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Publication numberUS3742402 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 26, 1973
Filing dateOct 1, 1970
Priority dateOct 1, 1970
Also published asCA960267A1
Publication numberUS 3742402 A, US 3742402A, US-A-3742402, US3742402 A, US3742402A
InventorsR Davis, R Nicol
Original AssigneeHeinemann Electric Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Circuit breaker with on off and trip indication
US 3742402 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Nicol et al.

[ 1 CIRCUIT BREAKER WITH ON, OFF, AND

TRIP INDICATION [75] Inventors: Ronald Nicol; Ralph B. Davis, both of Trenton, NJ.

[73] Assignee: Heinemann Electric Company,

Trenton, NJ.

[22] Filed: Oct. 1, 1970 [21} Appl. No.: 77,257

[52] US. Cl. 335/13, 335/17 [51] Int. Cl. HOlh 73/12 [58] Field of Search ..335/13, 17,38,161; 337/174, 79; 200/18 [56] 7 References Cited UNlTED STATES PATENTS 3,388,357 6/1968 Lawson et al.... 335/161 2,512,386 6/1950 Sandin et al. 200/18 3,329,913 7/1967 Camp 335/38 3,388,357 6/1968 Lawson..... 335/17 2,760,028 8/1956 Walker 337/79 2,804,522 8/1957 Dehmlow 335/174 3,562,733 2 1971 Murphy et a1. 335/17 Primary Examiner-Harold Broome Attorney-Denny and Denny [57] ABSTRACT A circuit breaker including a case which houses a fixedly mounted stationary contact, a movable contact carried by a movable arm, a handle link, and a collapsible linkage mechanism coupled between the movable arm and the handle link, the linkage mechanism including a collapsible toggle assembly. A pair of unitary switches are supported within an auxiliary cavity of the case and are activated to indicate whether the circuit breaker is on, off or electrically tripped off.

The circuit breaker contacts are opened in response either to rotation of the handle link, in which event the linkage mechanism undergoes a first motion along a first path, or to the occurrence of an electrical overload, in which instance the linkage mechanism undergoes a second motion along a second path and different from said first motion.

A sensing arrangement responds to the distinct motion of the linkage mechanism when moving to the contacts open position due to an electrical overload. The sensing arrangement comprises an actuating lever pivotally carried by the frame of the circuit breaker and having an upper portion adjacent the linkage mechanism, the upper portion forming a U-shaped space defined by upper and lower arms, and a lower portion for engaging a switch means upon rotation. During the first motion, a driving member, secured to the toggle assembly of the linkage mechanism, freely enters the U-shaped space of the lever, but during said second motion the driving member engages the upper arm, thereby rotating the lower portion of the lever into holding engagement with one of the unitary switches. When the contacts are subsequently closed by rotating the handle link, the actuating lever is reset by abutment between the driving member and the lower arm of the lever. The other of said switches responds to the movement of the movable arm in opening and closing the contacts.

14 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures CIRCUIT BREAKER WITH ON, OFF, AND TRIP INDICATION BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates generally to improvements in electric circuit breakers of the electromagnetic type and more particularly to an improved arrangement for indicating the condition of said circuit breakers.

Circuit breakers of the electromagnetic type are wellknown, for example, one such circuit breaker is shown in Camp Pat. No. 3,329,913, assigned to the Heinemann Electric Company. Circuit breakers of the above mentioned type generally comprise a movable contact, mounted on a movable arm, and a rigidly mounted stationary contact. An operating handle link is coupled to the movable arm via a linkage mechanism, part of the linkage mechanism comprising a'collapsible toggle assembly. The movable and stationary contacts are operated between the contacts open and the contacts closed positions through rotation of the operating handle. The circuit breaker further contains an electromagnetic device which, in response to predetermined electrical conditions, collapses the toggle assembly to thereby electrically trip open the'contacts.

It is desirable, therefore, in circuit breakers of the above mentioned type to incorporate an arrangement which discloses the condition of the circuit breaker as being on (circuit breaker contacts closed"), off (circuit breaker contacts open) or electrically tripped of (circuit breaker contacts open due to an overload condition).

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention is a circuit breaker of the type disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,329,913 and, in addition, incorporates an arrangement for indicating whether the circuit breaker is on," off or electrically tripped off.

The arrangement for indicating the condition of the circuit breaker comprises an electrical switch means compactly located within the circuit breaker case and responsive to the two distinctive movements of the circuit breaker linkage mechanism. The switch means is composed of two unitary auxiliary switches arranged side-by-side and contained within an auxiliary cavity of the case. The switch means is located approximately intermediate the main terminals of the circuit breaker with the terminals of the switch means extending generally in the same direction as the main terminals. A first of said unitary switches indicates the normal on and off conditions of the circuit breaker while a second indicates the electrically tripped of condition.

The first switch responds to the uncollapsed movement of the linkage mechanism, such as in manually moving the handle so as to open and close the contacts, whereas the second switch responds only to the movement of the contacts to the open position after the mechanism has been tripped, i.e., collapsed, on the occurrence of predetermined electrical conditions.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE VIEWS In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is an enlarged side elevation of the circuit breaker of the invention with one of the half-cases partially broken away to expose the operating assembly in the contacts closed position," the auxiliary cavity containing the auxiliary switches, and the element for actuating the on-off auxiliary switch;

FIG. 2 is a side elevation of the circuit breaker shown in FIG. 1, the view being taken similarly to FIG. 1, but showing the opposite side of the operating assembly and the operating elements for actuating the electrical trip auxiliary switch;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken along the line 3-3 in FIG. 2 showing the side-by-side placement of the auxiliary switches and the operating elements for actu-v ating the auxiliary switches; 7

FIG. 4 is a side elevation view similar to FIG. 2 but with the frame plate partially broken away and the actuating lever return spring omitted, showing the positions of the elements for actuating the electrical trip auxiliary switch when the circuit breaker contacts are in the contacts closed position;

FIG. 5 is a side elevation view similar to FIG. 4 showing the positions of elements for actuating the electrical ating lever shown in its final position in engagement with the electrical trip auxiliary switch; and,

FIG. 8 is a schematic wiring diagram illustrating the electrical connections between the auxiliary switches of the circuit breaker of this invention and lamps to indicate the condition of the contacts.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION Referring to the drawings, and in particular to FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, this invention comprises a circuit breaker 10 having a casing,40 which houses a circuit breaker assembly 41. An auxiliary switch means 11, comprised of switch units 16 and 26, is supported within an auxiliary cavity 33 of the casing 40 and located adjacent the circuit breaker assembly 41.

The basic operation of the circuit breaker assembly 41 is described in detail in U.S. Pat. No. 3,329,913, among others, hence, only a brief description will be given hereinafter.

The assembly 41 comprises a movable contact 42 carried by a movable arm 43 and engageable with a stationary contact 44, the latter carried by a terminal 45. The movable arm 43 is connected by flexible conductor 47 to one end of a coil 48 .forming part of an electromagnetic device 50. The electromagnetic device 50, on predetermined electrical conditions, causes the collapse of the linkage mechanism 51 to trip open the contacts 42 and 44. The electrical circuit of the circuit breaker is completed by connecting the other end of the coil 48 to the terminal 46.

Further, the movable arm 43 is biased by a spring 52 toward the open position of the contacts 42 and 44 and is mounted on a pin 53 about which it pivots, the pin 53 being carried by two spaced plates 54 which are integral with an L-shaped member 56 and jointly form a frame 59 for carrying the coil 48. The end portions of the pin 53 extend into holes formed in theopposed side walls of the half-cases 37 and 38 to properly locate and support the mechanism 41 inside-the casing 40. An-

other pin 62, carried by the movable arm 43, has end portions which engage the spaced plates 54 to limit the opening movement of the arm 43, as shown in FIG. 1.

The movable arm 43 is also connected by a pin 57 to the linkage mechanism 51 which includes a collapsible toggle assembly 58 having a toggle plate 68 and a toggle link 69, the latter being in turn connected to an arm 65 of the pivotal handle link 60 by a pin 61. The handle link 60 is formed with an integral handle and pivots about a pin 64 having its end portions also carried by the spaced plates 54. A spring 55 is coiled on the pin 64 and has one end attached to one of the frame plates 54 and the other end of the spring 55 is in contact with the pin 61, the spring being stressed at all times so as to bias the handle link 60 in the counterclockwise direction, FIG. 1, to the contacts open (circuit breaker of position. After tripping of the linkage mechanism 51 in response to an overload, for instance, the link spring 55 automatically moves the handle link 60 from the contacts closed (circuit breaker on) position to the contacts open (circuit breaker of position and relatches the toggle assembly 58.

The frame 59 forms a part of the electromagnetic device 50 to which is secured a time delay tube 63 housing a spring biased magnetizable core (not .shown) movable against the retarding action of a suitable fluid to provide a time delay before tripping of the mechanism on certain overloads.

The operation of this type of linkage mechanism 51 and electromagnetic device 50 is specifically set forth in U.S. Pat. No. 3,329,913 and for purposes of brevity it will only be generally described herein as follows-- as the pivotal link 60 is moved from the contacts open" position to the contacts closed position by pivoting the handle 15, the toggle assembly 58 and the movable arm 43 all move down, against the bias of the spring 52, and move the contact 42 into engagement with the stationary contact 44 achieving the contacts closed (circuit breaker on) position, illustrated in FIG. 1.

The electromagnetic device 50 includes an armature 70 which is pivoted on a pin 74 whose end portions are also carried by suitable holes in the frame plates 54. Upon the occurrence of a predetermined overload condition, assuming the circuit breaker to be in the contacts closed position, the armature 70 is attracted toward the pole piece 72, either after a time delay period or virtually instantaneously, depending on the overload condition. The movement of the armature 70 toward the pole piece72 causes the oppositely extending trip finger 71, which is integral with the armature 70, to pivot to the right as seen in FIG. 1 and engage and trip the arm 75 forming part of the linkage mechanism 51, whereupon the toggle assembly 58 collapses and the movable arm 43 moves upward under the bias of the spring 52 to open the contacts 42 and 44. The collapsing motion of the toggle assembly 58 is independent of the position of the handle link 60 and handle 15. The handle link 60 is then moved to the contacts open position, under the pressure applied by the spring 55, which simultaneously relatches the toggle assembly 58.

The casing consists of two approximate half-cases 37 and 38 which form a main cavity for housing the circuit breaker assembly 41. In addition to the main cavity in which the assembly 41 is located, the casing 40 provides for an auxiliary cavity 33 in which an auxiliary switch means 11 is located. A more detailed description of the construction of the casing 40 to provide for the auxiliary cavity is given in US. Pat. No. 3,329,793. Briefly, however, the auxiliary cavity 33 is formed by extending one pair of abutting peripheral walls forming part of the half-cases 37 and 38 outwardly to form an opening. The auxiliary cavity 33 is located on the margin of the casing 40 containing the circuit breaker terminals 45 and 46 and is intermediate these terminals.

The auxiliary switch means 11 comprises two auxiliary switches 16 and 26. The switch 16 is operated only in response to the movement of the movable arm 43 to indicate whether the circuit breaker is on or of The switch 26 is operated only in response to the distinct motion of the linkage mechanism during its collapsing movement from the contacts closed to the contacts open position in response to an overload condition to indicate whether the circuit breaker is in the electrically tripped open condition. The switches 16 and 26 are arranged in a side-by-side relationship in the auxiliary cavity 33 of the circuit breaker casing 40.

The casings of each of the auxiliary switches 16 and 26 contain two holes, the holes in the casing of switch 16 being aligned with the holes in the casing of switch 26. Two pins 35 and 36 are threaded through the aligned holes in the switch casings, the ends of pins 35 and 36 being supported in aligned recesses in the inner walls of the two half-cases 37 and 38. Auxiliary switches 16 and 26 are located within the auxiliary cavity 33, on opposite sides of the plane in which the movable arm 43 moves and approximately equidistant therefrom.

The auxiliary switch 16 carries three terminals 17, 18

and 19, and'operates as a single pole double throw switch to connect the common terminal 19 with either the terminal 17 or 18. The switch 16 is controlled by an operating button 20 which protrudes above the end of the switch 16 adjacent the movable arm 43 of the circuit breaker, and extends into the interior of the auxiliary switch 16 to control the mechanical switching function. The button 20 is normally biased upwardly to a position such that the common terminal 19 is internally connected to terminal 17. In this position it is indicative of the contacts open position of the circuit breaker.

A generally L-shaped operating arm 21 is secured to the lower portion of the movable arm 43 and extends laterally therefrom in the direction of the switch 16, FIGS. 1 and 3. The arm 21 overlies the button 20 and is located such that as the movable arm 43 moves downwardly to close the contacts 42 and 44, the arm 21 depresses the button 20 of the switch 16, thereby operating the switch 16 to the position indicative of the contacts closed position, in which position the electrical circuit is closed between terminals 19 and 18 and is open between the terminals 19 and 17. As the movable arm 43 moves upwardly, the operating arm 21 releases the button 20 which, since it is biased upwardly, again operates the switch 16 to the position indicative of the contacts open" position, in which the electrical circuit is closed between the terminals 19 and 17.

The auxiliary switch 26 is identical to switch 16 and is responsive to the distinctive collapsing motion of the linkage mechanism 51 during electrical tripping to indicate that the contacts have been opened in response to electrical tripping thereof. The switch 26 carries the terminals 27, 28 and 29, FIG, 2, and is operated by an operating button 30. The operating button 30 is similar to the button on switch 11 and is depressed during the tripping movement of the linkage mechanism 51 by means of the actuating lever 80 and held depressed until the movable contact is again moved toward the contacts closed position, FIGS. 2 and 3.

The lever 80 is pivotally mounted between the frame plates 54 on a pin 83, and lies in approximately the same plane occupied by the operating button 30 on the auxiliary switch 26. The end portions of the pin 83 are supported by holes in the frame plates 54. A spring 81 is carried by the pin 83 and has one end attached to the frame plate 54 and its other end bearing against the portion of the lever 80 nearest the switch 26, thereby continuously biasing the lever toward rotation in the counterclockwise direction, away from the button 30. The counterclockwise rotation of the lever 80 is limited by abutment with the frame 59 of the circuit breaker. The lower portion of the lever 80 has a detent 85 formed thereon to hold the button 30 in the engaged position, as explained more fully hereinafter.

The upper portion of the lever 80 has a generally U- shaped space 90 defined by lower reset arm 87 and upper actuating arm 97, with the open end of the U- shaped space 90 extending in the general direction of the movable arm 43. The upper actuating arm 97 has a cam portion 98 and a shoulder 99 located near the base of the U-shaped space 90.

A V-shaped trip link 105 is mounted in approximately the same plane in which the lever 80 moves. The apex of the V-shaped link 105 is fixedly secured to the movable arm 43 by the same pin 57 which attaches the movable arm 43 to the linkage mechanism 51, with the open end of the V-shaped link extending generally in the direction of the U-shaped space 90.

One arm 107 of the V-shaped link 105 has a stud 109 which extends through a hole in the toggle plate 68. The interfitting stud 109 and hole in conjunction with the apex serve to rigidly mount the V-shaped link 105 to the toggle plate 68 of the linkage mechanism 51. A driving member 114 is located on another arm 110 of the V-shaped link 105 and extends in a direction perpendicular to the plane occupied by the link 105. As expained more fully hereinafter, the drivingmember 114, during the collapsing movement of the linkage mechanism 51, enters the space 90 and engages the cam portion 98 of the upper actuating arm 97 to rotate the lever 80 clockwise and operate the switch 26 by depressing the button 30.

In operation, assuming the contacts 42 and 44 to be in the open position, when the handle link 60 is moved in a clockwise direction by means of the handle 15, the movable arm 43 and its operating arm 21 and movable contact 42, move downward toward the stationary contact 44. As the movable contact 42 engages the stationary contact 44, the operating arm 21 engages and depresses the operating button on the auxiliary switch 16, thereby indicating that the circuit breaker contacts are closed," (circuit breaker on).

Assuming the contacts 42 and 44 to be closed, if the handle link 60 is moved counterclockwise by rotating the handle 15 the movable arm 43, the operating arm 21 attached thereto and themovable contact 42 will all move upward, away from the stationary contact 44. During this upward movement the operating arm 21 will disengage itself from the operating button 20, thereby allowing it to be moved upwardly to a position indicative of the contacts open position, (circuit breaker off").

The movement of the V-shaped link 105 relative to the actuating lever in response to the above discussed pivoting movements of the handle 15 in manually tuming the circuit breaker on" and off" is illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5. FIG. 4 illustrates the position of the V-shaped link when the contacts 42 and 44 are closed while FIG. 5 shows the position of the V- shaped link 105 after the contacts have been completely opened. The dotted line labeled B in FIG. 4 traces the path of movement of the driving member 114 of the V-shaped link 105 in going from the position shown in FIG. 4 to the position seen in FIG. 5. Thus, when the movable arm 43 is moved from the contacts closed position, FIG. 4 (circuit breaker on), to the contacts open position, FIG. 5, (circuit breaker of through rotation of the handle link 60, the driving member 114 on the V-shaped link 105 moves through the open end of the space and into the shoulder 99 on the upper arm 97 of the lever 80, dotted line B of FIG. 4, without contacting the cam portion 98. Without contact between the driving member 114 and the upper portion of the actuating lever 80, no pivotal movement is imparted to the lever 80 and it remains in its initial reset position, FIG. 5, due to the biasing action of spring 81.

However, if the contacts are moved from the closed position to the contacts open position by virtue of the collapsing action of the linkage'mechanism 51 in response to anoverload, the driving member 114 on the V-shaped link follows generally a'second path illustrated by the dotted line A in FIG. 4. This results from the distinct collapsing movement of the toggle assembly 58 of the linkage mechanism 51. More specifically, when the toggle assembly 58 collapses, the toggle plate 68 moves in an upward direction under the bias of spring 52 and simultaneously moves in an outward direction away from the frame plate 54, as illustrated in FIG. 6. As a result of this upward and outward movement of the toggle plate 68, the V-shaped link 105 is rotated slightly in a counterclockwise direction while moving generally upward, such that the driving member 114 traverses the path labeled A in FIG. 4 and strikes the cam portion 98 of the upper arm 97, thereby rotating the lower portion of the actuating lever 80 clockwise about thepivot 83 (FIG. 4) toward the operating button 30 of switch 26. FIG. 6 illustrates the momentary engagement between the driving member 114 and the cam portion 98 of the upper arm 97 when the toggle assembly 58 is in its transient collapsed position prior to its being reset, while FIG. 7 shows the position of the driving member 1 14 when the toggle plate 68 has moved to its final position and the toggle assembly 58 has been reset.

As the lower portion of the actuating lever 80 rotates clock-wise it depresses the button 30 of the auxiliary switch 26 and latches or holds it depressed, the depressed position being indicative of the electrically tripped condition of the circuit breaker 10. The tip of the button 30 becomes trapped in the detent 85 in the lower portion of the actuating lever 80, holding the lever 80 in the position shown in FIG. 7 while the collapsed linkage mechanism is automatically reset by the action of the spring 55, FIG. 1 which biases the handle 15 from the on" position, FIG. 4, to the off" position shown in FIG. 7. It should be noted that the movement of the lever 80 in response to an overload is completely independent of the position of the handle 15. Therefore, even if the handle 15 were forcibly retained in the circuit breaker on position, FIG. 1, the lever 80 would operate switch 26 to indicate the trapped condition of the circuit breaker.

The switch 26 will remain in the position shown in FIG. 7 until the operating handle 15 is moved to the on position at which time the lever 80 will be reset. Assuming that the contacts have been electrically tripped open, when the movable arm 43 moves downward to close the contacts, the driving member 114 will follow a path indicated by the dotted line C in FIG. 7 and will bear against and pivot counterclockwise the lower reset arm 87 of the lever 80, thereby rotating the lever 80 counterclockwise out of engagement with the button 30 toward its initial position, shown in FIG. 4. The reset motion of the actuating lever 80 is completed by the bias spring 81 which moves the lever 80 to its initial position, as shown in FIG. 2, the spring 81 being omitted from FIGS. 4 and for clarity.

An electrical circuit for use with the invention is illustrated schematically in FIG. 8. Four indicator lamps 130, 131, 132, and 133 and five associated terminals 134, 135, 136, 137 and 138 are wired together as shown in the schematic of FIG. 8. The on-of auxiliary switch 16, carrying the terminals 17, 18, and 19 is wired so as to have its common terminal 19 connected to one side of a power supply. The terminal 18 on the switch 16 is connected to one side of the lamp 132, the other side of the lamp 132 being connected to the terminal 134 which in turn is coupled to the other side of the supply. The terminal 17 on the auxiliary switch 16 is connected to the common terminal 29 on the electrical trip auxiliary switch 26. The lamps 130 and 131 are coupled in parallel with each other and in series with the terminal 28 on switch 26 on the other side of the supply via the terminal 134. The terminal 27 of the switch 26 isconnected to one side of the lamp 133, the opposite side of which is also coupled to the supply via terminal 134.

Assuming the contacts 42 and 44 tobe in the open position, (circuit breaker of the switches 16 and 26 will be in the positions shown by the solid lines in FIG 8. In this position, it is seen that the lamp 133 is in series with the supply, the series path extending from one end of the supply, through terminals 19, 17, 29, 27, 137, lamp 133, terminal 134 to the other end of the supply. The lamp 133 is therefore designated as the off lamp, and is illuminated when the circuit breaker contacts 42 and 44 are open, and the circuit breaker is of or deactivated.

When the circuit breaker is turned on by moving the handle to the on position, FIG. 1, the contacts 42 and 44 will close. As the movable arm 43 moves downward, the lever arm 21 will operate the switch 16, as explained hereinbefore to the position shown by the dotted line in FIG.'8. The switch 26 remains in the position shown by the solid line, FIG. 8. With the switch 16 in the position shown by the dotted line, the 132 will be illuminated since it is in series with the supply, the series path consisting of the supply, the terminals 19, 18, 138, the lamp l32, and the terminal 134. The lamp 132,therefore, is designated as the on lamp since it is illuminated when the contacts are in the closed position, FIG. 1, (circuit breaker on).

If an overload occurs the electromagnetic device 50! of the circuit breaker will collapse the linkage mechanism 51, causing the movable arm 43 and the operating arm 21 to move upward which results in the switch 16 reassuming the position shown by the solid line in FIG. 8. Concurrently, as the linkage mechanism 51 collapses the lever arm is rotated in a clockwise direction thereby operating the electrical trip switch 26, as explained in detail hereinbefore with reference to FIGS. 4-7. The switch 26 will, therefore, assume the position shown by the dotted line in FIG. 8. Under these conditions, the parallel combination consisting of lamps and 131 will be in series with the supply, the series circuit extending from one side of the supply through terminals 19, 17, 29, 28 through the parallel combination of lamps 130 and 131, the terminal 134 to the other side of the supply. Thus, the lamps 130 and 131 will be illuminated when the contacts 42 and 44 have been tripped to the open position as a result of an overload and thus are designated electrical trip lamps. The lamps shown in FIG. 8 may be mounted near the circuit breaker or alternately may be located at a more remote monitoring station.

We claim:

1. A circuit breaker comprising,

a case, v

a pair of contacts enclosed by said case,

a collapsible mechanism to move one of the contacts between contacts closed and open positions,

operating means to operate said collapsible mechanism to open and close said contacts,

a device for sensing predetermined electricalconditions and collapsing said mechanism to trip open said contacts,

said collapsible mechanism undergoing a first motion along a first path when moving from said contacts closed position to said contacts open position under the influence of said operating means and undergoing a second motion along a second path when moving from said contacts closed position to said contacts open position due to the occurrence of said predetermined condition, and sensing means movable in response to said second motion from an initial position to an actuated position, indicator means separate from and operated by said sensing means to indicate that said contacts are in the electrically tripped open position, said sensing means comprising a lever rotatable in response to said second motion from an initial position to an actuated position to operate said indicator means, and said sensing means further comprising a driving member carried by said collapsible mechanism,and said driving member engaging and moving said lever when said collapsible mechanism travels through said second path. 2. The combination recited in claim 1 wherein said lever has upper and lower portions and is pivotally supported therebetween, said lower portion is positioned adjacent said indicator, said upper portion is positioned adjacent said collapsible mechanism, and said lever is positioned for rotation into engagement with said indicator in response to the abutment of said driving member with said upper portion during travel of said collapsible mechanism through said second path.

3. The combination recited in claim 2 wherein said upper portion of said lever has upper and lower arms which partially define an approximately U- shaped space,

said upper arm being positioned for engagement with said driving member during travel of said collapsible mechanism through said second path, and

said lower arm being positioned for contacting said driving member during movement of said collapsible mechanism from said contacts open position to said contacts closed position after said circuit breaker has been tripped.

4; The combination recited in claim 1 wherein said indicator means includes a first auxiliary electrical switch actuated by said lever.

S. A circuit breaker comprising,

a case,

a pair of contacts enclosed by said case,

a collapsible mechanism to move one of the contacts between contacts closed and open positions,

operating means to operate said collapsible mechanism to open and close said contacts,

a device for sensing predetermined electrical conditions and collapsing said mechanism to trip open said contacts, said collapsible mechanism undergoing a first motion along a first path when moving from said contacts closed position to said contacts open position under the influence of said operating means and undergoing a second motion along a second path when moving from said contacts closed position to said contacts open position due to the occurrence of said predetermined condition, and

sensing means movable in response to said second motion from an initial position to an actuated position, and

indicator means separate from and operated by said sensing means to indicate that said contacts are in the electrically tripped open position,

said sensing means comprising a lever rotatable in response to said second motion from an initial position to an actuated position to operate said indicator means, and

said indicator means including a first auxiliary electrical switch actuated by said lever, and

a second auxiliary electrical switch for indicating whether said contacts are open or closed.

6. The combination recited in claim 5 wherein said first and second auxiliary switches each comprise independent units supported by said case.

7. The combination recited in claim 6 wherein said first and second switches are in side-by-side relationship.

8. The combination recited in claim 7 further including electrical lamps coupled to said first and second switches and to a source of electrical potential for illumination in response to the actuation of said switches so as to indicate whether said contacts are open, closed or electrically tripped open."

9. A circuit breaker comprising,

a case,

a pair of contacts enclosed by said case,

a collapsible mechanism to move one of the contacts between contacts closed and open positions,

operating means to operate said collapsible mechanism to open and close said contacts,

a device for sensing predetermined electrical conditions and collapsing said mechanism to trip open said contacts,

said collapsible mechanism undergoing a first motion along a first path when moving from said contacts closed position to said contacts open position under the influence of said operating means and undergoing a second motion along a second path when moving from said contacts closed position to said contacts open position due to the occurrence of said predetermined condition, and

sensing means movable in response to said second motion from an initial position to an actuated position,

indicator means separate from and operated by said sensing means to indicate that said contacts are in the electrically tripped open" position,

said sensing means comprising a lever rotatable in response to said second motion from an initial position to an actuated position to operate said indicator means, and

said indicator means including a first auxiliary electrical switch actuated by said lever, and

retaining means on said lever and said switch for maintaining said switch actuated after said contacts are in the contacts open position and said collapsible mechanism is reset. I

10. The combination recited in claim 9 further including reset means operating in response tothe subsequent movement of said collapsible mechanism to the contacts "closed position to release said lever from engagement with said switch and return it to its initial position.

11. The combination recited in claim l0 wherein said retaining means comprises an operating button located on said first switch for actuating said switch,

said button being biased toward, but movable away from, said lever, and

a detent located on said portion of said lever,

whereby upon rotation of said lever toward said switch, said button becomes trapped within said detent to thereby retain said switch in an actuated state.

12. The combination recited in claim 11 wherein said reset means includes a spring for biasing said lever toward said initial position.

13. A circuit breaker comprising,

a case,

a pair of contacts,

a circuit breaker assembly enclosed within said case for moving said contacts between open and closed positions,

said assembly including a collapsible linkage, means for collapsing said linkage in response to a preselected electrical condition, and means for automatically resetting said linkage subsequent to the collapse thereof,

two pivotal lever parts pivoted about a common axis and mounted within said case, said assembly being engageable with one of the lever parts during electrical tripping thereof and engageable with the other lever part during movement from the contacts of to the con- 1 1 12 tacts on positions subsequent to being electri- 14. The circuit breaker recited in claim 13 wherein, p and said unitary switch means comprises two unitary auxunitary switch means carried by said case and responsive t the movement of said assembly and of said lever for indicating whether said circuit breaker is on, off or electrically tripped off." cuit breake iliary switches, one of said switches for indicating whether said cir- UNITED .STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3,742, 4O2 Dated June 26 1973 Inventor(s) Ronald Nicol and Ralph B. Davis It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Delete issued Claim 1 4 and substitute the following claim:

1 4 The circuit breaker recited in claim 13 wherein,

said unitary switch means comprises two unitary auxiliary switches, I I

one of said switches for indicating whether said circuit breaker is "on" or "off", and I the other of said switches for indicating whether said circuit breaker is electrically tripped off" Signed and sealed this 9th day of October 1973.

(S l Attest;

EDWAROB'LFLETCHERJR. RENE D. TEGTMEYER Attesting Officer Acting Commissioner of Patents UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3,7h2,h02 Dated 7 June 26, 1973 Inventofls) Ronald Nicol and Ralph B. Davis pears in the above-identified It is certified that error ap reby corrected as shown patent and that said Letters Patent are he below:

Delete issued Claim 1 and substitute the following claim:

1. The circuit breaker recited in claim 13 wherein,

" said unitary Switch means comprises two unitary auxiliary switches,

one of said switches for indicating whether said circuit breaker is "on" or "off", and

the other of said switches for indicating whether said circuit breaker is electrically tripped "off".

Signed and sealed this 9th da of October 1973.

(.S l Attest;

EDWARD M.FLETCHER,JR. RENE D. TEGTMEYER Attesting Officer Acting Commissioner of Patents

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3863042 *Aug 1, 1973Jan 28, 1975Heinemann Electric CoCircuit breaker with electrical and mechanical trip indication
US3863043 *Nov 1, 1973Jan 28, 1975Allis ChalmersOperating device for switches or the like
US3955162 *Nov 1, 1974May 4, 1976Heinemann Electric CompanyElectromagnetic circuit breaker with electrical and mechanical trip indication
US4056816 *Oct 5, 1976Nov 1, 1977Guim RLight emitting diode blown circuit breaker indicator
US4250476 *Nov 13, 1979Feb 10, 1981S & C Electric CompanyAuxiliary switch for indicating the condition of a circuit-interrupting device
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Classifications
U.S. Classification335/13, 335/17
International ClassificationH01H71/46
Cooperative ClassificationH01H2071/467, H01H71/465
European ClassificationH01H71/46C