Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3743336 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 3, 1973
Filing dateJul 3, 1972
Priority dateJul 3, 1972
Publication numberUS 3743336 A, US 3743336A, US-A-3743336, US3743336 A, US3743336A
InventorsW Andrews
Original AssigneeSealth Aero Marine
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Frictionless cabinet latch
US 3743336 A
Abstract
A flush mounted sliding bolt latching mechanism held in engagement with a spring and disengaged by a pivoting recessed handle with offset lever arm or a pivoting anti-friction rocker arm.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Andrews July 3, 1973 1 FRICTIONLESS CABINET LATCH 1.706.486 3/1929 Gasey 29%| 161.705 4/1875 Robinson. 29 191 [75] Invent: Weldon Andnwsxlrkland, l,73l.58l 10/1929 Ledwinka 292/223 Wash- 2,055,688 9/l936 Halinka 292/153 [73] Assignee: Sealth Aero Marine,Seattle,Wash. Primary Examiner-Albert G. Craig, Jr. 22 F1led: July 3. 19 Attorney-Morris A. Case [21} App]. No.: 268,762

' ABSTRACT [52] US. Cl 292/173, 292/191, 292/010. 31 51 1m. 01., E05c 1/14 A flush mounted Shdmg latchmg mechamsm held [58] Field of Search 70/208; 292/16 1, in engagement with a pring and disengaged by a pivot- 292/173, 191 223, DIG 31 192 ing recessed handle with offset lever arm or a plvoting anti-friction rocker arm. [56] References Cited 7 Cl i 5 D i Fi UNITED STATES PATENTS gum 3,495,862 2 1970 McClintock 292/173 SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention pertains to a new and novel recessed latching mechanism adapted to use on any type of interior door cabinet or panel which is particularly adapted to use on interior doors in a passenger airplane. A slid ing bolt latch is held in engagement with a spring. A recessed handle is pivotally mounted with an offset lever arm extending beyond the pivot point. The lever arm extends down into a recess in the sliding bolt to contact the bolt and limit the spring actuated outward travel of the sliding bolt. Raising the recessed handle moves the lever arm to actuate the sliding bolt in a direction against the spring to disengage the latch. The latch may also be moved by a striker acting against a rocker arm rotatably pinned to a support structure. The rocker arm is slotted to accept a pin fastened to and near the end of the sliding bolt. The pivoting rocker arm imparts rectilinear movement to the sliding bolt allowing the bolt with rocker arm to move past the striker. Spring action then reciprocates the sliding bolt to latch the bolt against the back of the striker plate.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1, is a plan view of a flush mounted latching mechanism with part of the mechanism shown in phantom.

FIG. 2, is a cross sectional view taken along line 2-2 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3, is a side elevation partly in section showing an alternate means of mounting a rocker arm with a sliding bolt latch.

FIG. 4, is a partial plan view of the flush mounted latching mechanism of FIG. 1, in an alternate embodiment with the end of the sliding bolt shortened.

FIG. 5, is a side elevation, partly in section, of the alternate embodiment shown in FIG. 4.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION A flush mounted latching mechanism 10, best shown in FIG. 1, may be mounted on a cabinet door, not shown. Mechanism structure 12, has projection 14, shaped to accept and to provide sliding surfaces for a sliding bolt 16. The sliding bolt in one preferred embodiment is yoke shaped and has a rounded tail stock 18, and outwardly extending arms 20, and 22. Rib 24, with slot 26, sized to closely accept the tail stock of the sliding bolt acts as a stop for spring 28, which encircles the tail stock and resiliently pushes against sliding bolt 16, at raised area 30.

Recessed handle 32, is pivotally mounted on pin 34, which is mounted to the structure 12, at 36, and 36a. The recessed handle has an offset lever arm 38, which extends down into the recess between sliding bolt arms 20, and 22, to contact the base 40, of the sliding bolt 16.

A rocker arm 42, is rotatably mounted by pin 44, to the projection 14, of structure 12. A slot 46, in the rocker arm allows pin 48, to extend through the rocker arm. The slot may be open ended as shown or may be closed. The pin extends between and is fastened to arms 20, and 22, of the sliding bolt 16.

In operation the latching mechanism 10, is moved against a striker, not shown, with concave surface 50, of the rocker arm 42 contacting the striker. This causes the rocker arm to pivot about pin 44, to provide leverage for anti-friction movement against pin 48, to move sliding bolt 16, against spring 28, to allow the end of the bolt and the rocker arm to move away from the striker. Once past the striker the spring reciprocates the sliding bolt so that it enters the recess behind the striker plate and the ends of the bolt become a latch in combination with the striker. To disengage the latch recessed handle 32, is lifted to rotate around pin 34, and move lever arm 38, against the base 40, of the sliding bolt. The action pushes the bolt against the springs force, moves the sliding bolt to clear the striker and allow the cabinet door to be opened. Upon releasing the recessed handle the spring reciprocates the sliding bolt and the lever arm 38, limits the travel of the bolt.

In another embodiment see FIG. 3, the sliding bolt is rotated degrees so that the sectional view would now show arm 22, structural projection 14, would now be slotted 52, in the area of the rocker arm 42, to allow the rocker arm to pivot about a new fastening point for pin 44. This alternate embodiment operates in the same manner as previously described, but the cabinet door now approaches thev striker from the opposite direction.

In FIGS. 4 and 5, there is shown still another embodiment. The ends of sliding bolt arms are cut off as shown at 20a, and 22a; so that the rocker arm 42a, extends beyond 20a and 22a, to now become the fastener member in conjunction with the striker. The rocker arm 42a, is modified. Slot 46a, now becomes an interior instead of an open ended slot as was shown in 46. The upper concave surface 54a, now becomes the contact surface with the striker when the mechanism is in the latched position.

It is apparent to one skilled in the art that various modifications may be resorted to without departing from the broad principles of the invention as indicated by the scope of the following claims.

I claim:

1. A flush mounted cabinet latching mechanism with recessed handle for actuating a sliding bolt latch the end of which has an anti-friction rocker arm for actuating the sliding bolt upon contact with a striker, the mechanism comprising:

a. a yoke shaped sliding bolt,

b. a spring urging the open ended arms of the yoke shaped sliding bolt outward,

c. a recessed handle pivotally mounted and having an offset lever arm extending into, and in contact with, the base of, the slot between the open ended arms, such that movement of the lever arm moves the sliding bolt against the spring,

d. a pivot pin located near the end of and extending between the open ended arms, and

e. a rocker arm slotted to accept the pin extending between the open ended arms, and rotatably pinned to the support structure.

2. A flush mounted cabinet latching mechanism as recited in claim 1, wherein: the rocker arm extends beyond the open ended arms of the sliding bolt to become a latch member.

3. A flush mounted cabinet latching mechanism as recited in claim 2, wherein the sliding bolt is rotated 180 degrees and the pin for pivoting the rocker arm is mounted to the support structure at a point to retain the relationship between the sliding bolt and the rocker arm.

4. A flush mounted latching mechanism for passenger transport aircraft interior doors comprising:

a. a slideably mounted yoke shaped latch bolt;

b. a yoke pin between the double armed end of the yoke and exending through a slot in,

c. a rocker arm rotatably pinned to the latch mechanism structure such that contact of the rocker arm against a striker causes rotation of the rocker arm to act against the yoke pin to slide the latch bolt,

d. a recessed handle, having an offset lever arm in contact with the base of the yoke, and being pivotally mounted such that rotation of the handle acts through the offset lever arm to slide the latch bolt to disengage the latch, and

e. a spring resiliently urging the latch bolt into engagement.

5. A flush mounted latching mechanism for passenger transport aircraft interior doors as recited in claim 4, wherein: the rocker arm extends beyond the latch bolt to become the latching means in combination with the striker.

6. A flush mounted latching mechanism for passenger transport interior doors as recited in claim 5, wherein: the attach point, on the latching mechanism structure, of the pivoting pin for the rocker arm is relocated on the opposite side of the latch bolt and the latch bolt is turned over to provide latching from the opposite direction.

7. A flush latching mechanism for passenger transport aircraft interior doors with recessed handle for actuating a sliding bolt latch the end of which has an antifriction rocker arm for actuating the sliding bolt upon contact with a striker, the mechanism comprising:

a. a yoke shaped sliding bolt,

b. a spring urging the open ended arms of the yoke shaped sliding bolt outward,

c. a recessed handle pivotally mounted and having an offset lever arm extending into, and in contact with, the base of, the slot between the open ended arms, such that movement of the lever arm moves the sliding bolt against the spring,

(1. a pivot pin located near the end of and extending between the open ended arms, and

e. a rocker arm slotted to accept the pin extending between the open ended arms, and rotatably pinned to the support structure, such that .contact of the rocker arm with a striker imparts rectilinear movement to the sliding bolt latch to first clear then engage the striker due to reciprocal movement imparted by the spring.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US161705 *Feb 17, 1875Apr 6, 1875Albert mImprovement in latches for doors
US1706486 *May 19, 1927Mar 26, 1929Gasey Leo LesterDead-locking mechanism for door latches
US1731581 *Feb 3, 1922Oct 15, 1929Budd Edward G Mfg CoLatch mechanism
US2055688 *Mar 22, 1935Sep 29, 1936Fred P BockAutomobile door lock
US3495862 *Mar 8, 1968Feb 17, 1970Tridair IndustriesLatch
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3993338 *Jul 28, 1975Nov 23, 1976Regie Nationale Des Usines RenaultSliding door release and actuating control device
US4580822 *Dec 28, 1983Apr 8, 1986Aisin Seiki Kabushiki KaishaDoor handle for a vehicle
US4650230 *May 5, 1986Mar 17, 1987Takigen Seizou Co. Ltd.Latch and lock mechanism for door handle
US4677834 *Sep 19, 1986Jul 7, 1987Hicks Cecil BElectro-mechanical security lock
US4707006 *Jan 31, 1986Nov 17, 1987Camrey Industries, Inc.Door latch assembly
US4838054 *Jul 10, 1987Jun 13, 1989The Eastern CompanyLatch and lock assemblies with lift and turn handles
US4838056 *Jul 10, 1987Jun 13, 1989The Eastern CompanyLatch and lock assemblies with expansible latch elements
US4841755 *Jul 10, 1987Jun 27, 1989The Eastern CompanyLatch and lock assemblies with spring-biased slide bolts
US4850208 *Jul 10, 1987Jul 25, 1989The Eastern CompanyLatch and lock assemblies with spring-biased pivot bolts
US4850209 *Jul 10, 1987Jul 25, 1989The Eastern CompanyLatch and lock housings, handles and mounting brackets
US4913476 *Aug 4, 1988Apr 3, 1990Crenlo, Inc.Door latch and release apparatus
US4969916 *Mar 23, 1989Nov 13, 1990The Eastern CompanyLatch and lock assemblies with spring-biased pivot bolts
US5005885 *Sep 18, 1989Apr 9, 1991Nifco, Inc.Apparatus for operating linkage or car door by pivotal lever
US5046340 *Jul 17, 1990Sep 10, 1991The Eastern CompanyLatch and lock assemblies with spring-biased pivot bolts
US5823583 *Dec 29, 1995Oct 20, 1998Nyx, Inc.Latch mechanism for glove box door
US6109669 *Sep 30, 1998Aug 29, 2000Southco, Inc.Load floor slam-action paw latch
US6719332Dec 3, 2001Apr 13, 2004Southco, Inc.Load floor latch
US7052053Sep 11, 2004May 30, 2006Southco, Inc.Load floor latch
US7083205Sep 17, 2003Aug 1, 2006Southco, Inc.Double-acting load floor slam latch
US7204528 *Jun 29, 2005Apr 17, 2007Southco, Inc.Load-floor latch
US7252351 *Sep 29, 2004Aug 7, 2007Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., Ltd.Computer enclosure with fastening device
US7325846 *May 7, 2003Feb 5, 2008Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Low profile mechanical assist hood latch
US7399009Aug 18, 2004Jul 15, 2008Southco, Inc.Load floor latch
US7510465 *Apr 3, 2007Mar 31, 2009Eastway Fair Company LimitedSand pad lock for sander
US7614672Nov 16, 2007Nov 10, 2009Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Low profile mechanical assist hood latch
US7798540Dec 29, 2006Sep 21, 2010Southco, Inc.Load-floor latch
US8424931 *Nov 25, 2009Apr 23, 2013Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., Ltd.Locking apparatus for locking hard disk to electronic device
US8534718Sep 9, 2011Sep 17, 2013The Young Engineers, Inc.Two assembly parts latch system
US8757675Mar 31, 2009Jun 24, 2014The Young Engineers, Inc.Two assembly parts latch system
US8770634 *Aug 14, 2013Jul 8, 2014The Young Engineers, Inc.Two assembly parts latch system
US20110074169 *Nov 25, 2009Mar 31, 2011Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., Ltd.Locking apparatus for locking hard disk to electronic device
US20110088436 *Apr 15, 2009Apr 21, 2011Paolo CioniSafety closure device for drawers and doors
CN1318719C *Oct 24, 2003May 30, 2007杨泰隆(私人)有限公司Locking mechanism
EP2746501A2Dec 17, 2013Jun 25, 2014The Young Engineers, Inc.Magnetically operated latch
WO2000019050A1 *Sep 29, 1999Apr 6, 2000William F MichaudLoad floor slam-action pawl latch
WO2002044504A2 *Dec 3, 2001Jun 6, 2002SouthcoLoad floor latch
WO2005018994A2 *Aug 18, 2004Mar 3, 2005SouthcoLoad floor latch
Classifications
U.S. Classification292/173, 292/DIG.310, 292/191
International ClassificationE05C1/14
Cooperative ClassificationE05C1/145, Y10S292/31
European ClassificationE05C1/14B