Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3740764 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 26, 1973
Filing dateJun 1, 1971
Priority dateMar 20, 1968
Also published asDE1809501A1, DE6807424U
Publication numberUS 3740764 A, US 3740764A, US-A-3740764, US3740764 A, US3740764A
InventorsIngvar B Elfstroem, Dennis E Oesterlund
Original AssigneeIngvar B Elfstroem, Dennis E Oesterlund
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Diving suit
US 3740764 A
Abstract
A diving suit made of an air-proof material, namely a closed cell porous rubber with a fabric cover on both sides, whereby the material has inherent heat-insulating properties, as well as a certain buoyancy. The cuit has a close fit so that in normal pressure conditions a minimum air layer can form between the interior of the suit and the diver's body, the suit being provided with means for controlling the supply of air from a pressurized source to the interior of the suit, as well as the removal of the air from the suit, air supplies normally taking place for the purpose of compensating the compressing action upon the air layer, which is generated by the pressure of the water in dependance upon the diving depth.
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Elistrom et al.

[ 1 June 26, 1973 DIVING SUIT [76] Inventors: Ingvar B. Elfstrom, Varvadersgatan 11, 417 31 Goteborg; Dennis E. Osterlund, Box 7047, 434 00 Kungsbacka, both of Sweden [22] Filed: June 1, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 148,742

Related US. Application Data [63] Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 742,288, July 3,

1968, abandoned.

[52] US. Cl 2/2.l R [51] Int. Cl. B63c 11/04, B63c 11/28 [58] Field of Search 2/2, 2.1 R, 2.1 A,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,321,583 6/1943 Craig et al 2/201 R UX 2,521,767 9/1950 Zecha 2/79 2,582,811 l/l952 Williams 2/2.1.R 2,749,551 6/1956 Garbellano..... 2/2.l R UX 3,138,155 6/1964 Bould ..2/2.1R X 3,172,126 3/1965 Spano et a1. 2/2.l R

7/1967 Slavick 2/2.l R

3,307,540 3/1967 Link 2/2.1 R

FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 979,205 12/1950 France 2/2.l R

Primary Examiner-Alfred R. Guest Att0rneyLinton & Linton [57] ABSTRACT A diving suit made of an air-proof material, namely a closed cell porous rubber with a fabric cover on both sides, whereby the material has inherent heat-insulating properties, as well as a certain buoyancy. The suit has a close fit so that in normal pressure conditions a minimum air layer can form between the interior of the suit and the divers body, the suit being provided with means for controlling the supply of air from a pressurized source to the interior of the suit, as well as the removal of the air from the suit, air supplies normally taking place for the purpose of compensating the compressing action upon the air layer, which is generated by the pressure of the water in dependance upon the diving depth.

5 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures PATENTEDwuzsnszs sum 1 or 3 ATTORNEYS PATENIEU JUN26|915 SHEEI 2 OF 3 INVE ."n m S IIVGVHR B. ELFSTRO RN!) DENNIS E. OSTERLUN BY Zia/2,:

ATTUPTIif/S PATENTEUJUNZBIQB 3.140.7 4

SHEET- 3 OF 3 INVENTORS INGVAR B .uFsrRom Ana DENNIS E. OSTIRLUND BY VJ? ATTORNEYS DIVING SUIT The present application is a Continuation-In-Part of applicants copending application, Ser. No. 742,288, filed July 3, 1968 and now abandoned.

The diving suits, hitherto known, may be classified according to four catagories. To the first category belongs the so-called heavy suit, which is made from a comparatively stiff material. This suit is very wide and is meant to be filled with air, which is also used for breathing. This suit has a great floating capacity, which makes it necessary for the diver to load himself with heavy weights. The suit is only adaptable for certain stationary work and requires a considerably amount of assistance by persons and land equipment.

The lighter dry suit is made from a thinner material, but also this material is comparatively stiff and the material gives no heat insulation. The suit is relatively wide, but is not meant to contain air, which makes the water pressure to press in a painful way the suit against the body of the diver.

In order to avoid these disadvantages, a suit, named constant volume dress, has been developed. This suit is mainly a suit into which air is introduced. It is thus relatively wide and the air is free to move in the suit, which causes very great dangers at position changes, as the air then rushes up towards the highest part of the suit. To eliminate this drawback, the suit has been provided with a number of safety valves, through which the air continuously leaves the suit. This means a great air consumption and the heat insulation is consequently diminished. I

The so-called wet suit is made from heat insulating material, usually expanded rubber. This suit is made to fit tightly against the body and it is provided with bands, through which water is intended to penetrate to form a layer between the suit and the skin of the wearer. This might be tolerated for shorter periods of work, but when used for a long period this suit is unsuitable. A further drawback is that the'heat insulation will considerably decrease, when the material through the influence of the water pressure is pressed against the body. The suit is further as well as the other suit types manufactured in such a manner that it makes it impossible for the diver to relieve his wants of nature without taking off the complete suit.

The general object of the present invention is to provide a diving suit which overcomes the above-noted drawbacks. More particularly, in accordance with the present invention, there is provided a diving suit which is intended to prevent a direct contact between the divers body.and the outside medium which surrounds the suit, said suit being made from a material which does not let through said outside medium, said suit being furthermore provided with means for controlling the supplyof 'a gaseous medium from a pressurized source of said gaseous medium to the interior of the suit as well as-the removal of said gaseous medium from the suit, said material having a multitude of discrete cells which are mutually separated from each other and are gasfilled such that the material of the suit inherently has heat-insulating properties as well as a certain buoyancy, said suit being manufactured as a close fit so that only a minimum gaseous medium layer can form between the interior of the suit and the divers body, said material having such resilient properties that it may fit tight about the divers body, such that said gaseous medium layer is maintained within the desired close limits,

and the supply of said gaseous medium normally only takes place for the purpose of compensating the compressing action upon the gaseous medium layer, which action is generated by the pressure of the outside medium in dependance upon the diving depth.

The invention will now be explained more in detail with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a side view showing a diver, equipped with a suit according to the invention;

FIG. 2 shows a suit partly in a vertical section and the diver is provided with a mouth piece and cyclope;

FIG. 3 shows on a smaller scale the suit in a front view;

FIG. 4 shows on a bigger scale a vertical section through the neck portion of the suit;

FIG. 5 shows on a yet bigger scale a section through a connection between two pieces of the suit;

FIG. 6 is a longitudinal section through a glove, as applied over the sleeve of the diving suit.

FIG. 7 is a side view of a second embodiment of the invention adapted for rapid divings without supplemental air.

FIG. 8 is a view similar to FIG. 7 but showing the suit for use with a supplemental air supply,and

FIG. 9 is a front view of the jacket part of the diving suit.

The diving suit according to the drawings consists of a number of cut pieces 1, 2 (see FIG. 5), each of which having a thickness of about one-fourth inch and having closed cells as for example porous rubber or so-called neoprene 3, which on both sides has a fabric cover, for example nylon 4, 5. The ends of the pieces 1, 2 face each other and the abutting parts 6 are jointed by means of glue or the like. The cloth parts 4 and 5 are mutually connected by means of seams 7 and 8. The said cloth covers increase the heat insulation of the material and protect the rubber layer 3. Especially the outer cover in addition contributes to decrease the forces upon the joints between the cut rubber pieces. The suit is also given the desired stability, which keeps the air layer in the suit within acceptable limits. Beginning at the middle of the suit at 11, passing through the crotch 9 between the legs 10 of the suit and ending on the back portion 12, is provided an opening 14, which may be closed by means of an air-tight zip fastener 13. Thus, the suit may be easily taken on and off. The feet of the suit are supplied with rubber soles 15. The legs 10 and also the sleeves 16 are supplied with reinforcements 17 and 18.

In the neck portion 19, situated below the cap 20 of the suit, which has an opening 21 for the face of the diver 22, is at the inside of the suit provided a downwardly and inwardly directed collar 23 made from rubber or a similar flexible material. The collar 23 contacts with its lower edge 24 the neck 25 of the diver 22. Thus, air is prevented to run from the body part of the dress into the cap 20. The air from the suit is trapped in an air trap 38 (FIG. 4) and will then press the collar 23 tightly against the neck 25. The pressures exerted are very small and, consequently, no inconveniences occur for the diver. It is, of course, possible to arrange further traps or tightenings according to the same principles as above, i.e., around the body, around the sleeve 16 and around the legs 10. In such instances, air may be introduced by means of valves 31 or an air communication may be established between different parts of the suit by means of adequate channels or the like. It is also essential that there is no need to use a stationary face mask 34 or cyclope 35 to prevent air from rushing out of the opening 21 and that the suit may be used in connection with standard equipments. To the suit belong a pair of gloves 26, the wrist portion 27 of which may be pulled over the band 28 of the sleeve 16 in a tightening way. To the chest portion 29 of the suit, there is connected an air valve 31, which by means of a tube or hose is in communication with a compressed air tank 30, and an air escape valve 33, operable by means of a button 32. A face mask 34 (FIG. 1), which is in communication with the tube 30 and which covers the entire opening 21 or a cyclope 35, contacting the skin of the face in the opening and a mouth nozzle 36 (FIG. 2), may be used.

As shown with dash-and-dot lines in FIG. 4, there may also be provided an upwardly and inwardly directed lip 37, preventing air of a higher pressure to be forced from the cap 20 into the body portion of the suit. When putting on the suit, the collar 23 and the cap 20 are first applied over the head of the diver 22,

whereupon he introduces his feet, one at a time into the leg portions 10. By operating the zip fastener, the suit is ready to use.

The suit should, during diving, be furnished with air from a smaller supplementary container (not shown). Owing to the proper size of the suit and its flexibility, the suit does not need much air and air let into the suit stays as long as the diver desires. The diver is free to take every position in the water without risking that big air volumes travel into different parts of his suit, thereby considerably influencing his balance. The suit itself controls the movements of the encased air at the same time as it eliminates unpleasant influences of the waterpressure and gives a good heat insulation. When diving, a pressure compensation for the increasing water pressure is obtained by means of manual or automatic control of the air inlet valve 31 and the diver can easily make himself lighter or heavier as desired.

The suit according to FIGS. 7 and 8 includes a jacket 1 made from the material according to FIG. 5. The jacket 1 is integral with a hood 41 provided with an opening for a so-called cyclope 42. The jacket is further at its chest portion provided with two manually operable valves 43 and 44 from which valve 44 is an outlet valve which when operated permits the air in the jacket to leave the same and the other one 43 serves to admit the supply of pressurized air from a pressure medium source. Said pressure medium source is preferably carried by the diver by means of a suspension device 45. The jacket is provided with an opening 46 which extends from the front middle portion of the jacket to a point at the back portion which is approximately at the same height as the beginning of the opening and which may be closedby means of an air-tight zipper 47. The opening passes the crotch of the diver which makes it possible for him to relieve nature after having opened the zipper. Thanks to the opening it is also easy to dress and undress.

The jacket has two short legs 48 from each of which extends a preferably somewhat conical collar 49, made from a resilient air-tight material such as rubber. These collars have such a size and shape that they may be folded inwardly from the position shown in FIG. 7 in which they constitute an extension of the legs 48. In their folded position they constitute a lip seal preventing the air in the jacket to leave the same. An air pocket 50 surrounding the folded part of the collar is thereby constituted which permits the air pressure to act upon said inwardly folded part of the collar. Between the chest portion of the jacket and the hood a similar sealing arrangement may be provided for preventing air to move from said chest portion to the hood and vice versa.

When adapted according to FIG. 7 the jacket may be used for rapid divings without pressure medium source. The air in the jacket will then leave the same via the folded down collars.

When it is desired however to use the jacket in combination with a pressure medium source to obtain the maximum heat insulating the collars are folded inwardly according toFlG. 1.

Usually the jacket is used together with separate leg coverings 51 which preferably are made from the same material as the jacket. These leg coverings 51 have such a length that their upper part will end somewhat above the upper edge of the inwardly folded collars 52 according to FIG. 8, thereby being secured against axial movements and pressed against the legs of the diver by means of the collars. These leg coverings are therefore preferably taken on prior to the folding of the collars. The suit may also include separate socks 53 or socks integral with the leg coverings.

Adapted in such a manner the suit functions exactly as the suit according to FIG. 1 to 2 but the risk for unwanted air-movements is completely eliminated by means of the sealings between the jacket and the leg coverings. Another important advantage is the universal application of the suit, i.e., the possibility of using the jacket with or without the legcoverings or with or without the air supply. By making the suit in such units the costs for repairing damages in for example the leg portion are essentially reduced. Owing to the eliminated risk for air-movements between the jacket and the leg coverings the size of the suit is in addition less critical.

We claim:

1. A diving suit which is intended to prevent a direct contact between the divers body and the outside medium which surrounds the suit, comprising a suit of a material which does not let through water or a gaseous medium like air, means on said suit for controlling the supply of said gaseous medium from a pressurized source of said gaseous medium to the interior of said suit as well as the removal of said gaseous medium from the suit, said suit material having a multitude of discrete cells which are mutually separated from each other and are gas-filled such that the material of the suit inherently has heat-insulating properties as well as a certain buoyancy, said suit having a close fit to the diver so that only a minimum gaseous medium layer in normal pressure conditions is apparent between the interior of said suit and the divers body, said suit having at least at its neck portion inner side being provided with a downwardly and inwardly directed collar of a resilient material which is, in use, pressed like a lip seal against the diverneck owing to an interior gaseous medium pressure around the diver 5 body, said material having such resilient properties that it may fit tight about the divers body such that said gaseous medium layer is maintained within the desired close limits, and the supply of said other gaseous medium normally only takes place for the purpose of compensating the comsuit on its inner side also has an upwardly and inwardly directed lip seal in the form of a collar of resilient material.

3. A diving suit as claimed in claim 1, in which a fabric cover is arranged on each side of the medium-proof material, a plurality of pieces of which material make up the suit, the outer fabric cover being connected together by means of seams, said material pieces being also mutually connected, the arrangement being such that said outer fabric reduces the strains on the connection between said pieces, whereby said outer fabric gives the suit the desired rigidity and constitutes a wear protection layer, which contributes in protecting the material from external influences.

4. A diving suit as claimed in claim 1, in which the diving suit has an opening which is closable by means of an air-tight fastener which extends from the front portion around the crotch and up to the back side and has such a length that the diver via this opening may put the suit on and with the suit put on by opening the fastener may relieve himself through the opening.

5. A diving suit as claimed in claim 1 wherein said suit comprises a jacket intended to cover the body of the wearer except the legs and having a first valve means for admitting pressurized gas to be introduced into the suit and a second valve means for permitting gas to leave the jacket, and short legs, collars made from thin, flexible material and secured to said legs and constituting in an unfolded position an extension of said legs thereby permitting gas to escape from the interior of the jacket, said collars having such a length as to be folded inwardly to fit tightly over the upper portion of two leg coverings adapted over the legs of the diver such that said leg coverings are secured against axial movements at the same time as they are seallingly pressed against the divers legs, said collarsfunctioning as lip sealings preventing gas to escape from the jacket. k

UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION PATENT NO. 3 3 740 7 4 DATED June 26, 1973 INVENT()R(S) 1 Ingvar B. Elfstrom and Dennis E. Osterlund it is certified that error appears in the ab0ve-identfted patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

In the heading to the printed specification, after line 10,

insert as a separate paragraph Claims priority, application Sweden, March 20, 1968, Nr.l390/68 In the drawings, Sheet 2, Fig. 3, the reference numeral 14 should be applied to the opening for zipper l3 and the reference numerals 14 applied to the feet should be omitted; Sheet 3, Fig. 7 reference numeral 2 should be 41; numeral 42 should be added to the face mask; numeral 1 should be 40; numeral 4 should be 44; numeral 5 should be 43;numeral ll should be 48; and numeral 12 should be 50; Fig.8 numeral 5 should be 43; numeral 8 should be 45; numeral 9 should be 47; numeral 12 should be 52; numeral 13 should be 50; numeral 11 should be 48; numeral 12 should be 52; numeral 14 should be 51 and numeral 15 should be 53; and Fig. 9 numeral 2 should be 41; numeral 5 should be 43; numeral 4 should be 44 ;numeral 9 should be 47; and numeral 10 should be 46; numeral 11 should be 48 and numeral 12 should be Signed and Scaled this eleventh Day of May 1976 [SEAL] AUCSI.

RUTH C. MASON C. MARSHALL DANN im'xn'ng ()j j'u'e' ('mnmissium'r nflare'nls and Trademarks

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2321583 *Feb 17, 1941Jun 15, 1943Craig Edward CBuoyant insulating and protective overalls
US2521767 *Jul 17, 1944Sep 12, 1950Dorothy ZechaGarment
US2582811 *Jan 31, 1947Jan 15, 1952Harvey L WilliamsGarment
US2749551 *Jan 22, 1954Jun 12, 1956Garbellano David WUnderwater suit
US3138155 *Jun 21, 1960Jun 23, 1964Dunlop Rubber CoUnderwater swimming and diving suits
US3172126 *Apr 23, 1963Mar 9, 1965Mine Safety Appliances CoProtective suit neck enclosure
US3307540 *Mar 10, 1964Mar 7, 1967Ocean SystemsProtective suit
US3329966 *Jan 3, 1964Jul 11, 1967Slavick Nicholas AContour garment
FR979205A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4015295 *Apr 15, 1976Apr 5, 1977Lancaster Woodrow ADiving suit and neck seal therefor
US5003630 *Oct 23, 1989Apr 2, 1991David Clark Company IncorporatedPressure garment
US5025502 *Sep 18, 1989Jun 25, 1991Raymond Douglas WPuff-off glove
US5140721 *Oct 25, 1990Aug 25, 1992Kauffeld Robert CThermal protective diving undergarments made with plastic bubble packing sheets
US5940878 *Mar 28, 1996Aug 24, 1999Apollo Sports Co., Ltd.Watertight suit
US20060223410 *Jun 13, 2006Oct 5, 2006Arias David ACollapsible Aquatic Toys
US20130340140 *May 2, 2013Dec 26, 2013La Spirotechnique Idustrielle Et CommercialeDiving dry suit
US20150290480 *Apr 8, 2015Oct 15, 2015Amron International, Inc.Neck seal for a gas treatment hood
EP0122350A1 *Nov 10, 1983Oct 24, 1984Precision Dippings Marketing LimitedRubber attachments for diving suits
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/2.16
International ClassificationB63C11/02, B63C11/08
Cooperative ClassificationB63C11/08, B63C11/02
European ClassificationB63C11/02, B63C11/08