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Publication numberUS3742585 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 3, 1973
Filing dateDec 28, 1970
Priority dateDec 28, 1970
Also published asCA944632A, CA944632A1, DE2163190A1
Publication numberUS 3742585 A, US 3742585A, US-A-3742585, US3742585 A, US3742585A
InventorsJ Wentzell
Original AssigneeHomogeneous Metals
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of manufacturing strip from metal powder
US 3742585 A
Abstract
A method is provided for forming metal strip from metal powders by spraying the powder as molten metal onto a cooled moving metal foil and thereafter consolidating the foil and sprayed metal by applying pressure.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Wentze11 [451 July 3,1973

[ METHOD OF MANUFACTURING STRIP FROM METAL POWDER [75] Inventor: Joseph M. Wentzell, Remsen, NY.

[73] Assignee: Homogeneous Metals, lnc.,

Herkimer, NY.

[22] Filed: Dec. 28, 1970 [21] Appl. No; 101,954

1 52 vs. Cl. 29/423,,29/149.5 s, 29/5272,

[51] Int. Cl 823p 17/00 [58] Field of Search 29/527.2, 527.7, 29/D1G. 39, 149.5 S, 423; 164/46; 117/105, 105.3

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,221,392 l2/1965 Gould 29/14955 Primary Examiner-Char1es W. Lanham Assistant ExaminerD. C. Reiley, lll Att0rneyBue1l, Blenko & Ziesenheim [5 7] ABSTRACT A method is provided for forming metal strip from metal powders by spraying the powder as molten metal onto a cooled moving metal foil and thereafter consolidating the foil and sprayed metal by applying pressure.

8 Claims, 2 Drawing Figures METHOD OF MANUFACTURING STRIP FROM METAL POWDER This invention relates to methods of manufacturing strip from metal powder and particularly to a method Norm ally the metals known as superalloys, i.e., alloys of iron, nickel or cobaltwhich will maintain usable me chanical properties at elevated temperatures, are cast into ingots which are then either forged or bloomed into slabs, cut and conditioned, rolled into either bands or plates, conditioned and then finally rolled into strip and cut. There are several heat treatments necessary throughout the process and a final heat treatment dependent on the customers requirements. All of this costs time and money. Perhaps more important is the fact that this large amount of hot working tends to deplete boron from superalloys through oxidation. Boron is essential to stress rupture life at elevated temperature.

Sheet and strip of nickel, aluminum and iron have been rolled directly from metal powder by feeding the powder through a mill with its rolls in a horizontal plane. When rolling strip in this fashion it is necessary that the green strength of the strip be sufficient to allow subsequent processing. This means that the powder must have a special configuration conducive to providing high green strength. Superalloy powder having high purity is generally made by a dry process which results in spherical powder having poor cold compactability lacking the special configuration necessary to provide green strength.

I have invented a method of making metal strip from metal powder which makes it possible to form strip from powder without regard to its shape. In my method I feed the metal powder through a plasma gun or similar metallizing gun onto a substrate of aluminum, copper or iron strip or foil, the foil being in intimate contact with a cooling element at the time the hot metal particles are sprayed onto the substrate. The metal spraying operation is carried out in an inert atmosphere such as in an inert gas purged chamber. Preferably the sprayed foil is cold rolled to apredetermined reduction and then resprayed if greater thickness is desired. The amount of spray, applied and the amount of cold rolling are dependent upon the particular alloy and the desired thickness. Each subsequent spraying or metallizing after rolling will stress relieve the strip. Since all heat treatment is carried out in an inert atmosphere oxidation is eliminated. The substrate may be removed from the finished strip by preferential etching using for example hydroxide for aluminum foil and nitric acid for copper or iron.

In the foregoing general description of my invention I have set out certainobjects, purposes and advantages of my invention. Other objects, purposes and advantages will be apparent from a consideration of the fol-. lowing description and the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a schematic section through an apparatus for carrying out the practice-of this invention, and

FIG. 2 is a section through a strip made from metal powder according to my invention.

Referring to the drawings I have illustrated a sheet of foil 10 being delivered from coil 11 through a chevron seal 12 into the interior of chamber 13 where it passes over a water cooled roll 14. The foil 10 is sprayed with molten superalloy 15 from a plasma gun l6 supplied with powdered superalloy from a hopper 17. The molten superalloy l5 solidifies on the foil 10 to form a layer of superalloy which is passed between pressure rolls 18 to cold roll the newly formed superalloy strip 15.

If a greater thickness of strip 15 is desired than can be applied with one pass in front of plasma gun 16, then the coating operation is simply repeated as many times as is necessary. The spraying of molten superalloy onto the strip 15 will stress relieve the previously formed layer 15 without danger of oxidation.

If the substrate 10 is to be removed the composite strip is passed through an appropriate etch solution to dissolve it away from the superalloy strip 15 after cold rolling.

In the foregoing specification I have set out certain preferred practices and embodiments of my invention, however, it will be understood that this invention may be otherwise embodied.

I claim:

l. A method of forming strip from metal powders comprising the steps of a. converting a metal powder to a molten metal spray,

b. applying the-molten metal spray in an inert atmosphere to a moving metal foil in a substantially uni form layer to form a major component of the combined thickness,

c. cooling the metal foil and molten spray applied thereto to solidify said molten spray while in said inert atmosphere, and

d. consolidating said foil and sprayed metal by' applying pressure thereto.

2. A method as claimed in claim 1 wherein the foil is cooled simultaneously with the application of the molten spray thereto.

3. A method as claimed in claim 1 wherein the foil is coated with metal spray while changing direction of the foil.

4. A method as claimed in claim 1 wherein the metal foil is a member selected from the group aluminum, nickel, copper and iron.

5. A method as claimed in claim 1 wherein the metal is consolidated by pressure rolling.

6. A method claimed in claim 1 wherein the metal powder is passed through a plasma gun to form a molten spray of metal.

7. A method as claimed'in claim '1 wherein the foil is removed by etching after consolidation of the metal.

8. A method as claimed in claim 1 wherein the foil is passed over a water cooled roll in an inert atmosphere and the molten metal sprayed onto the foil while the cooled roll.

foil is on the water

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2129702 *May 5, 1934Sep 13, 1938Merie Joseph MProcess for making metal products
US2289311 *Mar 6, 1940Jul 7, 1942Sk Wellman CoComposite blank and method of shaping
US2490543 *Jun 27, 1945Dec 6, 1949Gen Motors CorpMethod of making composite stock
US2639490 *Aug 12, 1948May 26, 1953Brennan Joseph BFormation of metal strip under controlled pressures
US2864137 *Oct 25, 1952Dec 16, 1958Brennan Helen EApparatus and method for producing metal strip
US3025182 *Mar 3, 1958Mar 13, 1962Kanthal AbFormation of corrosion-resistant metallic coatings by so-called flame-spraying techniques
US3221392 *Jul 30, 1964Dec 7, 1965Federal Mogul Bower BearingsMethod of making bearings
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US3378392 *Oct 21, 1966Apr 16, 1968Metco IncHigh temperature flame spray powder and process
US3652317 *May 1, 1970Mar 28, 1972Getters SpaMethod of producing substrate having a particulate metallic coating
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3826301 *Oct 16, 1972Jul 30, 1974R BrooksMethod and apparatus for manufacturing precision articles from molten articles
US3833983 *Jun 14, 1973Sep 10, 1974Alcan Res & DevMethod of making aluminium bearing alloy strip
US3899820 *Jun 21, 1973Aug 19, 1975Alcan Res & DevMethod of producing a dispersion-strengthened aluminum alloy article
US3909921 *Jul 9, 1974Oct 7, 1975Osprey Metals LtdMethod and apparatus for making shaped articles from sprayed molten metal or metal alloy
US4066117 *Oct 28, 1975Jan 3, 1978The International Nickel Company, Inc.Spray casting of gas atomized molten metal to produce high density ingots
US4076640 *Feb 24, 1975Feb 28, 1978Xerox CorporationPreparation of spheroidized particles
US4254164 *Jul 6, 1979Mar 3, 1981Nassau Recycle CorporationMethod of depositing copper on copper
US4323419 *May 8, 1980Apr 6, 1982Atlantic Richfield CompanyMethod for ribbon solar cell fabrication
US4418124 *Aug 14, 1981Nov 29, 1983General Electric CompanyPlasma spray-cast components
US4481237 *Dec 14, 1981Nov 6, 1984United Technologies CorporationMethod of applying ceramic coatings on a metallic substrate
US4592781 *Feb 21, 1984Jun 3, 1986Gte Products CorporationMethod for making ultrafine metal powder
US4625400 *Jul 6, 1983Dec 2, 1986Olin CorporationMethod of making a strip for an electrical contact terminal
US4723589 *May 19, 1986Feb 9, 1988Westinghouse Electric Corp.Method for making vacuum interrupter contacts by spray deposition
US4901784 *Mar 29, 1989Feb 20, 1990Olin CorporationGas atomizer for spray casting
US4907639 *Mar 13, 1989Mar 13, 1990Olin CorporationAsymmetrical gas-atomizing device and method for reducing deposite bottom surface porosity
US4917170 *Sep 20, 1988Apr 17, 1990Olin CorporationNon-preheated low thermal conductivity substrate for use in spray-deposited strip production
US4925103 *Mar 13, 1989May 15, 1990Olin CorporationMagnetic field-generating nozzle for atomizing a molten metal stream into a particle spray
US4926927 *Sep 20, 1988May 22, 1990Olin CorporationVertical substrate orientation for gas-atomizing spray-deposition apparatus
US4938278 *Sep 20, 1988Jul 3, 1990Olin CorporationSubstrate for use in spray-deposited strip
US4945973 *Nov 14, 1988Aug 7, 1990Olin CorporationThermal conductivity of substrate material correlated with atomizing gas-produced steady state temperature
US4966224 *Sep 20, 1988Oct 30, 1990Olin CorporationSubstrate orientation in a gas-atomizing spray-depositing apparatus
US4977950 *Mar 13, 1989Dec 18, 1990Olin CorporationEjection nozzle for imposing high angular momentum on molten metal stream for producing particle spray
US5240061 *Jul 24, 1992Aug 31, 1993Osprey Metals LimitedSubstrate for spray cast strip
US5358735 *Mar 26, 1992Oct 25, 1994Ngk Insulators, Ltd.Method for manufacturing solid oxide film and method for manufacturing solid oxide fuel cell using the solid oxide film
US5553371 *May 24, 1995Sep 10, 1996Aisin Seiki Kabushiki KaishaMethod of manufacturing friction plates
US5669436 *Jun 7, 1995Sep 23, 1997Aluminum Company Of AmericaMethod of continuously casting composite strip
US5881645 *Jan 10, 1997Mar 16, 1999Lenney; John RichardMethod of thermally spraying a lithographic substrate with a particulate material
US5942289 *Mar 26, 1997Aug 24, 1999Amorphous Technologies InternationalHardfacing a surface utilizing a method and apparatus having a chill block
US7147446Jan 2, 2003Dec 12, 2006Weyerhaeuser CompanyCrosslinking agent application method and system
US7582172Dec 22, 2003Sep 1, 2009Jan SchroersPt-base bulk solidifying amorphous alloys
US7896982Dec 16, 2005Mar 1, 2011Crucible Intellectual Property, LlcBulk solidifying amorphous alloys with improved mechanical properties
US8828155Feb 22, 2011Sep 9, 2014Crucible Intellectual Property, LlcBulk solidifying amorphous alloys with improved mechanical properties
US8882940Feb 1, 2012Nov 11, 2014Crucible Intellectual Property, LlcBulk solidifying amorphous alloys with improved mechanical properties
US20040130069 *Jan 2, 2003Jul 8, 2004Ray CraneCrosslinking agent application method and system
US20060113707 *Jan 17, 2006Jun 1, 2006Weyerhaeuser CompanyCrosslinking agent application method and system
US20060124209 *Dec 22, 2003Jun 15, 2006Jan SchroersPt-base bulk solidifying amorphous alloys
US20060157164 *Dec 16, 2005Jul 20, 2006William JohnsonBulk solidifying amorphous alloys with improved mechanical properties
US20110186183 *Feb 22, 2011Aug 4, 2011William JohnsonBulk solidifying amorphous alloys with improved mechanical properties
USRE31767 *Mar 19, 1982Dec 18, 1984Osprey Metals LimitedMethod and apparatus for making shaped articles from sprayed molten metal or metal alloy
WO1990003236A1 *Aug 28, 1989Apr 5, 1990Olin CorporationSubstrate for use in spray-deposited strip production
Classifications
U.S. Classification29/423, 427/398.2, 427/427, 29/898.12, 427/424, 427/422, 29/527.2, 164/76.1, 29/527.7, 164/131, 427/455, 164/46, 29/DIG.390, 427/398.4
International ClassificationC23C4/14, C23C4/12
Cooperative ClassificationC23C4/128, Y10S29/039, C23C4/14
European ClassificationC23C4/14, C23C4/12N