Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3742403 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 26, 1973
Filing dateOct 1, 1970
Priority dateOct 1, 1970
Also published asCA945191A, CA945191A1
Publication numberUS 3742403 A, US 3742403A, US-A-3742403, US3742403 A, US3742403A
InventorsR Nicol
Original AssigneeHeinemann Electric Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Circuit breaker with on off and trip indication
US 3742403 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 Nicol CIRCUIT BREAKER WITH ON, OFF, AND

TRIP INDICATION [75] Inventor: RonaldNicoLTrentomNJ.

[73] Assignee: Heinemann Electric Company,

Trenton, NJ.

[22] Filed: Oct. 1, 1970 211 Appl. No.: 77,258

521 user ..33s/1a,33s/17 51 Int.Cl. nouns/12 581 Field oiSearch ..335/13,17,3s, 161,

Dehmlow 335/! 74 Primary Examiner-Harold Broome Alt0rneyDenny & Denny [57] ABSTRACT A circuit breaker including a case formed of two.

approximate-half-cases, a pair of contacts enclosed by June 26, 1973 the case and a collapsible linkage mechanism to move one of the contacts between contacts closed" and i open positions, the mechanism including a pivotal handle" link. The circuit breaker also includes electrical means for sensing predetermined electrical conditions and collapsing said mechanism to electrically trip open said contacts at such time. A unitary adapter is secured to the case and includes an actuator movable generally linearly into engagement with the pivotal handle link and automatically retracted back to a neutral position out of engagement with the pivotal handle link to operate the mechanism for moving one of the contacts to the contacts closed or open positions while permitting the pivotal handle link to freely move when the mechanism is'collapsed on predetermined electrical conditions. The circuit breaker also includes an auxiliary switch means responsive to whether said contacts are closed," open or tripped open in response to a preselected-condition. The auxiliary switch means includes a first unitary switch carried in an auxiliary cavity formed intermediate the adapter and has a plunger engageable with theunitary.

adapter for actuating the latter. The push button mod ule contains electricallamps connected to the first and secondauxiliary switches for illumination to indicate whether said contacts are closed," open or tripped open.

36 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures United States Patent [I 1 June 26, 1973 CIRCUIT BREAKER WITH ON, OFF, AND TRIP INDICATION BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention is a circuit breaker of the type disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,329,913 and, in addition, incorporates an arrangement for indicating whether the circuit breaker is on, off or electrically tripped off.

The arrangement for indicating the condition of the circuit breaker comprises electrical switch means carried by the circuit breaker case and responsive to the circuit breaker operating mechanism to indicate whether the contacts of the circuit breaker are open," closed" or tripped open. The switch means comprises a first unitary switch carried intermediate portions of the half-cases of the circuit breaker case and jointly supported thereby to respond to the movement of the movable arm in operating between the contacts open and closed" positions. The switch means also comprises a second switch, the component parts of which are mounted in a wall of the circuit breaker case to respond to the distinct movement of the collapsible linkage mechanism upon the occurrence of a preselected overload condition.

The invention further comprises a push button module coupled to the circuit breaker case and containing electrical lamps which are interconnected to the switch means and an electrical source to give a visual indication of the state of the circuit breaker. The push button module also includes mounting structure for supporting the circuit breaker in a hole in a panel.

The invention further includes a unitary adapter to permit the operation of the circuit breaker taught in U.S. Pat. No. 3,329,913 by means of successive linear push type motions rather than by pivotal movement of an operating handle. The operation of the unitary adapter is more specifically described in U.S. Pat. application Ser. No. 881,502, under the name of Ronald Nicol and also assigned to the assignee of the instant application, the I-Ieinemann Electric Company. The unitary adapter is secured to the case and includes an actuator movable generally linearly into engagement with the pivotal handle link of the circuit breaker mechanism and automatically retracts back to a neutral position out of engagement with the pivotal link to operate the mechanism for moving one of the contacts to the contacts closed or open positions while permitting the pivotal link to freely move when the mechanism is collapsed on predetermined electrical conditions.

The foregoing and other objects of the invention, the principles of the invention, and the best modes in which I have contemplated applying such principles will more fully appear from the following description and accompanying drawings in illustration thereof.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE VIEWS In the drawings:

FIG. 1 shows the three subassemblies comprising the invention, the circuit breaker subassembly, including the auxiliary switches, being shown in side elevation with one of the half-cases of the circuit breaker casing partially broken away to expose the operating mechanism in the contacts closed position and the side of the insulating casing of the ON-OFF switch also broken away to expose the interior parts thereof, the adapter subassembly shown partly in section with the actuator in its lowermost, extended position, and the push but ton module subassembly shown in elevation with the push button in its fully depressed position within the push button module, and, hence, not shown while the plunger extends within the adapter;

FIG. 2 is a side elevation taken from the opposite side of the invention as shown in FIG. 1, however, the circuit breaker mechanism is shown in the contacts open' position with the toggle assembly fully reset, the adapter is shown with the actuator in its return or neutral position, and the push button module is shown with the push button in its uppermost or return position. 1

FIG. 3 is a side elevation similar to FIG. 1 with the push button module omitted, showing the contacts in the open" position and the toggle assembly in its transient collapsed position and illustrating the abutment between the striking head on the toggle assembly and the driving arm connected to the movable contact blade of the auxiliary trip switch just prior to the actuation of the trip switch to indicate that the circuit breaker contacts have been electrically tripped open;

FIG. 4 is a side elevation view similar to FIG. 3 showing the trip switch in its actuated or trip position and the toggle assembly in its most extreme collapsed position prior to resetting;

FIG. 5 is a schematic wiring diagram illustrating the electrical connections between the auxiliary switches of the circuit breaker subassembly and electrical lamps in the push button module to visually indicate the condition of the circuit breaker contacts.

FIG. 6 is a view taken along the line 6-6 in FIG. 3 and showing the on-off auxiliary switch supported intermediate the half-cases of the circuit breaker case with the switch in a position indicating that the circuit breaker contacts'are open,"

FIG. 7 is aview taken along the line 7-7 of FIG. 1 and showing the auxiliary trip switch with its component parts carried by one of the half-cases and the switch in its reset position indicating that the circuit breaker is not in the tripped off condition; and

FIG. 8 is a view taken along the line 8-8 of FIG. 2 and showing the auxiliary trip switch in its reset position and the reset cap extending from the movable arm in a direction traverse to the plane occupied by the reset arm of the trip switch.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION Referring to FIG. 1, the invention is generally comprised of three subassemblies, a single pole circuit breaker 10, a push button module 12 and an adapter 1 1, located between the push button module 12 and the cally in FIG. 5) and which operate in conjunction with auxiliary switches 16 and 26, carried by the circuit breaker 10, to indicate the state or condition of the circuit breaker contacts 42 and 44, as will be explained in further detail hereinafter with reference to the schematic diagram of FIG. 5.

Any one of several different types of commercially available push button modules may be used in conjunction with the adapter 11 and circuit breaker 12 of this invention and a typical push button module usable in the invention is commercially available from the Unimax Switch Division of Maxson Electronic Corporation, Wallingford, Conn., under the designation Series 9C. In view of the commercial availability of such push button modules, and their well known mode of operation, only a brief description will be given herein.

The push button switch 12 is formed of a generally tubular outer casing 21, closed on one end by an insulating platform (not shown) which supports the terminals 110, 111, 112, 113 and 114-, and closed at the other end by the push button 22. The push button 22 is directly coupled to the plunger 23 by a shaft (not shown) which is disposed along the longitudinal axis of the casing 21 and extends through a hole in the insulated platform (not shown) which supports the terminals 110, 111, 112, 113 and 114. The outer casing 21 has four integral legs 6 located at the end of the casing 21 opposite to the push button 22 and extending away therefrom. The legs 6 support a generally diamond shaped plate 7 by means of riveted connections. The plate 7 contains a hole centered on the central axis of the casing 21 through which the plunger 23 extends.

The push button 22 and the plunger 23 are slidably mounted for movement between two extreme positions. The upper first extreme position is shown in FIG. 2, wherein the button 22 protrudes above the uppermost portion of the outer casing 21 and the plunger 23, which is coupled to the push button 22, is likewise in its uppermost position extending slightly into the adapter subassembly .12 approximately in contact with the upper surface of the driving piston 101. The second extreme position is shown in FIG. 1 wherein the push button 22 has been depressed below the uppermost portion of the casing 21 and the plunger 23 extends well into the upper portion of the adapter subassembly 11, to thereby exert a driving force on the upper surface of the driving piston 101 and to move it to the position shown in FIG. 1.

A spring (not shown) within the casing 21 normally biases the push button 22 and the plunger 23 to the upper retracted position shown in FIG. 2, Le, with the push button 22 protruding above the casing 21 and the plunger 23 barely in contact with the upper surface of the piston 101.

The push button module 12 is mountable in a hole in a panel 2 by means of the resilient mounting clips 8 which extend through suitably shaped holes in the outer casing 21. The outer casing 21 has a lip portion 9 adjacent the push button 22 which overlaps the inner peripheral surface of the hole in the panel 2. As the module 12 is inserted in the hole in the panel the interior surfaces of the hole slide over and compress the clips 8 into the interior of the casing 21. Further movement of the switch 12 into the hole in the panel 2 causes the lip portion 9 of the casing 21 to come into abutment with the panel 2, the resilient mounting clips 8 springing outward to trap the panel between the lip portion 9 and the end portions of the clips 8.

The uppermost portion or cover 31 of the push button 22 is made of a translucent plastic material and is rectangular, having dimensions slightly smaller than those of the hole in the uppermost end of the tubular casing 21. Two indicator lamps 116 and 117, (shown schematically in FIG. 5), located inside the casing 21 are wired to each illuminate a quarter portion of the cover 31 to indicate the on or contacts closed condition and the of or contacts open position of the circuit breaker 10, while two other lights 118 and 119 (also illustrated in FIG. 5) are wired to illuminate the other half of the cover 31 to indicate the electrically tripped open condition of the circuit breaker 10.

A coupling shoe 14 formed of a resilient metal is at tached to the outermost side of the plate 7, the coupling shoe 14 having an inwardly projecting heel portion 17 and two toe portions 18, each having a cam surface. The coupling shoe 14 has a central hole located along the axis of the casing 21 through which the plunger 23 passes. The shoe 14 is snapped into place over a foot member 15 located on the uppermost portion of the adapter 11 serve to couple the push button module 12 andthe adapter 11 to each other, as explained in greater detail in the aforecited commonly assigned application Ser. No. 881,502.

The push button module 12 is connected to the adapter subassembly 11 which responds to the movement of the plunger 23 to turn the circuit breaker 10 on or of. The adapter subassembly 11 is described in detail in the aforecited patent application Ser. No. 881,502, however, for clarity sake it will be described briefly immediately hereinafter.

The adapter subassembly 11 comprises a bracket and a column 95, the column being aligned with the longitudinal axis of the push button module 12. The bracket 90 has a hole centered along the longitudinal axis of the push button module 12 and aligned with the column 95. The bracket 90 has a body portion 91 which is essentially U-shaped in cross section and inverted with the arms 93, FIGS. 1 and 2, of the U extending down, toward the circuit breaker casing 40 and the base of the U being spaced from and running approximately parallel to the adjacent upper surface of the casing 40 of the circuit breaker 10 to define a space with which is received the upstanding boss 99 of the circuit breaker 10. The arms 93 are extended to form four legs 92 which fit into corner depressions on the casing 40 and on opposite sides of the casing 40 to straddle the adjacent upper wall of the casing 40. The legs 92 have holes aligned with the holes through the upper corner portions of the casing 40 through which rivets are passed to connect the bracket 90 to the casing 40.

The column 95 comprises a cylindrical tube 96 which is mounted above the hole in the bracket 90 and in alignment therewith. The tube 96 houses a cylindrical piston 101 which is mounted for slidable movement along the axis of the tube 96 and is connected to an actuator by means of a pin 102. The actuator 100 is in the form of a quadrilateral bar and has a tapered section terminating in a rounded tip to facilitate actuation of the circuit breaker 10 by engagement with the pivotal link 60, as explained hereinafter.

The ends of the pin 102 are carried in slots 103 formed in the tube 96 to limit upward axial'movement of the pin 102 and also prevent rotation of the driving piston 101 and the actuator 100. A return spring 109 is trapped between a peripheral boss on the lower portion of the driving piston 101 and a flange projecting radially inwardly from the tube 96 and preferably integral therewith. The return spring 109 biases the driving piston 101 and the actuator 100 in a direction away from the link 60 in the circuit breaker 10, Le, toward the plunger 23, thereby forcing the pin 102 to a position in the slots 103 farthest removed from the link 60. A cylindrical sleeve 98 may surround the tube 96 to prevent the pin 102 from escaping from the slots 103, or alternatively the sleeve 98 may be omitted and the pin 102 held in place by a friction fit with the driving piston 101.

The driving piston 101 is formed with two communicating recesses, a first rectangular recess 106 and a second cylindrical recess 107. The primary purpose of the recess 106 is to allow a space for the free pivotal movement of the upper portion of the actuator 100. The recess 107 houses a centering mechanism which comprises a centering cap 108 and a centering spring 104, the centering mechanism functioning to return the actuator 100 to its neutral or return position along the axis of the tube 96 after engagement with the pivotal link 60.

The circuit breaker 10, FIG. 1, has a plastic outer casing 40 consisting of two approximate half-cases 37 and 38 inside which is received a single pole circuit breaker assembly 41. The circuit breaker assembly 41 is generally similar to that described in US. Pat. No. 3,329,913, except that the handle which projects out of the circuit breaker case, as shown in the above noted patent, has been eliminated and the upper contour of the handle link has been altered. The altered handle link operates in conjunction with the linearly movable actuator 100 located in the adapter subassembly 11 to turn the circuit breaker on and of in response to successive pushing movements applied to the top of the driving piston 101 in the adapter 11, either directly or via the push button module 12, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2.

The basic structure and operation of the circuit breaker mechanism 41 is described in detail in the aforementioned US. Pat. No. 3,329,913, among others, hence only a brief description is given immediately hereinafter.

The assembly 41 comprises a movable contact 42 carried by a movable arm 43 and engageable with a stationary contact 44, the latter carried by a terminal 45. The movable arm 43 is connected by a flexible conductor 47 to one end of a coil 48 forming part of an electromagnetic device 50. The electromagnetic device 50, on predetermined electrical conditions, causes the collapse of the linkage mechanism 51 to trip open the contacts 42 and 44. The electrical circuit of the circuit breaker is completed by connecting the other end of the coil 48 to the terminal 46.

Further, the movable arm 43 is biased by a spring 52 toward the open position of the contacts 42 and 44 and is mounted on a pin 53 about which it pivots, the pin 53 being carried by two spaced plates 54 which are integral with an L-shaped member 56 and jointly form a frame 59 for carrying the coil 48. The end portions of the pin 53'extend into holes formed in the opposed side walls of the half-cases 37 and 38 to properly locate and support the mechanism 41 inside the casing 40. Another pin 62, carried by the movable arm 43, has end portions which engage the spaced plates 54 to limit the opening movement of the arm 43, as shown in FIG. 4.

The movable arm 43 is also connected by a pin 57 to the linkage mechanism 51 which includes a collapsible toggle assembly 58 having a toggle plate 68 and a toggle link 69, the latter being in turn connected to an arm 65 of the pivotal handle link 60 by a pin 61. The pivotal handle link 60 has an approximately W-shaped upper contour comprising a central cam apex 80, and two inverted shoulders 85 and 86 disposed on opposite sides of the apex 80. When employed with the toggle assembly 58, the pivotal link 60 will normally be in one or the other of two extreme positions, the contacts closed position, illustrated in FIG. 1, and the contacts open position, illustrated in FIG. 2 and showing the mechanism 41 from the opposite side as FIG. 1. The pivotal link 60 is moved to either of its extreme positions by the actuator 100.

The link 60 pivots about a pin 64 having its end portions also carried by the spaced plates 54. A reset spring is coiled on the pin 64 and has one end attached to one of the frame plates 54 and the other end of the spring 55 is in contact with the pin 61, the spring being stressed at all times so as to bias the link to the contacts open position, FIG. 2. After tripping of the toggle assembly 58 in response to an overload, for instance, the reset spring 55 automatically moves the link 60 from the contacts closed" (circuit breaker on") position, FIG. 1 to the contacts open (circuit breaker off) position, FIG. 2, thereby automatically resetting the toggle assembly 58.

The frame 59 forms a part of the electromagnetic device 50 to which is secured a time delay tube 63 housing a spring biased magnetizable core (not shown) movable against the retarding action of a suitable fluid to provide a time delay before tripping of the mecha nism on certain overloads.

' As is well-known, a plurality of U-shaped magnetizable grids 66 are placed adjacent the movable and stationary contacts 42 and 44 to minimize any are that may form between the contacts upon opening.

The operation of the type of linkage mechanism 51 and electromagnetic device 50 is also specifically set forth in US. Pat. No. 3,329,913 and for purposes of brevity it will only be generally described herein as follows assuming the contacts 42 and 44 and the link 60 to be in the contacts open position, when the pivotal link 60 is moved from the contacts open" position to the contacts closed position, the toggle assembly 58 and the movable arm 43 all move down, against the bias of the spring 52, and move the contact 42 into engagement with the stationary contact 44 achieving the contacts closed" position, i.e., the circuit breaker on position as illustrated in FIG. 1.

The electromagnetic device 50 includes an armature 70 which is pivoted on a pin 74 whose end portions are also carried by suitable holes in the frame plates 54. Upon the occurrence ofa predetermined overload condition, assuming the circuit breaker to be in the contacts closed position, the armature 70 is attracted toward the pole piece 72, FIG. 1, either after a time delay period or virtually instantaneously, depending on the overload condition. The movement of the armature 70 toward the pole piece 72 causes the oppositely extending trip finger 71, which is integral with the armature 70, to pivot to the right as seen in FIG. 1 and engage and trip the arm 75 forming part of the linkage mechanism 51, whereupon the toggle assembly 58 collapses and the movable arm 43 moves upward under the bias of the spring 52 to open the contacts 42 and 44. The collapsing motion of the toggle assembly 58 is independent of the position of the handle link 60 and handle 15. The toggle assembly 58 is automatically relatched and simultaneously the pivotal link 60 is also moved to the contacts open position, FIG. 2, under the pressure applied by the spring 55.

The operation of the push button module 12 and the adapter 11 in moving the link 60 between its contacts open and contacts closed position is briefly described as follows assuming the contacts 42 and 44 and the pivotal link 60 to be in the contacts open position, FIG. 2, when the push button 22 of the push button module 12 is depressed, the plunger 23 will move axially downward protruding to a greater extent into the adapter subassembly 11 and bearing against the upper surface of driving piston 101. The driving piston 101, the pin 102 and the actuator 100, being interconnected and normally biased by return spring 109 to the position shown in FIG. 2, wherein the pin 102 is at the top of the slots 103, move downward as a unit in response to the downward motion of the plunger 23,

along a linear path determined by the portions of the pin 102 which are slidably received in the slots 103.

As the actuator 100 moves toward the pivotal link 60, the forward tapered portion of the actuator 100 engages and moves downward along the cam surface between the apex 80 and the shoulder 86 of the pivotal link 60, the rounded tip of the actuator 100 sliding downward to engage the shoulder 86. After engagement of the shoulder 86 by the actuator 100, further downward movement of the actuator 100 causes the link 60 to pivot counterclockwise as viewed in FIG. 2 about its mounting pin 64 against the bias of spring 55. This counterclockwise movement of the link 60 is transmitted via the interconnecting pin 61 to the toggle assembly 58 which moves the contacts 42 and 44 into the contacts closed position, FIG. 1.

As the tapered portion of the actuator 100 moves along the cam surface between the apex 80 and the shoulder 86 in closing the contacts 42 and 44, the actuator 100 pivots about pin 102 and compresses the centering cap 108 deeper into the cavity 107 against the bias of spring 104 to the position shown in FIG. 1. After the push button 22 is released, the plunger 23 and push button 22 move upward under the bias of a spring (not shown) in the push button module 12. As the plunger 23 returns to its upper position, the unit comprising the pin 102, the actuator 100, and the piston 101, will all also move upward under the bias of the return spring 109, thereby moving the actuator 100 out of engagement with the pivotal link 60. The movement of the pin 102 will continue upward until its movement is limited by the walls defining the top of the slots 103. As the actuator 100 disengages from the pivotal link 60 it will be pivoted to a position central with the longitudinal axis of the adapter 11 by the force exerted by the compressed centering spring 104 and the abutment of the lower, planar surface of the centering cap 100 with the upper planar surface of the actuator 100. The downward pressure of the cap 100 on the actuator 100 will impart a pivotal motion to the actuator 100 until the abutting planar surfaces of the actuator and the centering cap are in parallel abutment, as shown in FIG. 2.

If the circuit breaker 10 is in the contacts closed" position, FIG. 1, andit is desired to manually open" the contacts, the push button 22 is again depressed. The plunger 23 again forces the piston 101, the pin 102 and the actuator 100 to move downward. The pivotal link 60 being in its contacts closed position, as shown in FIG. 1, now presents the oppositely diverging cam surface between the apex and the shoulder for engagement by the tapered forward portion of the actu ator 100. As the actuator moves downward, the tapered forward portion of the actuator 100 engages the shoulder 85, thereby pivoting the link 60 counterclockwise as viewed in FIG. 1 and moving the linkage mechanism 51 to the open" position of the contacts 42 and 44.

As discussed previously, downward movement of the tapered portion of the actuator 100 along either of the oppositely diverging cam surfaces disposed astride the apex 80 results in the pivotal movement of the actuator 100 about pin 102, causing the centering cap 108 to move upwardly relative to the piston 101 and again compresses the centering spring. Upon release of the push button 22, the actuator 100 moves upward under the bias of return spring 109 while the-centering cap 108 imparts a pivotal movement to the actuator 100 until the force of the centering spring 104, transmitted to the actuator via the centering cap 108, is distributed evenly along the upper surface of the actuator 100, thereby centering the actuator 100 along the longitudinal axis of the adapter 11. t

The foregoing operations repeat upon successive depressions of the push button 22, as will be understood.

The circuit breaker 10 also comprises switch means for indicating the state of the circuit breaker contacts 42 and 44 as closed, open or electrically tripped open. The switch means is supported by the casing 40 and comprises two electrical switches 16 and 26 which respond to the movements of the circuit breaker mechanism 41.

The switch 16 is operated only in response to the movement of the movable arm 43 to indicate whether the circuit breaker is on or off. The switch 26 is operated only in response to the distinct motion of the linkage mechanism during its breaking or collapsing movement from the contacts closed to the contacts open position in response to an overload condition to indicate whether the circuit breaker is in the electrically tripped open condition.

The switch 16 is located in an auxiliary cavity 33 of the circuit breaker case 40. A more detailed descrip tion of the construction of the case 40 to provide for a main cavity for housing the circuit breaker assembly 41 and an auxiliary cavity 33 for enclosing the auxiliary switch 16 is given in U.S. Pat. No. 3,329,793. Briefly, however, the auxiliary cavity 33 is formed by extending one pair of abutting peripheral walls forming part of the half-cases 37 and 38 outwardly to form an opening which communicates between the main cavity and the exterior of the casing 40. The auxiliary cavity 33 is located on the margin of the casing 40'containing the circuit breaker terminals 45 and 46 and is intermediate these terminals.

The auxiliary switch 16 comprises an independent or unitary structure jointly supported in the auxiliary cavity 33 intermediate the half-cases 37 and 38 and approximately centered with respect to the plane of movement of the movable arm 43. The operating elements of the auxiliary switch 16 are housed in a casing 76 which is supported between the half-cases 37 and 38 by two pins 39 which are threaded through two holes in the casing '76 and the pins 39 extending into aligned recesses in the interior walls of the two half-cases 37 and 38.

The auxiliary switch casing 76 is in the shape of a parallelpiped having sides which are generally rectangular, and carrying three terminals 17, 18 and 19. The terminals 17 and 18 have upper contact portions 77 and 78 disposed within a hollow portion 87, spaced from each other, bent at right angles to the major dimension of the terminals and overlying each other in crossed relation, as illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2.

The terminal 19 has an upper support portion 79 disposed within the hollow portion 87. The support portion 79 includes a first arm 89 extending in the same direction, and integral with the major dimension of the terminal 19.

The upper support portion 79 further comprises two generally L-shaped arms 122, each of the arms 122 having a first segment 125 extending at right angles to the major dimension of the terminal 19 and integral therewith, and a second segment 123 extending approximately parallel to the arm 89 and spaced therefrom and approximately perpendicular to the first segments 125. The segments 125 are parallel to and spaced from each other to define a continuous opening running therebetween. The segments 123 are likewise parallel to and spaced from each other to define another opening which merges with the opening formed between the segments 125.

A generally Y-shaped movable contact blade 126 is disposed with its root 124 between the terminal contact portions 77 and 78, so that the raised and depending contacts 129a and 12% are engageable therewith. The Y-shaped blade 126 is formed with legs 120, FIG. 6, the extremities of which terminate in tongues which interfit into notches 121 in the segments 123 of the arms 122. The contact blade 126 is provided with a hole in which is received one end of a spring 127, the other end of the spring 127 being received in a hole formed in the arm 89, the spring 127 passing between the segments 123 of the arms 122. The spring 127 continuously biases the contact blade 126 toward the notches 12'1, thereby holding the legs 120 of the contact blade 126 in interfitting engagement therewith. The interfitting tongues of the legs 120 and notches 121 restrain lateral movement and provide a pivotal connection between the movable contact blade 126 and the segments 123. The spring 127 also simultaneously pivotally rotates the contact carrying end of the contact blade 126 and the contact 129a about the pivotal connection between the notches 121 and the legs 120 of the contact blade 126 and into abutment with the upper contact portion 77 of the terminal 17 when the circuit breaker contacts 42 and 44 are in the contacts open" position, FIG. 2.

The casing 76 has an opening in its upper wall adja cent the spring 127 in which is mounted anapproximately cylindrical operating rod or plunger 20 made of electrical insulating material. The upper portion of the plunger 20 extends beyond the casing 76 to a position adjacent the movable arm 43 of the operating mechanism and the lower portion of the plunger rests on and is normally biased upwardly by the spring 127, the plunger 20 being prevented from escaping out of the opening by an annular flange which is wider than the diameter of the opening in the casing 76. The upper portion of the plunger 20 is located at least in part traverse to the plane in which the movable arm 43 moves in operating between the contacts closed positions.

The auxiliary switch 16 operates as single pole double throw switch to connect the common terminal 19 with either of the terminals 17 or 18. The condition of the switch 16 is controlled by the position of the plunger 20 which when in its uppermost position, FIG. 2, allows the spring 127 to exert a tension force on the contact blade 126 directed along a line passing on the movable arm side of the plane intersetting the notches 121 and the hole in the contact blade 126 which holds one end of the spring 127. This uppermost position of the plunger 20 permits the common terminal 19 to be connected to the terminal 17 by way of the arms 122, the contact blade 126, the contact 129a, and the contact portion 77. When the plunger 20 is in its lowermost position as shown in FIG. 1, it bears against the spring 127 to redirect the tension force exerted by the spring 127 on the blade 126 along a straight line passing on the terminal side of the plane containing the notches 121 and the hole in the contact blade 126 which holds the spring 127. This results in the pivotal rotation of the contact blade 126 and its associated contact 129b into abutment with the terminal 18 thereby placing the common terminal 19 in series with the terminal 18 via the support arms 122, the contact blade 126, the contact 129i) and the terminal portion 78.

The auxiliary switch 26 is mounted on a margin of the case 40 adjacent the linkage mechanism 51 of the operating assembly 41. Unlike the auxiliary switch 16 which is formed as an independent unit supported jointly between the half-cases 37 and 38, the component elements of the auxiliary switch 26 are carried by the halfcase 37. While the component elements are illustrated open and in the drawings as being mounted to the half-case 37,

it should be understood that they may be alternatively carried by the half-case 38.

As noted above, the auxiliary switch 26 responds only to the distinctive breaking or collapsing motion of the linkage mechanism 51 to indicate whether the circuit breaker contacts are open due to the occurrence of an electrical overload. The switch 26 comprises the terminals 27, 28 and 29, the terminals 27 and 28 having contact portions 147 and 148 disposed in the main cavity of the casing 40. The contact portions 147 and 148 are spaced from and parallel to each other, bent at right angles to the major dimension of the terminals 27, 28 and 29 and are positioned relative to each other in crossed relation, as illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 7.

The terminal 29 has an interior support portion 136 disposed within the main cavity of the casing 40 comprising a first support arm 139 integral with and extending in the same direction as the major dimension of the terminal 29.

The interior support portion 136 further comprises a pair of generally L-shaped support arms 140, each of the arms 140 having a first segment 141 extending sub- A generally Y-shaped movable contact blade 146, similar to the contact blade 126 of switch 16, is disposed with its root 143 between the terminal contact portions 147 and 148 so that the oppositely directed, raised contact portions 145a and 14512 are engageable therewith. The Y-shaped blade 146 further comprises two legs 150, FIG. 8, the extremities of which terminate in tongues which interfit into corresponding notches 152 in the segments 142 of the arms 140. The contact blade 146 is provided with a hole in which is received one end ofa spring 154, the other end of the spring 154 being received in a hole formed in the support arm 139, the spring 154 passing between the segments 142 and the legs 150 of the contact blade 146. The Y-shaped contact blade 146 has secured thereto a driving arm 155 which extends toward the toggle assembly 58 of the circuit breaker assembly 41. The driving arm 155 is disposed at least in part traverse to the plane in which the toggle plate 68 of the toggle assembly 58 moves in collapsing from the contacts closed to the the contacts open position in response to an electrical overload.

The toggle plate 68 of the toggle assembly 58 carries a striking head 158 which extends therefrom in the direction of the driving arm 155 and is semi-cylindrical in shape. The operation of the striking head 158 and driving arm 155 in actuating the trip switch 26 will be explained in greater detail hereinafter. The specific shapes of the striking head 158 and driving arm 155 can, of course, be varied to accomplish the same purpose while remaining within the teachings of the invention.

The contact blade 146 also carries a reset arm 159 which extends toward and below the pin 57 on one side of the movable arm 43. The pin 57 has secured thereto a reset extension cap 160 which extends away from the pin 57 on the side of the movable arm 43 on which the reset arm 159 is disposed and cuts through an extension of the plane occupied by the reset arm 156. The operation of the reset arm 159 and reset cap 160 in resetting the trip switch 26 will be explained hereinafter.

The auxiliary switch 26 has two stable states, the first shown in FIG. 1, which indicates that the circuit breaker is not in the electrically tripped condition and the second, shown in FIG. 4, which indicates that the circuit breaker has been electrically tripped in response to an electrical overload. The state of the switch 26 is determined by the direction of the force applied by the spring 154 to the contact blade 146. If the force applied by the spring 154 to the contact blade 146 is directed along a line passing on the toggle assembly side of an imaginary plane which intersects the notches 152 and the hole in the contact blade 146 holding one end of the spring 154, the contact blade 146 will be pivotally rotated to a position such that the contact 145a is in contact with the terminal portion 147 of the terminal 27, FIG. 1. However, if the tension force of the spring 154 is directed along a line passing to the opposite side of said imaginary plane the contact blade 146 will be pivotally rotated to a position such that the contact 146 will be in contact with the terminal portion 148 of the terminal 28, FIG. 4.

In operation, assuming the circuit breaker contacts 42 and 44 to be in the contacts open" position, FIG. 2, the positions of the elements of the auxiliary switch 16 are such that the common terminal 19 is electrically in series with the terminal 17 through the support arms 122, the contact blade 126 and the contact 129a. This position of the switch 16 is indicative of the contacts open or circuit breaker off condition which as noted hereinbefore is caused by the tension force applied by the spring 127 to the contact blade 126. This force tends to pivot the blade counterclockwise, as viewed in FIG. 2, with its movement limited by abutment between the contact 129a and the terminal por tion 77 of the terminal 17.

Now, when the handle link 60 is moved in a counterclockwise direction as viewed in FIG. 2 by depressing the push button 22, the movable arm 43 and movable contact 42 move downward toward the stationary contact 44. As the movable contact 42 engages the stationary contact 44, the underside of the movable arm 43 engages and depresses the operating plunger 20 on the auxiliary switch 16. As the plunger 20 moves downward it bears against and flexes the spring 127 thereby altering the direction of the force applied by the spring to the contact blade 126 and pivots it so that the contact portion 12% engages the contact portion 78 of the terminal 18. This position is indicative of the contact closed or circuit breaker on condition.

In moving between the contacts open position of the circuit breaker, FIG. 2, and closed position, FIG. 1, in response to successive depressions of the push button 22 transmitted via the handle link 60, the toggle assembly 58 of the linkage mechanism 51 is not broken or collapsed but acts only as a rigid link interconnecting the handle link 60'with the movable arm 43. As a result of this manual movement of the toggle assembly 58, in moving the circuit breaker contacts 42 and 44 between the open and closed positions in response to the movement of the handle link 60 undergoes a first motion along a first path such that the striking head 158 secured to the toggle plate 68 does not abut or engage the driving arm 155. Without contact between the striking head 158 and the driving arm 155, the contact blade 146 remains in its normal or reset position, FIGS. 1 and 2, wherein the common terminal 2.9 is in series with the terminal 27 via the support arms 140, the contact blade 146, contact a and the terminal portion 147.

However, assuming the circuit breaker contacts 42 and 44 to be closed, upon the occurrence of a preselected electrical overload, the contacts 42 and 44 are moved to the open position due to the breaking or collapsing of the toggle assembly 58 of the linkage mechanism 51. In collapsing in response to suchan overload, the toggle assembly 58 undergoes a second motion along a second path, said second motion and second path being different from the ones followed as the circuit breaker contacts 42 and 44 are opened via manual movement of the handle link 60. More specifically, as the toggle assembly 58 collapses, the toggle plate 68 moves in an upward direction under the bias of the spring 52 and simultaneously moves in an outward direction away from the circuit breaker operating assembly 41, as illustrated in FIG. 3. As a result of this upward and outward movement of the toggle plate 68, the striking head 158 attached thereto engages the driving arm of the auxiliary trip switch 26 and pivotally rotates the movable contact blade 146 to which it is secured about the notches 152 in the arms 1411 such that the contact 145b is brought into engagement with the terminal portion 148 of the terminal 28, as shown in FIG. 4. This places the common terminal 29 in electrical series with the terminal 28, the movable contact blade 146 being held in this position by the bias of the tension spring 154. This position of the switch 26 is indicative of the electrically tripped condition of the circuit breaker 10. As the contact blade 146 is being rotated to this tripped position, the reset arm 159 attached thereto simultaneously rotates from the position shown in FIG. 3 to the position shown in FIG. 4. In operating the contact blade 146 to its trip position, the collasping toggle assembly 58 engages the driving arm 155 only momentarily and is thereafter automatically reset by the bias of the Spring 55.

The auxiliary trip switch 26 is held in the position shown in FIG. 4 by the bias of the spring 154 until the operating link 60 is manually rotated by means of the push button 22 to again move the circuit breaker contacts 42 and 44 to the closed position. Assuming the contacts 42 and 44 to be in the electrically tripped open position, FIG. 4, as the movable arm 43 moves downward to close the contacts 42 and 44, the extension cap 160 carried by the pin 57 bears against the reset arm 159 adjacent its free end and pivots it counterclockwise as viewed in FIG. 4 thereby rotating the contact blade 146 attached thereto from its tripped position, FIG. 4, to its initial or reset position, FIG. 1 and simultaneously rotating the contact 145b out of engagement with the terminal 28 and into engagement with the terminal 27. The switch 26 is held in its initial or reset position, as indicated previously, by the tension force applied by the spring 154 to the contact blade 146.

An electrical circuit for use with the invention is illustrated schematically in FIG. 5. Four indicator lamps 116, 117, 118 and 119 and five associated terminals 110, 111, 112, 113 and 114 are wired together as shown in the schematic of FIG. 5. The on-off auxiliary switch 16, carrying the terminals 17, 18 and 19 is wired so as to have its common terminal 19 connected to one side of a power supply. The terminal 18 on the switch 16 is connected to one side of the lamp 116, the other side of the lamp 116 being connected to the terminal 110 which in turn is coupled to the other side of the supply. The terminal 17 on the auxiliary switch 16 is connected to the common terminal 29 on the electrical trip auxiliary switch 26. The lamps 118 and 119 are coupled in parallel with each other and in series with the terminal 28 on switch 26 and the other side of the supply via the terminal 110. The terminal 27 of the switch 26 is connected to one side of the lamp 117, the opposite side of which is also coupled to the supply via terminal 110.

Assuming the circuit breaker contacts 42 and 44 to be in the open position, (circuit breaker of the switches 16 and 26 will be in the positions shown by the solid lines in FIG. 5. In this position, it is seen that the lamp 117 is in series with the supply, the series path extending from one end of the supply, through terminals 19,17, 29, 27, 111, lamp 117, terminal 110 to the other end of the supply. The lamp 117 is therefore designated as the off lamp, and is illuminated when the circuit breaker contacts 42 and 44 are open, and the circuit breaker is off" or deactivated.

When the circuit breaker is turned on manually by depressing the push button 22 thereby rotating the handle link 60 to the on position, FIG. 1, the contacts 42 and 44 will close. As the movable arm 43 moves downward, it will operate the switch 16 by depressing the plunger 20, as explained hereinbefore to the position shown by the dotted line in FIG. 5. The switch 26 remains in the position shown by the solid line in FIG. 5. With the switch 16 in the position shown by the dotted line, the lamp 116 will be illuminated since it is in series with the supply, the series path consisting of the supply, the terminals 19, 18, 114, the lamp 116, and the terminal 110. The lamp 116, therefore, is designated as the on lamp since it is illuminated when the contacts are in the closed position, FIG. 1, (circuit breaker on).

If an overload occurs the electromagnetic device 50 of the circuit breaker 10 will collapse the linkage mechanism 51, causing the movable arm 43 to move upward which results in the switch 16 reassuming the position shown by the solid line in FIG. 5. Concurrently, as the linkage mechanism 51 collapses striking head 158 on the toggle assembly 58 engages the driving member 155 on the movable contact blade 146 thereby operating the electrical trip switch 26, as explained in detail hereinbefore with reference to FIGS. 3 and 4. The switch 26 will, therefore, assume the position shown by the dotted line in FIG. 5. Under these conditions, the parallel combination consisting of lamps 118 and 119 will be in series with the supply, the series circuit extending from one side of the supply through terminals 19, 17, 29, 28 and 112, through the parallel combination of lamps 118 and 119 and the terminal to the other side of the supply. Thus, the lamps 118 and 119 will be illuminated when the contacts 42 and 44 have been tripped to the open position as a result of an overload and thus are designated electrical trip lamps.

It is possible, of course, to use a modified adapter 11, similar to the one shown in the drawings, in conjunction with the circuit breaker 10 without the necessity of incorporating the push button module 12 to operate it. For example, by simply eliminating the module 12 and lengthening the driving piston 101 of the adapter 11 of FIG. 1 to protrude above the top of the tube 96 a suitable amount, the circuit breaker 10 could be operated by finger pressure applied to the upper surface of the driving piston 101. The diameter of the piston may, of course, vary but is preferably smaller than the width of an adult finger. The indicator lights normally contained in the module 12 may be remotely located or mounted in an adjacent panel near the circuit breaker 10.

While the invention is intended primarily for operation in response to successive push type linear movements, the circuit breaker 10 including the switches 16 and 26 may be operated without use of either the push button module 12 or the adapter 11 by utilizing an operating handle as shown in US. Pat. No. 3,329,913, the operating handle being formed integral with the pivotal handle link disclosed in this application. In such an embodiment, the auxiliary switches 16 and 26 would operate in a similar manner as explained hereinbefore to indicate the condition of the circuit breaker.

Having described this invention, what I claim is:

1. A circuit breaker comprising,

a case,

a stationary contact,

a movable contact mounted on a movable arm,

a collapsible linkage connected to said arm for moving said contacts between the contacts open and the contacts closed" positions,

tripped means for collapsing said linkage upon predetermined electrical overloads to move said contacts from said closed to said open position,

control means connected to said linkage for moving the contacts between said open and closed positions, said linkage undergoing a first motion when moving from the contacts closed position to the contacts open position under the influence of said control means and a second motion when going from the contacts closed to the contacts open position due to an electrical overload, first switch means responsive to the movement of said movable arm for indicating whether said circuit breaker contacts are open or closed, and

second switch means located in part transversely to the path followed by said linkage during said second motion and operated by said linkage for indicating when said circuit breaker has been electrically tripped open.

2. The combination recited in claim 1 wherein said first switch means is a unitary electrical switch having its own insulating case.

3. The combination recited in claim 2 wherein said case comprises two approximate half-cases, and

said first switch means is located intermediate portions of said half-cases and supported jointed by said half-cases.

4. The combination recited in claim 3 wherein one side of said first switch means communicates with the interior of said case, and another side communicates to the exterior of said case.

5. The combination recited in claim 1 wherein said linkage includes a collapsible toggle for actuating said second switch.

6. The combination recited in claim 1 wherein said second switch means comprises three terminals, a first and second of said terminals having contact portions parallel to and spaced from each other, said third terminal having a support portion and being spaced from said first and second terminals, a movable contact blade pivotally supported from said support portion of said third terminal and having a contact carrying portion intermediate said contact portions, a spring biasing said blade towards one of two stable positions, a reset position in which said blade abuts said first terminal, and a trip position in which said blade abuts said second terminal, said spring being connected at one end to said blade and at the other end to said third terminal, said blade including operating means disposed for engagement with a portion of said linkage during the collapsing of said linkage in response to the occurrence of an preselected electrical overload, said engagement resulting in the movement of said contact blade against the bias of said spring out of abutment with said first terminal and into abutment with said second terminal, said contact blade being held in abutment with said second terminal by the bias of said spring.

7. The combination recited in claim 6 wherein said second switch means further includes reset means for moving said contact blade from its trip position to its reset position in response to the movement of said contacts from their tripped open position to their contacts closed" position.

8. The combination recited in claim 7 wherein said reset means comprises a reset arm connected to said movable contact blade and extending on one side of said movable arm, and a reset cap carried by said movable arm and extending in a direction traverse to the plane occupied by said reset arm, whereby when said contacts are closed at a time when said movable con tact blade is in its trip position, said cap moves downward into abutment with said reset arm and pivots it and said contact blade to the reset position.

9. The combination recited in claim 1 further including mounting means coupled to said circuit breaker for supporting said circuit breaker within a hole in a panel, said mounting means containing indicating lamps electrically connected to said switch means for illumination in response to the state of said switch means.

10. The combination recited in claim 1 wherein said control means includes a pivotal link, and unitary adapter means connected to said circuit breaker case for rotating said pivotal link to open and close said contacts in response to successive push type motions applied to said adapter.

11. The combination recited in claim 10 further including a unitary module connected to said adapter and containing a slidable means responsive to successive push type motions applied thereto for actuating said adapter to open and close said contacts, said module means further including holding means for supporting said circuit breaker case and adapter within a hole in a panel, said module including indicating lamps connected to said switch means and a voltage source for illumination in response to the condition of said switch means to indicate whether said contacts are open, closed or tripped open.

12. A circuit breaker comprising a case, a pair of cir cuit breaker contacts enclosed by the case including a stationary contact and a movable contact, said movable contact mounted on a movable arm, control means for moving said movable arm to open" and close said contacts, said control means including a collapsible linkage mechanism, a device for collapsing said collapsible linkage mechanism on the occurrence of a preselected electrical condition to open said circuit breaker contacts, said collapsible linkage mechanism undergoing a first motion along a first path when moving said contacts between the contacts open and closed positions in response to said control means and undergoing a second motion along a second path different from said first path when collapsed in response to said preselected condition, switch means responsive to said second motion of said linkage, mechanism but not responsive to said first motion to indicate when said circuit breaker contacts are tripped open," and means for automatically resetting the collapsed linkage mechanism.

13. The combination recited in claim 12 wherein said switch means includes a movable contact blade mounted for movement between two stable positions, an initial position in which it is in contact with a first terminal and a trip position in which it is in contact with a second terminal, said initial position indicating that said circuit breaker contacts have not been tripped open and said tripped position indicating that said contacts have been tripped open in response to the occurrence of said preselected condition, said movable contact blade responsive to said second motion of said linkage mechanism to move from said initial to said trip position.

14. The combination recited in claim 13 wherein said switch means is carried on a margin of said case adjacent said linkage mechanism, and further includes a driving arm extending from said contact blade in the direction of said linkage mechanism at least in part traverse to said second path followed by said mechanism.

15. The combination recited in claim 13 wherein said linkage mechanism includes a collapsible toggle assembly and said device includes trip means for collapsing said toggle assembly when said contacts are closed upon the occurrence of said condition, a portion of said toggle assembly momentarily engaging said driving arm to move said movable contact blade to its trip position.

16. The combination recited in claim 14 wherein said switch means further includes reset means for moving said contact blade from its trip position to its reset position in response to the movement of said contacts from the tripped open position to the contacts closed position.

17. The combination recited in claim 16 wherein said reset means comprises a reset arm connected to said movable contact blade and extending on one side of said movable arm, a reset cap carried by said movable arm and extending in a direction traverse the plane occupied by said reset arm whereby when said contacts are closed with said movable contact blade in its trip position, said cap moves downward, into abutment with said reset arm, and pivots it and said contact blade from the trip position to the reset position.

18. A circuit breaker comprising a case, a pair of circuit breaker contacts enclosed by the case including a stationary contact and a movable contact, said movable contact mounted on a movable arm, operating means extending through an opening in said case for moving said movable arm to open and close said contacts, a collapsible linkage mechanism connected intermediate said operating means and said movable arm, a device for collapsing said linkage mechanism on the occurrence of a preselected electrical condition to open said circuit breaker contacts, said collapsible'linkage mechanism undergoing a first motion along a first path when moving said contacts between the contacts open and closed positions in response to the movement of said operating means and undergoing a second motion along a second path, different from said first path, when collapsing in response to said preselected condition, and first indicator means located in part traverse to said second path and responsive to said second motion of said collapsible mechanism but not responsive to said first motion for providing a signal when said circuit breaker contacts are tripped open, said signal being independent of the position of said operating means.

19. The combination recited in claim 18 further including means for automatically resetting said collapsible mechanism.

2t). The combination recited in claim 19 wherein said indicator means comprises a movable member and biasing means for maintaining said member in one of two stable alternate positions, said member being movable from one of said positions to the other in response to said second motion.

21. The combination recited in claim 20 further including reset means for moving said member from said other stable position to said one stable position in response to the movement of said contacts to the contacts closed position subsequent to the occurrence of said preselected condition.

22. The combination recited in claim 20 wherein said collapsible linkage mechanism comprises a collapsible toggle and wherein said toggle momentarily engages said member when collapsing in response to said preselected condition.

23. The combination recited in claim 18 wherein said first indicator means comprises a first auxiliary switch.

24. The combination recited in claim 18 further including a second indicator means responsive to the movement of said movable arm for indicating when said contacts are open or closed.

25. The combination recited in claim 23 further including a second indicator means comprising a second auxiliary switch responsive to the movement of said movable arm to indicate when said contacts are open or closed.

26. The combination recited in claim 25 wherein said second auxiliary switch comprises a unitary switch including its own insulating casing, and said case comp'rises approximate half-cases which jointly support said second switch intermediate therebetween.

27. A circuit breaker comprising a case, a pair of circuit breaker contacts enclosed by the case including a stationary contact and a movable contact, said movable contact being mounted on a movable arm, a circuit breaker assembly for moving said movable contact into and out of engagement with said stationary contact, said assembly including an operating means extending at least in part through said case for moving said movable arm, a collapsible linkage mechanism connected intermediate said operating means and said movable arm, and means for automatically resetting said collapsible linkage mechanism, a device for collapsing said linkage mechanism on the occurrence of a preselected electrical condition to open the contacts, said collapsible linkage mechanism undergoing a first motion-when moving the contacts between the contacts open and closed positions in response to'the movement of said operating means and undergoing a second motion, different from said first motion, when collapsing in response to said preselected condition, and indicator means carried by said case, independent of said operating means and responsive inpart to said second motion of said linkage for indicating whether said contacts are open, closed or open due to the occurrence of said electrical condition.

28. The combination recited in claim 27 wherein said indicator means comprises two'electrical switches.

29. The combination recited in claim 28 wherein at least one of said switches comprises a unitary electrical switch including its own insulating casing and supported by said circuit breaker case.

30. The combination recited in claim 29 wherein said case comprises two approximate half-cases, and said unitary electrical switch is located intermediate portions of said half-cases and supported jointly thereby.

31. The combination recited in claim 30 wherein said case includes a main cavity in which is located said assembly and an auxiliary cavity which communicates with the exterior of the case and the main cavity, said unitary electrical switch being located within said auxiliary cavity.

32. The combination recited in claim 28 wherein a first of said switches indicates whether said circuit breaker contacts are open or closed and wherein a second of said switches indicates whether said contacts are open due to the occurrence of said condition.

ber in one of two stable alternate positions, said member being movable from one of said positions to the other in response to said second motion.

35. The combination recited in claim 34 further including reset means for moving said member from said other stable position to said one stable position in response to the movement of said contacts to the contacts closed position subsequent to the occurrence of said preselected condition.

36. The combination recited in claim 35 wherein said device comprises an electrical switch.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3863042 *Aug 1, 1973Jan 28, 1975Heinemann Electric CoCircuit breaker with electrical and mechanical trip indication
US3863043 *Nov 1, 1973Jan 28, 1975Allis ChalmersOperating device for switches or the like
US4760226 *Apr 8, 1987Jul 26, 1988Carlingswitch, Inc.Split case circuit breaker with multi-purpose well
US4969063 *May 16, 1989Nov 6, 1990Square D CompanyCircuit breaker with status indicating lights
US5264673 *Oct 3, 1991Nov 23, 1993Eaton CorporationCircuit interrupter with center trip position and alarm
US5831500 *Aug 23, 1996Nov 3, 1998Square D CompanyTrip flag guide for a circuit breaker
US6194675Dec 30, 1999Feb 27, 2001Square D CompanyBoxer linkage for double throw safety switches
US6246304Mar 23, 2000Jun 12, 2001Airpax Corporation, LlcTrip indicating circuit breaker
US6271489Dec 31, 1999Aug 7, 2001Square D CompanyCam-lock enhanced pressure switch contacts
US6320143Dec 30, 1999Nov 20, 2001Square D CompanySlider linkage for double throw safety switches
US6342995Mar 2, 2000Jan 29, 2002Instrument Transformers, Inc.Lighted escutcheon plate for power distribution equipment
US6362442Dec 31, 1999Mar 26, 2002Square D CompanyTwo-stage self adjusting trip latch
US6864447Aug 28, 2003Mar 8, 2005Eaton CorporationCircuit breaker empolying illuminating indicators for open and closed positions
US7319373 *Jan 23, 2006Jan 15, 2008Eaton CorporationElectrical switching apparatus and terminal housing therefor
US7369022 *Jan 23, 2006May 6, 2008Eaton CorporationAuxiliary switch sub-assembly and electrical switching apparatus employing the same
US20050046526 *Aug 28, 2003Mar 3, 2005Lipsey Percy J.Circuit breaker empolying illuminating indicators for open and closed positions
US20070171010 *Jan 23, 2006Jul 26, 2007Eaton CorporationElectrical switching apparatus and terminal housing therefor
US20070171011 *Jan 23, 2006Jul 26, 2007Eaton CorporationAuxiliary switch sub-assembly and electrical switching apparatus employing the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification335/13, 335/17
International ClassificationH01H71/46
Cooperative ClassificationH01H2071/467, H01H71/465
European ClassificationH01H71/46C