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Publication numberUS3742209 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 26, 1973
Filing dateMay 28, 1971
Priority dateMay 28, 1971
Publication numberUS 3742209 A, US 3742209A, US-A-3742209, US3742209 A, US3742209A
InventorsC Williams
Original AssigneeC Williams
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lighting fixture
US 3742209 A
Abstract
A light support portion is interconnected to a first spring means. The first spring means is interconnected with a second spring means by an intermediate relatively rigid means which may include a swivel joint connected at an intermediate point thereof. The second spring means is interconnected with a mounting means which movably mounts the lighting fixture for movement with respect to a support means, the lighting fixture being supported in a generally horizontal relationship. The second spring means is shorter and more rigid than the first spring means and serves mainly to absorb vertical forces while the first spring means absorbs both vertical and horizontal forces.
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O United States Patent [111 3,742,209

Williams June 26, 1973 [54] LIGHTING FIXTURE 2,538,655 1/1951 Preston 248/204 X Inventor: Charles s. Williams, P'O- BOX 6534, 2,717,141 9/1955 Livingston 248/289 X Lubbock 79413 Primary Examiner-Williarn l-l. Schultz [22] Filed: May 28, 1971 Attorney-William D. Hall, Elliott l. Pollock, Fred C. Philpit't, George Vande Sande, Charles F. Steininge'r, [21] Appl' 147835 Robert R. Priddy and Burton A. Amernick Related U.S. Application Data [63] Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 58,622, July 27, [57] ABSTRACT 1970, which is a continuation-in-part of Ser. No. A H h i g t support portion is interconnected to a first 846,000, July 30, 1969, aban spring means. The first spring means is interconnected -with a second spring means by an intermediate relag 240/73 tively rigid means which may include a swivel joint con- [58] Fie'm 278 282 nected at an intermediate point thereof. The second 248 240/73 spring means is interconnected with a mounting means which movably mounts the lighting fixture for movement with respect to a support means, the lighting fix- [56] References cued ture being supported in a generally horizontal relation- UNITED STATES PATENTS ship. The second spring means is shorter and more rigid 297,269 4/1884 Klein 240/73 BJ than the first spring means and serves mainly to absorb 444,424 1391 Dawes vertical forces while the first spring means absorbs both i g vertical and horizontal forces. awson 1,319,247 10/1919 Romig 248/324 13 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures PAIENIEnJms I973 INVENTOR CHARLES 3. WILLIAM S ATTORNEY l LIGHTING FIXTURE CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS The present application is a continuation-in-part of copending US. Pat. application Ser. No. 58,622 filed July 27, 1970, entitled Lighting Fixture" which in turn is a continuation-in-part of US. Pat. application Ser. No. 846,000, filed July 30, 1969 and now abandoned.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION support means which provides a shock resistant mount ing to protect the lighting fixture as well as any object which may strike the lighting fixture.

The lighting fixturev must be capable of absorbing both horizontal and vertical forces applied thereto, and in addition it is desirable to provide an arrangement whereby the position of the light support portion can be Each of the spring means employed in the present invention comprises a compression spring which is in complete compression. The second spring means is shorter and accordingly more rigid than the first spring means, the two spring means being of substantially identical construction and differing only in the length thereof. It is of course apparent that springs of varying size can be employed so long as the relative rigidity relationship of the two springs is maintained. This construction enables the fixture to readily absorb forces applied both longitudinally thereof and laterally thereof and the fixture will quickly return to its original position after having been deflected.

In the present invention, the fixture is supported in generally horizontal position and the second spring is primarily adapted to absorb vertical forces while the first spring is adapted to absorb both vertical and horiselectively adjusted so that the beam of light can be aimed to provide illumination at a desired location.

Various shock resistant lighting fixtures have been provided in the prior art, many such fixtures employing spring means for enabling deflection of the lighting fixture when force is applied thereto.

In conventional lighting fixtures, a single spring may be provided which is secured to a rigid conduit either fixedly secured to a junction box or connected therewith by a ball swivel arrangement. When a ball swivel connection is provided, the electrical wiring is often twisted so as to sever it or to cause the insulation to wear off thereby resulting in a short-circuit. This occurs with ball swivel arrangements even though they are keyed and slotted.

ln some instances, the rigid conduit is fixedly secured to a junction box. If such a conduit is struck or has a force applied to it inboard of a spring connected to the outer end thereof, the conduit is permanently bent out of alignment since there is no means for absorbing energy applied to the conduit.

On the other hand, if the light support portion of the fixture is attached to a rigid conduit which in turn has a single spring disposed inboard thereof, no protection is provided against forces applied longitudinally of the fixture whereby the conduit portion will break or bend 'out of alignment thereby rendering the fixture unsafe in those cases where the insulation around the wiring is penetrated or crimped.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In the present invention, the light support portion is connected to a first spring means, for example by means of a joint which may be adjustable. The first spring means in turn is interconnected with a second spring means by an intermediate relatively rigid means. A mounting means is in turn interconnected with the second spring means to movably mount the lighting fixture for movement with respect to a support means, the lighting fixture being supported in a generally horizontal position.

zontal forces and in particular affords protection for the fixture from horizontal forces applied thereto and localizes the area of give to preserve the rigidity needed for the varying length of the device. The length can of course be readily varied by altering the'length of the relatively rigid intermediate portion of the fixture.

The first spring may be of sufficient length so that it is capable of bending double upon itself, this spring being capable of holding approximately three times the weight of the light support portion and yet at the same time being adapted to flex under a force substantially less than that required to break or bend any portion of the fixture.

The springs are placed at the points where the greatest amount of force is produced and will reduce the forces most effectively at these points. The spring action is localized and any reflex action is minimized if the fixture is struck.

The springs, as well as the components associated therewith, including the relatively rigid intermediate portion, are all of tubular construction so as to receive and provide protection to electrical lead means employed to provide electrical energy to the lights mounted in the light fixture.

A special mounting means is provided in the present invention enabling the fixture to be mounted in a horizontal position and further allowing the fixture to swing in a horizontal plane so as to be readily adjusted. The mounting means enables the lighting fixture to be readily supported on any suitable vertical surface and, for example, the fixture may be mounted along the side of a door so that it is able to swing out into the door opening.

The relatively rigid intermediate portion of the fixture may in some instances include a swivel joint although such a joint is not necessary. The swivel joint provides greater versatility for the fixture and is of such a construction that a minimum wearing effect is produced on the wiring of the fixture which passes through the tubular components of the swivel joint.

The fixture includes first and second interconnected arm portions spaced horizontally from one another when the swivel joint is employed whereby the fixture can fold back upon itself against a wall, column, or any other suitable vertical support means. The outboard arm portion of the fixture preferably is longer than the inboard arm portion to prevent the second arm portion from having a full 360 of travel about an associated swivel joint. In other words, the light support portion will contact the associated support means before it can travel a complete circle about the associated swivel joint thereby preventing winding up or tearing of the internal wiring of the fixture.

The swivel joint may include means for limiting the angular movement of the movable portions of the swivel joint, although such limiting means is not necessary when the outboard arm portion is of greater length than the inboard arm portion as discussed above.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is an elevation of a lighting fixture according to the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an exploded view of the components of the swivel joints of the fixture;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view on an enlarged scale taken substantially along the line 3-3 of FIG. 1 looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 4 is a top perspective view of a portion of said mounting means;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged sectional view taken substantially along the line 55 of FIG. 1 looking in the direction of the arrows; and

FIG. 6 is a sectional view taken substantially on line 6-6 of FIG. 1 looking in the direction of the arrows.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to the drawings wherein like reference characters designate corresponding parts throughout the several views, the fixture includes a housing or reflector 10 which may be formed of spun aluminum or the like and which is sufficiently resilient to bend back into shape if it is deformed. A wire bulb guard 12 formed of heavy gauge wire is supported at the outer end of the housing to prevent bulb breakage. A conventional incandescent bulb is of course adapted to be supported within the usual ceramic light socket supported by the housing.

A rigid portion 14 extending from the housing is interconnected with an adjustable joint means indicated generally by reference numeral 16 which may be substantially identical with the adjustable joint means illustrated in detail in the aforementioned copending patent application. A further rigid tubular portion 18 is interconnected with the adjustable joint means and is further connected with a first elongated compression spring 20. The light support portion is substantially adjacent to the end of the first elongated spring 20. That is, the length of the portions 14 and 18 and any other connection between the light support portion and the first spring means is small as compared to the overall length of the lighting fixture. As seen most clearly in FIG. 5, the inner end of tubular portion 18 is provided with threads on the outer surface thereof which are threaded into the outer end of spring 20. In a typical example, the spring may have a length on the order of 5 inches. An electrical lead 22 extends through these tubular portions and is connected in a suitable manner to the electrical socket in a housing 10.

The length of relatively rigid electrical conduit 30 has the outer end thereof threaded and threaded into the inner end of spring 20. The opposite end of member 30 is threaded within a tubular coupler 32 having internal threads formed therein as seen in FIG. 6. A further length of relatively rigid electrical conduit 34 has the outer end thereof threaded within coupler 32, while the inner end of member 34 is similarly threaded within a further coupler 36. A short length of relatively rigid electrical conduit 38 has the outer end thereof threaded within coupler 36, while the inner threaded end of member 38 is interconnected with a swivel joint indicated generally by reference numeral 40.

The swivel joint as seen most clearly in FIG. 2 includes three members, 42, 44, and 46, members 42. and 46 being of similar construction and comprising elbow members, while member 44 is of straight cylindrical construction. Member 42 includes a first opening 50 for receiving member 38, the interior of the elbow member being threaded to cooperate with the thread on member 38. Elbow member 42 also includes a second opening 52 for receiving member 44, a set screw 54 being threaded through a suitable hole in the elbow for a purpose hereinafter described. The elbow member is also illustrated as including a removable cover 55.

The second elbow member 46 includes an opening 56 for receiving a relatively rigid tubular member hereinafter described, the elbow member also including an opening 58 for receiving one end of member 44. A set screw 60 is threaded through a suitable hole provided in the elbow for a purpose hereinafter described. Elbow 46 also includes a removable cover 59.

Member 44 of the swivel joint includes a pair of slots 60 and 62, each of which extends through an arc of approximately l80 on opposite sides of the member and at opposite ends thereof. The upper end of member 44 fits through hole 52 and elbow 42, and set screw 54 is received within slot 60. In a similar manner, the lower end of member 44 fits through opening 58 in elbow 46 and set screw 60 is received within slot 62.

It is apparent that the cooperation between the set screws and the slots maintain the members of the swivel joint in a similar relationship with respect to one another and further serve to limit the relative rotation between the members thereof. The set screw and slot arrangement may be eliminated if so desired since it is not necessary to provide means for limiting the relative rotation between the parts. Additionally, it is again noted that the swivel joint itself is an optional feature and may be eliminated from the fixture construction.

Follow again the FIG. 1 of the drawings, a short length of relatively rigid electrical conduits as the opposite ends thereof threaded within elbow 46 and a coupler 74. A further length of relatively rigid electrical conduit 76 has the opposite ends thereof threaded within coupler 74 and still another coupler 78.

A further length of electrical conduit 80 has the opposite ends thereof threaded within coupler 78 and a second spring means 82. This second spring means is also a compression spring in complete compression and in a typical example may have a length of approximately 3 inches whereby it is of substantially less length than the first spring means 20 and accordingly is of greater rigidity.

A further length of relatively rigid electrical conduit 84 has the opposite ends thereof threaded within spring 82 and a T member 90. Two members 92 and 94 are threaded within opposite line holes formed in the T member, and in line swivel 96 being connected with the upper end of member 94. It will be noted that the electrical lead means 22 extends from swivel 96 to a suitable source of electrical energy, the electrical lead means extending through the various tubular components of thefixture to the aforementioned light socket.

The mounting means includes first portion including T member as well as tubular members 92, 94, and 96 as well as a second portion which as seen most clearly in FIG. 4 comprises a plate 100 having a plurality of spaced holes 102 formed therethrough for receiving screws or the like whereby the plate may be mounted on any suitable vertical support surface. The plate includes a pair of integral spaced tubular portions 104 which are adapted to receive tubular portions 92 and 94 aforedescribed. As seen in FIG. 1, when the mounting means is in assembled relationship, the fixture is mounted in generally horizontal position and is adapted to swing about a vertical axis extending through the portions 104 of the mounting means.

In the form of the invention illustrated in the drawings, a swivel joint is illustrated, and in such an arrangement first and second interconnected arm portions are provided which are spaced horizontally from one another. The first or outboard arm portion includes members 18, 20, 30, 32, 34, 36, and 38, while the second or inboard arm portion includes members 70, 74, 76, 78, 80, 82, and 84. It will be noted that the first arm portion is longer than the second arm portion so as to limit swinging movement of the first arm portion as aforedescribed.

As this invention may be embodied in several forms without departing from the spirit or essential characteristics thereof, the present embodiment is therefore illustrative and not restrictive, and since the scope of the invention is defined by the appended claims, all changes that fall within the metes and bounds of the claims or that form their functional as well as conjointly cooperate equivalents are therefore intended to be embraced by those claims.

What is claimed is:

l. A lighting fixture comprising a light support portion, a first spring means interconnected with said light support portion, a second spring means, intermediate relatively rigid means connected between said first and second spring means, a swivel joint connected to an intermediate portion of said relatively rigid means, and mounting means interconnected with said second spring means to movably mount the lighting fixture with respect to a support means for movement.

2. A lighting fixture comprising a light support portion which includes a light socket, a first spring means interconnected with said light support portion, a second spring means, intermediate relatively rigid means connected between said first and second spring means, mounting means interconnected with said second spring means to movably mount the lighting fixture with respect to a support means for movement, and wherein said first and second spring means, said relatively rigid means and a portion of said mounting means are all of tubular construction, and electrical lead means extending through said tubular means.

3. The fixture of claim 2 wherein each of said spring means comprises a compression spring.

4. The lighting fixture of claim 2 wherein said light support portion is substantially adjacent to said first spring means.

5. A fixture as defined in claim 2 wherein said mounting means includes first and second portions, said first portion being connected to said second spring means and being pivotally supported by said second portion to support said first and second spring means as well as said relatively rigid means in generally horizontal position.

6. A fixture as defined in claim 5 wherein said second portion includes spaced parts for receiving spaced parts of said first portion and wherein said first portion is supported for pivotal movement about a generally vertical axis.

7. A fixture as defined in claim 2 including first and second interconnected arm portions spaced horizontally from one another. 7

8. A fixture as defined in claim 7 wherein said first arm portion is connected to said light support portion and said second arm portion is connected to said mounting means, said first arm portion being longer than said second arm portion.

9. A fixture as defined in claim 2 wherein said second spring means is more rigid than said first spring means.

10. The lighting fixture of claim 9 wherein said light support portion is substantially adjacent to said first spring means.-

11. A fixture as defined in claim 9 wherein said sections.

* i I. l

Patent Citations
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US297269 *Dec 12, 1883Apr 22, 1884 Philip h
US444424 *Jan 29, 1890Jan 13, 1891 Electric-light support
US577023 *Jul 6, 1896Feb 16, 1897 Lamp-bracket
US673636 *Aug 9, 1899May 7, 1901Selden I ClawsonToy.
US1319247 *May 16, 1918Oct 21, 1919 Electric-lighting sixtttre
US2538655 *May 5, 1947Jan 16, 1951Preston Ralph GLoader's extensible light fixture
US2717141 *May 17, 1951Sep 6, 1955Harry F LivingstonAdjustable supports providing universal movement
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3862410 *Oct 25, 1973Jan 21, 1975Maxetron Ind IncBicycle warning light
US3942751 *Oct 18, 1974Mar 9, 1976Fay James PMount for hospital communications system
US4305560 *Aug 31, 1979Dec 15, 1981Shigeru BanAdjustable light support
US4413803 *Jun 4, 1981Nov 8, 1983William RossPivoting license plate bracket
US4613275 *Jan 22, 1985Sep 23, 1986Karlowsky Ernest WAuger arrangement for unloading a truck box
US4669941 *May 16, 1985Jun 2, 1987Ar-Man Construction, Ltd.Grain auger system
US4714222 *Nov 26, 1985Dec 22, 1987Siemens AktiengesellschaftBracket structure for dental purposes
US4881707 *Feb 23, 1989Nov 21, 1989Clamp Swing Pricing Co.Sign holder device
US5595128 *Aug 28, 1995Jan 21, 1997Dycaf Pro-Vision InternationalTable assembly
US5810307 *Aug 21, 1996Sep 22, 1998Detector Electronics CorporationExplosion-proof swivel mounting bracket
US6632170Nov 27, 2000Oct 14, 2003Biomec Inc.Articulated arm for holding surgical instruments
Classifications
U.S. Classification362/430, 248/629, 248/278.1, 248/624
International ClassificationF21V21/26, F21V21/28
Cooperative ClassificationF21V21/28, F21V21/26
European ClassificationF21V21/26, F21V21/28