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Publication numberUS3741363 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 26, 1973
Filing dateJun 15, 1971
Priority dateJun 16, 1970
Also published asDE2029751A1, DE2029751B2, DE2029751C3
Publication numberUS 3741363 A, US 3741363A, US-A-3741363, US3741363 A, US3741363A
InventorsA Hinterstocker
Original AssigneeA Hinterstocker
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electronic coin testing apparatus
US 3741363 A
Abstract
An electronic coin testing apparatus for comparing a coin travelling down a chute with a standard coin, of the type including means for producing a difference signal depending on the difference between the effect produced by the coin to be tested and that produced by the standard coin, the said difference signal decreasing from a predetermined value to zero and rising again as a coin identical with the standard coin passes a given position in the chute comprises a threshold device producing or not producing a predetermined threshold output signal depending on whether or not the difference signal exceeds a given value, a gate for separating accepted coins from rejected coins, and discriminating means for actuating the gate arranged to accept a coin only if there is a threshold output signal and it is not followed by a second such signal within a predetermined period of time.
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I United States Patent 11 1 1111 3,741,363 Hinterstocker June 26, 197 3 ELECTRONIC COIN TESTING APPARATUS Primary Examiner-Robert B. Reeves [76] Inventor figg near Assistant Examiner-David A. Scherbel Holz c en, Germany Attorney-Spencer & Kaye [22] Filed. June 15, 1971 ABSTRACT [21] Appl' 153228 An electronic coin testingapparatus for comparing a coin travelling down a chute with a standard coin, of [30] Foreign Application Priority Data the type including means for producing a difference J 16, 1970 Gen-any n p 20 29 751.2 signal depending on thedifference between the effect produced by the coin to be tested and that produced by 52 US. Cl. 194 100 A, 209/1111; the standard win, the said difference signal decreasing [51] Int. Cl. G07! 3/02 from a predetermined Value to Zero and rising again as 581 Field of Search 194/100 R, 100 A; a coin identical with the standard will passes a given 73 1 3; 209 1113 position in the chute comprises a threshold device producing or not producing a predetermined threshold 5 References i d output signal depending on whether or not the differ- UNITED STATES PATENTS ence signal exceeds a given value, a gate for separating accepted coins from rejected coins, and discriminating gag 35 agi 6 3: means for actuating the gate arranged to accept a coin 3401780 9/1968 Jumeml) 194]00 R only if there is a threshold output signal and it is not fol- 315991771 8/1971 l-linterstocker 194/100 A 10%! byva such $181131 predetermined period of time.

7 Claims, 9 DrawingFigures PAIENIEDJlm2s 191s SHEET 1 BF 1 N VENT OR. Adolf Hinters'rocker ATTORNEYS memmiuuz ms 3.741; 363

SHEET 2 OF 2 Fig.5

L5 I Time t 1 Time t Time t Time t c i v i: l

I 5 Time t pzumsj Time t 0 g n H I L-Zllms Time t Time i A-\/- 5 7 Time t imviamuii;

Adolf Hinierstocker BY: J

ATTORNEYS.

ELECTRONIC COIN TESTING APPARATUS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to electronic coin testing apparatus for comparing a coin travelling down a chute with a standard coin. In this type of testing apparatus a difference signal is produced which depends on the difference between the effect produced by the coin to be tested and that produced by the standard coin. This difference signal decreases from a predetermined initial value down to zero and then returns to its initial value as a coin identical with the standard coin passes a given position in the chute. A threshold device produces a predetermined threshold output signal the difference signal exceeds a given value. A gate separates accepted coins from the rejected coins. The gate is actuated by a discriminating means.-

In one embodiment of the testing apparatus, the chute extends between a primary coil connected to a source of alternating current and a first secondary coil inductively coupled with the primary coil. The secondary coil is coupled to the gate, beyond the coils in the direction of travel of the coins. A second secondary coil is mounted on the side of the primary coil remote from the coin chute, and is inductively coupled with it, and is connected in series with the first secondary coil in such direction that the voltages induced by the primary coil in the two secondary coils are subtracted, with a device for holding a standard coin between the primary coil and the second secondary coil.

Such a coin testing device is described in my earlier patent application Ser. No. 852,531 filed Aug. 1969, now US. Pat. No. 3,599,771. In this known coin testing device the testing must take place during a relatively short space of time, during which the coin to be tested (travelling down the chute) is situated exactly symmetrically with the standard coin For this purpose provision has been made for a switching device actuated by the coin to be tested, which device switches on the test circuit at the right moment and compares the coin to be tested, which must not move appreciably during the short testing period.

Such switching devices, which test the coin passing through the coin chute at the moment when the coin is in the testing position between the primary coil and the secondary coil, give rise to certain problems. Mechanical switching devices, e. g. a rocker which is actuated by the coin to be tested, and on which a small magnet is mounted for the actuation of a reed contact, are sensitive, liable to interference and, with considerable use, wear relatively quickly. Contact-free switching devices, e.g. switching devices with capacitive and inductive sensors, are costly and also sensitive as well as susceptible to interference.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION An object of the present invention is to provide such an electronic coin testing device in which it is not necessary to provide a coin-controlled switching device which limits the testing to a predetermined short space of time.

According to the invention discriminating means is provided for actuating the gate, arranged to accept a coin only if there is a threshold output signal and it is not followed by a second such signal within a predetermined period.

The discriminating means preferably include a bistable circuit arranged to be alternately set and reset by successive threshold output signals, to produce a flipflop output signal arranged to actuate the gate through a time constant circuit to accept a coin only if the flipflop output signal persists for a predetermined period. The time constant circuit conveniently includes an integrating operational amplifier, and may also include a level-responsive trigger device.

Resetting means may be provided for resetting the bistable circuit, if it is not already reset, after a second predetermined period, longer than the first predetermined period (in readiness for the next coin). Such resetting means may include a delay device connected between the output of the time constant circuit and a resetting input to the bistable device.

The invention may be put into practice in various ways but one specific embodiment will be described by way of example with reference to the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a simplified cross-sectional view through the coin chute and the measuring coils of an electronic coin-testing device, on the line l1 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 2 is a cross-section on the line 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a circuit diagram of an electronic cointesting device according to the invention;

FIG. 4 is a graphic representation of the attenuation caused by various coins to be tested;

FIGS. 5 to 9 are diagrammatic graphs, relating respectively to the coins correspondingly numbered in FIG. 4, showing the time progress of signals at various points in the circuit.

DESCRIPTION OF'TI-IE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The present coin-testing device includes, as usual, a coin chute 10 of rectangular cross-section which starts at a coin input slot 11. The coin chute extends between a primary coil 12 and a first secondary coil 14 arranged coaxially with the primary coil. On the side of the primary coil 12 remote from the coin chute 10 there is a second secondary coil 16, the two secondary coils being mounted symmetrically with respect to the primary coil 12. Between the primary coil 12 and the second secondary coil 16 there is disposed a standard coin 18, i.e. a typicalspecimen of the coins to be tested.

In the direction of travel of the coins in the coin chute, beyond the coil arrangement 12, 14, 16, is a gate containing an abutment 20 which protrudes into the coin chute, and may be retracted by a magnet coil (FIG. 3). In the retracted state the gate allows the tested coin to enter a channel for accepted coins 22, while, when the magnet coil is not excited, the abutment 20 protrudes into the coin chute, so that the tested coin strikes against it and enters a reject channel 24.

The primary coil 12 is connected to an alternating current source 26 which may, for example, comprise a transistor oscillator, and which supplies an output voltage at a frequency in the range of approximately 10 to kHz.

The two secondary coils l4, 16 are connected in series in such direction that the voltages induced in them by the primary coil 12 are subtracted from each other, to produce a difference signal which will be zero when betweenthe primary coil 12 and the first secondary coil .14 there is acoin which corresponds exactly to the standard coin 1 8 and lies symmetrically with it.;

The differencesignal of the secondary coils 14, I6 is led via an amplifier30 to a demodulator orrectifier. 32 which supplies a difference signal A which corresponds I to the envelope of the differential voltage produced by the series connected secondary coils 14, 16. The output d rest value M, as represented in the upperdiagram of FIG.5.

When the coin tojb e .tested has an attenuation smaller thanthe attenuationofthestandard coin, as is shown signal A of the rectifier 32 is supplied to a level respon-p sive trigger circuit 34, for example a Schmitt trigger circuit, which provides a threshold output signal B as long as the amplitude of the difference a predeterminedthresholdvalue S.

signal A lies below.

As described so far the arrangement is similar to that I described in the specification referred to above.

The output of the trigger ciruit 34 is connected to a I (FIG. 2). The outputsig nal A has therefore a first zero position x,, when thecoin to be tested is situated switchover input of a bistable or flip-flop circuit 36, so

that the latter will be alternately set and resetby successive threshold output signals B, and when set )will supply an output signal C. This outputsignal C, which may be termed a flip-flop output signalis led via a a coin to be tested is located in the centre position 44',

time constant 38, e.g. an integrating operational amplifier with an input resistorand a feedback capaciton and if required a further'level-responsive triggercircuit, to an amplifier 40, the output of whichactuates the magnetic coil 22 of the gate. I a

The time constant circuit 38 is so designed that gate is actuated only when the duration of the flip-flop output signal C of the bistable circuit 36 exceeds a predetermined value, in practice about 20 ms.

The output 'signalof the amplifier is'furtherr nore led via a delay device 42, which may for example have a delay time of 100 ms, to a reset input R of thebistable Beforean explanation is given of the modus operandi circuit 36.

of the present coin testing device a shortexamination will be made of the conditions present atthetesting sta;

tion (FIG. 1). I

In coin testing devicesiof the present type the attenu ation of thecoupling between the primary coill2and Inth'ecircuit ofFIGQ3 the trigger circuit 34 supplies U .athreshold output signal B as long as the amplitudeof theidifilerence signal A lieskbelow the threshold value S (cf. the upper diagram ofFlGS. 5 to 9). By .t hefon the secondary coil 14 by a coin 44 to be tested, located between these coils,is compared with the attenuation which the standardjcoin l8causes between theprimary coil and the second secondary coil 16. Accepted as genuine are such coins as have an attenuation which falls within a predetermined range, which in FIG.:4 is

delimited by the horizontal dashed lines. The attenuation of the standard coincorresponds to the value V at the center of this range.

If a coin, with respect to its attenuation qualitiescor responds exactly to'the standard coin 18, travels down the 'coin chute 10 between the coils 12 and 14, the threshold output signal A of the rectifier 32 (FIG. 3) alters as a function of time as represented in FIG..5. As long as the coin has not yet entered the field of influence of the coils, the signal A has a definite rest value M. When the coin begins to enter the space between the coils 12 and 14, the amplitude of the signal A decreases until it finally becomes zero, when the coin'is situated exactly between the coils 12 and 14,,as is shown in FIG. 2 by the continuous circle 44. At this moment, in the known coin-testing devices, the testing of the coin for genuineness took place, i.e. at this moment the attenuations of the coin to be tested and the standard coin were compared. If the coin then travels further, the amplitude of the signal A rises again to the mcoins, w

at 6 in ElGJlpthe output, signal A develops according to the first diagram in FIG. If the attenuation is still y 1: smaller and lies outside thetolerance range, as is shown Cur v eAin FIG. 7. as a a d If thevattenuation is slightly greater than thatof the at 7 in FIG. 4, the output signal develops according to standard coin, asshown at 8 in FIG. '4, the form of the output'signal as shown in FIG. 8. Theattenua tion effected bythe cointo be'tested is thenirideed equalf 'to the attenuation of the {standard coin 18 coin to betested finds itself the centralised position in the: position 44" (FIG. 2 shown doted.When the the output signalhas a small intermediate maximum,

and'it again becomes zerofata positionx g when the coin to be testedis in a position 44" symmetrical with r t the position 44'- Then, the output signal increases again to the rest value. If the coin has an attenuation so great thatit lies outside the tolerance range, as repre sentedyat. 9 in FIG. 4, the development of the output signaI A is as representedin FIG; 9, so that theinterme diate maximum, at afpoint ,x has a relatively. high value.

Thestate of. affairs depicted above as regards the de velopment of the output signal of the rectifier-32 with coins of different attenuation is used in the present in vention todiscriminate between accepted andrejected thoutthe necessityfor making the test within a definite interval of time. 1

coins.

impulse B and thebistable circuit 36is therefore set,

coils 12 and 14, supplies onlya single threshold output and remains set until, after for example 120 ms, it is reset by the reset circuit with the delay device 42, as is represented by the curves C in FIGS. 5, 6 and 8.

When, however, the attenuation of the coin to be a tested is as small as is represented at 7 in FIG. 4, the difference signal A (FIG. 7) does not fall below the threshold value S of the trigger circuit 34, the latter cannot supply any threshold output signal, the bistable circuit 36 is not set and therefore also no impulse can be produced for the actuation of the gate.

, When, on the other hand, the attenuation of the coin to be tested lies above the upper tolerance limit, as

represented at 9 in FIG. 4, two impulses occur in the threshold output signal B as will be easily seen from FIG. 9. The intermediate maximum at x, in this case acbefore the 7 This is possible with "was with attenuation values such as represented at 5, 6, and Sin FIG. 4, as herethe threshold'circuit 34, as the coin passesbetweenthe tually exceeds the threshold value S, so that the trigger circuit 34 can for a short time reset before the difference signal A (FIG. 9) becomes zero for the second time. The second impulse B, (FIG. 9), however, then resets the bistable circuit 36 before the time constant member 38 and the amplifier 40 can respond, and the gate is therefore in this case also not actuated, so that the tested coin strikes on the abutment 20 and is directed into the rejected channel 24.

In the circuit of FIG. 3 the entire testing circuit is therefore continuously operative when coins are to be tested. With mains-operated coin testing devices the oscillator 26 and the other stages can then be constantly in operation; with battery-operated coin testing devices provision can be made for a quite simple switching device actuated by the insertion of a coin, which switches on the arrangement for the duration of the test. As these switching processes need not be synchronised with the run of the coin through the testing station, this switching arrangement may be made very simple and cheap.

Instead of the. bistable or flip-flop circuit 36 and of the reset circuit consisting in a delay circuit 42, it is naturally possible to use also other known switching arrangements equivalent in effect.

The values given above for the delay times efiected through the time constant circuit 38 and the delay circuit 42 are typical, and have proved themselves adequately in practice; however, they may be modified if desired. The retardation time of the time constant circuit must, however, be at least long enough to make possible resetting of the bistable circuit 36 by the second impulse B (FIG. 9B) to prevent actuation of the gate.

The delay circuit 42 must ensure that the abutment 20 of the gate remains retracted from the coin chute until a coin found to be acceptable as a result of the testing is able to enter the channel 22 for accepted coins.

The circuits mentioned above and shown in block form in the drawing are preferably transistoriaed'circuits which may be of known construction.

As various changes could be made in the above disclosed embodiment without departing from the scope of invention, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

What I claim is: I

1. In an electronic coin testing apparatus including a signal generating means for producing a test signal in dependence on a coin to be tested in comparison to a standard coin and a control means for producing an acceptance signal only when the maximum value of the test signal falls within'preselected boundaries, the improvement wherein the control means comprises, in

combination: a rectifier means connected to said signal generating means for producing a rectified output of the test signal; threshold value means connected to said rectifier means for producing a threshold output signal each time the rectified output of the test signal is within a threshold area defined by the two preselected boundaries; a bistable means, receiving a plurality of signals and connected to said threshold value means, for producing a gating signal upon receipt of a first signal and turning off the gating signal upon receipt of a second signal; a time constant means connected to said bistable means for producing an acceptance pulse when the duration of the gating signal is longer than a first predetermined time period; and reset means providing a signal for resetting said bistable means after a second predetermined time period which is longer than the first predetermined time. period.

2. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein said time constant means includes an integrating operational am- 3. Apparatus asdefined in claim 2 wherein said time constant circuit further includes a level-responsive trigger device.

4. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein said reset means includes a delay device connected between the output of said time constant means and' a resetting input to said bistable means.

5. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 further comprising a chute along which the coin to be tested passes; and wherein said signal generating means includes: a source of alternating current; a primary coil connected to said current source and arranged on one side of said chute; a first secondary coil inductively coupled with said primary coil and arranged on the side of said chute opposite said primary coil, whereby the voltage induced in said first secondary coil by the current in said primary coil is affected by the coin passing along said chute; a second secondary coil inductively coupled with said primary coil and arranged on the side of said primary coil remote from said chute, whereby the voltage induced in said second secondary coil by the current in said primary coil is affected by a standard coin positioned between said primary coil and said second secondary coil; said first and second secondary coils being connected in such a manner that the voltages induced therein by said primary coil are subtracted.

6. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein the first predetermined time period is selected such that the gat-- ing signal will only be of a longer duration than the first predetermined time period when the rectified output of the test signal onlypasses into the threshold area once.

7. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein said threshold value means includes a Schmitt trigger cir- Clllt.

s s a sn

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AU152433A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3918564 *Oct 12, 1973Nov 11, 1975Mars IncMethod and apparatus for use in an inductive sensor coin selector
US4105105 *Sep 20, 1976Aug 8, 1978Libandor Trading Corporation Inc.Method for checking coins and coin checking apparatus for the performance of the aforesaid method
US4398626 *Aug 21, 1981Aug 16, 1983Mars, Inc.Low frequency phase shift coin examination method and apparatus
US4441602 *Dec 2, 1981Apr 10, 1984Joseph OstroskiElectronic coin verification mechanism
US4448297 *Jun 18, 1981May 15, 1984Mendelsohn Lewis IFerromagnetic coin validator and method
US4469213 *Jun 14, 1982Sep 4, 1984Raymond NicholsonCoin detector system
US4567325 *Dec 30, 1983Jan 28, 1986At&T Technologies Inc.Controller for a coin telephone set
US4574936 *May 10, 1983Mar 11, 1986Lance KlingerCoin accepter/rejector including symmetrical dual feedback oscillator
US4666027 *Feb 7, 1986May 19, 1987Validation Systems, Inc.Coin validation apparatus and method for detecting stringing of coins and distinguishing valid tokens or coins from slugs
US4884672 *Aug 12, 1988Dec 5, 1989Parker Engineering & Manufacturing Co.Coin analyzer system and apparatus
US4936435 *Oct 11, 1988Jun 26, 1990Unidynamics CorporationCoin validating apparatus and method
US5056644 *Aug 7, 1989Oct 15, 1991Parker Donald OCoin analyzer system and apparatus
US5216234 *Mar 29, 1990Jun 1, 1993Jani Supplies Enterprises, Inc.Tokens having minted identification codes
US5226520 *May 2, 1991Jul 13, 1993Parker Donald OCoin detector system
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US5566808 *Sep 9, 1994Oct 22, 1996Parker Engineering & Manufacturing Co.Low profile coin analyzer apparatus
US6298973 *Nov 10, 1999Oct 9, 2001Parker Engineering & Manufacturing Co., Inc.Multiple coin analyzer system
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Classifications
U.S. Classification194/318
International ClassificationG07D5/00
Cooperative ClassificationG07D5/00
European ClassificationG07D5/00