Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3740083 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 19, 1973
Filing dateNov 30, 1971
Priority dateNov 30, 1971
Publication numberUS 3740083 A, US 3740083A, US-A-3740083, US3740083 A, US3740083A
InventorsH Zenhausern
Original AssigneeZenhaeusern Heinrich
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mounting support for climbing elements
US 3740083 A
Abstract
A mounting support for climbing elements for force fitting into a correspondingly shaped but smaller bore in a wall comprises a hard, strong, yielding plastic sleeve having cylindrical or square inner and outer longitudinal surfaces with serrations in the form of ring-shaped fins which are interrupted to form fish scale sectors with gaps between them. The serrations on the inner surface have oblique slopes running in the direction of insertion of the sleeve into the bore in the wall, while the serrations on the outer surface have oblique slopes running in the other direction. The shanks of the climbing elements are inserted into the sleeves.
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 Zenhausern MOUNTING SUPPORT FOR CLIMBING ELEMENTS [76] Inventor: Heinrich Zenhausern,

Birmensdorferstrasse 134, CH8902 U rdorf, Switzerland [22] Filed: Nov. 30, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 203,254

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,8l7,775 8/1931 Sipe 287/126 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 2/1970 Great Britain 85/83 7/1937 Italy 85/83 12/!969 Switzerland 85/83 Primary Examiner-Andrew V. Kundrat Attorney-Abraham A. Saffitz [57] ABSTRACT A mounting support for climbing elements for force fitting into a correspondingly shaped but smaller bore in a wall comprises a hard, strong, yielding plastic sleeve having cylindrical or square inner and outer longitudinal surfaces with serrations in the form of ring'shaped fins which are interrupted to form fish scale sectors with gaps between them. The serrations on the inner surface have oblique slopes running in the direction of insertion of the sleeve into the bore in the wall, while the serrations on the outer surface have oblique slopes running in the other direction. The shanks of the climbing elements are inserted into the sleeves.

5 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures PAIENIEIJJUIH a mesnm a or 3 Fig. 3

MOUNTING SUPPORT FOR CLIMBING ELEMENTS The present invention relates to a mounting support for climbing elements or the like, the free ends of which are tube-shaped and capable of being anchored in a wall by means of sleeves which are insertable into bores in the wall.

The term climbing element is intended to include U-shaped stirrups of steel, light metal or other suitable materials, ladders made of one piece or assembled from individual components, associated aids to climbing such as handholds, guard railings and the like.

Such climbing elements are appropriately clad in a plastic material or with aluminum, are used in sewer manholes, water reservoirs, sewage treatment plants which are subjected to various chemicals, moisture and vapors, and similar objects, and serve for moving about on such objects.

Traditionally, the fastening of the climbing elements has been accomplished by cementing them in or embedding them in concrete. This necessitates quite large cutouts in the wall which weaken it, so that cracks often result through which water can penetrate into the passages. The mounting and fastening of the climbing elements involves a great deal of wasted material and is expensive. Further, there is a serious danger of oxidation and rusting-through in cases where the ends of the climbing elements are cemended in, so that it is not uncommon for a climbing element to break unexpectedly. The replacement of climbing elements anchored in this manner is both time-consuming and costly.

The object of the present invention is to provide a mounting support for such a climbing element which overcomes the above-mentioned disadvantages. The climbing element can be fastened into the wall easily and quickly and the fastening is not subject to any danger of corrosion.

In accordance with the present invention, a mounting support is provided for climbing elements, the free ends of which are tube-shaped and capable of being anchored in a wall by means of sleeves which are insertable into internal bores in the wall. The invention is characterized'by the fact that at least the exteriorsurface of each sleeve is provided with peripheral fins which are sub-divided into sector-shaped segments in fish-scale fashion, and which are so arranged that they slope counter to the insertion direction of the sleeve, the gaps between adjacent fins being staggered with respect to each other peripherally, so that these gaps form a labyrinth seal. It is also advantageous to provide the the interior surface of each sleeve with peripheral fins which are sub-divided into sectorshaped segments in fish-scale fashion and which are arranged to slope in the insertion direction of the sleeve.

The preferred embodiments of the invention will be better understood from the following description and accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. I is a general illustration of a passage with climbing elements;

FIG. 2 shows a mounting support in axial section;

FIG. 3 shows a developed projection of the exterior surface of a sleeve;

FIG. 4 is an alternative embodiment of FIG. 3; and

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of a sleeve.

FIG. 1 illustrates a partly installed set of climbing equipment for a sewer manhole. The equipment consists of a number of pieces of pipe bent in U-shape and provided with a covering, the pieces being fastened vertically one above the other in the wall 1 of the sewer manhole. For this purpose, bores 2 are drilled into the manhole wall, the diameter of the bores being some what smaller than the largest diameter of the sleeves 3 to be inserted into the bores, thereby providing a force fit. Such a sleeve 3 is shown in axial section in FIG. 2.

The sleeve consists of a hard, strong, yielding plastic material and its inner wall is in the form of a cylindrical or square interior bore 4, the inner surfaces of the bore being provided with serrations 5 in the form of ringshaped fins which are interrupted peripherally so that sector-shaped segments are formed in fish-scale fashion with gaps between them. The plastic materials useful for manufacturing the sleeve elements are well-known and such materials as Delrin, polyethylene terephthalate, polycarbonate resin and nylon may be used.

The exterior surface of the sleeve 3 is similarly provided with ring-shaped fins 6 which are also interrupted to form sector-shaped, fish-scale segments 7 having intermediate gaps 8 (see FIG. 5). These segments 7 of the ring-fins 6 are of unequal sizeand have surfaces of varying dimensions and areas. The oblique slopes of these segments 7 run counter to the insertion direction P of the sleeve 3. In contrast, the surfaces of the interior fins 5 are sloped in the insertion direction P. The gaps 8 between the individual scale-shaped segments 7 lie clamped against the bore wall to lock the sleeve in the bore 2 so that the sleeve is prevented from being pulled out of the bore 2. Even if the bore wall is of a non-uniform nature or is out-of-round, the scaleshaped segments 7 adjust themselves to the adjoining wall surface of the bore because of the yielding character of the plastic material and because of the spacing between the scale-shaped segments.

According to the alternative embodiment shown in FIG. 4, the exterior fins are arranged in helical fashion and are again sub-divided into individual scale-shaped segments 9. As in the embodiment of FIG. 3, the gaps 10 of adjacent helical threads do not lie directly one behind the other but are staggered peripherally so that a labyrinth seal is formed. The slope of the surfaces of the helically-arranged fins is counter to the insertion direction P of the sleeve.

The shape and arrangement of the interior fins 5 are exactly the same as those of the exterior fins with the exception of the slope of the fin surface, which is in the same direction as the insertion direction P.

After the sleeves 3 have been forcibly inserted into the bores 2, each of the shanks ll of a climbing element 19 is anchored in one of the sleeves 3. Preferably, the open end 12 of the tube-shaped shank end is closed off by means of a closure piece 13 which is made of plastic material such as nylon or the like. The closure piece consists of a plug 14 having an outer diameter corresponding to the interior bore 4 of the sleeve 3 and having on its outer surface interrupted ring-fins 15 which are sloped in the opposite direction as the interior fins 5 of the sleeve 3. Furthermore, the closure piece is provided with a tube extension 16 of smaller diameter and projecting axially, the outer diameter of which corresponds to the inner diamter of the climbing element 19. This tube also has interrupted ringor helically-arranged fins 17, which are directed counter to the fins 15, so that the tube can easily be inserted into the bore of the climbing element 19 but cannot be withdrawn from it.

After the ends 12 of the climbing element 19 have been closed off with closure pieces 13, the shanks 11 of the climbing element together with closure pieces 13 are inserted, one each, onto the sleeves 3, which were previously anchored in the wall 1 of the manhole wall. The ring-fins 15 interlock with the fins of the sleeve 3, which also press against the inserted shank end 11 of the climbing element 19, so that the climbing element 19 is held immovably fast. The longitudinal fins 18 prevent any turning of the sleeve in the bore.

As mentioned above, FIG. 1 shows a partially installed set of climbing equipment with three fullyanchored climbing elements 19 for ascending and descending the illustrated sewer manhole. In exactly the same manner, climbing aids of different shapes can be fastened to the wall, such as the rod-shaped climbing aid 21 equipped with sockets, also shown in FlG. 1. The rod-shaped climbing aid 21 is supported adjustably in the sockets and can be shifted from the illustrated working position into the rest position, shown in dotted lines, by pushing it in the axial direction.

If, for any reason, a climbing element must be removed from its anchorage, this can be done by using a hydraulic jack set in between the cross-support portion of the climbing element 19, which is parallel to the wall, and the wall.

What is claimed is:

1. In combination, a mounting support for insertion into a bore in a wall and a climbing element, said climbing element having a hollow shank portion which is inserted into said mounting support, said mounting support comprising a hard, strong, yielding plastic sleeve serted into the sleeve and the sleeve is force fitted into I the bore in the wall, said serrations resist pulling away of the climbing element from the wall and said staggered gaps between adjacent fish-scale sectors form a labyrinth seal.

2. A mounting support as claimed in claim 1, wherein said serrations are helically disposed.

3. A mounting support as claimed in claim 1, wherein a plastic closure plug is provided to close the end of said hollow shank portion.

4. A mounting support as claimed in claim 3, wherein said plastic closure plug is cylindrical and has an outer surface corresponding to the inner bore of said sleeve which is also cylindrical and wherein said closure plug includes a tube extension smaller in diameter than said plug which smaller diameter corresponds to the inner diameter of said hollow shank.

5. A mounting support as claimed in claim 4, wherein said outer surface of said closure plug is formed with interrupted ring-shaped fins which slope in the opposite direction as the interior fins on the inner surface of said sleeve.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1817775 *Jun 20, 1928Aug 4, 1931Harry E SipeMetallic coupling device
CH480533A * Title not available
GB1182227A * Title not available
IT350463A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3931842 *Jun 18, 1974Jan 13, 1976David John WhiteGolf tube collar
US3971577 *Aug 16, 1974Jul 27, 1976Scovill Manufacturing CompanyUnion device for flexible tubing
US4077636 *Apr 18, 1977Mar 7, 1978Incom International, Inc.Self-aligning cable rod seal
US4079950 *Apr 18, 1977Mar 21, 1978Incom International Inc.Self-adjusting cable rod seal
US4513632 *Jan 16, 1984Apr 30, 1985Dana CorporationMounting bracket for a steering column control stalk
US4830324 *Sep 28, 1987May 16, 1989Illinois Tool Works, Inc.Post bushings
US5569008 *May 22, 1995Oct 29, 1996United Technologies CorporationHybrid panel fastener and a retention mechanism for use in combination therewith for composite articles
US5569123 *Jul 18, 1995Oct 29, 1996Creatchman; JeffDevice for exercising in a doorframe
US6042315 *Oct 2, 1998Mar 28, 2000United Technologies CorporationFastener
US6045310 *Oct 2, 1998Apr 4, 2000United Technologies CorporationComposite fastener for use in high temperature environments
US6215074 *Apr 29, 1994Apr 10, 2001International Business Machines CorporationDirect mounting system for a disk drive
US6889960 *Nov 14, 2003May 10, 2005Kelly D JonesConnectors and railing system having metal balusters isolated from corrosion
US7108101 *Sep 14, 1999Sep 19, 2006Poly-Tec Products, Inc.Manhole insert for manufacture of a cast member and to provide a step insert having increased structural and holding strength
US8251626 *Oct 14, 2009Aug 28, 2012Jose GonzalezBolt and receiver for adaptively attaching to surfaces
US8443493 *Apr 6, 2009May 21, 2013Itw Automotive Products Gmbh & Co. KgFastening device
US8622490 *Oct 22, 2009Jan 7, 2014Mtn Products, Inc.Panel attachment for water cooler
US20090249923 *Apr 6, 2009Oct 8, 2009Illinois Tool Works Inc.fastening device
US20110070047 *May 12, 2009Mar 24, 2011Psm Ip LimitedInsert Kit and Installation Method
US20110095668 *Oct 22, 2009Apr 28, 2011Mtn Products, Inc.Panel attachment for water cooler
US20110248232 *Apr 9, 2010Oct 13, 2011Leary Steven JUniversal baluster connector
US20130209197 *Aug 15, 2012Aug 15, 2013Zephyros, Inc.Push-pin cavity sealer
USRE32641 *Sep 3, 1986Apr 12, 1988Dana CorporationMounting bracket for a steering column control stalk
WO2005122831A1 *Jun 16, 2005Dec 29, 2005Dov RotshtainFastener system
Classifications
U.S. Classification403/243, 411/339, 411/913, 411/510, 403/372
International ClassificationF16B13/00, E06C9/04
Cooperative ClassificationY10S411/913, F16B13/00, E06C9/04
European ClassificationE06C9/04, F16B13/00