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Publication numberUS3741411 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 26, 1973
Filing dateOct 4, 1971
Priority dateOct 4, 1971
Publication numberUS 3741411 A, US 3741411A, US-A-3741411, US3741411 A, US3741411A
InventorsPeacock B
Original AssigneeMa Ind Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Molded cushion pad insertable between heavy panels
US 3741411 A
Abstract
A molded plastic cushion pad for insertion between respective heavy panels such as precast concrete, architectual slabs used in building construction and the like. The pad is placed between such heavy panels when panels are stacked against each other so as to prevent damage, permit the circulation of air and so forth. A typical plastic pad is molded from polyethyelene about the size of a man's wallet and is rectangular in formation with large protruding, hemispherical bumps on both sides making the pad also about the thickness of a man's wallet. The main body of the pad is a thin flat sheet of polyethelene and the hemispherical bumps are molded intricately therewith. Heavy concrete slabs may be stacked one on the other vertically with the present cushion pad therebetween.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 11 1 Peacock 1 June 26, 1973 v MOLDED CUSHION PAD INSERTABLE BETWEEN HEAVY PANELS [76] Inventor: Bobbie D Peacock, c/o MA Industries, 2350 Sylvan Road, I 1 Forest Park, Ga. 30344- [22] Filed: Oct. 4, 1971 [211 App]. No.: 186,233

521 U.s.'c|. ..214/1o.sa 51 m. 865; 1/14 581 Field oISenrch 248/119; 206/60;

108/51; 220/97 B; 2l4/l 0.5 R; 105/367, 369- 6]. l s sms cd UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,519,901 12/1924 Boazet a1. ..214/l0.5 R 2,075,473' '3/1937 Schwary et a1... 214/10.5RX'

' 3,220,681 11/1965 I Erbert 108/51 X Primary Examiner-Gerald M. Forlenza Assistant Examiner-Junk E. Werner Attorney-Patrick F. Henry [57] ,I ABSTRACT A molded plastic cushion pad for insertion between respective heavy panels such as precast concrete, architectual slabs used in building construction and the like. The pad is placed between such heavy panels when panels are stacked against each other so as to prevent damage, permit the circulation of air and so forth. A typical plastic pad is molded from polyethyelene about the size of a man's wallet andis rectangular in formation with large'protruding, hemispherical bumps on both sides making the pad'also about the thickness of va mans wallet. The main body of the pad is a thin flat sheet ofpolyethelene and the hemispherical bumps are molded intricately therewith. Heavy concrete slabs maybe stacked 'one an the other vertically'with the present cushion pad therebetween.

1 Claim, 3 Drawing Figures MOLDED CUSHION PAD INSERTABLE BETWEEN r-HEAVY PANELS CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION Application Ser. No. 839,450 filed.07/07/69 now U.S. Pat. No. 3,612,301.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention Cushion devices, pads, and packing inserts. Also special supports.

2. Prior Art Discussion The closest known prior art is the above noted U.S. Pat. No. 3,612,301. The pad shown in that patent is very suitable for both tilted stacking arrangements as shown in FIG. 3 of the patent as well as vertical stacking arrangement as shown in FIG. 4. However, as noted in FIG. 4 with the tip 18 the device has limitations as to the extent of insertion between the heavy panels 20. Furthermore, it has been determined that the absence of bumps on one side of the device makes it harder to slide the panels apart and also may detract from the cushion effect. The present pad is a modification of that one shown in U.S. Pat. No. 3,612,301 and is very suitable for use in vertical or almost vertical stacking relationships.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION For use with a plurality of very heavy, closely associated architectual panels such as precast concrete slabs arranged so that the weight of one panel would rest somewhat on another panel, the present cushion pad is a simple inexpensive device which may be molded in one piece of polyethelene plastic with a plurality of hemispherical bumps on both sides of a thin plastic panel so that when in place the pads may be inserted to any depth between vertically stacked concrete panels and normally have only a small area of the periphery of each hemispherical bump in contact withthe concrete slab whereby maximum air flow and circulation is achieved as well as very effective cushioning and panels may be slid with less effort.

An object of this device is to provide a simple and inexpensive protective pad for heavy concrete slabs which is easy to install and after which it is also easy to remove or rearrange the panels.

'As part of the above noted object it is also intended that the present device provide a maximum of circulation and as much resilient cushioning as is possible under compression which is achieved by the arrangement of bumps on both sides.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. I is a perspective view of the present cushion ad. p FIG. 2 is a side elevation view of the cushion pad shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a side elevation view of several concrete slabs having the pads of FIGS. 1 and 2 inserted therebetween.

DISCUSSION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The present cushion pad, which is both a cushion and a pad, is designated generally by reference numeral and is molded integrally in one piece by a conventional molding operation, such as injection molding, from typical plastic material such as polyethelene plastic. This not for a plurality of hemispherical bumps 20 molded into respective surfaces l6, 18 preferably simultaneously with the molding of the entire pad. Each bump 20 is substantially hemispherical in shape but such is not a mandatory configuration since other shapes of bumps may be used even cylindrical formations.

Also, while approximately half of a sphere has been molded in the present form and in side elevation as seen in FIG. 2 this becomes an eliptical shape in crosssection presenting an elipsoid or egg-shaped configuration, this is not a critical formation since the bumps 20 may be larger or smaller and there may be more or less on one side or the other. Unlike the formation shown in the U.S. Pat. No. 3,612,301, there are bumps 20 on both sides of the panel and there is no obstruction on either side of the panel l6, 18 other than the bumps 20 to prevent the cushion pad 10 from being inserted between heavy concrete, architectual panels designated generally by reference numeral 24 herein as shown in FIG. 3 resting on a support means 26 on the ground 28. Thus, each cushion pad 10 may be inserted not just approximately its length from each end but may be inserted more or less.

As stated in U.S. Pat. No. 3,612,301, there is a minimum amount of contact between the bumps 20 and the respective surfaces of the panels 24 between which each pad 10 is confined in the stack shown in FIG. 3, which makes it easier to slide the bumps along the surface and vice versa and since the material such as polyethelene plastic and the like are smooth and have some amount of lubrication it is easier to effect relative motion between the pad 10 and the panels 24. Even more air can circulate in the areas between the bumps 20 on both the side 16 and the side 18 than in the embodiment disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,612,301 because there are bumps on both sides. This is even more effective in preventing curing stains and other problems which may arise from either too much contact or a lack of circulation of air and at the same time the cushion effect has been improved since there are bumps on both sides rather than one side. The pad 10 includes the usual holes 14 on opposite corners which can be used to nail the pads 10 to wood frames whenever necessary or for any other use, such as hanging the pad 10 on a nail, whereas it would be otherwise necessary to penetrate the pad 10.

While I have shown and described a particular exact form of the .pad using for example hemispherical shapes, as mentioned previously, while the particular pad is a preferred embodiment there are various alterations, changes, deviations, eliminations, modifications, substitutions and departures which may be made in the particular form depicted and described without departing from the scope of my invention as defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed:

1. A cushion pad to be positioned between respective, successive heavy panels such as precast, concrete architectual panels:

a. a unitary, molded pad constructed from polyethelene and the like, of substantially thin construction t and havinga substantially flatback and a substantially flat front each having a plurality of spaced, 1

thereon arranged in spaced relai sides thereof, whereby said pad so that the bumps on one panel and the bumps on the other sideflengagethe n next successive panel protruding bumps tionship on both maybe positioned between stacked heavy panels to permit and tocushion said panels,

therebetween I ing hemispherical in 1 formation,

said bumps be side engagea respective air oircuiation thereof.

e."aidlpailbeing ub mp on onesideiof said pad correin rows, there being a

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1519901 *Mar 5, 1924Dec 16, 1924Boaz John WalterDunnage strip
US2075473 *Jul 29, 1936Mar 30, 1937Louise GilkeySpacer for stacking cut meats
US3220681 *May 5, 1964Nov 30, 1965Adelhard ErbertBase mat
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3892902 *Dec 4, 1972Jul 1, 1975Preco Ind LtdPlastic panel pad construction for spacing concrete panels
US4137356 *Oct 25, 1977Jan 30, 1979The Hoffmaster Company, Inc.Non-skid place mat and the like
US4605582 *May 23, 1985Aug 12, 1986American Hospital Supply CorporationBody support pad
US4673605 *Jul 25, 1986Jun 16, 1987Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc.Body support pad
US5251414 *Mar 16, 1992Oct 12, 1993Duke Darryl AEnergy absorbing composite and reinforcing core
US7299592 *May 14, 2003Nov 27, 2007Snap Lock Industries, Inc.Structural support system for floor tiles
US7306108 *Apr 13, 2004Dec 11, 2007Berry Plastics CorporationClosure with vents for venting during molding of a liner, method of forming a liner in a closure, and device for forming a liner in a closure
US7571572Jun 2, 2005Aug 11, 2009Moller Jr Jorgen JModular floor tile system with sliding lock
US7571573Apr 11, 2006Aug 11, 2009Moller Jr Jorgen JModular floor tile with lower cross rib
US7587865Apr 18, 2006Sep 15, 2009Moller Jr Jorgen JModular floor tile with multi level support system
US7634876Dec 8, 2006Dec 22, 2009Moller Jr Jorgen JModular floor locator apparatus
US7918057Apr 5, 2011Moller Jr Jorgen JModular floor tile system with sliding lock
US7958681Jun 14, 2011Moller Jr Jorgen JModular floor tile with nonslip insert system
US8099915Jan 24, 2012Snapsports CompanyModular floor tile with resilient support members
US8341896Jan 23, 2012Jan 1, 2013Snapsports CompanyModular floor tile with resilient support members
US8646242Sep 18, 2009Feb 11, 2014Snap Lock Industries, Inc.Modular floor tile with connector system
US8656662Nov 12, 2010Feb 25, 2014Snapsports CompanyModular floor tile with resilient support members
US8713863Mar 4, 2013May 6, 2014Snapsports CompanyModular floor tile with resilient support members
US9080333May 5, 2014Jul 14, 2015Snapsports CompanyModular floor tile with resilient support members
US20040226242 *May 14, 2003Nov 18, 2004Snap Lock Industries, Inc.Structural support system for floor tiles
US20050224447 *Apr 13, 2004Oct 13, 2005Bruce CleevelyClosure with vents for venting during molding of a liner, method of forming a liner in a closure, and device for forming a liner in a closure
US20060105498 *Aug 13, 2004May 18, 2006Cheng-Chung HuangWafer stack separator
US20060272252 *Nov 30, 2005Dec 7, 2006Moller Jorgen J JrModular floor tile with nonslip insert system
US20060283118 *Apr 18, 2006Dec 21, 2006Moller Jr Jorgen JModular floor tile with multi level support system
US20060283125 *Jun 2, 2005Dec 21, 2006Moller Jorgen J JrModular floor tile system with sliding lock
US20070261317 *Apr 11, 2006Nov 15, 2007Moller Jorgen J JrModular floor tile with lower cross rib
US20080134593 *Dec 8, 2006Jun 12, 2008Moller Jorgen JModular Floor Locator Apparatus
US20090031658 *Oct 15, 2008Feb 5, 2009Snapsports CompanyModular floor tile with resilient support members
US20090282769 *Nov 19, 2009Moller Jr Jorgen JModular floor tile system with sliding lock
US20110056158 *Nov 12, 2010Mar 10, 2011Snapsports CompanyModular floor tile with resilient support members
US20110067340 *Mar 24, 2011Snap Lock Industries, Inc.Modular floor tile with connector system
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/593, 428/178
International ClassificationB65D81/05, B65D57/00, B65D81/127
Cooperative ClassificationB65D57/00, B65D81/127
European ClassificationB65D81/127, B65D57/00