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Publication numberUS3742479 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 26, 1973
Filing dateOct 18, 1971
Priority dateOct 18, 1971
Publication numberUS 3742479 A, US 3742479A, US-A-3742479, US3742479 A, US3742479A
InventorsWilliams G
Original AssigneeWilliams G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Window alarm particularly useful with metal windows
US 3742479 A
Abstract
A battery operated alarm mounted within a closed housing adapted to be secured below the sill member of a metallic window by fastening means that are inaccessible when the window is closed. Switching means are provided for actuating the alarm selectively in accordance with the opened or closed condition of any one of a plurality of sash, these switching means being located in the plane of each sash and being biased to energize the alarm upon opening of the window.
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United States Patent Williams 1 June 26, 1973 WINDOW ALARM PARTICULARLY USEFUL WITH METAL WINDOWS [76] Inventor: George J. Williams, 10 Oak Ridge Lane, Albertson, NY. U507 '22 Filed: Oct. 18,1971 [2i] Appl.No.: 190,418

[52] U.S. Cl. 340/274, ZOO/61.93 [51] Int. Cl. G08b 13/08 [58] Field of Search 340/274; ZOO/61.81,

ZOO/61.93

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 4/1968 Patrick ZOO/61.81 2/1972 Cutler et al'. 340/274 3,641,571' 2/1972 Kitman 340/274 Primary Examiner-John W. Caldwell Assistant Examiner-Glen R. Swann, Ill

Att0rneyRobert R. Strack et al.

57 ABSTRACT A battery operated alarm mounted within a closed housing adapted to be secured below the sill member of a metallic window by fastening means that are inaccessible when the window is closed. Switching means are provided for actuating the alarm selectively in accordance with the opened or closed condition of any one of a plurality of sash, these switching means being located in the plane of each sash and being biased to energize the alarm upon opening of the window.

9 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures WINDOW ALARM PARTICULARLY USEFUL WITI-I METAL WINDOWS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to alarm systems that are actuated responsive to attempted unauthorized entry into protected premises. More particularly, the invention relates to a window alarm system that is electrically operated independently of the building power supply, and which is particularly adapted for use with metallic window frames.

2. Description of the Prior Art The need to sound an alarm in the event of an attempted or actual unauthorized entry upon premises, has long been recognized. The art is filled with attempts to provide simple and reliable means for producing audible alarms under such conditions. The various systems are generally tailored to the particularportals protected, and various classes of systems such as window alarms, door alarms, and the like, have been developed. Each type of alarm system exhibits characteristics determined by their function, but usually, there is a desire for an inconspicuous mounting that cannot be tampered with. With electric alarms, a switch is frequently controlled by movement of the door or window, and remotely installed power supplies and signalling devices are wired to the switch.

Recognizing that individuals move from place to place and may desire protection of the particular premises in which they are temporarily residing, portable alarms have also been developed, including a battery operated system wherein an alarm, battery, and switch contacts are housed within a single box that is adapted for mounting upon the portal desired to be protected. Opening or closing this portal will result in the actuation or deenergization of the portable alarm respectively. In general, the prior permanent installations have relied upon techniques which are inconvenient and/or expensive for the average homeowner. For example, the majority of window installations require the mortising of a portion of the unit into the frame of the window, followed by the internal routing of power wires to interconnect contacts within the mortised cavity with the power supply and the actual alarm unit. This type of installation requires special tools, and skills which are not always available to the average home-owner, and inevitably leads to costs which are prohibitive to the average homeowner.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention is specifically adapted for utilization with metallic windows comprising a number of sash mounted for translation in adjacent parallel planes. These windows include the vast majority now installed and being installed, and frequently include a triple hung window wherein the third sash is a screened rather than a glass window pane. Where more than one sash is employed, it is necessary to provide means whereby opening any one of the sash will actuate the alarm system.

Unlike wood frame windows, it is difficult and impractical to cut through a metal frame to sink an alarm unit in a mortise cavity. The present invention assures convenience and ease of installation by providing a tamperproof externally mounted unit. This unit is speeifically designed for installation with a minimum of structural changes in the window frame.

Another feature of the invention resides in the fact that the alarm unit is battery powered and does not require attachment to the existing power supply. This leads to not only greater ease of installation, but also greater reliability inasmuch as the alarm system cannot be deactivated by cutting the power supply.

The alarm unit of the present invention achieves further effectiveness because it can be safely mounted in a visible location and therefore psychologically acts to prevent unauthorized entry upon the premises. It is well recognized that probably the greatest deterrent effect of an alarm system lies in its psychological restraint upon parties considering unauthorized entry. By mounting these units in a position that can be viewed from the outside, and yet which cannot be tampered with from the outside, the invention insures maximum psychological impact and deterrance.

It is an object of the present invention to provide an improved window alarm system.

It is another object of the invention to provide an improved window alarm system of the battery powered type.

It is another object of the invention to provide an improved window alarm system combining maximum In accordance with one aspect of the invention there is provided a self-contained alarm comprising a battery, an electrically operated alarm means, and switch means interconnected in series. These components are mounted within a housing having an opening on one side only. The switch means are normally closed devices having actuating elements which are biased to project above the flat surface of the housing. When the actuating elements are depressed such that they fall substantially within the plane of the opening, the switch' means are opened and the alarm is de-energized. This unit is provided with means for securing the opening to a substantially planar surface.

In accordance with another aspect of the invention there is provided an alarm system of the type described, in combination with a metal window having at least two sash mounted in parallel tracks for translitory motion therein. The alarm device is mounted at one end of the window with actuating elements projecting through said end, each disposed within one of the tracks.

The above objects and features of the invention, along with further details and advantages, will be more thoroughly understood and appreciated from the fol-- lowing description of the invention which is made in conjunction with the drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an exemplary window with an alarm system incorporating the invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged vertical cross-sectional view taken along the lines of 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a partial cross-sectional view taken along the lines 3--3 of FIG. 2, and illustrates a metal sill with the alarm housing mounted thereunder;

FIG. 4 is'a partial cross-sectional view taken along the lines 4-4 in FIG. 2 and provides a view of the interior of an alarm housing and elements used in an embodiment of the invention; and

FIG. 5 is a simple circuit schematic showing the interconnection of circuitry in an illustrative embodiment of the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS As illustrated in FIG. 1, a typical metal frame window 11), of a type wellsuited to utilization of the present invention, may be mounted upon a building 11 having a wooden frame 12 and wooden sill 13. The metal window has flange portions 14 secured to the wooden frame by screws or the like, and frequently includes a skirt portion 15 that adjusts to sit tightly along sill 13.

The window in FIG. 1 comprises three separate sash 17, 18, and 19, the latter being provided with screening. The sash are mounted within a channel or track in parallel planes and they are adapted to be moved up and down and secured in position as desired. In the general operation of such windows, the glass pane sash 18 is adapted to be positioned at the bottom of the window and the glass pane 1.7 is adapted to be positioned at the top. During the summer, window pane 18 may be relocated to the uppermost position and screen 19 positioned at the bottom. Thus, either sash 18 or 19 may be used as the lowermost window closure and the unauthorized opening of either of these sash must therefore effect the actuation of the alarm system. Inasmuch as these windows are movable within separate tracks, contact actuating elements 21 and 22 are provided within each track for controlling the alarm device.

The alarm housing 20, as best seen in FIG. 2, is mounted below the extending sill 26 of the metal window frame. In this position, it is visible from the outside of the building and in some instances may be provided with a label to the effect that it is an alarm-protected home. The housing 20 contains all of the operating components for sounding an alarm, including the electrical switching elements, the signaling means, and a battery.

The means-for actuating the alarm system may be seen most effectively in FIG. 2. Actuating elements or push buttons 21 and 22 are positioned in the innermost track and second track respectively on the metal sill of the window. These elements control normally closed switch contacts 34, 35 (FIG. 5) which are opened when the elements are depressed. Thus, when the window is closed, these elements hold the alarm circuit deenergized; when it is opened, the respective element goes to its normal-biased position and effects closure of the switch contact thereby enabling the alarm. The particular switch element controlling the alarm, is determined by a further switch 25 that is manually operable in accordance with whether the inner or outer track is being employed, or in the event that neither element is to be in control. This is explained hereinafter.

FIGS. 3 and 4 illustrate the upper portion of the alarm housing and the manner in which the various components are mounted therein. The structure and characteristics of this housing are important because they must provide assurance that an unauthorized party cannot dismount the alarm without causing its actuation. They must also make possible the disassembly of the alarm so that the building occupant may easily and conveniently change batteries. Experience has shown that this type of servicing may be carried out on an annual basis when the building owner is preparing for a change of seasons.

As shown in FIG. 3 the housing may be fastened to the bottom of lower sill member 26 by the utilization of two screws 30 and 31 only. These screws go through holes in the lower sill 26 on the inside track, and into engagement with flanges 32 and 33 which project inwardly at the top of the housing. As illustrated in FIG. 4, only the top of the housing is open. The construction of the housing is such that all four sides and the base are completely enclosed and it is impossible to gain access to the components therein. Accordingly, by securely fastening the housing below sill 26, one is assured that the components are free from tampering.

Furthermore, by securing the housing to the sill with means such as screws 30 and 31, disposed on the inner track of the window, it is possible to insure that these screws cannot be removed without actual opening of the window. If desired, screws or fastening devices may be employed in both the innermost and central tracks. In the event that an attempt is made to pry the housing free from the outside, as soon as it is moved downward the actuating elements 21, 22 will go to their biased positions and their respective contacts will immediately energize the alarm. I

Considering FIGS. 3 and 4 again, it will be noted that actuating elements 21 and 22 project through holes on.

the innermost and central track of the metal window sill 26. In addition, a switching element 40 appears on the innermost track. This is a three-position switch that establishes which of the actuating elements controls the operation of the alarm. It will be apparent that in order to install this device one merely drills five holesin the sill, one for each of the mounting screws, and an aperture for each of the switches. These holes are internal and will in no way affect the weather proofing of the premises. Although not illustrated in the drawing, small weep holes may be provided in housing 20 in order to insure that any moisture that may accumulate will drain through. Means may also be provided for sealing the top of the housing against the base of metallic sill 26.

The essential characteristic of the housing is its complete enclosure of the components so as to avoid unauthorized access, and yet ready accesibility when disassembled by the building occupant.

The basic alarm elements are visible in FIG. 4. Battery 50 may be a standard dry cell mounted within spring clamps 51. A buzzer or bell unit 52 is mounted at one end of the battery and may be serially wired thereto via the various switching elements, in the manner shown by the circuit schematic in FIG. 5. Actuating elements 21 and 22 are mounted within the housing and project above the top of the housing by an appropriate amount to effect opening of their associated contacts when the sash is properly seated on the metallic sill. Three-position switch 40 is located within the housing in any convenient position and preferably does not project above sill 26. This switch may be actuated through the aperture 41 provided in the sill, and this aperture although illustrated in rectangular form in FIG. 3, may be made circular if this is more convenient for the installer.

In FIG. 5, a buzzer system is depicted, with the battery 50 serially connected to the winding 53 of the buzzer, via contacts 54, three-position switch 40, and contacts 34, 35. The contacts 34 and 35 are the normally closed contacts controlled by push buttons 21 and 22. Three-position switch 40 thus selects which series circuit will control operation of the buzzer. In the position illustrated, normallyclosed contact 34 will control buzzer operation; in the central position neither of the contacts will control buzzer operation; and in the extreme clockwise position, normally-closed contact 35 will be in control. Thus, if desired, the building occupant may raise both lower sash and disable the alarm.

ln recapitulation it will be seen that the relative simplicity of the alarm device disclosed herein, renders it particularly convenient for installation and maintenance by an average unskilled building occupant. The alarm is very effective with metallic windows inasmuch as the housing, suitably insulated relative to the electrical components therein, is preferably of metal-itself and by engagement with the metal frame of the window, achieves a mechanical resonance which tends to amplify the sounds produced by the signalizing means utilized.

Of course, the specific layout of components within thev alarm housing and the specific wiring illustrated, may be varied in accordance with specific installations and varying design factors. The essential ingredients of these structural and electrical components are set forth with particularity'in the appended claims. 1

What is claimed and desired to be secured by Letters Patent of the United States:

1. An alarm system comprising a source of electric power, an electrically responsive alarm means, and switching means, mounted within a housing and electrically connected in a series circuit; said housing being enclosed with an opening on one side only, said switching means including one actuating element biased to project beyond said opening and being operative to open said series circuit when depressed, and mounting means aligned with said actuating element within the periphery of said opening for securing said one side to a surface.

2. An alarm system comprising a source of electric power, an electrically responsive alarm means, and switching means, mounted within a housing and electrically connected in a series circuit; said housing being enclosed with an opening on one side only; said switching means including one actuating element biased to project beyond said opening and operative to open said series circuit when depressed, and a second actuating element biased to project beyond said opening, said actuating elements each controlling separate normally closed electric contacts which are electrically connected in parallel with each other, said actuating elements being disposed different distances from a side of said housing that is contiguous to said one side.

3. An alarm system as defined in claim 2, including further switching means serially connected with said source of electric power and said alarm means and selectively operative to interconnect either of said normally closed electric contacts in said series circuit.

4. An alarm system as defined in claim 3, wherein said further switching means is disposed the same distance from said contiguous side of the housing as one of said actuating elements, and within said opening.

5. An alarm system as defined in claim 1, wherein said housing has walls extending from said one side,

said switching means includes a second actuating element biased to project beyond said opening, said actuating elements disposed different predetermined distances from one of said walls, separate normally closed electric contacts each controlled by one of said actuating elements, and means selectively connecting either of said normally closed contacts in said series circuit.

6. An alarm system as defined in claim 5, wherein said housing is metallic.

7. An alarm system as defined in claim 1, in combination with a metallic window having at least one sash movable within a plane and a sill disposed transverse to said plane, said alarm device being secured to the remote side of said sill from said sash, by means extending through said sill, and said actuating element projecting through said sill for actuation by said sash when positioned in proximity to said sill.

8. An alarm system as defined in claim 2 in combination with a metallic window having at least two sashes movable within adjacent parallelplanes and a sill disposedtransverse to said planes; said alarm device being secured to the remote side of said sill from said sash, by means extending through said sill; each of said actuating elements projecting through said sill within one of said adjacent parallel planes for actuating by the cone sponding sash when it is in proximity to said sill.

9. An alarm system as defined in claim 8, including further switching means within said housing serially connected with said source of electric power and said alarm means, and selectively operative through said sill to interconnect either of said normally closed electric contacts in said series circuit.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3378830 *Aug 4, 1965Apr 16, 1968George D. PatrickAlarm device
US3641540 *Mar 30, 1970Feb 8, 1972Glickman Joel IWireless alarm system
US3641571 *Sep 15, 1969Feb 8, 1972Kitman Irwin ICombination burglar and fire alarm
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3943485 *May 1, 1975Mar 9, 1976Marjo Systems, Inc.Alarm system for three-element windows
US4837557 *Aug 30, 1988Jun 6, 1989Raywheel, Inc.Combination alarm and lock device with sensitivity adjustment
US5007199 *Feb 15, 1990Apr 16, 1991Larmco Security, Inc.Anti-intrusion window
US5164705 *Apr 15, 1991Nov 17, 1992Larmco Security, Inc.Anti-intrusion window
Classifications
U.S. Classification340/540, 200/61.93, 340/545.2, 340/545.1
International ClassificationG08B13/02, G08B13/08
Cooperative ClassificationG08B13/08
European ClassificationG08B13/08