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Publication numberUS3740767 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 26, 1973
Filing dateFeb 17, 1971
Priority dateFeb 17, 1971
Also published asCA935251A1, DE2143854A1
Publication numberUS 3740767 A, US 3740767A, US-A-3740767, US3740767 A, US3740767A
InventorsSchuessler R
Original AssigneeSchuessler R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Knitted headwear with wind barrier
US 3740767 A
Abstract
A cap and hood combination wherein the hood portion is composed of inner and outer layers of stretchable, porous, knitted material having aligned eye openings. Between the inner and outer knitted layers is a relatively non-porous and relatively non-stretchable intermediate layer formed of plastic or other suitable material, such intermediate layer having free lateral portions slidable with respect to the knitted layers and being positioned to protect the wearer's face against blasts of cold air which might otherwise pass through the porous knitted layers. The intermediate layer has an eye opening larger than, but aligned with, the eye openings of the knitted inner and outer layers, the lower portion of the intermediate layer's opening being defined by a flap which is foldable downwardly between the knitted layers when the eye openings of the inner and outer layers are expanded to expose the lower portion of a wearer's face. Means are provided for urging the flap into a raised position when the lower portion of the face is again covered by the inner and outer knitted layers.
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United States Patent Schuessler KNITTED IIEADWEAR WITH WIND BARRIER [76] Inventor: Richard D. Schuessler, 564 Meadow Road, Winnetka, 111. 60093 [22] Filed: Feb. 17, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 116,080

[52] U.S. Cl 2/173, 2/202, 2/206 [51] Int. Cl .1 A42!) 1/18 [58] Field of Search 2/201, 202, 203,

[56] References Cited I UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,271,781 9/1966 Sontag et a1. 2/202 1,167,379 l/l9l6 Buckman 2,682,667 7/1954 Michelstetter... 2,998,611 9/1961 Schuessler 1,482,270 l/l924 Shuster 2,500,982 3/1950 Fligel 1,235,927 8/1917 Sanbom 2,641,768 6/1953 Pipher 2/205 Primary ExaminerGeorge l-l. Krizmanich Attorney-Dawson, Tilton, Fallon & Lungmus [57] ABSTRACT A cap and hood combination wherein the hood portion is composed of inner and outer layers of stretchable, porous, knitted material having aligned eye openings. Between the inner and outer knitted layers is a relatively non-porous and relatively non-stretchable intermediate layer formed of plastic or other suitable material, such intermediate layer having free lateral portions slidable with respect to the knitted layers and being p0- sitioned to protect the wearers face against blasts of cold air which might otherwise pass through the porous knitted layers. The intermediate layer has an eye opening larger than, but aligned with, the eye openings of the knitted inner and outer layers, the lower portion of the intermediate layers opening being defined by a flap which is foldable downwardly between the knitted layers when the eye openings of the inner and outer layers are expanded to expose the lower portion of a wearers face. Means are provided for urging the flap into a raised position when the lower portion of the face is again covered by the inner and outer knitted layers.

' 30 Claims, 10 Drawing Figures PAIENIEB 3.740.767

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BACKGROUND The effectiveness of knitted material for caps and face hoods has long been recognized. Knitted caps and hoods are usually highly stretchable and readily conform to the contours of a wearers head and face to retain heat and to protect against the chilling effects of cold winter air. However, while such knitted headwear provides adequate protection in most instances, under extremely severe conditions, as in a situation where arctic winds and temperatures are involved, the protection afforded by a conventional knitted caphas often been found insufficient. Under such conditions, caps of added thickness and more tightly knitted fabric are frequently used; however, such increased protection is achieved at the cost of reduced wearer comfort in other respects, since heavier, more closely knitted fabrics are generally less stretchable and do not conform as readily to the contours of a wearers face.

SUMMARY A principal object of this invention is therefore to provide a knitted cap and hood which is highly stretchable and relatively light in weightand, nevertheless, which is extremely effective in protecting a wearers face against harsh and penetrating winter winds. A further object is to provide a cap which is highly stretchable and which readily conforms to the contours of the wearers face despite the presence of a relatively nonporous and non-stretchable wind barrier disposed within the face hood thereof.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a knitted cap having a face-protecting barrier panel formed of flexible but substantially non-stretchable material, the barrier panel and the front of the knitted cap having aligned eye openings. It is a specific object to provide for the expansion of the opening in the barrier panel when the opening in the knitted face portion is enlarged to expose the nose, or even the entire lower face portion, of the wearer. A still further object is to provide means for urging or returning the barrier panel into its original condition (wherein the opening therein is of reduced size) when the knitted portion is again lifted to cover the lower portion of the wearers face.

Briefly, the headwear comprises a tube formed of inner and outer layers of porous stretchable knitted fabric. The tube is open at its lower end and is adapted to be stretched over the face of a wearer to serve as a face-protecting hood. In a preferred embodiment, the upper end of the tube is closed so that the unit constitutes an integrally formed cap and face hood combination, the upper end portion constituting the cap and the lower end portion forming the face hood.

The inner and outer layers of knitted fabric which form the face hood have aligned eye openings and are joined together about such openings with elastic stitching which enables the face opening of the cap to be enlarged to frame substantially the entire lower face of the wearer when such enlargement is considered necessary or desirable. Between the two knitted layers is a wind barrier formed of a sheet of relatively non-porous and non-stretchable material which has an eye opening aligned with the eye openings in the inner and outer knitted layers. A pair of slits extend downwardly from opposite side edges of. the opening in the barrier layer to define a flap which normally covers the nose, mouth,

and chin of the wearer. However, when expansion of the masks face opening is desired for the purpose of exposing the nose, mouth, and chin, the flap portion automatically folds downwardly as the knitted layers are stretched to increase the size of the mask's face opening. Means in the form of elastic bands exert an upward force on the flap to return it into its raised position when the wearers lower face portion is again covered.

Means are provided for retaining the barrier layer in place between the knitted layers but it is particularly significant that such means does not prevent relative movement between the knitted layers and the barrier when the knitted layers are subjected to stretching forces.

DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a cap and hood combination fitted upon a wearer, the border of the face opening being generally untensioned and the lower portion of the wearer's face being covered;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view similar to FIG. 1 but illustrating the hood with the border of the face opening tensioned or stretched beneath a wearers chin to expose the lower portion of his face;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view illustrating the condition of the intermediate barrier layer when the hood is worn as shown in FIG. 1, the outline of the entire cap and face hood being illustrated in broken lines;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view similar to FIG. 3 but illustrating the condition of the intermediate barrier layer when the hood is worn as shown in FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a plan view of the intermediate barrier layer;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of a knitted tube from which the headwear is formed;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view illustrating the relationship of parts at an early stage in the manufacture of the headwear;

FIG. 8 is a perspective view illustrating the headwear at an intermediate stage of its manufacture;

FIG. 9 is a perspective view illustrating the headwear at a subsequent stage of manufacture;

FIG. 10 is a perspective view illustrating the cap and hood combination at a still later manufacturing stage.

DESCRIPTION Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, the numeral 10 generally designates headwear embodying the present invention. In the embodiment illustrated, the headwear comprises a tube 11 having an upper section 11a which constitutes a cap portion and a lower section 11b which con-. stitutes a face hood portion. However, while the combination of a cap and an integrally formed face hood constitutes a particularly effective embodiment of the invention, it will be apparent as the specification proceeds that the two need not be integrally formed and that a face hood having a wind barrier as hereinafter described may be formed with or secured to crowncovering cap portions of different construction and appearance.

Tube 11 is open at its bottom end 12 and closed at its upper end 13. An eye or face opening 14 is provided .at the front of face hood portion 11b, such opening being expandable into the enlarged condition illustrated in FIG. 2 when exposure of substantially the entire lower portion of a wearers face is desired. In outward appearance, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the headwear of the present invention is similar to prior headwear and the structure so far described is quite conventional.

The cap and hood combination is preferably formed from a sleeve16 of knitted material as illustrated in FIG. 6. The sleeve may be knitted of natural or synthetic fibers and, as shown in the drawing, is knitted so that its ribs extend longitudinally. The length of the sleeve is twice the length of the tube 11 to be formed therefrom, it being apparent from FIGS. 7 and 8 that the lower end of the sleeve is to be reversely folded to form substantially co-extensive inner and outer knitted layers 17 and 18 (FIG. 9). Thus, the transverse mid line 19 of the sleeve 16 defines the folded edge of the tubes open bottom 12 when reverse folding of the sleeve is completed.

While sleeve 16 is generally cylindrical in shape, the knitting pattern may be altered along circumferential zones 20 adjacent to or on opposite sides of the transverse mid line 19 so that such zones will overlie each other when the sleeve is fully folded and will together define a neck receiving zone of reduced diameter for the finished tube 11.

Since the inner and outer layers of the tube 11 are formed of porous and highly stretchable knitted material, it is apparent that the open lower end 12 of the tube may be easily slipped over a wearers head and that the knitted layers will readily stretch to conform to the contour of the wearers facial features. Interposed between the inner and outer knitted layers 17 and 18 is a relatively non-porous and relatively nonstretchable intermediate layer or panel 21. This intermediate barrier layer is formed from any flexible sheet material which is essentially non-porous and nonstretchable and which is sufficiently durable to withstand continual flexing, moisture, and low temperatures. "Plastic films of polyethylene, cellulose acetate butyrate, polyvinyl chloride, and polyester resins are effective, but other generally non-porous and nonstretchable sheet materials may be used. Furthermore, barrier layers tightly woven from nylon and other synthetic and non-synthetic fibers may be used. It is apparent, especially when the barrier layer is formed of woven fibers, that some porosity in the barrier layer will exist; however, in comparison with the outer knitted layers, such a barrier layer will nevertheless be relatively non-porous if it is to be effective in performing its protective function.

The barrier sheet 21 has vertical dimensions substantially less than tube 11 and lateral dimensions substantially less than the circumferential dimensions of the tube. In the form illustrated, the barrier 21 has a width less than one half of the tubes circumference, the intention being that the barrier panel will generally follow the outline of the wearer's face and, in particular, will extend over his forehead, cheeks, chin and nose.

An enlarged opening or aperture 14a is formed in the barrier sheet in the area of the wearer's eyes and a smaller opening 22 is formed in the area of his mouth. When the knitted sleeve 16 is folded upon itself with the barrier panel 21 therebetween to form the finished cap, opening 140 will be aligned with openings 14b and 140 in the inner and outer knitted layers so that together such aligned openings form the face opening 14 of the cap. The locations of openings 14b and 140 in the knitted fabric are indicated in broken lines in FIG. 6; however, it is to be understood that at least in a preferred method of manufacture, the openings in the knitted material will be formed at a later stage, as indicated in FIG. 10.

Each of the openings 14a, 14b, and is horizontally elongated, openings 14b and 140 being substantially identical in size and shape. While opening 14a is similar in shape to openings 14b and 140, it is larger than the other two in substantially all dimensions. Referring TO FIG. 5, it will be observed that a pair of tabs 23b project into opening 14a along the vertical mid line of the barrier sheet, the distance between the tabs being essentially the same as the vertical dimensions of openings 14a and 14b when the knitted material is in an untensioned state.

A pair of slits 24 extend downwardly from opposite sides of opening 14a, each slit terminating at a level below the wearers mouth and, preferably, at a point slightly below his chin. The two slits thus define a flap portion 25, the upper edge of the flap constituting the lower border for opening 14a in the barrier sheet. Mouth opening 22 is located in flap portion 25 near the lower end thereof.

An elastic cord or band 26 extends along the upper edge of flap 25 and has end portions 26a which project upwardly and which are secured by stitching 27 or by other suitable means to the barrier sheet at points above and lateral to eye opening 14a. Portions 26a of the elastic band exert an upward force on the flap when the flap is folded downwardly into a lowered position, as when the hood is worn as illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 4.

In the final stages of manufacture of the headwear, the open upper ends of the inner and outer layers of knitted material are brought together (FIGS. 7-9) and are secured by stitching 28 to form the closed upper end 13 of tube 11 (FIG. 10). Eye openings 14b and 140 are then cut through the inner and outer knitted layers and the margins of the aligned openings in the knitted material are then sewn together by elastic marginal stitching 29 (FIGS. 1 and 2). Since the opening 14a in the intermediate barrier layer is generally of larger size, the elastic stitching 29 does not secure the lateral margins of the barrier layers eye opening to the knitted layers. However, in the embodiment illustrated, stitching 29 does pass through central tabs 23 so that the knitted layers and the wind barrier are joined at points along the vertical mid line of the barrier layer.

It is particularly significant that lateral portions of the barrier layer remain unsecured to the knitted fabric of the inner and outer layers. Although the three layers are joined by the stitching which passes through tabs 23, the lateral portions of the layers on each side of the tabs may move relative to each other. Thus, the lateral portions of the barrier layer tend to float between the two knitted layers and the knitted'layers are free to stretch and contract without resistance by the intermediate layer.

When weather conditions are severe, it is preferable to wear the hood as illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 3 with the knitted material and the elastic stitching around eye opening 14 being in a relatively unstretched or untensioned state. The wearers chin, mouth, and nose are covered, the intermediate barrier layer 21, and espelayer keeps that layer from blocking the flow of breathing air, or of preventing voice transmission, when the headwear is worn as shown in FIG. 1.

Under milder weather conditions, opening 14 may be enlarged, as illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 4, to expose substantially the entire lower face of the wearer. The lower edge of the opening is stretched beneath the wearer s chin. When the face opening is so enlarged, the barrier layer assumes the condition illustrated in FIG. 4 with the flap 25 being folded beneath the chin. In addition to the positions illustrated, the flap portion may be only partially lowered so as to expose the wearers eyes and nose while, at the same time, covering the mouth and chin.

From the foregoing, it is believed apparentthat the headwear of the present invention has all of the advantages of a lightweight, highly stretchable knitted cap and hood and at the same time provides an effective barrier to protect the wearers face against cold blasts of air which might otherwise pass through the knitted layers to cause discomfort and possible injury. Furthermore, the protective action of the plastic barrier is achieved without discomfort to the wearer because the inner knitted layer serves as a liner and prevents direct contact between the barrier and the wearers face.

While in the above, I have disclosed an embodiment of the invention in considerable detail for purposes of illustration, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that many of these details may be varied without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

I claim:

1. Headwear having a face hood dimensioned to extend about the face and neck of a wearer, said hood being in the form of a tube open at its lower end, wherein the improvement comprises said tube being formed of inner and outer layers of stretchable porous knitted material having aligned eye openings, a wind barrier comprising a flexible intermediate layer of relatively non-stretchable material disposed between said inner and outer layers and having free lateral portions unsecured to said knitted layers, said intermediate layer having lateral dimensions substantially less than the circumference of said tube and having an eye opening in registry with and larger than the eye openings of the respective inner and outer knitted layers, whereby, said knitted layers are circumferentially stretchable and contractable without restraint from said intermediate layer, and means for retaining said intermediate layer with the eye opening thereof in registry with the eye openings of said inner and outer knitted layers.

2. The structure of claim 1 in which said intermediate layer is provided with a mouth opening positioned to be aligned with a users mouth when said headwear is worn.

3. The structure of claim 1 in which said inner and outer layers are integrally formed. 7

4. The structure of claim 1 in which said intermediate layer has the general outline of a wearers face and has a width substantially less than one half the circumference of said tube.

5. The structure of claim 1 in which said intermediate barrier layer is formed of relatively non-porous flexible resilient plastic material.

6. The structure of claim 1 in which said means comprises stitching for attaching the margins of the eye openings of said inner and outer layers together.

7. The structure of claim 6 in which said stitching is stretchable to permit expansion of said aligned eye openings in said inner and outer knitted layers so that the lower edges of said openings may be extended beneath a wearers chin to expose his mouth, nose, and chin.

8. Headwear having a face hood dimensioned to extend about the face and neck of a wearer, said hood being in the form of a tube open at its lower end, wherein the improvement comprises said tube being formed of inner and outer layers of stretchable porous knitted material having aligned eye openings, a wind barrier comprising a flexible intermediate layer of relatively non-stretchable material disposed between said inner and outer layers and having free lateral portions unsecured to said knitted layers, said intermediate layer having lateral dimensions substantially less than the circumference of said tube and having an eye opening in registry with and larger than the eye openings of the respective inner and outer knitted layers, whereby, said knitted layers are circumferentially stretchable and contractable without restraint from said intermediate layer, and means for retaining said intermediate layer with the eye opening thereof in registry with the eye openings of said inner and outer knitted layers, said means comprising stitching for attaching the margins of the eye openings of said inner and outer layers together, said stitching being stretchable to permit expansion of said aligned eye openings in said inner. and outer knitted layers so that the lower edges of said openings may be extended beneath a wearers chin to expose his mouth, nose, and chin, said intermediate layer being provided with a pair of slits extending downwardly from opposite sides of the eye opening thereof and terminating at their lower ends at points spaced above the bottom of said intermediate layer to define a flap portion disposed beneath the intermediate layers eye opening, said flap portion being foldable downwardly as the knitted material is stretched to expose the lower portion of a wearers face.

9. The structure of claim 8 in which said flap portion is provided with a mouth opening positioned to be aligned with a wearers mouth when said flap is raised to cover the mouth.

10. The structure of claim 8 in which means are provided to urge the upper corners of said flap portion in an upward direction.

11. The structure of claim 10 in which said means comprises a pair of elastic bands extending between the upper corners of said flap portion and lateral points disposed above the eye opening of said intermediate layer.

12. The structure of claim 6 in which said intermediate layer is provided with a tab projecting into the eye opening thereof along the vertical mid line of said intermediate portion, said tab being connected by said stitching to said inner and outer knitted layers.

13. A cap and hood combination comprising a tube formed of inner and outer layers of stretchable porous knitted material, said tube being open at its lower end and closed at its upper end and being dimensioned to be stretched over the head of a wearer, said inner and outer layers having aligned openings therein, a wind barrier comprising a flexible intermediate layer of relatively non-porous and relatively non-stretchable material disposed between said inner and outer knitted layers and having free lateral portions unsecured to said knitted layers for movement relative thereto, said intermediate layer having lateral dimensions substantially less than the full circumference of said tube and having 7 an opening in registry with the aligned openings of said inner and outer layers, and means for retaining said intermediate layer with the opening thereof in registry with the openings of said inner and outer layers to form in combination a single face opening for the hood.

14. The structure of claim 13 in which the opening of said intermediate layer is substantially larger than the aligned openings of said inner and outer layers, said means including stitching securing the margins of the openings of said inner and outer layers together, said stitching extending through said opening of said intermediate layer.

15. The structure of claim 14 in which said intermediate layer is provided with at least one tab portion projecting into the opening of said intermediate layer along the vertical mid line thereof, said stitching extending through said tab to join said intermediate layer to said inner and outer layers only along said vertical mid line.

16. The structure of claim 15 in which said intermediate layer is provided with a pair of said tabs extending upwardly and downwardly from the lower and upper edges of the opening in said intermediate layer, said stitching extending through both of said tabs.

17. The structure of claim 13 in which said intermediate layer is formed of flexible plastic material.

18. The structure of claim 13 in which said intermediate layer has a width substantially less than one half the circumference of said tube.

19. The structure of claim 13 in which said intermediate layer has vertical dimensions substantially less than the vertical axial dimension of said tube.

20. The structure of claim 13 in which said inner and outer layers are integrally formed.

21. A cap-hood combination comprising a tube formed of inner and outer layers of stretchable porous knitted material, said tube being open at its lower end and closed at its upper end and being dimensioned to be stretched over the head of a wearer, said inner and outer layers having aligned openings therethrough, a wind barrier comprising a flexible intermediate layer of relatively non-porous and relatively non-stretchable material disposed between said inner and outer layers, said intermediate layer having lateral dimensions substantially less than the full circumference of said tube and having an opening in registry with the aligned openings of said inner and outer layers, said openings of said intermediate, inner, and outer layers together forming a face opening for said hood, said opening of said intermediate layer being substantially larger than the aligned openings of said inner and outer layers, and stretchable stitching attaching the margins of the aligned openings of said inner and outer layers, said stitching extending through the opening of said intermediate layer.

22. A cap-hood combination comprising a tube formed of inner and outer layers of stretchable porous knitted material, said tube being open at its lower end openings of said inner and outer layers, said openings of said intermediate, inner, and outer layers together forming a face opening for said hood, said opening of said intermediate layer being substantially larger than the aligned openings of said inner and outer layers, and stretchable stitching attaching the margins of the aligned openings of said inner and outer layers, said stitching extending through the opening of said intermediate layer, said intermediate layer being provided with a pair of slits extending downwardly from opposite sides of the opening thereof to define a flap portion foldable downwardly as the face opening of said hood is expanded to expose the lower portion of a wearers face.

23. The structure of claim 22 in which said flap portion is provided with a mouth opening positioned to be aligned with a wearers mouth when said'flap is in raised position.

24. The structure of claim 22 in which means are provided to urge said flap into a normally raised position.

25. The structure of claim 24 in which said means comprises a pair of elastic bands extending between the upper corners of said flap and spaced lateral points above the opening of said intermediate layer.

26. The structure of claim 21 in which said intermediate layer is provided with at least one tab projecting into the opening of said intermediate layer along the vertical mid line thereof, said tab portion being connected by said stitching to said inner and outer knitted layers, said intermediate layer having free lateral portions on opposite sides of said tab unsecured to said knitted layers.

27. The structure of claim 26 in which said intermediate layer is provided with a pair of said tabs projecting downwardly and upwardly from the upper and lower edges of the opening in said intermediate layer and along the vertical mid line of such layer, both of said tab portions being secured by said stitching to said knitted layers.

28. The structure of claim 21 in which said intermediate layer is formed of flexible plastic material.

29. The structure of claim 21 in which said intermediate layer has a width substantially less than one half the circumference of said tube.

30. The structure of claim 21 in which said intermediate layer has vertical dimensions substantially less than the vertical axial dimensions of said tube.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4176409 *Jul 15, 1977Dec 4, 1979Allen D. Everitt Knitting CompanyKnit cap with multiple layer construction and process of making same
US4285068 *Mar 6, 1980Aug 25, 1981Ross Daniel LCamouflage headwear
US4610247 *Sep 20, 1984Sep 9, 1986Arctic Temperature ControlsCold weather breathing apparatus
US4825473 *Feb 1, 1988May 2, 1989Spray Sok Co., Inc.Disposable eye guard
US4941211 *Apr 14, 1989Jul 17, 1990Reliable Knitting WorksCold weather hood
US4961232 *Jun 26, 1989Oct 9, 1990Micron Technology, Inc.Underhood having combined skirt and release means
US5025507 *Jul 27, 1990Jun 25, 1991Kirby Richard CFace mask
US5091996 *Apr 2, 1991Mar 3, 1992Kirby Richard CFace mask
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US7114195 *Aug 11, 2005Oct 3, 2006Ilene Devoney GrandisonNeonate warmth stocking cap
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US7188374Dec 6, 2002Mar 13, 2007Seirus Innovative Accessories, Inc.Hat with scarf
US7290293Sep 25, 2006Nov 6, 2007Victoria Ann KanitzArticle of headwear and method of making same
US7681251Mar 9, 2007Mar 23, 2010Seirus Innovative Accessories, Inc.Hat with scarf
US7823222 *Feb 20, 2007Nov 2, 2010Morning Pride Manufacturing, L.L.C.Hood with adaptive face opening
US8225428 *Jul 28, 2009Jul 24, 2012Honeywell International Inc.Protective hood
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Classifications
U.S. Classification2/173, 2/206, 2/202
International ClassificationA42B1/04
Cooperative ClassificationA42B1/046
European ClassificationA42B1/04D