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Publication numberUS3742934 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 3, 1973
Filing dateAug 12, 1971
Priority dateAug 12, 1971
Publication numberUS 3742934 A, US 3742934A, US-A-3742934, US3742934 A, US3742934A
InventorsL Holbrook, D Ostler
Original AssigneeMedical Dev Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Body fluid collection bottle for pediatric use
US 3742934 A
Abstract
The present invention comprises a body fluid collection bottle construction wherein the container portion thereof is provided with fluid constraining means, this to provide a container area of reduced transverse cross-section such that an initial filling of the lower portion of the container, even as to introduction of small quantities of liquid, will result in a rapid rise in the fluid level. In such event, and with the employment of appropriate graduation indicia, small amounts of fluid initially introduced into the bottle may be very accurately measured. Above the lowermost, fluid constraining portion of the bottle construction, the introduction of progressively larger amounts of liquid will produce a reduced vertical rise in the fluid level of the upper portion of the bottle construction.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 11 1 Holbrook et al.

[ 1 BODY FLUID COLLECTION BOTTLE FOR PEDIATRIC USE Inventors: Legrand K. Holbrook; David S.

Ostler, both of Salt Lake City, Utah Medical Development Corporation, Salt Lake City, Utah Filed: Aug. 12, 1971 Appl. No.: 171,294

Related U.S. Application Data Continuation of Ser. No. 859,849, Sept. 22, 1969, abandoned.

[73] Assignee:

References Cited I UNITED sTATEs PATENTS 9/1961 Andelin l28/D1G. 24 10/1967 Coanda 128/2 F 12/1969 Bernstein et al 23/292 5/1937 Fehr 215/10 X 4/1932 Stuart 1 73/426 X 1/1916 Nirdlinger 1 73/426 12/1963 Hadley 4/110 3/1940 Nevin 73/427 X 1451 July 3, 1973 3,001,397 9/1961 Leonard 73/427 X 3,545,932 12/1970 GiIfOrd 23/292 X FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 1,316,153 1l/1963 France 206/47 B 653,552 11/1935 Germany..... 73/171 1,015,829 10/1952 France 73/427 23,388 4/1910 Great Britain 215/1 Primary ExaminerRichard A. Gaudet Assistant ExaminerJ. C. McGowan Att0rneyM. Ralph Shaffer [57 1 ABSTRACT The present invention comprises a body fluid collection bottle construction wherein the container portion thereof is provided with fluid constraining means, this to provide a container area of reduced transverse crosssection such that an initial filling of the lower portion of the container, even as to introduction of small quantities of liquid, will result in a rapid rise in the fluid level. In such event, and with the employment of appropriate graduation indicia, small amounts of fluid initially introduced into the bottle may be very accurately measured. Above the lowermost, fluid constraining portion of the bottle construction, the introduction of progressively larger amounts of liquid will produce a reduced vertical rise in the fluid level of the upper portion of the bottle construction.

1 Claim, 5 Drawing Figures PATENTEDJUL3 191a INVENTORS LEGRAND K. HOLBROOK DAVID S. OSTLER W 7M F/Ci4 F/Cif) THEIR- ATTORNEY BODY FLUID COLLECTION BOTTLE FOR PEDIATRIC USE This is a continuation of the inventors prior, pending application entitled Body Fluid Collection Bottle for Pediatric Use, Ser. No. 859,849, filed Sept. 22, 1969, to be abandoned.

The present invention relates to body fluid collection bottles and, more particularly, to a new and improved bottle which may be used in hospitals for pediatric cases as well as for child and adult patients.

In the past a number of different types of vacuumoperated body fluid collection bottles have been devised. Not known heretofore are bottles which are suitable for pediatric use. It is well known that for body fluid removal from pediatric cases, i.e., babies, there must be a very accurate measurement of any fluid, such as blood, drained from the operative area of the small child. The purpose for this is so that if blood is withdrawn from the child, an equivalent amount of blood can be replaced into the infant during or following the operation. It is most important to determine accurately the quantity of fluid withdrawn from the operative area, this in order that an identical amount of fluid may be introduced intravenously into the young patient.

Heretofore, the fluid collection bottles have been designed to be useful principally for adults and, when graduated, measure substantially large volumes of liquid in the bottle area. There is no present bottle, to the inventors knowledge, which is useable both for pediatric patients as well as for adult patients.

Accordingly, a principal object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved body fluid collection bottle.

An additional object is to provide a surgical bottle of the type described which is useable for pediatric cases.

An additional object is to provide a body fluid collection bottle wherein initial quantities of fluid introduced into the bottle may be very accurately measured.

A further object is to provide a body fluid collection bottle which fills rapidly as to vertical height displacement on introduction of initial quantities of fluid and, thereafter, fills more slowly as progressively increasing amounts of fluid are introduced into the bottle.

According to the present invention, the bottle construction in a preferred form of the invention includes a container having a fluid constraining means. Such fluid constraining means is configured and oriented so that a rapid vertical rise of the fluid level in the bottle is experienced even though small quantities of fluid are initially introduced into the bottle. Above the general,

fluid-constraining means the container will open into an enlarged area such that further introduction of liquid will fill such container more slowly. The fluidconstraining means as further illustrated in the invention may take many forms such as an angulated partition, a graduated cylinder, an inverted cone, and so forth.

The features of the present invention which are believed to be novel are set forth with particularity in the appended claims. The present invention, both as to its organization and manner of operation, together with further objects and advantages thereof, may best be understood by reference to the following description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. I is an enlarged side elevation, principally taken along a vertical transverse plane, of a body fluid collec tion bottle incorporating the featuresof the present invention in one form thereof.

FIGS. 2 are similar to FIG. 1, with the cover of the bottle being omitted for purposes of clarity and illustrate in reduced scale additional embodiments of the invention wherein the fluid-constraining means is constructed to provide for a rapid rise of fluid level within the container upon initial introduction of fluid therein.

In FIG. 1, body fluid collection bottle 10 is shown to include a cover 11 and also a container 12. Cover 11 is preferably made of a slightly flexible material such as a suitable grade of polyethylene, polystyrene or polyurethane. In such event the depending lip 13 of cover 11 may include an interior annular groove 14 which may be pressed over annular bead 15 on the upper lip margin 16 of container 12. Top 17 of cover 11 is provided with vacuum port 18 and fluid admittance port 19. Vacuum port 18 is constructed for connection to a vacuum pump, whereas the fluid admittance port will be provided with tubular means constructed for proximate disposition, at its receiving end, at an operative or other area of a patient, which area is to be drained of fluid.

In the construction shown, and relative to the releasable engagement of cover 11 of container 12, the groove and bead construction, reference numerals l4 and 15, provide an easy snap-fit engagement of these two members to complete the configuration of bottle 10.

Container 12 will of course include a peripheral side wall 20 having a side wall interior surface 21. Side wall 20 depends to its support base 22. Thus, bottle 10 may be constructed to rest upon solid structure at support base 22 or, in an alternate form of the invention, a depending shoulder 23 may be provided the configuration of container 12. Equivalent means may also be employed such that, by shoulder 23 or such equivalent means, the container may be supported from a circularly configured wall bracket, by way of example.

Of importance in the present invention is the provision of a fluid-constraining means which in FIG. 1 takes the form of a slanted partition 24. Either the partition itself or side wall 20 may be provided with mutually spaced graduations 25. Such graduations are used in order that an observer may visually determine the volume of fluid contained by the bottle at any given time. Close inspection of the bottle of FIG. 1 reveals that there are really two basic interior areas, namely, A and B. Area B is useable to contain and accurately measure initial inflow of body fluid such as blood. Graduations 25 may be very closely spaced or variably spaced, as required and depending upon the particular configuration of the fluid-constraining means 24.

As thus far described, the fluid collection bottle 10 of FIG. 1 operates as follows. The container 12 and cover 11 will in general be separately packaged in sterile or other desired condition and, immediately preparatory to use, will be snapped or otherwise secured or disposed together in the manner shown in FIG. 1. Vacuum port 18 will be connected to a suitable vacuum pump and the fluid admittance port will be connected to a hose leading to the patient. The starting of the vacuum pump will lower the gaseous pressure within the interior of container I2 so that fluid subject to gaseous (atmospheric) pressure above that within the container will commence to travel through the hose and enter the container area.

It is noted that the fluid-constraining means or partition 24 is not horizontal but rather, in the form of the invention shown in FIG. 1, is uniformly angulated or flat. This is to provide an interior area B which fills rapidly upon the introduction of small volumes of liquid. Accordingly, there will be a marked vertical rise of fluid within the area B upon the entrance into the bottle of but a small amount of fluid. There are a number of advantages as a consequence thereof. For example, the

bottle as shown is very suitable for pediatric use, wherein, for surgery involving infants, the amount of body fluid or blood which is drained from the operative area must be accurately measured even as to minimal amounts, this in order that such blood specific amount may be replaced in the infants system. Graduation markings 25, which may appear either on the side wall of container 12 or on the fluid-constraining means itself, will be variably spaced as indicated for measuring equivalent amounts of liquid in area B. It is noted that the fluid-constraining means 24 satisfies requirement of preserving the essentially cylindrical configuration of the container, with or without a slight taper, and yet provide at a bottom area thereof a rapid rise of fluid level for given introduction of small quantities of fluid within the container, and then allowing more normal fluid level rises proximate area B wherein further amounts of blood or other fluid are collected, either from a pediatric patient or an adult.

Where the bottle is to be used both for infants and for older persons, then it is advantageous to supply additional graduations 26 which will measure in increments substantially larger volumes of liquid introduced into the bottle; thus, the bottle is suitable for use not only with infant patients, but with adults as well.

In FIG. 2 container 12A, corresponding to container 12 in FIG. 1, includes a fluid-constraining means 24A a graduated cylinder portion 27 contiguous with a funnel portion 28 and having graduations 31. Funnel portion 28 feathers into the side wall A of container 12A. It is noted that the bottom 29 of graduated cylinder portion 27 may be disposed at or above support base 228 of container 12A.

In the embodiments shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, as well as in the remaining embodiments, it is contemplated that the material used will be transparent and clear in order that accurate readings may be made. In the case of FIG. 2, the graduations within graduated cylinder portion 27 may be equally spaced at 31, since this cylinder" portion is in fact cylindrical. In any event, very small quantities of fluid initially introduced into container 12A may be very easily and accurately measured within the graduated cylinder portion of the container. Thereafter, that is after additional amounts of fluid are introduced above area B, then further graduations may be used to measure substantially larger volumes of fluid or liquid.

In FIG. 3 container 128 includes a graduated cylinder portion 32 which, with funnel portion 33, forms a fluid-constraining means 248. Accordingly, an initial introduction of fluid or liquid will flow into the graduated cylinder portion 32, the same being conveniently graduated at G1 for rapid reading thereof by medical personnel.

Where graduated cylinder portion 32 forms a leg, then an additional support 34 may be provided in the container construction and depend from the remainder of the container construction in the manner illustrated in FIG. 3.

In FIG. 4, fluid container 12C is indented at opposite extremities to form a fluid-constraining means; the fluid-constraining means takes the form of an inverted cone 24C, formed as a partition by and between representative container indentations C and D. It is noted that by virtue of graduations G1, very small amounts of fluid initially introduced into the container may be accurately measured. Graduations G1, for equivalent volumes will progressively decrease in spacing as one advances upwardly, and that above the cone area there will be normal measurements of increased quantities of fluid introduced into the container, i.e., 12C.

In FIG. 5, a graduated chamber or cylinder portion 34 combines with funnel portions 35 in forming a fluidconstraining means 24D for container 12D. It is noted that the graduated cylinder portion 34 will be filled first and that suitable graduations at G2 may be used to measure initial amounts of fluid introduced in the container.

Funnel portion 35 of course serves as a means for introducing fluid into the graduated chamber 34 of container 12D of FIG. 5. It is noted that the chamber, which may be cylindrical as seen in FIG. 2, may also be slotlike or rectangular, as desired.

What is provided, hence, is a body fluid collection bottle which incorporates fluid-constraining means such that initial introductions of fluid or liquid within the container of the bottle construction can be accurately measured, even as to minute amounts. Above the fluid-constraining means there may be provided graduations for measuring substantially larger quantities of fluid or liquid.

It is noted that all of the containers shown in FIGS. l-5 may be easily molded by mold halves both of which have positive portions. The invention may take any one of several forms of course, subject to imposition of the conceptual restriction that a lowermost portion of the container, fills rapidly upon introduction of small quantities of initial fluid and, thereafter, fills more slowly. At least that portion of the container which fills rapidly, initially, will be graduated with appropriate small incremental markings representative of small incremental fluid level displacements correspondingly to small increases in volume. The container will preferably include additional graduation markings measuring larger quantities of fluid above the fluid-constraining area of the container.

While particular embodiments of the present invention have been shown and described, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that changes and modifications may be made without departing from this invention in its broader aspects.

We claim: a

l. A surgical fluid collection bottle for pediatric use and including, in combination, structure defining a fluid enclosure and comprising a container having a support base, a transparent side wall, and an upper lip margin, a cover constructed for releasable securement to said upper lip margin, said cover being so releasably secured to said upper lip margin, said cover including mutually spaced vacuum pump operated vacuum port means and fluid inlet port means depending beneath said cover within said container and communicating with the interior thereof, said container including a uniformly angulated non-horizontal uni-cavity-forming for an equivalent volume disposed in an upper volume area situated above said lower volume area and formed by said side wall above said sector, said structure also including mutually, vertically spaced graduation indicia disposed on said side wall of said container proximate said partition.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3815579 *Jun 5, 1972Jun 11, 1974Rose SBlood withdrawing means
US3859671 *Apr 13, 1973Jan 14, 1975Marianna TomaselloUrine container for urinalysis
US3929412 *Nov 15, 1974Dec 30, 1975Kendall & CoLiquid receiving device
US4024857 *Dec 11, 1975May 24, 1977Becton, Dickinson And CompanyMicro blood collection device
US4658834 *Mar 16, 1983Apr 21, 1987C.R. Bard, Inc.Medical apparatus for monitoring body liquid discharge
US4787894 *Oct 26, 1987Nov 29, 1988Turnbull Christopher JMeconium aspiration device
US5411705 *Jan 14, 1994May 2, 1995Avecor Cardiovascular Inc.Inlet chamber has filter and defoamer; extracorporeal circuit for surgery
US5871693 *Jun 7, 1996Feb 16, 1999Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyModular blood treatment cartridge
US6180058Jul 17, 1998Jan 30, 2001Terumo Cardiovascular Systems CorporationBlood treatment system
US6346096Mar 9, 2000Feb 12, 2002Sherwood Services AgMedical drainage device with flow restriction feature
US6890323Dec 3, 2002May 10, 2005University Of FloridaSmall volume effusion trap
US7594901Jul 24, 2006Sep 29, 2009Alcon, Inc.Surgical cassette with multi area fluid chamber
US7931629Oct 26, 2002Apr 26, 2011Medindica-Pak, Inc.Sterile liquid materials distribution, consumption and material waste disposal method and apparatus
EP1996269A2 *Mar 6, 2007Dec 3, 2008Alcon, Inc.Surgical cassette with multi area fluid chamber
WO2006129337A1 *May 30, 2006Dec 7, 2006Azienda Agraria Farchioni GiamBottle with means for retaining solid residues
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Classifications
U.S. Classification600/584, 215/370, 604/319, 215/309, 215/373, 73/427, 215/DIG.300
International ClassificationA61B5/20, A61M1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61B5/208, A61M1/0001, Y10S215/03, A61B5/20
European ClassificationA61B5/20F2, A61M1/00A, A61B5/20