Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3743294 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 3, 1973
Filing dateFeb 18, 1971
Priority dateFeb 18, 1971
Also published asCA948665A1, DE2158665A1
Publication numberUS 3743294 A, US 3743294A, US-A-3743294, US3743294 A, US3743294A
InventorsForster L
Original AssigneeForster L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bridge hand dealing system
US 3743294 A
Abstract
A bridge system including a sealed book of reproduced newspaper bridge columns; punched master cards chosen at random for successive play each containing dealing identification for one complete four-hand deal corresponding to one of the bridge column reported hands, an indication of any vulnerability among the original players, and page cross reference to the corresponding bridge column; playing cards symmetrically face code-marked along side margins for registration successively in superimposed position on a master card; a dealing unit for holding one master card and the deck face down with a mirror under one side margin for viewing code-marked dealing instruction for the lowermost playing card through the punched apertures of the master card; the dealing unit including an escapement slit for one card at a time dealt from the bottom of the deck to the hand indicated by the master card; the master card having alternative punched aperture positions for playing card code marks whereby the viewing of one, or the other, or both, or neither of the alternative aperture marks will indicate to which of the four individual hands the card should be dealt; the corresponding book page being unsealed for comparison after play is completed.
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Forster 1 BRIDGE HAND DEALING SYSTEM [76] Inventor: Lloyd M. Forster, 1624 Lockridge Road Bloomfield Hills, Mich. 48013 [22] Filed: Feb. 18, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 116,329

Related US. Application Data [63} Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 746,117, July'19,

1968, abandoned.

Primary Examiner-Anton O. Oechsle Attorney-Farley, Forster & Farley [5 7 ABSTRACT A bridge system including a sealed book of reproduced newspaper bridge columns; punched master cards chosen at random for successive play each containing dealing identification for one complete four-hand deal corresponding to one of the bridge column reported hands, an indication of any vulnerability among the original players, and page cross reference to the corresponding bridge column; playing cards symmetrically face code-marked along side margins for registration successively in superimposed position on a master card; a dealing unit for holding one master card and the deck face down with a mirror under one side margin for viewing code-marked dealing instruction for the lowermost playing card through the punched apertures of the master card; the dealing unit including an escapement' slit for one card at a time dealt from the bottom of the deck to the hand indicated by the master card; the master card having alternative punched aperture positions for playing card code marks whereby the viewing of' one, or the other, or both, or neither of the alternative aperture marks will indicate to which of the four individual hands the card should be dealt; the corresponding book page being unsealed for comparison after play is completed.

22 Claims, 14 Drawing Figures July 3,1973

PATENTEDJUL 3 1975 SHEEI 1 BF 4 INVENTOR ATTORNEYS PATENTEUJUL 3191a SHE" 2 BF 4 PAfT/VZE a m a a H be 4/7 U U H mm MU U m @MM F Um mm U n U /6 6 a a INVENTOR ZZU/fi M. FUPSTEE ATTORNEYS PATENIED JUL 3197a sumaura F'IGJC) V AVV mflwm v M. O Q L 40 g 4%.

\\ AIIIII PATENTEU JUL 3 I973 SHEU'HJFII oo oo o 0000 0000 g O0 O0 O0 0000 FIG-l3 A TTORNEVS BRIDGE HAND DEALING SYSTEM This application is a continuation-impart of my copending application, Ser. No. 746,117, filed July 19, I968, abandoned by the filing of this application.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION It has long been recognized among all classes of bridge players that some bridge hands are more interesting than others and that bridge is more enjoyable when interesting hands are encountered. Accordingly, numerous attempts have been made to provide systems for dealing previously played, interesting hands. There are numerous prior art disclosures of mechanical dealing mechanisms for dealing predetermined hands none of which has proved practical or commercially feasible. Somewhat simpler manual systems have also been proposed including at least one which has been commercially introduced with limited success wherein instructions for dealing a limited number of predetermined hands are printed on the backs of playing cards in a game where playing instructions call for revised bidding in accordance with the authors published recommendations for proper bidding before playing each hand. Duplicate bridge played with predetermined hands involves hand sorting in advance of play.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present bridge system provides for playing interesting newspaper" hands with the opportunity thereafter for comparing the original bidding and playing of the experts as reported in the newspaper columns. The system employs face coded playing cards, hand identi fying punched master cards, a manual dealing unit, and a sealed booklet having reproduced newspaper column descriptions of hands corresponding to the master cards.

A master card is placed under the deck of face coded playing cards in the dealing unit which has a mirror under one edge for viewing underside margin code marks of the lowermost card through punched holes in the master card indicating the hand to which the playing card should be dealt. As each playing card is dealt from the bottom through an escapement slit in the dealing unit hand identification for the next card appears.

A code line on each side margin of each playing card is symmetrically located in one of 52 distinctive positions. The master card has two columns of punched holes extending under one side margin of the playing cards. When a mark appears in the column nearest the dealer he deals to himself. When in the column nearest to his partner he deals to his partner. When in both columns he deals to his left. When no mark appears in either column he deals to his right.

Each master card has 13 punches in the nearest column identifying the dealer's hand; 13 differently spaced punches in the farthest column identifying his partner's hand; 13 further differently spaced punches in both columns identifying the left hand; and 13 unpunched positions corresponding to the right hand. After one or two hands are dealt the dealing pattern becomes automatic and almost as fast as a conventional deal. A large number of master cards corresponding to different newspaper column hands are supplied as part of the original set along with the sealed booklet having the corresponding newspaper bridge column experts comments on bidding and play reproduced which may be unsealed and referred to for comparison after the hand is played.

In a preferred modification of the system newly disclosed in the present continuation-impart application as illustrated in FIGS. 7l4, the use of standard data recording punch card hole spacing has been adapted with opening of tolerance requirements for coordinated registration with playing card code marks through the use of 26 longitudinal and four lateral hole positions instead of 52 longitudinal and two lateral.

The system contemplates subscription or other purchase of an unlimited number of master cards and booklets available from the vast reservoir of newspaper hands published over many years.

The foregoing as well as other objects of the present bridge system will best be understood from the following detailed description of a preferred embodiment with reference to the drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the various components of the bridge system;

FIG. 2 is a face view of several playing cards indicating code markings;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the dealing unit show ing a single card passing through the escapement slit;

FIG. 4 is another perspective view of the dealing unit taken'from another angle and illustrating the mirror system of reading through the master card;

FIG. 5 is a plan view 'of a single master card per se;

FIG. 6 is a sectional view taken along the line 6-6 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of the modified dealing unit;

FIG. 8 is a plan view of such dealing unit;

FIG. 9 is a sectional view taken along the line 9--9 of FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 is a face view of two playing cards employing the modified code marking;

FIG. 1 l is an enlarged single master card strip for use in the dealing unit to identify one complete hand;

FIG. 12 is a reverse view (end over end) of the master card strip illustrated in FIG. 11;

FIG. 13 is a face view of a complete standard punch card adapted to identify three hands in three individual strips separable for use 1 in the dealing unit (with punched holes omitted); and

FIG. 14 is a reverse view (end over end) of the punch card shown in FIG. 13.

Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2 code marks 10 such as applied to the ace of diamonds are located symmetrically on each side margin extending in from the edge approximately of an inch within a normally blank area of the face border of a conventional deck of bridge cards. Code marks are provided in 52 distinct positions on the respective 52 cards comprising the deck within approximately a2 inch length along the side border with approximately a 0.040 inch relative spacing or pitch in line location. The code lines are preferably solid black on a white background and as heavy as possible short of overlapping which could lead to misreading under the various tolerances hereinafter described. In assigning code mark locations to the various card suits and values they are deliberately mixed on either a random or overlapping sequence basis so as to render impossible any specific or general evaluation from memorization and observation of mark location during dealing. In this connection the close 0.040 inch spacing is such as to render adjacent mark locations indistinguishable from general observations unaided by gauging means, which is an important factor in avoiding any suspicion of dealer knowledge of card values gained through observations of code mark locations.

As best shown in FIG. 5, the master card 11 is preferably punched with rectangular holes extending to the full width of the spacing or pitch so that two adjacent punches will leave no intermediate web, thereby assuring maximum visibility of any playing card code line in registration therewith when viewed in the mirror 12 located in a recessed pocket of the dealing unit 13 under the punched area of a master card positioned therein. The master cards are also preferably punched in two columns 14-15 on either side of a central dividing line 16 so as to provide four alternatives with respect to any particular card code line: (I) a single punch on the dealers side 14 indicating the card to be dealt to the dealer; (2) a single punch on the partners side indicating the card to be dealt to the partner; (3) punches on both sides 14 and 15 indicating the card to be dealt to the left or the west position (as shown by the indicia 17 on the top left rail of the dealing unit); and (4) no punch in either column indicating the card to be dealt to the right or east (as indicated on the right rail at 18).

Printed on the upper face of the master card is the number of the hand (82 as shown in FIG. 4) and indication of vulnerability of original players by the letters W-E or N-S or neither or both (as shown in FIG. 4).

In dealing the deck of cards is placed face down over a master card in the dealing unit and cards are dealt from the bottom of the deck through an escapement slit 19 at the lower end of a retaining gate 20 extending over the bottom of the holder 21; finger access to the bottom card being provided by an opening 22 in the bottom. Preferably, the bottom of the dealing unit incorporates a recessed pocket having a depth equal to the thickness of the master card to permit the deck to lie flush on top of same with the lowermost card aligned with the escapement slit which preferably has a depth of approximately 1 h times card thickness to facilitate card removal without hang-up or jamming of a second card. The master card and dealing unit preferably are provided with interengaging tabs 23 and recesses 24 positively retaining the master card against lateral movement with the bottom playing card during dealing. Endwise location of the master card is effected through registration of end surfaces 26 with side rails 27; the length of the master card apart from the projecting tabs 23 being exactly the same as that of the playing cards. A close free fit between the side rails and lowermost playing card is essential to avoid misalignment of master card and playing card which could result in a false reading. In this connection a draft or taper in the side walls is desirable to facilitate insertion of the deck while providing a close free fit for the bottom card.

In practice, it has been found that a code mark line width in the order of 0.020 to 0.030 inch with a pitch spacing of 0.040 inch and a punch slot opening of 0.040 X 0.100 inch for each column provides a highly visible combination while providing sufficient allowance for clearance and tolerance variations without any possibility of misreading a mark from an adjacent space. The dealing unit is preferably held directly in front of the dealer in a level position with the mirror reflection in full view of both eyes. In this position the code marks indicating the dealerss and partners positions are logical and the code of double marks for west and none for east is readily remembered and automatic after dealing a few hands at which time the speed of dealing is almost as fast as normal sequence dealing.

The master cards 11 are preferably selected at random from a book such as shown in FIG. 1 or cut for deal simulating the conventional cut of the playing cards, preserving the element of chance as to the hand to be dealt and the deal rotates from hand to hand in a clockwise manner as in conventional bridge. Each hand is bid and played under assumption of vulnerability corresponding to original players with scoring as in duplicate bridge. In producing the hand from a given newspaper column the dealers hand becomes south in the master card regardless of whether the dealer is north, south, east or west as reported in the newspaper column where the south hand is normally presented as the winning bid playerss hand regardless of who may be dealer. In this respect, vulnerability will likewise be restated with respect to the master card dealers hand as south in order to preserve the same conditions of play. It is of course obvious that in comparing play with that reported in the republished bridge column comparison would be made with reference to the actual hands rather than their designated positions of north, south, east and west which may or may not correspond depending on whether the dealer is south or otherwise in the reported hand. The book 30 containing reproduced newspaper hands preferably is sealed at its front edges 31 with an adhesive binder except for the top edge available for page reference corresponding to that of the master card. When bidding and play of a particular hand is completed it is intended that the players may then, if they desire, refer to the corresponding book page, slit open that page only and make any desired comparisons. It is intended that once a hand has been played the master card will be disposed of thereby avoiding any possibility of preview on the part of the host or other players. In this connection it will also be understood that additional master hands and books may be made available by subscription or otherwise and used with the original deck of cards and dealing unit so that the element of fresh hands may always be retained.

From the foregoing description it will be clear that the present bridge system provides a simple, inexpensive, convenient manual system for reproducing and redealing the interesting hands which have been reported for years in newspaper columns with the provision of an opportunity for comparison with the original bidding and play of the experts, if desired. The system retains all of the elements of natural play with the single exception that consistently interesting hands are provided. The deal passes successively from player to player. The element of chance as to who gets what hand is preserved by cutting for the next master card to be used. Secrecy is preserved and previews are rendered impractical by furnishing large numbers of hands with a sealed book describing each original newspaper hand .to be unsealed for comparison only after bidding and play are completed. The system contemplates a subscription opportunity for an unlimited number of additional hands for which master cards and sealed books are furnished and which can be used with the original coded playing cards and dealing unit fu rnished with the initial kit.

This system has been developed to avoid any possibility of memorizing or observing suit values of cards or any preview information regarding the hand by the dealer or other players. Code markings have been employed for the playing cards which are completely compatible with standard decks employing only side margins on the face which are otherwise blank on all of the cards of a conventional deck. Face rather than back markings are employed to avoid any possible implication of reading the card from the back by any opponent during dealing or play. 52 distinct code marked locations are employed with a spacing so close as to be indistinguishable from an unaided visual observation of location and are mixed with regard to suit and card values so as to render any information as to either, even of a general nature, unavailable from observation of code mark location during the dealing process. Only three hands are identified through punch marks in the master card so that there is no way of observing memorized code marks with reference to terminal punches in the master card (there being the possibility of up to 13 unpunched positions at each extremity of the master card).

Referring to FIGS. 7-14 the modified dealing unit, master card and coded playing card arrangement as illustrated, makes use of standard IBM System 3 data recording punch cards, FIGS. 13 and 14, adapted for multiple hand punching and separation into individual master card strips shown double size in FIGS. 11 and 12, each containing punched information necessary to identify one four-hand deal.

As shown in FIGS. 11 and 12, a standard 4 X 26 hole pattern is employed for hand identification. The holes punched in this standard data recording punch card are circular, spaced on a 0.0871 inch pitch in each direction, with a diameter equal to approximately one-half the pitch. The four hole positions a, b, c, d, extending progressively inwardly from the margin for each of the 26 longitudinal positions identify two different playing cards, one of which corresponds to the a and c hole positions on either side of the central dividing line 120 and the other of which corresponds to the b and d hole positions; likewise on either side of the dividing line 120.

A master card strip placed in the pocket of the dealing unit illustrated in FIGS. 7, 8 and 9 over the mirror 121 is supported on a ledge 122 with the left end of the strip as seen in FIG. 11 registering against the end wall 123 of the dealing unit and the right end confined by the ledge wall 124 shown in FIG. 8. The outer or lower edge of the strip as seen in FIG. 11 registers against the back wall surfaces 125 and the remaining inner edge against the shoulder 126 provided on the ledge 122 with recesses 127 accommodating tab projections 128 which may remain on the strip when separated for use. The pocket in the dealing unit is dimensioned to fit closely the four edges of a master card strip in order to minimize any clearance for shifting of the master card relative to the dealing unit.

With the master card strip positioned over the mirror 121, a deck of playing cards code marked as shown in FIG. is inserted face down so that one side edge of the lowermost playing card is superimposed over the master card strip. The dealing unit is provided with tapering walls to facilitate insertion of the deck but dimensioned at the lowermost card level to closely fit with a minimum free clearance assuring a coordination of playing card position relative to the master card strip. Each playing card is code marked with two side margin spaced code marks symmetrically arranged on either side, adapted to align in superimposed position with either a or 0 position punched holes 1300 in the master card strip as in the case of the 4 of diamonds or with the b and d positions 130b as in the case of the 4 of hearts. The two code marks on each playing card occupy a distinctive position in one of the 26 longitudinal spaces and in one of the two alternate pairs of the four lateral spaces to provide a total of 52 distinctive and unduplicated double mark positions corresponding to one of the 52 available pairs of punch card hole locations in the 4 X 26 hole pattern allocated to card identification.

The size of the code marks on the playing cards is preferably substantially equal to the hole pitch spacing of the holes in the master card which is approximately twice the diameter of an individual punched hole in order to provide a maximum tolerance in the relative location of superimposed punched holes and code marks without loss of full mark appearance in the mir-' ror viewing of the code mark through the punched holes. Thus, with a pitch and hole spacing of 0.0871 inches a relative shifting between master card and playing card from a nominal exactly centered position of approximately 0.022 of an inch in any direction can be accommodated without loss of hole mark registration for the corresponding punched hole and without any code mark registration for adjacent punched holes which could provide any chance for misreading.

The advantages of the modified. system illustrated in FIGS. 7-14 accordingly lie not only in the utilization of standard data processing hole spacing which permits the direct use of standard data processing cards in making master cards as will be subsequently explained, including available high volume rapid reproduction equipment for duplicating punch cards, but also in substantially doubling the manufacturing tolerances compatible with accurate reading relative to the dealing unit, card size, printing inaccuracies and master card as compared to the previously disclosed embodiment wherein 52 distinct longitudinal positions are allocated to approximately the same space along the margin on the playing card.

The same general dealing system as in the first embodiment is employed with a black dot appearing oh the out side only of the dividing line signifying a card to be dealt to the dealer; a black dot on the in side to the dealer's partner; a black dot on both sides to the dealers left; and no apparent mark to the dealer's right.

With reference to FIGS. 11-14, in adapting the standard IBM "System 3" datarecording punch card to the fabrication of master cards, the hole pattern available is in a rectilinear pattern of 32 X 18 as shown in FIG. 13 with a pitch of 0.0871 in inches in each direction. In the preferred embodiment, three complete fourhand deals are identified in three equal size strips which may be separated for individual use in the dealing unit and then discarded (or saved for repeated use if desired).

In processing standard blank System 3" IBM data recording cards, the size of which is represented in FIGS. 13 and 14 including the phantom line 134 at the bottom, the first step is to print the face of all supply cards with common page numerals as indicated in FIG. 13 in locations which maybe selectively punched to indicate a specific page number such as page 41 in FIG. 11. (Thus, any page from I to 9 may be indicated by a single punch in the right hand group of numbers and from 10 to 99 by a combination of two punches in left and right hand number groups.) On the reverse side shown on FIG. 14 only three dividing lines 200, b and c are printed. There is space at the top of the blank IBM cards 131 which of course may be used for printing any specific instructions or otherwise and only that printing specifically required for dealing purposes has been shown.

The next step in processing is to key punch one complete four-hand deal in the lower left 4 X 26 hole location space for three individual master cards 132a, l32b and 1320. Such punched holes, omitted in FIGS. 13 and 14, will involve a pattern spacing similar to enlarged FIGS. 11 and 12 but of course on a normal rather than double scale in size. Accordingly, whatever specific hand identifying pattern is punched will lie within the area indicated in phantom in each of the three strips shown in FIG. 13 which will overlie and be confined within the area of the mirror 121 as seen in FIG. 8.

In addition to hand identifying and page number punching, vulnerability if any is also indicated by punches 133; two horizontal or vertical punches indicating respectively opponents or dealers team vulnerability and three punches as shown in FIG. 11 indicating both teams are vulnerable. After all punching is completed for the three hands, the composite master card is employed for duplicating purposes, employing standard IBM duplicating equipment, in quantities sufficient to meet distribution requirements. Following production punching a suitably large number of different three-hand punch cards are collated for sales distribution. The cards are next processed to trimming and slitting operations wherein the lowermost phantom portion 134 is completely trimmed off and partial slitting along the three lines 135 is performed leaving only three tab connections 128 to facilitate player removal of individual strips 132a, b and c.

It is contemplated that the triple hand master cards will be packaged and distributed intact and for normal play will constitute a random distribution of interesting newspaper hands. In order to further simulate normal random play, it is contemplated that as the deal progresses clockwise from player to player each individual hand to be played will be determined by an opponent of the dealer cutting a stack of master cards to any random level from which the lowermost strip of the top card will be removed for insertion in the dealing unit. In order to avoid suspicions or implications of previous play, particularly where gambling is involved, it is contemplated that a fresh master card strip will be separated from triple hand supply card at the start of each deal and disposed of thereafter, since the available supply of newspaper hands is so great, and the production costs of the master cards so economical as to make possible a constant supply of fresh hands at nominal cost.

For special purposes such as duplicate bridge or instruction the master card strips may of course be reused at the players option. Nevertheless, it will be understood that an important factor in gaining general acceptance for the system lies in the provision of every possible means to avoid any suspicion of pre-view knowledge of the hand to be played. Thus, by using fresh master card strip each time, providing a sealed booklet with reprints of newspaper columns opened only after bidding and play are completed, and by employing a face coding system of card identification which avoids any possibility of reading code marks, as when printed on or punched through the back, acceptance of the system for general play and other purposes may be greatly enhanced.

With reference to the dealing unit illustrated in FIGS. 7, 8 and 9, it will be understood that the deck played face down, overlying a master card inserted in the recess pocket, will be supported on the top surface of the ledge 126 and the two corner supports 139a adjacent each of the escapement slits 139 establishing a level for the lowermost card along the line 138. With the deck in normal unbowed condition, the center support 137 is tapered along its upper surface as shown in FIG. 9 to provide a slight clearance at the end in the order of 1/16 inch against which a deck may be bowed by thumb pressure to assure lowermost card contact with the comer supports 139a facilitating bottom card dealing through the escapement slits without interference or hang-up. Since the cards need not be shuffled in use of this system, they are not exposed to distortion from the bowing incurred in shuffling and the use of escapement slits 139 in the order of 0.015 inch or 50 percent greater than card thickness has been found suitable to release the lowermost card freely while retaining the remainder of the deck in position. Slight practice results in accurate dealing almost as fast as conventional dealing.

The present invention is believed to incorporate novel patentable subject matter in the various sub combination elements of the system, including the master card and booklet which may be furnished as subscription or supplemental supply items, as well as the dealing unit and coded playing cards furnished as part of an original kit. Thus, while all elements cooperate in a single combination system, claims directed to novel and patentable subject matter of the sub combination elements are included along with complete combination system claims.

While two embodiments of the present invention have been disclosed and described here in detail, it will be understood that numerous modifications might be resorted to without departing from the scope of the invention as defined in the following claims.

I claim:

1. A bridge system comprising a deck of visually coded playing cards, a book of numerous, interesting, previously-played bridge hands including description of bidding and play by experts, corresponding master cards each identifying one complete four-hand deal with reference to said deck of coded playing cards, a manual dealing unit adapted to hold one of said master cards and said deck of coded playing cards for manual dealing with visual code observation without revealing playing card suit or value, and a cross reference between each master card and the corresponding page of said book permitting comparison after bidding and play have been completed, said book of previously played bridge hands comprising a reproduction of newspaper bridge columns, said book having its pages sealed so that the pages corresponding to the master card cross references may be selectively unsealed and read one hand at a time.

2. In a bridge system as set forth in claim 1, said sealed pages comprising aplurality of pages secured together at one edge, means adhering other normally free edges to each other except for a limited extent whereby the page number indicia may be viewed, and whereby the adhering means may be selectively broken at a selected page which corresponds to the cross reference indicated on the master card for a selected hand.

3. A bridge system comprising a deck of visually coded playing cards, numerous master cards each identifying one complete four-hand deal with reference to said deck of coded playing cards, and a manual dealing unit adapted to hold one of said master cards and said deck of coded playing cards for manual visual dealing in accordance with observation of code marks through said master card without revealing playing card suit or value, said master card having punched apertures including two distinguishable alternative aperture locations so located relative to the code marks on the playing cards when both the master card and playing cards are held in the dealing unit that the playing card code marks are alternatively visible through one, or the other, or both, or neither of the apertures of the master card to identify to which of the four hands a playing card should be dealt.

4. A bridge system comprising a deck of visually facecoded playing cards, said face code identification being located symmetrically along opposite side margins of each playing card, numerous master cards each identi' fying one complete four-hand deal with reference to said deck of coded playing cards, and a manual dealing unit adapted to hold one of said master cards and said deck of coded playing cards for manual visual dealing in accordance with observation of code marks through said master card without revealing playing card suit or value, said dealing unit being adapted to hold a master card with punched apertures registering with successive code marks on the side margins of successive lowermost cards of a superimposed deck, including a mirror under one side margin of the deck and master card for viewing code mark identification of the successive lowermost playing cards through the punched apertures in the master card.

5. In a bridge system as set forth in claim 4, the bottom of said dealing unit being recessed to accommodate a single master card of substantially narrower width than the deck and provided with an opening to accommodate finger engagement of the lowermost playing card in dealing from the bottom of the deck.

6. In a bridge system employing a master card and playing cards as in claim 3, said deck of playing cards comprising 52 different playing cards having an identification code mark lines occupying 52 distinct positions spaced longitudinally along the side of the playing cards for selective viewing through the punch apertures of said master card.

7. In a bridge system as set forth in claim 6, said punch apertures in said master card having a spacing and size corresponding to said identification lines and such that adjacent punches to permit viewing of adjacent code line positions eliminates any intermediate web between said adjacent punch apertures.

8. A bridge system comprising;

a deck of coded playing cards, numerous master cards identifying numerous different complete four hand deals with reference to said deck of coded playing cards, and a dealing unit adapted to coordinate said master and coded playing cards in effecting the dealing of respective identified hands, said master cards including selectively punched hole patterns produced with standard data recording key punch card hole spacing, having a pitch in the order of ll to 12 spaces per inch, and said coded playing cards having a code system located in positions not otherwise occupied with interfering playing card markings coordinated with said standard hole spacing adapted to accommodate a selective system of hand distribution in accordance with said master card hand identification.

9. A bridge system comprising;

a deck of coded playing cards, numerous master cards identifying numerous different complete four-hand deals with reference to said deck of coded playing cards, and a dealing unit adapted to coordinate said master and coded playing cards in effecting the dealing of respective identified hands, said master cards including selectively punched hole patterns produced with standard data recording key punch card hole spacing, having a pitch in the order of 11 to 12 spaces per inch, said coded playing cards having a code system located in posi' tions not otherwise occupied with interfering playing card markings coordinated with said standard hole spacing adapted to accommodate a selective system of hand distribution in accordance with said master card hand identification and a page numbered booklet reporting an analysis of bidding and play for hands identified in said master cards, each master card including page number identification for cross reference to the corresponding analysis in said booklet.

10. In combination for use in a bridge system as set forth in claim 8 a booklet of published reports analyzing the bidding and play with respect to said hands, said master cards including page number identification for cross reference to said booklet as well as punched hand identification for dealing purposes.

11. In a bridge system for identifying numerous different complete four-hand deals with reference to a deck of coded playing cards having a code system located in positions not otherwise occupied with interfering playing card markings and a dealing unit for holding said deck, the improvement comprising numerous punched master cards identifying numerous different complete four-hand deals adapted for use in said dealing unit with said deck of coded playing cards superimposed in coordinated juxtaposition, said master cards including selectively punched hole patterns produced with standard data recording key punch card hole spacing having a pitch in the order of ll to l2 spaces per inch.

12. The improvement as set forth in claim 11 wherein a fractional portion of a single selectively punched standard data recording card is adapted to identify each complete four-hand deal.

13. The improvement as set forth in claim 12 wherein said hole pattern for each four-hand deal is selectively punched from a rectangular 4 X 26 potential hole pattern.

14. The improvement as set forth in claim 12 wherein a plurality of complete four-hand deals are identified in a single selectively punched standard data recording card, each fractional portion identifying a single fourhand deal being separable for use in the dealing unit.

15. The improvement as set forth in claim 11 further characterized by hole spacing having a pitch of approximately 0.087 inch.

16. The improvement as set forth in claim 11 wherein said four-hand deals correspond to previously played bridge hands reported in a page numbered reference, and wherein said master cards include punched identification of page numbers and of vulnerability, if any, with respect to the hands as previously played and reported.

17. The improvement as set forth in claim 11 wherein said punch card holes are round and have a diameter equal to approximately one-half of the hole spacing pitch.

18. In a bridge system for holding a deck of coded playing cards in coordinated juxtaposition with any of numerous punched master cards identifying different complete four-hand deals, the improvement comprising a dealing unit having a master card recess for holding a single punched master card which is a fraction of the size of the playing card, said dealing unit being adapted to hold said deck of playing cards face down with one side margin of the lowermost card superimposed over said master card, and a mirror in said dealing unit spaced substantially below said master card for viewing hand identifying code marks of the lowermost playing card through the punched holes of said master card.

19. The improvement as set forth in claim 18 wherein the extension of said mirror and walls of said dealing unit substantially confine the mirror view to hand identifying code marks within a rectangular 4 X 26 potential hole pattern.

20. In a bridge system for code identification of playing cards in a dealing unit in coordinated juxtaposition with any of numerous punched master cards identifying different complete four-hand deals, the improvement comprising a deck of 52 different playing cards each identified by face code marks spaced along each of the side margins longitudinally in 26 distinct positions and laterally in two distinct positions for registration with different of the 26 X 4 potential punched holes for each playing card. 21. The improvement as set forth in claim 20 wherein each side margin of each playing card is symmetrically marked in a distinct relative position for registration with two of the potential 104 punched master card holes.

22. The improvement as set forth in claim 21 wherein a reference centerline on each master card extends longitudinally of said 26 X 4 hole pattern and each of said two holes is on a different side thereof.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1887203 *Apr 11, 1930Nov 8, 1932Hoke Hampton WPlaying cards
US2051615 *Jun 23, 1933Aug 18, 1936Miles William CPlaying-card dealing apparatus
US3117491 *Jun 29, 1962Jan 14, 1964Joshua SternInformation retrieval apparatus
US3165319 *Jul 17, 1961Jan 12, 1965David BenimaMechanical device and system
US3482082 *Mar 18, 1966Dec 2, 1969Techicon CorpSample identification apparatus
US3521813 *Sep 7, 1966Jul 28, 1970Reyrolle & Co Ltd APunched cards and methods for forming such cards
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3814436 *Apr 24, 1972Jun 4, 1974W BorenPlaying card distribution apparatus
US4951950 *Sep 29, 1988Aug 28, 1990Acticiel S.A.Manual playing card dealing appliance for the production of programmed deals
US5110134 *Mar 1, 1991May 5, 1992No Peek 21Card mark sensor and methods for blackjack
US5219172 *Oct 9, 1991Jun 15, 1993No Peek 21Playing card marks and card mark sensor for blackjack
US5224712 *Apr 10, 1992Jul 6, 1993No Peek 21Card mark sensor and methods for blackjack
US5312104 *May 31, 1991May 17, 1994Tech Art, Inc.Card reader for blackjack table
US5362053 *Jul 27, 1993Nov 8, 1994Tech Art, Inc.Card reader for blackjack table
US5364106 *Nov 4, 1992Nov 15, 1994No Peek 21Card mark sensor and methods for blackjack
US5681039 *Nov 4, 1994Oct 28, 1997Tech Art, Inc.Card reader for blackjack table
US8567784Apr 20, 2012Oct 29, 2013Tech Art, Inc.Integrated blackjack hole card readers and chip racks, and improved covers for chip racks
US20080179831 *Feb 29, 2008Jul 31, 2008Whitebox, Inc.Promotional Card Deck
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/149.00P
International ClassificationA63F1/14, A63F1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F1/14
European ClassificationA63F1/14