to their columns of share areas. However one of the areas 8 contains instructions to pay adividend on all stocks as the share index piece passes (i.e. not only when the piece lands on the area 8).; an area. 10 contains instructions to the players to pay tax on all stocks held as the index passes (i.e. not only when the piece lands on the area 10); and an area 12 contains; instructions that an extra dividend should be paid out on gulf stocks.

It will be understood that the wording and instructions, share prices, dividends, etc., may be varied to suit individual requirements without departing from the invention.

For two or more people the method of play and the appropriaterules are exemplified as=followsz RULES The object of the game:

The object of the game is for the players to make fortunes by buying and selling stocks. No previous knowledge or experience of stocks is required. With good judgement stocks can be bought at a low price and sold at a higher one. The price of the stocks varies from moment to moment, being influenced both by demand for the stock and by general market trends which occur in cycles. Stocks may be bought and sold in deals with a central bank or in deals with other players. Money may also be made from the dividends which are periodically paid out, on all stock units in the possession of the players.

On account of the repeated tax demands it is necessary to make somemoney in order to stay in the game at all. An unsuccessful player may go bankrupt while a successful player may make a bigger fortune than his fellows.

Stock-board and Stock units The stock-board is the board (illustrated in FIG. 2) with columns of coloured spaces, one column for each kind of stock. The stock units are correspondingly coloured rectangles which are placed on the coloured spaces of the stock columns. At the beginning of the game on each space is placed a pile of as many stock units as there are players.

Price-lists The price lists are the long strips (illustrated in FIG. 3) bearing the prices. At the beginning of the game the price lists are placed against the left-hand side of the corresponding stock column (see foot of list). The lists are placed so that the cross-line is level with the top edge of the topmost space in the stock column (i.e. the figure 100 is opposite the topmost space in all the columns).

Playing-board (outer track) The playing-board (illustrated in FIG. 1) consists of an outer track and an inner track which are quite separate. The outer track is for the player's. At the beginning of the game the players place their tokens on the start square in the top left-hand corner of the board. In turn they then move their tokens clockwise around the track according to the throw of a single die, an extra throw being taken whenever a six is shown. (inner track) The inner track is used only by a single token which is common to all players and is called the INDEX TO- KEN. This index token is placed on the Start for index" square (just below the other Start square) and is then moved clockwise around the inner track in the manner described below.

Index token moves When any players token lands on a square bearing the words Index moves." then the index token moves that number of squares in a clockwise direction around the inner track.

Coloured squares When a players token lands on a coloured square this gives him the right to BUY OR SELL STOCK TO THE CENTRAL BANK. This applies to the stock of the same colour as the square he is on only. He can buy or sell as many units of that stock as he wishes. But he is obliged to buy or sell at least one unit. The price of the stock unit is explained below.

Stock unit prices When a stock unit is bought it is taken from the top end of the stock column. The price of the unit is given by the figure on the price list adjacent to the unit. As the units on any one space are bought up it becomes necessary to obtain units from the next space down the column. Here the adjacent price is higher so the price of each unit rises as more units are bought.

When a stock unit is sold back to the bank it is placed on a space as low down the stock column as possible (to get the best selling price) but no space may hold more units than there are players so if this number is filled then the unit must be placed on a space higher up the column. The selling price is given by the figure on the price list adjacent to the space to which the unit is returned.

Private deals A player may only buy and sell stock units to the bank at the market price (i.e. adjacent price on price list) if he lands on the appropriate coloured square. A player may, however, try and buy or sell units through another player who has landed on a coloured square if the other player is willing. The player who is on the coloured square must make ONE definite transaction with the bank, either buying or selling any number of units (at least one unit).

A player may trade with any other player at any time, in any amount and at any agreed price.

Rock-bottom prices The prices described so far have been market prices and are given by the adjacent figures on the price list to the space on the stock column occupied by the unit. The bank will, however, at any time buy any stock back from a player at the lowest price on the price list (e.g. 10 a stock unit for Ford, 20 a unit for TWA etc.). This is the rock-bottom price.

TAX

Players must pay tax whenever they pass the tax square which is in the bottom right-hand corner of the board. This tax may be paid at the end of the turn when any other deals have been concluded but must be paid before the next player takes his turn.

A tax of 20 per stock unit held is paid by all players whenever the index token passes the square with this demand. A further tax of S 200 is payable by all players should the index token land exactly on the appropriate square (both these squares are in the middle of the bottom section of the inner track).

Extra-payments A players token may also land on squares which are concerned with extra money either paid to the bank (insurance premium, medical expenses) or paid by the bank to the player (bonus, legacy, tax rebate).

Price movements As the index token moves around the inner track it may land on a square which indicates, all stocks up 2. This means that the price list alongside the stock column or columns slides up 2 positions with the result that the price of any unit has gone up by two steps. When the instruction reads all stocks down 3", etc., then the price list slides down 3 positions and the prices of all units fall by 3 steps.

Boom and Depression One half of the inner track is concerned with falling prices and is called a DEPRESSION. The other half is concerned with rising prices and is a BOOM.

Price limits The price list cannot move so far up or down that a space on the stock column (whether occupied by units or not) is left without an adjacent price. The price list moves as far as it can and then no further movement takes place until it moves in the opposite direction. Dividends Whenever the index token passes the dividend square (middle of top section of inner track) then all players are paid a dividend on each stock unit they hold. The amount of dividend is indicated at the foot of the stock column and this never changes.

Extra dividends are paid when the index token lands exactly on a square so indicating.

Bankruptcy A player may raise money in three ways:

1. By private deals with other players 2. If he lands on a coloured square by selling the appropriate stock to the bank at market price.

3. By selling other stock to the bank at rock-bottom prices.

When a player is unable to raise enough money to pay his taxes or other expenses then he is declared bankrupt.

When a player lands on a coloured square and is unable to buy or sell at least one unit of the appropriate stock to the bank (either for himself or for another player acting through him) then he is also declared bankrupt.

All the stocks of a player who is bankrupt are replaced on the stock board, his money is returned to the bank and his token is thrown off the board.

END OF GAME The game may be played until all players but one are bankrupt or else for an agreed time. If play ends after an agreed time then the player with the most money wins. At the end of the game all stocks are valued at that price which would be obtained from the bank if the first unit of each type of stock was sold to the bank (i.e. the market price for the first unit of each stock sold to the bank).

The Bank The bank may either be one of the players taking part in the game or someone who is not actually moving a token. The bank owns all the stock units on the stock board and buys and sells to the players as they demand. It also collects all taxes, pays the dividends and deals with any other transaction that is not directly between players.

PREPARATIONS TO BEGIN THE GAME The players are each given 1,500 made up as fol.- lows:2 $500,3X$ l00,2 $50,3X$20,4 10. (no units less than are used). The stock units are placed on the stock board as described previously and the price lists are placed alongside the stock columns. The players decide who is going to be bank.

The players tokens are then placed on the start of the outer track and a single token representing the index token is placed on the start of the inner track.

PLAYING POINTS The stocks are not identical. Some stocks give a better dividend, other stocks give a low divident but have a more marked variation in price. Money may be made either by keeping stocks with high dividends or by buying stocks with large price variations at a low price and selling at a high price. There are also other additional peculiarities. For instance Gulf stock has an extra dividend.

Although the general market trends may be anticipated the exact behaviour of the market cannot.

The best amount of cash to keep in hand and the way to make advantageous private deals are matters of experience and temperament.

I claim:

1. Board game apparatus comprising the combination of: a playing piece board marked with a playing piece path which is divided into areas and along which playing pieces may be moved in accordance with throws of dice or the like, at least some of the areas containing an indication that the area corresponds to a respective stock; a shares price board marked with share-areas equally spaced in columns, each column corresponding to a respective stock and a share price list for each column, each list having marked thereon at spacings equal to the spacing between the shareareas in their columns indications of the price of a share, the prices at one end of the list being higher than at the other, the arrangement being such that a price list may be placed on the shares-price board adjacent to its corresponding column of share areas with each of the areas adjacent to a respective price indication to indicate the buying and selling price of stock units stacked on said shares areas; and chance selection means enabling chance selection of instructions relating to said positions of the price lists on the shares price board so as to vary the prices of the shares.

2. Board game apparatus as claimed in claim 1 wherein the chance selection means is so arranged as to create periods during which the shares prices increase, and other periods during which the shares prices decrease.

3. Board game apparatus as claimed in claim 2 wherein the chance selection means comprises a shareindex piece path, which is marked. on a board, the said path being divided into areas so that a share index piece may be moved along the path in accordance with instructions indicated by indicia borne by other of said areas of said playing piece path.

4. Board game apparatus as claimed in claim 3 wherein still other areas of both the playing piece path and the shares index piece path bear indicia indicating that payments should be made to at least one player.

5. Board game apparatus as claimed in claim 3 wherein still other areas of both the playing piece path and the shares index piece path bear indicia indicating that payments should be made by at least one player.

6. Board game apparatus as claimed in claim 1, including a plurality of playing pieces.

7. Board game apparatus as claimed in claim 1, including a plurality of shares units.

8. Board game apparatus as claimed in claim 1, in-

cluding a supply of simulated money.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1760287 *May 12, 1928May 27, 1930Francis J SchippersGame
US2794642 *May 20, 1954Jun 4, 1957O'neill Philip HolmesBoard game apparatus
US3058747 *Apr 3, 1961Oct 16, 1962Schorr JeromeStock exchange game
US3556528 *Aug 7, 1968Jan 19, 1971James Christopher SpiringExpedition simulating board game
GB915550A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3858885 *Feb 6, 1973Jan 7, 1975Alan AdcockApparatus for playing a board game
US3973775 *Oct 2, 1974Aug 10, 1976William Bernard BolanGame board apparatus
US4312510 *Dec 11, 1979Jan 26, 1982Richard BodnerBoard game apparatus
US4522407 *Sep 27, 1984Jun 11, 1985Hatherley Bruce EFinancial board game
US4535994 *Apr 21, 1983Aug 20, 1985Cowan William PBoard game apparatus
US6189886 *Aug 7, 1999Feb 20, 2001Gayle Marie MoranBoard game based on stock market concepts
US6764077Sep 12, 2002Jul 20, 2004Paul MiraveteFinancial board game
US7185890Apr 28, 2004Mar 6, 2007A.A.M., LlcMethod and apparatus for playing a stock trading simulation game
WO1999002229A1 *Jul 8, 1998Jan 21, 1999Kam Yuet LamGame
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/256
International ClassificationA63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00006, A63F3/00069
European ClassificationA63F3/00A6D