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Publication numberUS3742232 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 26, 1973
Filing dateMar 30, 1971
Priority dateApr 2, 1970
Also published asDE2015619A1
Publication numberUS 3742232 A, US 3742232A, US-A-3742232, US3742232 A, US3742232A
InventorsJ Koehn, G Wahle, F Lehmann
Original AssigneeHauni Werke Koerber & Co Kg
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for evaluating the operation of machines for the production and/or processing of smokers{40 {11 products
US 3742232 A
Abstract
The operation of a single machine or a group of two or more machines for the production and/or processing of smokers' products is monitored by detectors serving to measure the quantity of comminuted tobacco or filter material which is admitted at each inlet and discharged at each outlet of the machine or machines. The detectors produce electric signals for evaluation by a computer or by a system of totalizing, multiplying and/or dividing circuits which furnish indications of the ratio of admitted to discharged quantities of tobacco or filter material.
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United States Patent 91 Koehn et al. I I I METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR EVALUATING HE OPERATION OF MACHINES FOR THE PRODUCTION AND/0R PROCESSING OF SMOKERS PRODUCTS Inventors: Jurgen Koehn; Gunter Wahle;

Frank-Dieter Lehmann, all of Wentorf, Germany Hauni-Werke Korber & Co. KG, Hamburg, Germany Filedz Mar. 30, 1971 Appl. No.: 129,370

Assignee:

Foreign Application Priority Data Apr. 2, 19'70 Germany P 20 15 619.8

US. Cl. 235/151.3, 131/21 R, 340/213 Q Int. Cl. G06t 15/46 Field of Search 235/15l.13; l3l/2l R, 21 A, 21 B, 21 C, .21 D, 22 R, 22

[451 June'26, 1973,

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Primary Examiner-Malcolm A. Morrison Assistant Examiner-R. Stephen Dildine, Jr. Attorney-Michael S. Striker [57] ABSTRACT The operation of a single machine or a group of two or more machines for the production and/or processing of smokers products is monitored by detectors serving to measure the quantity of comminuted tobacco or filter material which is admitted at each inlet and discharged at each outlet of the machine or machines. The-detectors produce electric signals for evaluation by a computer or by a system of totalizing, multiplying and/or dividing circuits which furnish indications of the ratio of admitted to discharged quantities of tobacco or filter material.

37 Claims, 16 Drawing Figures XPI2 a??? 3 Hkr 12/1970 Brown et al. 235/l5l.l3 X Y PAIENIEUmzs ma SHEEISUFQ Q \N Q R Q O Nm 1 m .L//\\, 6mm 3. E; LG. I 1 i R R N% sh N O Q 0 wk N MN. a x 8 N a 0 Q Q f$ Q G O o m h It a an PAIENTEDJUN26 ms 3742.232

sum 8 OF 9 METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR EVALUATING THE OPERATION OF MACHINES FOR THE PRODUCTION AND/OR PROCESSING OF SMOKERS PRODUCTS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for supervising and evaluating the operation of machines which are utilized for the production and/r processing of smokers products, such as parts or groups of cigarettes, cigars, cigarillos, filter rods and/or ingredients of such commodities.

In accordance with the present invention, smokers products include finished smokers products, such as plain or filter-tipped cigars, cigarillos or cigarettes; semifinished products, such as components of filtertipped cigars, cigarillos or cigarettes; and the ingredients of finished or semifinished products, such as tobacco leaves, shredded tobacco, filaments or grains of filter material, webs of cigarette paper, adhesive paste, plasticizer for filaments of synthetic plastic filter material and/or other substances which are needed for the production and/or processing of smokers products.

It is already known to monitor the operation of machines for the production or processing of smokers products.

The presently known monitoring operations involve the utilization of testing or detecting devices which determine the quality or condition of smokers products (for example, the quality or condition of cigarettes which are produced in a cigarette rod making machine), and the utilization of the results of such tests to regulate the operation of the machine and/or to classify the products according to their quality or condition. Thus, if the testing operation involves determining the mass or quantity of tobacco in plain or filter-tipped cigarettes, the results of the tests can be utilized to regulate the quantity of tobacco shreds in the stream which is formed in the distributor of a cigarette rod making machine and is converted into the filler of a wrapped cigarette rod.

It is also known to record the periods of operation and idleness of a machine for the production and/or processing of smokers products, and/or to separately record the periods during which a machine respectively turns out satisfactory and unsatisfactory products. All such monitoring operations are intended to furnish information concerning the efficiency of automatic or semiautomatic machines which are used in tobacco processing plants. The presently. known monitoring methods and apparatus exhibit the drawback that the information which is obtained is not immediately suited for accurate and convenient determination of the efficiency, lack of cfficiency and/or other characteristics of the monitored machine or machines, as well as that the information which is collected and recorded does not include all such data which are best suited to facilitate an evaluation of the operation and to enable the supervisory personnel to undertake, with little loss in time, all such steps which will result in elimination 'of' causes of unsatisfactory output and/or unsatisfactory quality of products.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION An object of the invention is to provide a novel method of supervising and evaluating the operation of one or more machines for the production and/or processing of smokers products in such a way that the results can be utilized to determine the origins and causes of losses in commodities which are being processed in such machines.

Another object of the invention is to provide an evaluating method which enables the supervisory personnel to determine the quantities and causes of losses in tobacco and/or filter material in discrete machines and- /or in production lines which are composed of a plurality of directly or indirectly coupled machines for the production and/or processing of smokers products.

A further object of the invention is to provide a method of automatically determining the ratio of quantities of tobacco or filter material which are fed into one or more producing or processing machines to the quantity of tobacco or filter material which is contained in the product, namely, in the satisfactory articles or portions of satisfactory articles which issue from such machine or machines.

An additional object of the invention is to provide a novel and improved apparatus for the monitoring of machines which are used in the production and/orprocessing of smokers products, particularly for determining the losses in tobacco, filter material and/or other valuable commodities which constitute the ingredients of plain or filter-tipped cigarettes, cigars or cigarillos.

Another object of the invention is to provide an apparatus which serves to determine and indicate those quantities of tobacco or filter material which do not form part of satisfactory "products and leave one or more producing or processing machines in the same form or condition in which such materials enter the machine or machines as well as those quantities which do not form part of satisfactory products and leave the machine or machines in altered condition.

The method of the present invention is employed for supervising and evaluating the operation of machines for the production and/or processing of smokers prod-- ucts wherein the commodities which are contained in or constitute smokersproducts are admitted into a machine at at least one first point or inlet and are discharged from the machine at at least one second point or outlet. The method comprises a first measuring step which includes measuring the quantity of commodities which are admitted at at least one first point or inlet and producing first signals which are indicative of the measured incoming quantities, a second measuring step including measuring the quantity of commodities which are discharged at at least one second point or outlet and producing signals which are indicative of the measured outgoing quantities, and utilizing the first and second signals for an automatic computing operation, for example, to establish a ratio of the quantities of incoming commodities within a predetermined period of time to the-quantities of outgoing commodities within the same period of time.

As a rule, the second measuring step will comprise measuring the quantity of discharged commodities at a plurality of second points including a main outlet for satisfactory commodities and one or more secondary outlets for unsatisfactory commodities, and producing a plurality of signals each of which is indicative of the measured quantity at a different second point. The automatic computing operation then preferably involves establishing the ratios of quantities of incoming commodities to quantities of outgoing commodities at each outlet. For example, a cigarette rod making machine will have an inlet for shredded tobacco,'a first or main outlet for plain cigarettes, and one or more secondary outlets for evacuation of tobacco dust, ribs and/or stem, defective plain cigarettes (which contain tobacco), and/or defective portions of a wrapped tobacco filler rod (which also contain tobacco).

If the commodities are admitted and discharged at timely spaced intervals, the first measuring step comprises producing successive first signals which are indicative of successively admitted quantities of commodities within a predetermined period of time (e.g., within a full shift), and the second measuring step then comprises producing successive second signals which are indicative of successively discharged quantities of commodities within the same period of time. The computing operation then preferably involves establishing a ratio of the sum of quantities indicated by the first signals to the sum of quantities indicated by the second signals.

As mentioned before, the commodities are normally discharged at several second points including a main outlet for discharge of satisfactory commodities and one or more secondary outlets for unsatisfactory or defective commodities. The second measuring step then comprises producing discrete second signals which are respectively indicative of the measured quantities of satisfactory and unsatisfactory commodities. The measuring steps may involve a counting of discrete commodities, such as plain cigarettes, filter cigarettes, packs of plain or filter cigarettes, or sections of a filter rod; or weighing of bulky commodities, such as tobacco shreds, fragments of tobacco ribs or stem, tobacco dust or filamentary filter material. If the commodities are in the form of discrete articles and the purpose of the method is to determine the quantities of incoming and outgoing tobacco or filter material, the signals which represent numbers of counted articles can be modified (multiplied) with a factor which is indicative of the average quantity of tobacco or filter material in a discrete article.

The novel features which are considered as characteristic of the invention are set forth in particular in the appended claims. The improved apparatus itself, however, both as to its construction and its mode of operation, together with additional features and advantages thereof, will be best understood upon perusal of the following detailed description of certain specific embodiments with reference to the accompanying drawing.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic view of a production line consisting of three directly coupled machines for the production and processing of filter cigarettes and of an evaluating apparatus which is employed to determine the efficiency of the individual machines and of the entire production line;

FIG. la is an interconnection pattern for a totalizer and storage unit.

FIG. 2 is an elevational view of a cigarette rod making machine which constitutes one of the three machines in the production line shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged vertical sectional view of a portion of the machine shown in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is an elevational view of a filter cigarette making machine which constitutes a second machine in the production line shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a schematic elevational view of a packing machine which constitutes the third machine in the production line shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a somewhat schematic enlarged view of a first measuring device or detector which is utilized in the production line of FIG. 1 to measure the quantity of tobacco which is admitted into the machine of FIG.

FIG. 7 is a similar schematic view of a second measuring device or detector which is used in the machine of FIG. 2 or 4 to determine the number of satisfactory plain cigarettes which leave the machine of FIG. 2 and enter the machine of FIG. 4;

FIG. 8 is a schematic view of a third detector which is used to count the number of satisfactory filter cigarettes leaving the machine of FIG. 4 and entering the machine of FIG. 5;

FIG. 9 is a schematic view of a fourth detector which is used in the machine of FIG. 5 to determine the number of satisfactory packs of filter cigarettes;

FIG. 10 is a schematic view of a fifth detector which is used to determine the quantities of tobacco dust leaving the machine of FIG. 2;

FIG. 11 is a schematic view of a sixth detector which is used to determine the quantities of tobacco ribs or stem leaving the machine of FIG. 2;

FIG. 12 is a schematic view of a seventh detector which is used to determine the quantities of shredded tobacco which leave the machine of FIG. 2 in unsatisfactory portions of wrapped tobacco filler rods;

FIG. 13 is a schematic view of an eighth detector which is used to determine the number of unsatisfactory plain cigarettes leaving the machine of FIG. 2;

FIG. 14 is a schematic view of a ninth detector which is used to determine the number of unsatisfactory filter cigarettes leaving the machine of FIG. 4; and

FIG. 15 is a schematic side elevational view of a filter rod making machine and of an apparatus which serves to evaluate the efficiency of such machine.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring first to FIG. 1, there is shown the diagram of a production line which is composed of three directly coupled machines for the production and processing of filter cigarettes FZ (see FIG. 4). The production line includes a cigarette rod making machine ZM, a filter cigarette making machine FA which receives the satisfactory output of the machine ZM, and a packing machine PM which receives the satisfactory output of the machine FA and discharges packs P (see FIG. 9) of filter cigarettes F2.

The cigarette rod making machine ZM has a single inlet EGZ constituting the point of admission of shredded tobacco which is converted into a stream. The stream is thereupon converted into a filler rod which is wrapped to form a wrapped cigarette rod ready to be subdivided into plain cigarettes of desired length. Satisfactory plain cigarettes Z (see FIG. 7) are discharged at the main outlet AGZ of the cigarette rod making machine ZM. This outlet is one of several points where the tobacco which is admitted at the inlet EGZ leaves the machine ZM. The outlet AGZ discharges satisfactory plain cigarettes Z into the inlet EGF of the filter cigarette making machine FA. The inlet EGF is the only point where the machine FA receives the intermediate product (plain cigarettes Z of satisfactory quality) which is discharged by the cigarette rod making machine ZM. The main outlet AGF of the machine FA constitutes one of two points where the plain cigarettes (forming part of filter cigarettes) are discharged from the machine FA. The filter cigarettes FZ which reachthe outlet AGF must be of satisfactory quality because only satisfactory filter cigarettescan be admitted into the single inlet EGP of the packing machine PM. The construction of the parts at the outlet AGX of the cigarette rod making machine ZM can be identical with the construction of parts at the inlet EGF of the filter cigarette making machine FA. The packing machine PM provides groups of satisfactory filter cigarettes with one or more envelopes, revenue labels and/or tear strips to form packs of filter cigarettes and discharges satisfactory packs P by way of an outlet AGP which constitutes the single point where the packs can automatically leave the machine PM.

The quantity of tobacco which is admitted into the cigarette rod making machine 2M by way of the inlet B62 is measured by a measuring device'or detector MZ2. A second measuring device or detector M215 is installed at the outlet AGZ to determine the number of satisfactory plain cigarettes Z which leave the machine ZM to enter the inlet EGF of the machine FA. The detector M215 can be provided in addition to or it may constitute a detector MF2 which is located at the inlet EGF and determines the number of satisfactory plain cigarettes Z which enter the filter cigarette making machine FA. The number of satisfactory filter cigarettes F2 which leave the machine FA by way of the main outlet AGF is determined by a detector MP12 which can be provided in addition to or constitutes a detector MP2 serving to determine the number of satisfactory filter cigarettes F2 entering the packing machine PM by way of the inlet EGP. A further detector MP12 is provided at the outlet AGP to determine the number of satisfactory packs P which leave the packing machine PM. The detectors M215 (MP2), MP12 (MP2) and MP12 can be designed to indicate the quantity of tobacco which passes through the respective inlets and outlets. For example, the detector MP12 can be designed to indicate the total quantity of tobacco in the satisfactory filter cigarettes FZ which are contained in a satisfactory pack P leaving the packing machine PM by way of the outlet AGP.

The cigarette rod making machine 2M further comprises four secondary or auxiliary outlets AS211, ASZ12, AS213, ASZ14-servingfor evacuation of that quantity of tobacco which constitutes the difference between the quantity admitted by way of the inlet E62 and the quantity evacuated by way of the main outlet AGZ. Thus, the total quantity of tobacco which leaves by way of the secondary outlets AS211-AS214 is a good indicator of the efficiency of the cigarette rod making machine 2M and, to some extent, of the efficiency of theentire production line. The tobacco which leavesby way of the secondary outlets AS211 to AS214 is in the form of dust, tobacco ribs or stem, fillers of unsatisfactory plain cigarettes which are not permitted to reach the main outlet AGZ, and wrapped or unwrapped fillers which are removed due to defects or as a precautionary measure during certain stages of operation of the machine 2M, for example, when the machine ZM is started, during acceleration of the machine to normal speed, and/or during deceleration of the machine from a higher speed to a lower speed or from the lower speed to zero speed. Measuring devices or detectors M211, M212, M213, M214 are .respectively mounted in the general areas of the secondary outlets AS2l1-AS214 to measure the quantity .of tobacco which leaves the machine ZM by way of the respective secondary outlets.

The filter cigarette making machine FA comprises an auxiliary or secondary outlet ASF which constitutes the point of discharge of unsatisfactory filter cigarettes. The number of unsatisfactory filter cigarettes which leave the machine FA by way of the secondary outlet ASF is counted by a measuring device or detector MFll. The detector MFll can be designed to measure the quantities of tobacco leaving the machine FA'by way of the outlet ASP, and such quantities are a reliable indicator of the efficiency of the machine FA and also of the efficiency of the entire production line.

The packing machine PM comprises the aforementioned single outlet-AGP for evacuation or discharge of satisfactory packs P of filter cigarettes F2. The defective packs or portions of defective packs are removed from the machine PM by hand. The outlet for manual removal of unsatisfactory packs or portions of packs. is indicated by phantom lines, as at ASP, and the quantity of tobacco in the unsatisfactory packs which are withdrawn at ASP is determined by ameasuring device or detector MP1 1. This detector can indirectly determine the quantities of tobacco which leave the machine PM via outlet ASP by taking into consideration the average quantity of tobacco in a satisfactory plain cigarette entering the machine PM by way of the inlet EGP, the quantity of tobacco in a pack which leaves the machine PM by way of the main outlet AGP, and the number of defective packs or portions or packs which leave the machine PM by way of the secondary outlet ASP. The manual removal of unsatisfactory packs or unsatisfactory portions of packs can take place at one or more points of the packing machine PM so that the secondary outlet ASP can be considered as a single secondary outlet or as being indicative of two or more secondary outlets for manual removal of commodities which pass through the packing machine. The detector MPll can constitute a differential counter circuit having an output 0 and inputs a and b. The output c serves to emit a signal which is indicative of the difference of quantities represented by signals transmitted by way of the inlets'a and b. The signals transmitted to the'input a of the detector MPll represent the number of satisfactory packs P of filter cigarettes which leave the machine PM at the outlet AGP and the signals at the input b are indicative of thenumber of satisfactory filter cigarettes F2 which enter'the machine PM at the inlet EGP. The detectors MZll-MZIS, MFll, MP12, MP11, MP12 can be said to constitute measuring means of one type, and the detectors MZ2, MF2 and MP2 can be said to constitute measuring means of another type. The detectors of the one typedetermine the quantity of outgoing tobacco and the detectors of the other type determine the quantity of incoming tobacco. I

The outputs c of the detectors M22, M21 l-M2l5, MF2, MFll, MP12, MP2, MPH and MP12 are con nected with the inputs a of similarly referenced adding or totalizing circuits S22, S211, S212, S213, S214, S215 (SP2), SFll, SF12 (SP2), SP11 and SP12. The purpose of the totalizing circuits (hereinafter called totalizers for short) is to record the sum of signals which are furnished by the respective measuring devices or detectors and which are indicative of the quantity of tobacco passing the respective inlets and outlets. The output of the totalizer SP12 for signals furnished by the detector MP12 for satisfactory cigarette packs P is connected with the input a of a multiplying circuit XP'12 (hereinafter called multiplier for short) which has a second input b connected with the output 0 of an adjustable source NP12 of reference signals. Such reference signals are indicative of the average quantity of tobacco in a satisfactory pack P of filter cigarettes F2 or of the number of filter cigarettes FZ in a satisfactory pack P.

The outputs c of the totalizers 8Z1 1, S212, S213 are respectively connected with the inputs 0 of dividing circuits QZll, QZ12, QZ13 (hereinafter called dividers for short). The inputs b of the dividers QZ11-QZ13 are connected with the output 0 of the totalizer SZ2.

The outputs c of the totalizers S214, SZlS (SP2), SFll, SF12 (SP2), SPll and SP12 are respectively connected with the inputs a of multipliers XZ14, XZlS,

XFl 1, XP12, XPll and XP12. The inputs b of the just enumerated multipliers are connected with a source D of reference signals which are indicative of the average quantity of tobacco in a satisfactory plain or filter cigarette.

The outputs c of the multipliers XZ14, XZ15, XFll, XF12, XPl 1 and XP12 are respectively connected with the inputs (1 of dividers QZ14, QZlS, QF'll, QF'12, QP'll and QP'12. The inputs b of the just enumerated dividers are connected with the output c of the totalizer SZ2. The output c of the totalizer SP12 is further con-.

nected with the input a of a divider QP12. The input b of the divider QP12 is connected with the output 0 of the totalizer SP2. The output c of the totalizer SPll is further connected with the input a of a divider QPll which has a second input b connected to the output 0 of the totalizer SP2. The output c of the totalizer SFl2 is further connected with the input a of a divider QF12 having a second input b which is connected to the output c of the totalizer SP2. The output c of the totalizer SFll is further connected with he input a of a divider QFll having a second input b connected to the output 6 of the totalizer SF2.

The dividers QZll QP'12 are respectively connected with similarly referenced signal recording devices AZll, AZ12, AZ13, A214, AZ15, AFll, AF'll, AF12, AF'12, APll, AP'll, AP12 and AP12.

The totalizers SZ2, 8Z1 1, SZl2, andSZl3 are known electronic circuits working on the (analogue) principle of measuring by means of operational amplifiers or on the (digital) principle of counting. FIG. la shows an example. The totalizers SZ14, SZ15 (SF2), SFll, SFIZ (SP2), SPll and SP12 are counters. Such counters are well-known and are, for example, described in the journal Elektronik", No. 6, 1962, page 188. The multipliers XZ14, XZlS, XFll, XP12, XPll, XP12 and XP'lZ are also known electronic circuits working on the analogue or digital principle as mentioned in connection with the totalizers SZ2 and SZll-SZ13. Examples of analogue multipliers are described in the book Elektronische Analogrechner by H. Adler, 1968, VEB- Deutscher Verlag der Wissenschaften, Berlin, on pages 179 to 2l2. The same holds true for the dividers 0211 to QP'12; each of these dividers is designed to furnish at its output c a signal which is indicative of the quotient of the values represented by signals transmitted to the respective inputs 0 and b. Ratio-forming circuits are well-known and are, for example, described in H. Adlers above-mentioned book on pages 206 to 209. Circuits which employ operational amplifiers and can be used as totalizers, multipliers and dividers in the arrangement shown in FIG. 1 are also disclosed in chapters 10.3.4. to 10.3.11 of a book by K. Steinbuch published in 1962 and entitled Taschenbuch der Nachrichtenverarbeitung. The multiplying operations to be performed by the multipliers XZ14, XZIS, XFll, XP12, XPll and XP12 are triggered by signals which are transmitted to their inputs :4 by a conduit LRT. The multiplier XP'12 performs the multiplications without any delay, i.e., as soon as it receives signals at the inputs a (totalizer SP12) and b (source NP12). The conduit LRT also transmits signals which cause the dividers QZll to QP'12 to start their computing operations. To this end, the dividers have third inputs u each of which is connected to the conduit LRT.

For the sake of clarity, the multipliers and dividers are shown in FIG. 1 as discrete circuits. It is clear that the multiplying and dividing operations can be performed serially by a single computer.

FIG. la shows an example of a totalizer with storage capability 8Z1 1, and which is connected to a detector MZll. Totalizer SZIl consists of a known analoguedigi'tal converter ADZll, a known digital adder ACZll, a known digital storage unit SSZll and a known digital-analogue converter DAZl 1. GIZll is a known gate circuit, which allows a signal to pass from its input a to output b when there is a drive signal present at control input 0. G2Zll is a known gate circuit, which allows a signal to pass from its input a to output b when there is no drive signal at its control input.

Totalizer SZll works as follows:

When an analogue signal passes from detector MZl 1, it is transformed into a digital signal by the analogue-to-digital converter ADZll and is then passed on to input a of adder ACZll. Another signal is passed simultaneously from MZll to input c of gate circuit GlZll, and this makes the gate circuit conductive so that the contents of storage unit SSZl 1 pass on to input b of adder ACZll. The output signal at output 0 of adder ACZl 1, which corresponds to the sum of the signals standing at inputs a and b of adder ACZll, passes to input a of storage unit S821] and enters when the drive signal from MZll disappears at input c of gate circuit G2Zll, thus making the gate circuit conductive. The output signal from storage unit SSZll remains when the output signal from MZl 1 disappears. The digital output signal from SSZl l is transformed into an analogue signal by digital-to-analogue converter DAZll which thus corresponds to the sum of the individual analogue signals coming in series from MZll.

Those details of the cigarette rod making machine ZM which require mentioning for full understanding of the present invention are illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3. The illustrated machine is of the type known as GAR- ANT and is produced by HauniWerke, Korber & Co. K.G., of Hamburg-Bergedorf, Western Germany.

Referring first to FIG. 3, there is shown a distributor which forms part of the cigarette rod making machine ZM shown in FIG. 2 and serves to form a continuous narrow tobacco stream 13 which is thereupon con-' layer of tobacco shreds past a first refuser 2 and thereupon past a second refuser 3. The magazine la receives shredded tobacco from a pneumatic conveyor by way of a hopper 15. The first refuser 2 is a driven paddle wheel which equalizes the layer of tobacco shreds on the carding of the drum 1. The second refuser 3 is a carded drum which equalizes the once-equalized layer of tobacco shreds and accumulates a small supply 4 of shreds in the space downstream of the first refuser 2. The quantity of tobacco shreds in the intermediate supply 4 is measured by a photosensitive detector 6 which is connected with a servomechanism for moving the first refuser 2 nearer to or further away from the carding of the drum 1. The purpose of the detector 6 is to insure that the quantity of tobacco shreds in the intermediate supply 4' remains within a predetermined range. A rapidly driven picker roller 7 is located downstream of the second refuser 3 to expel the shreds of the twice-equalized layer from the carding of the drum 1 and to direct the shreds against protuberances provided on the periphery of a winnower 8 which is driven to rotate in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in FIG. 3. The winnower 8 serves to classify the tobacco shreds according to their size and weight. The heavier tobacco particles (such as fragments of stem or ribs) are propelled into an intercepting container 11 having in'its bottom zone a rotating feed screw serving to evacuate the heavier particles into a receptaclella. A pneumatic conveyor is provided to evacuate the heavier tobacco particles from the receptacle 1la.'The lighter tobacco particles are showered bythe winnower 8 onto the upper stretch of an endless band 9 which accumulates a wide sliver or carpet 12 of satisfactory shreds and showers the leading end of the carpet 12 into a channel 14. The showered particles accumulate on the upper stretch of an endless foraminous belt 16 to form the aforementioned narrow stream 13 which is transported in a direction at right angles to the plane of FIG. 3. The upper stretch of the belt 16 slides along a perforated plate 17 constituting the top wall of a suction chamber 18 which insures that the shredswhich form the narrow stream 13 share the lengthwise movement of the belt 16. I 4

Referring now to FIG. 2, the upper stretch of the belt 16 deliversthe tobacco stream 13. into the circumferential groove (not shown) of a suction wheel 19 which rotates with reference to a suction chamber serving to retain the tobacco shreds in the groove at least during travel toward an adjustable trimming device 21 which removes the surplus and thus converts the stream 13 into a filler rod 22. The bottom wall of the groove in the periphery of the suction wheel 19 is foraminou s to permit retention of tobacco shreds by suction.

A tongue 23 expels the filler rod 22 from the groove of the suction wheel 19 and causes the filler rod to move along the underside of the lower stretch of an endless steel belt 24a which is perforated and the lower stretch of which travels below a stationary suction chamber 24. The filler rod 22 then enters the wrapping station of the machine ZM to be provided with a tubular wrapper consisting of cigarette paper. The cigarette paper is stored on a bobbin 27 in the form of a web 26 and is caused to pass through a printing mechanism 28 which provides longitudinally spaced portions of the web with indicia representing the name of the brand, the name of the manufacturer and/or other printed matter. The web 26 then enters the wrapping station by moving below the tongue 23 and onto the upper stretch of a belt 29 which also transports the filler rod 22. The web 26 is draped around the filler rod 22 by a wrapping mechanism 31 which causes one marginal portion of the web to extend substantially tangentially of the wrapped filler rod so as to advance along a conventional paster 32 which provides such marginal portion with a strip of adhesive. The thus coated marginal portion is folded over the other marginal portion and the adhesive between the overlapping marginal portions is heated by a sealer plate 33 which causes the adhesive to set. The filler rod 22 is thus converted into a continuous wrapped cigarette rod 34 which is severed at regular intervals by a severing device 36 known as cutoff so as to yield a single file of plain cigarettes which are propelled into successive flutes of a driven transfer drum 38 by means of a rotary accelerating cam 37. Unsatisfactory portions 34' of the wrapped cigarette rod are caused to enter a collecting receptacle 40. A pneumatic conveyor 42 is provided to evacuate tobacco from the receptacle 40. The wrapped cigarette rod is usually unsatisfactory during the acceleration of machine ZM from zero speed, and those portions of the rod which are produced during acceleration are caused to enter the receptacle 40 in order to prevent such portions from being converted into plain cigarettes and from entering the filter cigarette making'machine FA. The unsatisfactory quality of the wrapped rod which is produced immediately after the machine is started is attributable to'irregular feed of tobacco'shreds and to unsatisfactory seam between the overlapping marginal portions of the wrapper.

The tobacco dust which is presentbetween the tobacco shreds and enters the distributor and the rod forming partsof the cigarette rod making machine ZM is sucked up by suitable fans (not shown) and is separated from air by filter means 43 (FIG. 3) to be collected in a receptacle 44. The thus collected tobacco dust is evacuated by way of a pneumatic conveyor 45.

When the supply of cigarette paper web 26 on the bobbin '27 is nearly exhausted, the .trailing end of the web 26 is spliced to the leading end of a fresh web 26a comingfrom a fresh bobbin 27a. The exact details of the splicing mechanism which is shown in FIG. 2, as at 26A, form no part of the present invention. A photosensitive detector 39 scans the web 26 downstream of the splicing mechanism 26A to detect the splices between the expiring web and a fresh web and to transmit signals to an ejector 41which expels defective or presumably defective plain cigarettes into a receptacle 46 located downstream of the cutoff 36. The signals from the detector 39 to the ejector 41 are delayed to insure that the ejector 41 expels into the receptacle 46 that plain cigarette or those plain cigarettes whose wrapper or wrappers contain portions of the splice. The ejector 41 preferably comprises a nozzle which is connected with a source of compressed air in response to signals from the detector 39 to thereby direct the air stream against plain cigarettes travelling from the cutoff 36 toward the transfer drum 38. The ejector 41 is also activated when the machine ZM is started so as to insure that the plain cigarettes whichare likely to be defective are invariably prevented from entering the filter cigarette making machine FA. In order to make sure that no defective plain cigarettes will enter the machine FA, the signal from the detector 39 or the signal which is transmitted in response to starting of the machine ZM is caused to maintain the ejector 41 in operation for a certain interval of time which is long enough to insure expulsion of all defective plain cigarettes.

The measuring divices or detectors M22 and MZ11-MZ15 of FIG. 1 are distributed in the machine ZM of FIGS. 2 and 3 as follows:

The detector MZ2 is installed at the hopper l5 (inlet EGZ) which controls the transfer of tobacco shreds from the pneumatic conveyor 5 into the magazine la of the distributor shown in FIG. 3. The detector MZll is installed in or on the receptacle 44 (secondary outlet ASZl l) for tobacco dust (see the lower right-hand portion of FIG. 3). The detector M212 is installed in the receptacle 11a (secondary outlet ASZ12) which receives heavier tobacco particles from the container 11 by way of the feed screw 10. The detector MZ13 is installed in or on the receptacle 40 (secondary outlet ASZ13) for collection of unsatisfactory portions 34 of the wrapped cigarette rod. The detector MZ14 is installed in the region of the ejector 41 (secondary outlet ASZ14) to detect the plain cigarettes which enter or leave the receptacle 46. The detector MZ15 is adjacent to the transfer drum 38 (main outlet AGZ) to detect the satisfactory plain cigarettes Z which are to be introduced into the filter cigarette making machine FA. The details of the measuring devices or detectors M22 and MZ11MZ1S are respectively illustrated in FIGS. 6, -13 and 7.

FIG. 4 illustrates the details of the filter cigarette making machine FA. This machine is of the type shown as MAX and is produced by Hauni-Werke of Hamburg Bergedorf, Western Germany. The transfer drum 38 is designed to convert the single file of satisfactory plain cigarettes Z which leave the cigarette rod making machine ZM into two rows wherein the plain cigarettes travel sideways. The two rows are transferred into the flutes of two aligning conveyors 52 (only one shown in FIG. 4) which rotate at different speeds or have different diameters in order to insure that each thereof can deliver a plain cigarette into each flute of an assembly conveyor 53. Thus, each flute of the assembly conveyor 53 carries two coaxial plain cigarettes which are spaced from each other to provide a gap having a width which exceeds the length ofa filter plug of double unit length.

The filter cigarette machine FA further comprises a magazine 54 which serves for reception and temporary storage of filter rod sections 334 (see FIG. of six times unit length. Successive filter rod sections are evacuated from the magazine 54 by way of a chute 54a to enter the flutes of a so-called cutting conveyor 56 cooperating with two coaxial axially spaced rotary diskshaped cutters 57 (only one shown) serving to subdivide successive filter rod sections of six times unit length into filter rod sections or filter plugs of double unit length. Such filter plugs are still coaxial with each other during transfer into the flutes of three staggering conveyors 58 (only one shown) which move two of three coaxial filter plugs sideways with reference to the third plug so as to stagger the filter plugs in the circum ferential direction for introduction into successive flutes of a shuffling conveyor 59. The latter cooperates with stationary cams 60 to align the filter plugs prior to introduction into successive flutes of an intermediate conveyor 61 which delivers the filter plugs into successive flutes of an accelerating conveyor 62. The latter introduces filter plugs into the gaps between successive pairs of coaxial plain cigarettes in the flutes of the assembly conveyor 53. Thus, each flute of the conveyor 53 then contains a group consisting of three coaxial rod-shaped articles including a filter plug of double unit length and two plain cigarettes which flank the respective filter plug. Such groups re transported along one or more stationary cams 53a which cause the plain ciga' rettes each group to move toward the corresponding filter plug so that the ends of each filter plug abut against the innerv ends of the respective plain cigarettes before the groups enter the flutes of a transfer conveyor 63. The latter moves the groups past a suction drum 69 which provides each group with an adhesivecoated uniting band. The uniting bands are obtained in response to severing of a tape or web 65 consisting of paper or cork and being drawn from a bobbin 64 by two advancing rolls 66, 67 to thereupon pass through a conventional paster 68 located upstream of the aforementioned suction drum 69. The paster-68 has a rollershaped applicator which coats the underside of the tape 65 with a film of adhesive and the thus coated tape then reaches the periphery of the suction drum 69 to be severed by the knives ofa rotary cutting drum 71. The thus obtained uniting bands are caused to adhere to successive groups in the flutes of the transfer conveyor 63 in such a way that each uniting band adheres to the respective filter plug and to the inner end portions of the respective plain cigarettes.

The transfer conveyor 63 transfers the thus obtained assemblies of groups and uniting bands onto a rotary rolling or wrapping conveyor 72 which cooperates with a stationary or movable rolling member 73 to convolute each uniting band around the respective filter plug I and around the inner end portions of the respective plain cigarettes in order to form a series of filter cigarettes of double unit length. The conversion of assemblies into filter cigarettes of double unit length is completed in the elongated gap between the conveyor 72 and rolling member 73.

The filter cigarettes of double unit length are thereupon transferred onto a testing conveyor 74 whichis provided with or cooperates with conventional testing means to detect the presence of defective filter cigarettes. The satisfactory filter cigarettes of double unit length are transferred onto a cutting conveyor 76 cooperating with a rotary disk-shaped cutter to sever the filter cigarette of double unit length midway between its ends and to thus form two rows of filter cigarettes of unit length. The filter cigarettes of one row are inverted end-for-end by an inverting conveyor 77 so that the filter plugs of all cigarettes face in the same direction. The arrangement is preferably such that the conveyor 77 places the inverted filter cigarettes into the gaps between the filter cigarettes of the other row so that the filter cigarettes which leave the inverting conveyor 77 form a single row. Such filter cigarettes are then transported by an intermediate conveyor 78 which delivers them onto a second testing conveyor 79 cooperating with or having means for detecting defective filter cigarettes of unit length. The satisfactory filter cigarettes FZ of unit length are transferred onto a further conveyor 81 which delivers them onto the upper stretch of an endless belt or chain conveyor 82 serving to deliver satisfactory filter cigarettes FZ into the packing machine PM.

The defective filter cigarettes FZ' (see FIG. 14) are segregated from satisfactory filter cigarettes FZ by an ejector nozzle 83 which can discharge streams of compressed air to propel defective filter cigarettes into a receptacle 84. In the illustrated embodiment, the ejector nozzle 83 is mounted to expel defective filter cigarettes PZ' from the flutes of the conveyor 81, i.e., downstream of the second testing conveyor 79. The ejector nozzle 83 is operatively connected with the testing conveyor 74 so as to also expel from the flutes of the conveyor 81 those filter cigarettes of unit length which are obtained in response to severing of defective filter cigarettes of double unitlength. Thus, the receptacle 84 collects all such filter cigarettes which were found to be defective, either during transport with the testing conveyor 74 or during transport with the testing conveyor 79.

The measuring devices or detectors MP2, MPH and MF12 are distributed as follows:

The detector MP2 is adjacent to the transfer drum 38 (inlet EGP); the detector MP1] is adjacent to the ejector nozzle 83 and receptacle 84 (secondary outlet ASP); and the detector MF12 is adjacent to the conveyor 82 (main outlet AGP). As mentioned before, the detector MP2 may constitute the detector MZ or it may be provided in addition to the detector MZ15.

The details of the detectors MP2, MPH and MF12 are respectively shown in FIGS. 7, l4 and 8.

Certain details of the packing machine PM are shown in FIG. 5. This machine is of the type known as KDW and is produced by Hauni-Werke of Hamburg- Bergedorf, Western Germany. The conveyor 82 of the filter'cigarette making machine PA delivers satisfactory filter cigarettes FZ of unit length into a magazine 101 wherein the filter cigarettes enter three vertical ducts to form in each duct a single stack of superimposed cigarettes. A suitable pusher (not shown) is caused to periodically expel from the lower end of the magazine 10] blocks or arrays containing, for example, filter cigarettes in the formation which are customary in cigarette packs. Thus, each such array will normally consist of two outer layers of seven filter cigarettes each and a medium layer of six cigarettes which are staggered with reference to the filter cigarettes of the outer layers. The blocks are transported along a path 102 in the direction indicated by the arrow 103 to advance past a first wrapping or envelope-forming apparatus 104 which provides each block with an inner envelope consisting, for example, of tinfoil. The apparatus 104 comprises a severing device which cuts tinfoil blanks from a roll of tinfoil or a magazine which contains a supply of prefabricated tinfoil blanks. The blanks are moved across the inlets of suitable mouthpieces (not shown) through which the blocks of filter cigarettes pass whereby the blanks are partially draped around the respective blocks. The blocks then advance through a folding unit 106 which continues the conversion of tinfoil blanks into inner envelopes. In the next step, the blocks advance through a second wrapping or envelope-forming apparatus 107 which provides each block with a second or outer envelope consisting of paper or cardboard. The apparatus 107 may include a magazine for a stack of suitably imprinted paper or cardboard blanks which are withdrawn by means of one or more suction heads and are introduced into the path of successive blocks to be draped around the respective inner envelopes of tinfoil. The apparatus 107 further comprises a paste which coats selected portions of paper or cardboard blanks with films of adhesive and one or more rollers which place the thus coated outer blanks into the path of successive blocks of 20 filter cigarettes each. The blocks are thereupon caused to pass through a further folding unit 108 which continues the conversion of blanks into envelopes. A set of brushes 109 is caused to move the adhesive-coated portions of outer envelopes into contact with the uncoated portions of such envelopes to further advance the transformation of blanks into envelopes. The partially finished cigarette packs then enter a labelling apparatus 111 which applies to the head end of each pack a revenue label whereby such label also serves to prevent opening of folds and tucks at the respective end of the pack. The labelling apparatus 111 comprises a magazine for a stack of revenue labels which are withdrawn by means of one or more suction heads or suction drums and are coated with adhesive prior to being applied to the head ends of the packs, preferably by resorting to suction drums. The packs then enter the compartments or chambers of a carriage 112 which partially completes the closing of the other ends of successive packs in a manner not forming part of the invention and introduces the nearly finished packs into the lower end of a stacking tower or magazine 1 13. The magazine 113 is preferably heated to cause rapid setting of adhesive on the outer envelopes of the packs. The stack of packs in the magazine 113 is lifted periodically to permit insertion of a fresh pack into the lower end of the magazine. The uppermost packs re withdrawn from the magazine 1 13 to be delivered onto the upper stretch of a conveyor 114. Certain folding operations upon the inner and/or outer envelopes of the packs can be carried out during introduction of packs into and/or during transport of packs upwardly through the magazine 113. The carriage l12'cooperates with a suitable lever, not shown, which causes the folding of certain flaps or tucks on the inner and/or outer envelopes during transport of partly finished packs in the aforementioned compartments. The manner in which one or more portions of the magazine 113 are heated to insure rapid setting of adhesive which is applied in the apparatus 107 forms no part of the invention.

it is preferred to construct the packing machine PM in such a way that it comprises means for withdrawing from the magazine 101 blocks or arrays of filter cigarettes which are transported along two discrete paths, namely, along the path 102 and a similar second path, not shown. The machine PM then comprises two each of the apparatus and units numbered 104, 106-109 and 111-113 so as to produce pairs of finished packs which are delivered onto the upper stretch of the conveyor 114.

The measuring devices or detectors MP2, MPH and MPlZ are distributed in the packing machine PM of FIG. 5 as follows:

The detector MP2 is adjacent to the conveyor 82 (inlet EGP) to detect the satisfactory filter cigarettes P2 of unit length which are caused to enter the magazine 101. As mentioned before, the detector MP2 may be provided in addition to or it constitutes the detector MF12 of the filter cigarette making machine FA.

The detector MPll is adjacent to the secondary outlet or outlets ASP here shown as being located in the region of the carriage 112. When the aforementioned lever fails to operate properly in that it cannot expel a partly finished pack from the corresponding compartment of the carriage 1 12 or mutilates the pack, the machine PM produces a signal or comes to a halt so that the attendant can remove the defective pack before it enters the magazine 113 or before it can reach the conveyor 114. The detector MP12 is adjacent to the conveyor 114 (main outlet AGP).

The details of the detector MP12 are shown in FIG. 9.

Referring to FIG. 6, there is shown the measuring device or detector MZ2 which determines the quantities of tobacco shreds entering the magazine 1a of the distributor (FIG. 3) in the cigarette rod making machine ZM. The detector MZ2 comprises a high-precision weighing device 120 having an output 121 for emission of electric signals. The weighing device 120 is mounted below the hopper 15 which comprises a housing 122 serving to receive tobacco shreds from the pneumatic conveyor 5. The reference character 5' denotes a suction conduit which communicates with the interior of the housing 122. A flap or gate 123 is hingedly connected to a side wall of the housing 122 and can be moved to open position to permit gravitational descent of tobacco shreds into a tray 127 of the weighing device 120. The gate 123 is moved to open position in response to a signal from a scanning device 124 mounted in the interior of the housing 122 and serving to furnish signals when the housing 122 accumulates a predetermined quantity of tobacco shreds. The scanning device 124 then deenergizes an electromagnet 126 which can move the gate 123 between open and closed positions. When energized, the electromagnet 126 maintains the gate 123 in the closed position.

The weighing device 120 includes means for determining the exact weight of the mass of shredded tobacco in the tray 127 and for producing signals which are indicative of the thus determined weight. The weighing operation takes up a certain interval of time and the signals are transmitted, with a delay determined by a time-lag device 128, to the inputa of the totalizer SZ2 of FIG. 1. The time-lag device 128 is connected with the input a of the weighing device 120.

When the shredded tobacco which was admitted by way of the pneumatic conveyor 5 leaves the housing 122, the scanning device 124 energizes the electromagnet 126 which returns the gate 123to the closed position. The scanning device 124 is further connected with the time-lag device 128. The latter responds to the signal from the scanning device 124 to energize an electromagnet 129 with appropriate delay whereby the electromagnet 129 causes its armature 131 to temporarily disengage a locking pawl 132 from a tooth 136 on a disk which is connected with a shaft 133 for the tray 127. When filled with shreds, the tray 127 is mounted on the shaft 133 in unbalanced position so that it tends to pivot in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in FIG. 6, and to dump its contents into a chute 134 which delivers the shreds into the magazine la of the distributor shown in FIG. 3. The distance between the center of gravity of the tray 127 and the axis of the shaft 133 is selected in such a way that the tray 127 automatically reassumes the illustrated tobaccoreceiving position when it completes the discharge of its contents into the chute 134. The locking pawl 132 then reengages the tooth 136 and holds the tray 127 against pivotal movement during admission of shredded tobacco in response to opening of the gate 123. The directions in which the tray 127 can pivot to and from the illustrated tobacco-receiving position are indicated by the double-headed arrow 137;

The measuring device or detector MF2 (MZlS) at the inlet EGF of the filter cigarette making machine FA (outlet AGZ of the cigarette rod making machine ZM) is shown in FIG. 7. This detector comprises a photosensitive scanning device having a housing 141 for a light source 142 and a mirror or an analogous optical element 143 which permits a portion of light issuing from the source 142 to impinge on a lens serving to focus the light on the periphery of the transfer drum 38. When the thus focussed light is reflected on a passing plain I cigarette Z in a flute 38a of the drum 38, it is caused to impinge on the light-sensitive surface of a photosensitive element 144. The element 144 then transmits a signal to the input a of an AND-gate 146 whose output 0 is connected with the input a of the totalizer SF2 (SZ15). The detector MF2 further comprises a socalled contactless initiator 148 having a coil 147 which is connected with the input b of the AND gate 146. The coil 147 transmits signals at intervals determined by a timer disk 149 which is driven in synchronism with the transfer drum 38 and carries a set of equidistant protuberances 149a in the form of permanent magnets which travel past the coil 147 and cause the latter to transmit signals to the input b of the AND-gate 146. In a manner which is well known from the art of logical circuits, the output 0 of the AND-gate transmits a signal to the totalizer SF2 only when its input b receives a signal from the coil 147 simultaneously with transmission of a signal to the input 0, Le, in response to detection of a satisfactory cigarettes Z which arecaused to enter the filter cigarette making machine FA, namely, the flutes of the aligning drums 52 shown in FIG. 4. The transfer drum 38 constitutes a direct connection between the machines ZM and FA; therefore, the detector MZ15 can be omitted because the number of satisfactory plain cigarettes Z which leave the machine ZM by way of the main outlet AGZ is identical with the number of plain cigarettes entering the machine FA by way of the inlet EGF.

The measuring detector MP2 (MF12) of FIG. 8 is very similar to the detector MF2 of FIG. 7. This detector serves to produce signals in response to detection of each satisfactory filter cigarette FZ which leaves the machine FA. As shown in FIG. 8, the conveyor 82 is an endless chain conveyor whose links are provided with sockets for filter cigarettes FZ. Such cigarettes move past adetecting station which accommodates a photosensitive scanning device having a housing 151, a light source 152, a partially light-transmitting optical element 153, a lens, and a photosensitive element 154 connected to the input a of an AND-gate 156. The output c of the AND-gate 156 is connected with the input a of the totalizer SP2 and the input b of this gate is connected with a coil 158 forming part of a contactless initiator 157 further including a timer disk 159 which is driven in synchronism with the chain conveyor 82 and carries a set of equidistant protuberances 159a. These protuberances cause the coil 158 to produce signals at regular intervals, and the AND-gate 156 transmits to the totalizer SP2 a signal only when its input b receives a signal simultaneously with a signal which is generated by the element 154 and is transmitted to the input a. Thus, the number of signals which are transmitted to the totalizer SP2 corresponds to the number of'satisfactory filter cigarettes FZ which enter the packing machine PM by way of the inlet EGP. Since the chain conveyor 82 constitutes a direct connection between the machines FA and PM, the detector MF12 or MP2 can be omitted.

FIG. 9 illustrates the details of the measuring device or detector MP12 which is mounted at the outlet AGP of the packing machine PM. This detector is adjacent to the endless conveyor 114 for satisfactory packs P of filter cigarettes F2. The detector MP12 comprises a microswitch 161 which is mounted on a transfer member 163 reciprocable in directions indicated by the double-headed arrow 16 2 and serving to transfer the uppermost pack P of the stack in the magazine or turret 113 onto the upper stretch of the conveyor 114. The movable contact 161a of the microswitch 161 strikes against the uppermost pack P whenever the transfer member 163 performs a rightward stroke whereby the microswitch 161 transmits a signal to the input a of the totalizer SP12. The number of such signals equals the number of satisfactory packs P which leave the machine PM.

Referring to FIG. 10, there is shown the measuring device or detector MZll which is mounted in the cigarette rod making machine ZM to-determine the weight of tobacco dust which accumulates in the receptacle 44 and is intermittently evacuated by the pneumatic conveyor 45. This detector is similar to the detector MZ2 of FIG. 6. The receptacle 44 receives tobacco dust from a conventional filter 43 which is connected with a vibrator 168 and comprises a set of filtering hoses 167. The air stream which contains particles of tobacco dust is admitted by way of a pipe 169 and the dust-free air stream is evacuated by way of the pipe 169a. The receptacle 44 resembles a funnel and collects dust which .descends from the filter 43 in response to the shaking action of the vibrator 168.

One side wall 172 of the receptacle 44 supports a movably mounted scanning device 173 which is con nected with an electromagnet 174 for a pivotable gate 176 in another side wall of the receptacle 44. When the scanning device 173 is caused to assume a position which is indicative of the fact that the receptacle 44 contains a predetermined quantity of tobacco dust, it deenergizes the electromagnet 174 which enables or causes the gate 176 to assume an open position so that the accumulated tobacco dust can descend into the tray 177 of a precision weighing device 178 corresponding in principle to the weighing device 120 of FIG. 6. The outlet 181 of the weighing device 178 is connected with the input a of the totalizer SZl 1. When 1 the receptacle 44 is empty, the scanning device 173 produces a signal which causes energization of the electromagnet 174 to thereby effect a return movement of the gate 176 to the illustrated closed position. The first signal from the scanning device 173 is delayed by a time-lag device 179 which is connected with the input a of the weighing device 178 and with an electromagnet 191 for a flap or valve 189 in the pneumatic conveyor 45. The output 181 of the weighing device 178 transmits to the totalizerSZll a signal in response to transmission of a signal to the input a from the time-lag device 179. The signal to a is delayed to such an extent that the weighing device 178 can complete the weighing operation so that the signal transmitted by way of the output 181 is representative of the weight of tobacco dust in the tray 177.

The time-lag device 179 is further connected with an electromagnet 182 which is energized simultaneously with transmission of a signal to the input a of the weighing device 178 so that its armature 183 causes disengagement of a locking pawl 184 from the tooth 193 of a disk on the shaft 186 for the tray 17. The dustcontaining tray 177 is then caused to pivot in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in FIG. 10, to dump its contents into a chute 187 serving to admit the dust into the inlet of the pneumatic conveyor 45. The flap 189 is caused by the time-lag device 179 to open (by way of the electromagnet 191) when the tray 177 dumps its contents into the chute 187 so that the dust is caused to pass through the pneumatic conveyor 45 and is delivered to a further processing station, for example, into an apparatus for the production of sheets or webs consisting of reconstituted tobacco. The tray 177 automatically returns to the illustrated normal position to permit the locking pawl 184 toreengage the tooth 193 as soon as the contents of the tray are transferred into the chute 187. The directions of pivotal movement of the tray 177 are indicated by a double-headed arrow 192. The reasons for automatic return movement of the tray 177 to the illustrated position are the same as explained inconnection with the tray 127 of FIG. 6. I

FIG. 11 illustrates the details of the measuring device or detector MZ12 whichmeasures the quantities of heavier tobacco particles during transfer of such particles from the receptacle 11a into the pneumatic conveyor 20. As mentioned before, the receptacle 11a receives particles from the receptacle 1] of FIG; 3 through the intermediary of the feed screw 10. The lower part of the receptacle 11a forms a funnel having a side wall 202 which supports a a scanning device 203 arranged to change its position in response to accumulation of heavy tobacco particles in the receptacle 11a. When the receptacle 11a accumulates a predetermined quantity of particles, the scanning device 203 deenergizes an electromagnet 204 which opens a pivotable gate 206 to permit gravitational descent of accumulated heavier particles into the tray'207 of a precision weighing device 208 having an output 211 and an input a. When the receptacle 11a is empty, the scanning device 203 produces a second signal which is delayed by a time-lag device 209 and is transmittedto the input a so that the output 21 1 of the weighing device 208 transmits a signal to the input a of the totalizer SZ12. The second signal from the scanning device 203 also serves to reenergize the electromagnet 204 which returns the gate 206 to the illustrated closed position so that the receptacle 11a can accumulate a fresh supply of heavy tobacco particles.' The time-lag device 209 further causesenergization of an electromagnet 212 having an armature 213-for disengaging a locking pawl 214 which normally engages a tooth 233 on a disk secured to the shaft 216 for the tray 207 of the weighing device 208. When the pawl 214 is disengaged from the tooth 223, the tray 207 pivots in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in FIG. 11, and dumps its contents into achute 217 for delivery into the pneumatic conveyor 20. The tray 207 automatically reassumes the illustrated position and causes the pawl 214 to reengage the tooth 223 when its contents descend into the chute 217. The pneumatic conveyor 20 contains a valve 219 which is opened by an electromagnet 221 when the latter is energized by the time-lag device 209 simultaneously with energization of the electromagnet 212. The conveyor 20 then transports the heavier particles to a further processing station. The arrow 222 indicates the directions of pivotal movement of the tray 207. The reasons for automatic dumping of heavier particles in response to energization of the electromagnet 212 and for automatic return of empty tray 207 to the position of FIG. 11 are the same as explained in connection with the tray 127 of FIG. 6.

The measuring device or detector MZ13 (FIG. 12) at the outlet AS Z13 of the cigarette rod making machine ZM is practically identical with the detector MZ12 of FIG. 11 excepting that the receptacle 40 accumulates unsatisfactory portions 34' of the wrapped cigarette rod. The lower part of the receptacle 40 constitutes a funnel having a side wall 232 which supports a movable scanning device 233 corresponding to the scanning device 203 of FIG. 11. The pneumatic conveyor 42 contains a valve 249 movable to open position by an electromagnet 251 which is controlled by a time-lag device 239. It will be noted that all such parts of the detector MZ13 which are identical with or clearly analogous to the corresponding parts of the detector MZ12 shown in FIG. 11 are denoted by similar reference characters plus 30.

When the funnel of the receptacle 40 accumulates a certain quantity of unsatisfactory wrapped rod material, the device 233 deenergizes the electromagnet 234 which opens the gate 236 so that the material can descend into the tray 237 of the weighing device 238. When the funnel of the receptacle 40 is empty, the device 233 transmits a second signal which reenergizes the electromagnet 234 to return the gate 236 to the il lustrated closed position. The second signal is delayed by the device 239 for transmission to the input a of the weighing device 238 and for energization of the electromagnets 242 and 251. The electromagnet 242 has an armature 243 which disengages the locking pawl 244 from the tooth 253 so that the filled tray 237 pivots about the axis of the shaft 246 in a counterclockwise direction to dump its contents into the chute 247. The empty tray 237 returns to the illustrated position and causes the pawl 244 to reengage the tooth 253. The output 241 of the weighing device 238 transmits a signal to the input a of the totalizer $213 in response to reception of a signal at the input a (from the time-lag device 239). The electromagnet 251 is energized simultaneously with the electromagnet 242 and opens the valve 249 so that the pneumatic conveyor 42 can remove the material which is supplied thereto by the chute 247.

The cigarette rod making machine ZM is preferably provided with a device which automatically breaks the defective wrapped cigarette rod 34 so that the funnel of the receptacle 40 accumulates shredded tobacco.

FIG. 13 illustrates the details of the measuring device or detector MZ14 at the outlet ASZ14 of the cigarette rod making machine ZM. This detector is adjacent to the ejector 41 and has a light source 262 located opposite a photosensitive element 263. The numeral 261 denotes a guide channel wherein satisfactory plain cigarettes Z and unsatisfactory plain cigarettes Z advance past the ejector 41 so that the cigarettes Z move into the range of the accelerating cam 37 to be introduced into the flutes 38a of the transfer drum 38. A defective plain cigarette Z is expelled from the channel 261 by a stream of compressed air issuing from the ejector 41 ahd descends in a chute of the receptacle 46. The descending defective cigarette Z' interrupts the light beam issuing from the source 262 whereby the element 263 transmits a signal to the input a of the totalizer SZ14. The defective cigarettes Z can constitute those cigarettes which are produced during starting of the machine ZM and/or those cigarettes whose wrappers include portions of splices between an expiring web and a fresh web of cigarette paper (see the webs 26 and 26a of FIG. 2).

Referring to FIG. 14, the measuring device or detector MF] 1 at the secondary outlet ASF of the filter cigarette machine FA comprises a light source 272 and a photosensitive element 273 which is impinged upon by light issuing from the source 272 and produces a signal for transmission to the input a of the totalizer SF11 when the light beam is interrupted by a defective filter cigarette F2. The conveyor 81 (see also FIG. 4) is a suction drum having flutes which transport filter cigarettes FZ past the ejector nozzle 83 which includes a source of compressed air connected with ports leading to the flute at the ejecting station in response to signals from the testing conveyor 74 or 79. The descending defective filter cigarette FZ' interrupts the light beam issuing from the source 272 and causes the photosensitive element 273 to transmit a signal to the totalizer SFl 1. I

The operation of the evaluating apparatus for the efficiency of the production line of FIG. 1 is as follows:

Shredded tobacco which is admitted into the distributor shown in FIG. 3 by way of the structures shown in FIG. 6 is processed to form the filler rod 22 and thereupon the wrapped cigarette rod 34 which is severed by the cutoff 36 to yield a file of plain cigarettes Z. The detector MZ2 weighs successive batches of shredded tobacco which are admitted at spaced intervals into the magazine la of the distributor and transmits appropriate signals to the input a of the totalizer SZ2. The sum of such signals is indicative of the total quantity of to bacco which is admitted to the production line by way of the inlet EGZ of the cigarette rod making machine ZM.

The satisfactory plain cigarettes Z enter the inlet EGF of the filter rod making machine FA and are combined with filter plugs to form groups, assemblies, filter cigarettes of double unit length and filter cigarettes FZ of unit length in a manner as described in connection with FIG. 4. The satisfactory filter cigarettes FZ of unit length enter the magazine 101 of the packing machine PM and are provided with inner and outer envelopes and revenue labels in a manner as described in connection with FIG. 5. The satisfactory packs P are transferred onto the conveyor 114 for transport into a carton filing machine, into a baling machine or into storage.

When the production line is in operation, certain quantities of tobacco leave'the machines ZM, FA and PM by way of the secondary outlets ASZ1l-ASZ14, ASF and ASP. The outlet ASZll discharges tobacco dust in a manner as described in connection with FIG. 10, the outlet ASZl2 discharges heavy tobacco particles in a manner as describedin connection with FIG. 12, the outlet AS213 discharges tobacco shreds which are recovered from unsatisfactory wrapped cigarette rod portions 34' (see FIG. 12), the outlet AS214 discharges defective plain cigarettes Z in a'manner as shown in FIG. 13, the outlet ASF discharges defective filter cigarettes F2 in a manner as shown in FIG. 14, and the outlet ASP servesv for manual removal of defective packs in a manner as described in connection with FIG. 5. The removal or evacuation of tobacco at the

Patent Citations
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US3549514 *Jan 9, 1969Dec 22, 1970Texaco IncMethods and apparatus for monitoring and control of solvent dewaxing processes
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3996942 *Mar 21, 1975Dec 14, 1976Hauni-Werke Korber & Co., KgArrangement for determining the mass of a stream of tobacco, or other constituent material of smokers' products
US4280187 *Sep 24, 1979Jul 21, 1981Hauni-Werke Korber & Co. KgMethod and apparatus for pinpointing the causes of malfunction of machines for the manufacture and/or processing of cigarettes or the like
US4511420 *Dec 8, 1981Apr 16, 1985Molins, Ltd.Continuous rod manufacture
US4519042 *Aug 13, 1981May 21, 1985Kabushiki Kaisha Ishida Koki SeisakushoMethod of indicating results of combinatorial computations
DE3149670A1 *Dec 15, 1981Jul 8, 1982Molins LtdVorrichtung zur herstellung eines fortlaufenden strangs zur verwendung in der zigarettenindustrie
Classifications
U.S. Classification131/280, 131/910, 701/99
International ClassificationA24C5/32
Cooperative ClassificationA24C5/321, Y10S131/91
European ClassificationA24C5/32C
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Sep 1, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: KORBER AG
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNORS:HAUNI-WERKE KORBER & CO. KG (MERGED INTO);KORBER GESELLSCHAFT MIT BESCHRANKTER HAFTUNG (CHANGED TO);REEL/FRAME:004889/0874;SIGNING DATES FROM 19870617 TO 19870713