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Publication numberUS3743534 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 3, 1973
Filing dateSep 7, 1971
Priority dateApr 28, 1969
Also published asDE2020197A1, DE2020197C2, US3632396
Publication numberUS 3743534 A, US 3743534A, US-A-3743534, US3743534 A, US3743534A
InventorsP Zamora
Original AssigneeProcter & Gamble
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Process for softening fabrics in a dryer
US 3743534 A
Abstract  available in
Images(18)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent O 3,743,534 PROCESS FOR SOFTENING FABRICS IN A DRYER Pablo Perez Zamora, Greenhilis, Ohio, assignor to The Procter & Gamble Company, Cincinnati, Ohio No Drawing. Original application Apr. 28, 1969, Ser. No.

819,965, now Patent No. 3,632,396. Divided and this application Sept. 7, 1971, Ser. No. 178,436

Int. Cl. B05c 3/08 U.S. Cl. 117-109 24 Ciaims ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A process for softening fabrics in a clothes dryer comprising loading fabrics into a dryer, adding a length or sheet of fabric softening composition and operating the dryer at from about 75 F. to about 170 F. to effect softening of the fabrics, the fabric softening composition consisting essentially of a substrate having a substrate coating, which consists essentially of a substantially solid, waxy, cationic or nonionic material, and having a substantially solid outer coating comprising from 30% to 100% by weight of a fabric softener, wherein at least one of the coatings has a melting point equal to or less than about 170 F.

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS This application is a division of my copending and commonly-assigned patent application U.S. Ser. No. 819,965, filed Apr. 28, 1969, entitled, Dryer Added Fabric Softening Compositions, and now US. Pat. 3,632,396, issued Jan. 4, 1972.

The invention herein relates generally to the softening of fabrics in an automatic, rotary drum, clothes dryer and to compositions employed to achieve softening therein. The invention herein represents a significant improvement over other dryer added fabric softening compositions of the type disclosed in a pending application by David Russell Morton, entitled Textile Fabric Softeners Impregnated Into Absorbent Substrates, Ser. No. 788,- 102, filed Dec. 30, 1968, and now US. Pat. 3,686,025, issued Aug. 22, 1972, and in a pending application by Howard W. Krueger, Jr., entitled, Fabric Softening Compositions, Ser. No. 788,103, filed Dec. 30, 1968, and now abandoned, the specifications of which are incorporated herein by reference.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Certain chemical compounds have long been known in the art to possess the desired quality of imparting softness to textile fabrics. The quality of softness or being soft is well defined in the art, and, as used herein, means that quality of the treated fabric whereby its handle or texture is smooth, pliable, and flulfy, and not rough or scratchy to the touch. Known generally as fabric softeners, these compounds have long been used by housewives in the laundry and by the textile industry to soften a finished fabric.

Additionally, many of these compounds act to reduce the static cling of the treated fabrics. Static cling is, generally, the phenomenon of a fabric adhering to another object or to parts of itself as a result of static electrical charges located on the surface of the fabric. It can also involve the adherence of lint, dust, and other undesired substances to the fabric due tothese static charges. It is noticeably present in unsoftened fabrics that are freshly washed and dried in an automatic dryer. By softening and reducing the static cling of a fabric, it is more comfortable when worn. Such treated fabrics additionally are easier to iron, and have fewer hard to iron Wrinkles.

3,743,534 Patented July 3, 1973 Generally, fabric softeners are used in the rinse cycle of an automatic clothes washer, and liquid, powder, tablet, and granular formulations are known for such use.

Recently, however, fabric softening compositions have been disclosed for use in softening fabrics in an automatic, rotary drum, clothes dryer. One such composition, sold commercially in February 1968, consists essentially of (as marketed) dense paper coated with a cationic quaternary ammonium fabric softener. Such a composition presents fabric staining problems. The above referenced Morton and Krueger applications disclose two other types of softener compositions which do not present staining problems and essentially consist of an absorbent substrate impregnated with, respectively, a fabric softener and an admixture of two or more compatible fabric softeners.

In softening fabrics in a clothes dryer with the prior art types of compositions, adequate release of fabric softener from the substrate during use cannot be achieved. The prior art has not provided a softener composition of this type which will release or more fabric softener during use. Such release can reduce the cost of fabric softener used in dryer added compositions by reducing the retention of the fabric softener in the substrate. Additionally, certain non-staining fabric softeners, as described in detail hereafter, can be more conveniently used in the compositions of this invention.

Therefore, it is an object of this invention to provide novel, fabric softening compositions which can be used to soften fabrics in a standard, automatic, rotary drum clothes dryer.

Additionally, it is an object of the invention herein to provide dryer added fabric softening compositions which eliminate or substantially eliminate fabric staining.

It is a further object of the invention herein to provide dryer added fabric softening compositions Which exhibit desirable fabric softener release from the substrate.

It is also an object of the invention herein to provide a composition which can be used to impart anti-static qualities to a variety of fabric materials, especially synthetic fabrics from which automobile and some furniture upholstery are generally made.

Moreover, it is an object of the invention herein to provide a composition which can be used as a detergent to cleanse articles made of wood (furniture), plastic and the like.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION These and other objects are achieved by the invention herein which is a fabric softening composition consisting essentially of a substrate; a waxy, substantially solid, cationic or nonionic substrate coating; and a solid or substantially solid outer coating which comprises a fabric softener. Efficient fabric softener release (from the outer coating) is achieved in the compositions of this invention because the substrate coating provides a releasing force and/or prevents entrapment of the fabric softener (of the outer coating) within the structure of the substrate.

The fabric softening compositions herein, while effective when used to soften fabrics in rinse water, particularly in the rinse cycle of an automatic clothes washer, find particular application in effectively softening fabrics in a standard, automatic, clothes dryer. As the fabrics in the dryer contact the compositions of this invention by means of the spinning or tumbling action of the dryers rotary drum, fabric softening occurs as the outer coating is transferred from the substrate to the fabrics.

Preferably, the fabric softening compositions herein are made up into tubular rolls or into individual sheets.

When used as a dryer additive, a desired length of the fabric softening composition is torn off the roll or a sheet removed from its package and placed into the clothes dryer wherein the fabrics to be treated have been loaded, the dryer is then operated in customary fashion.

The fabric softening composition can be formulated for use in a washer by using, e.g., a conventional cationic softener for the substrate coating. When a sheet of such a composition is removed from its package or desired length torn off its roll and placed into the rinse water, e.g., in the rinse water of the final rinse cycle, both the substrate and outer coatings disperse into the rinse water and are then absorbed by the fabrics.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION The invention herein relates to a fabric softening composition consisting essentially of: (a) a substrate; (b) a substantially solid, waxy substrate (inner) coating, which consists essentially of a substantially solid, waxy, cationic or nonionic material; and (c) a solid or substantially solid outer coating, which comprises from about 30% to 100% by Weight of the outer coating of a fabric softener. The fabric softener is a compound or an admixture of two or more compounds having a diiferent composition than the substrate coating (that is, when the substrate coating consists essentially of a nonionic material, the outer coating is some material other than the same nonionic material, and, when the substrate coating consists essentially of a cationic material, the outer coating is some material other than the same cationic material). Either the substrate coating or the outer coating (or both) has a melting point equal to or less than about 170 F.; that is, at least one of the coatings has a melting point of no more than about 170 F. The weight ratio of the substrate to the total sum of the inner and outer coatings ranges from 2:1 to 1: 10.

The coated substrate in the instant composition is a vehicle for the fabric softener in the outer coating to effect an efficient use of the softener. The substrate coat ing serves (a) to prevent or reduce entrapment of fabric softener in any open structure that the substrate may have, including the open structure of any fibers present in the substrate, and/or (b) to improve the releasability of the fabric softener in the outer coating by liquifying during dryer usage.

SUBSTRATES The substrates employed herein are solid or substan tially solid materials. They can be dense or open in structure, preferably the latter. Examples of suitable materials which can be used as a substrate herein include, among others, paper, woven cloth, and non-woven cloth. The term cloth herein means a woven or non-woven fabric or cloth used as a substrate, in order to distinguish said components from the term fabric which means the textile fabric which is desired to be softened. Absorbent capacity, thickness, or fiber density are not limitations on the substrates which can be used herein. Preferably, the substrates employed herein are paper or non-woven cloth.

Paper substrates which can be employed herein encompass the broad spectrum of known paper structures and are not limited to any specific paper-making fiber or wood pulp; thus, the fibers can be derived from softwoods, hardwoods or annual plants (e.g., bagasse, cereal straw, and the like), and wood pulps, such as bleached or unbleached kraft, sulfite, soda, groundwood, or mixtures thereof, can be used. Moreover, the paper substrates which can be employed herein are not limited to a specific type of paper; thus, tissue paper, toweling paper, toilet paper, wrapping paper, writing paper, newsprint, etc., can be used.

Specific examples of paper substrates preferred herein include a one-ply paper having a basis Weight of about 32 pounds per 3,000 square feet made from, for example,

a mixture of groundwood and kraft bleached wood pulps. Another example is the absorbent, multi-ply, toweling paper particularly preferred in the above-referenced Morton application and disclosed in Wells, US. Pat. 3,414,459, said patent being incorporated hereinto by reference.

The preferred non-woven cloth substrates used in the invention herein can generally be defined as adhesively bonded fibrous products, having a web or corded fiber structure (where the fiber strength is suitable to allow carding) or comprising fibrous mats, in which the fibers are distributed haphazardly or in random array (i.e., an array of fibers in a carded web wherein partial oirentation of the fibers is frequently present as well as a completely haphazard distributional orientation) or substantially aligned. The fibers can be natural (e.g., wool, silk, jute, hemp, cotton, linen, sisal, or ramie) or synthetic (e.g., rayon, cellulose ester, polyvinyl derivatives, polyolfins, polyamides, or polyesters). Any diameter or denier of the fiber (generally up to about 10 denier) can be used.

Methods of making non-woven cloth suitable for use herein are not a part of this invention, and, being well known in the art, are not described in detail herein. Generally, such cloths are made by dry- (e.g., air-) or waterlaying processes in which the fibers are first cut to desired lengths from long strands, passed into a water or air stream, and then deposited onto a screen, through which the fiber-laden air or water is passed. The deposited fibers are then adhesively bonded together, dried, cured, and otherwise treated as desired to form the nonwoven cloth. Non-woven cloth made of polyesters, polyamides, vinyl resins and other thermoplastic fibers can be spun-bonded, i.e., the fibers are spun out onto a flat surface and bonded (melted) together by heat or by chemical reactions.

The binder-resins used in the manufacture of non- Woven cloths can provide substrates possessing a variety of desirable traits. For example, a hydrophobic binderresin, when used singly or as the predominant compound of a hydrophobic-hydrophilic binder-resin mixture, provides a non-woven cloth which is especially useful as a substrate when the fabric softening compositions herein are used in the rinse cycle of an automatic washer. Additionally, a hydrophilic binder-resin and a water-dissolvable fiber can be employed to make a non-woven cloth substrate which dissolves when a fabric softening composition employing the substrate is used in the rinse water of an automatic washer.

When the substrate of the fabric softening compositions herein is a non-Woven cloth made from fibers deposited haphazardly or in random array on the screen, the compositions exhibit excellent strength in all directions and are not prone to tear or separate when used in the washer or the dryer.

Preferably, the non-woven cloth is water-laid or drylaid and is made from cellulosic fibers, particularly from regenerated cellulose or rayon, which are lubricated with a standard textile lubricant. Preferably, the fibers are from about inch to about 2 inches in length and are from about 1.5 to about 5 denier. Preferably, the fibers are at least partially oriented haphazardly, particularly substantially haphazardly, and are adhesively bonded together with a hydrophobic or substantially by drophobic binder-resin, particularly with a nonionic selfcross-linking acrylic polymer or polymers. Preferably, the cloth comprises about 70% fiber and about 30% binderresin polymer by weight and has a basis weight of from about 18 to about 30 grams per square yard.

The substrates, which are used in the fabric softening compositions herein, can take a variety of forms. For example, the substrate can be in the shape of a ball or puff, or it can be a sheet or swatch of woven or nonwoven cloth. When the substrate is paper or non-Woven cloth, individual sheets of desired length and width can be used, or a continuous roll of desired width from which a measured length is torn off can be employed.

The substrates usable herein can be dense, or they can be open and have a high amount of free space. Free space, also called void volume, means that space within a substrate structure that is unoccupied. For example, certain absorbent, multi-ply paper structures comprise plies embossed with protuberances, the ends of which are mated and joined; this paper structure has free space between the unembossed portions of the plies, as well as between the fibers of the paper plies themselves. A non-woven cloth also has such space among its fibers. The free space of a substrate can be varied by modifying the density of the fibers of the substrate. Substrates with a high amount of free space generally have low fiber density; substrates having high fiber density (i.e., dense substrates) generally have a low amount of free space.

The amount of free space of a material is not essential to its employment as a substrate herein; however, the amount of free space in the substrate structure does affect the amount of the substrate coating applied to the substrate to achieve a desired coating effect, as described hereinafter.

SUBSTRATE COATING An essential component of the fabric softening compositions herein is the substantially solid, waxy, substrate coating, which consists essentially or substantially solid, waxy, nonionic or cationic material, preferably having a melting point of at least about 75 F. The term melting point (also designated M.P.), as used herein, means the point below which the substrate coating is substantially solid.

While applicant does not desire to be bound by theory, it is believed that the substrate coating improves the release efiiciency of the fabric softener in the outer coating by one or both of two mechanisms: (1) the substrate coating prevents entrapment of the fabric softener in the outer coating within any free space in the substrate (including absorption of the fabric softener in the outer coating into any fibers of the substrate), and/or (2) the substrate coating promotes the release of the softenercontaining outer coating during usage.

The temperature in an electric dryer ranges from about 75 F. (room temperature) at start-up to about 150-160 F. at the end of the drying cycle; gas dryers reach even higher temperatures, e.g., about 170 F. Many fabric softeners do not melt or liquify within the temperature range of a gas or electric dryer.

By employing a substrate coating when the substrate in the fabric softening compositions has an open structure (containing free space), the outer softener-containing coating can be prevented from adhering to or being retained by any substrate fibers and from occupying and being retained in any free space of the substrate. The coating is provided by treating the substrate with a substantially solid, waxy cationic or nonionic material. Thus, the substrate coating can have a melting point as high as desired, generally up to about 200 F. for practicality. However, when the substrate coating has a melting point above the range of the automatic dryer (i.e., above about 170 F.), it is essential that the substantially solid outer coating then have a melting point lower than the maX- imum temperature of the dryer (e.g., equal to or less than about 170 F.) to obtain satisfactory fabric softening. Preferably the inner coating has a melting point of atleast about 75 F. and most preferably within the range from about 75 F. to about 170 F.

Additionally, a releasing force, promoting the release of the outer coating, is provided when the substrate coating has a melting point within the temperature range of an automatic dryer. As the substrate coating melts or liquifies during the drying cycle, the liquified substrate coating releases the adjacent outer coating, and, at the fabrics in the dryer contact the fabric softening composition, the outer coating (containing the fabric softener) is absorbed by the fabrics. Thus, when the substrate coating has a melting point within the range of from about 75 F. to about 170 F., the solid or substantially solid outer coating can have a melting point as high as desired, generally up to about 200 F. for practical purposes.

In this manner, improved (e.g., or more) fabric softener release can be obtained when the fabric softening compositions herein are used in a dryer as compared to 40% or less fabric softener release from some prior art compositions; accordingly, the softening of fabrics in a dryer is significantly improved by the compositions herein and/or made more effecient. The manufacturing cost of dryer added fabric softening compositions can be reduced since the inner coating can be very inexpensive material and less fabric softener is required.

Moreover, fabric staining can efli'ectively be controlled by the use of the substrate coating in the fabric softening compositions herein. More specifically, certain fabric softeners (e.g., certain cationic quaternary ammonium compounds), known in the art to be superior fabric softeners when used during the rinse cycle of an automatic washer, can cause some fabric staining when a sufficient amount of said fabric softeners comes in direct contact with the fabrics in an automatic dryer. Other fabric softeners do not cause fabric staining, but have high melting points (e.g., 180 F. or above); such higher melting fabric softeners required mixture when a volatile solvent in order to effect eifcient release from substrates which do not contain a substrate coating. By utilizing a substrate coating having a melting point within the range of from about 75 F. to about F., a high melting, non-staining fabric softener can be employed in the outer coating of the instant composition and is aided in its release by the liquification of the inner coating in the dryer. Thus, the selection of the fabric softener used in the outer coating is not limited to one that has a melting point within the range if an automatic dryer; rather, the fabric softenering can be selected on the basis minimizing fabric staining, as well as on other factors, e.g., germicidal or anti-static properties, or cost considerations.

For example, 3 (N alkyl-N,N-dimethylammonio)-2- hydroxypropane-l-sulfonate, wherein the alkyl is a mixture of alkyls having from 20 to 22 carbon atoms (hereinafter designated C HAPS) is a fabric softener which is known to exhibit superior fabric softening when used in aqueous systems; moreover, this compound additionally does not cause fabric staining even when used in dryer added fabric softening compositions in high amounts. By utilizing a substrate having a substrate coating as described herein, C2042 HAPS can be efficiently used as a fabric softener employed in the outer coating. In a subsequent washing of the treated fabric, the C2042 HAPS can act as a detergent.

Accordingly, the term substrate coating as used herein means the substantially solid, waxy, nonionic or cationic material applied to the substrate in an amount such that, at least, any fibers of the substrate are substantially completely coated therewith and, at most, the fibers of the substrate are completely coated and any free space of the substrate is completely filed, thereby achieving a substrate having a film of the nonionic or cationic material on the external surface of the substrate. Preferably, the nonionic or cationic material is applied to the substrate in an amount to substantially completely coat any fibers of the substrate and to sub stantially completely fill any of the substrates free space.

As disclosed above, it is essential that are at least one of the coatings has a melting point equal to or less than about 170 F., when one of the coatings has a melting point equal to or less than about 170 F the other coating is limited only in that it should be solid or substantially solid.

Preferably, the substrate coating has a melting point within the range of from about 75 F. to about 170 F.,

thereby broadening the selection of a fabric softener employed in the outer coating. Thus, a preferred embodiment of the invention here comprises a substrate coating, have a melting point within the range of from about 75 F. to about 170 F., and a solid or substantially solid outer coating. Another preferred embodiment comprises a substrate coating and an outer coating having melting points within the range of from about 75 F. to about 170 F.

Particularly preferred compositions herein comprises substrate and outer coatings having melting points of at least about 100 F. to achieve fabric softening compositions which are solid or substantially solid during seasonal temperatures and storage.

Thus, a particularly preferred embodiment of the invention herein comprises a substrate coating have a melting point within the range of from about 100 F to about 170 F. and a solid or substantially solid outer coating having a melting point of at least about 100 F. Another particularly preferred embodiment comprises substrate and outer coatings having melting points within the range of from about 100 F. to about 170 F.

Although not essential, it is also desirable that the compositions herein begin to effect fabric softening early in the drying cycle (from 3 to 5 minutes after start-up).

Thus, a most particularly preferred embodiment of the invention herein comprises a substrate coating having a melting point within the range of from about 100 F. to about 140 F.; another most particularly preferred embodiment comprises a substrate coating having a melting point within the range of from about 100 F. to about 140 F. and an outer coating having a melting point of at least about 100 F., preferably within the range of about 100 F. to about 170 F., particularly from about 100 F. to about 140 F.

The above preferred embodiments utilize a substrate coating having a melting point within the range of an automatic dryer. However, the substrate coating can have a melting point above about 170 F., and in such a case, it is essential that the outer coating have a melting point equal to or less than about 170 F., preferably within the range of from about 75 F. to about 170 F'., particularly from about 100 F. to about 170 F., and most particularly from about 100 F. to about 140 F.

The substrate coating consists essentially of substantially solid, waxy, nonionic or cationic materials, preferably nonionic. A wide variety of such materials are known and selection can be made to achieve desired melting points; specific examples of suitable nonionic materials for use as the substrate (inner) coating in the fabric softening compositions herein are given in Example IX.

Particularly preferred nonionic materials are the condensation products of one mole of tallow alcohol with from to 40 moles of ethylene oxide (M.P. from about 100 F. to about 150 F.), most particularly with 20 and 30 moles of ethylene oxide (hereinafter designated, respectively, TAE and TAE The term tallow, as used as herein means an alkyl containing from 16 to 18 carbon atoms.

Other particularly preferred nonionic materials herein include polymers of polyethylene glycol having average molecular weights (A.M.W.) ranging from about 950- to about 7,500. Polymers of polyethylene glycol are commercially available under the trade-name Carbowax. Specific Carbowaxes which are particularly preferred herein include the following:

Other nonionic materials can be selected from the group consisting of:

(a) The condensation product of one mole of a saturated or unsaturated, straight or branched chained aliphatic alcohol having from about 10 to about 24 carbon atoms with from about 10 to about 40 moles of ethylene oxide;

(b) The condensation product of one mole of a saturated or unsaturated, straight or branched chain aliphatic carboxylic acid having from about 10 to about 18 car-' bon atoms with from about 20 to about 50 moles of ethylene oxide;

(c) Aliphatic carboxylic acids containing from about 12 to about 30 carbon atoms;

(d) Aliphatic alcohols having from about 16 to about 30 carbon atoms;

(e) The condensation product of one mole of an alkyl phenol, wherein the alkyl chain has from about 8 to about 18 carbon atoms, with from about 25 to about 50 moles of ethylene oxide;

(f) Glycerides, selected from the group consisting of monoglycerides, diglycerides, and mixtures thereof;

(g) Amides, selected from the group consisting of:

(i) propyl amide,

(ii) N-methyl amides having an acyl chain length of from about 10 to about 15 carbon atoms,

(iii) oleamide,

(iv) amides of ricinoleic acid,

(v) N-isobutyl amides of pelargonic, capric, undecanoic,

or lauric acids,

(vi) N-(2-hydroxyethyl)amides having a carbon chain length of from about 6 to about 10 carbon atoms,

(vii) pentyl anilide,

(viii) anilides having a carbon chain length of from about 7 to about 12 carbon atoms, and

(ix) N cyclopentyllauramide and N-cyclopentylstearamide; and,

(h) The condensation product of 1 mole of a primary or secondary amine containing at least 12 carbon atoms with from 1 to about moles of ethylene oxide.

It is desirable, although not essential, that the substrate coating contains no volatile solvents; many of the nonionic materials are prepared or formulated without such solvents and, therefore, are particularly useful in this respect. Cationic materials, (e.g., ditallowdimethyl ammonium chloride), which generally are prepared in formulations containing an isopropyl alcohol and water mixture, can be used as the inner coating in the fabric softening compositions herein to achieve the benefit of additional softening, especially in the rinse cycle. Even though such materials contain volatile solvents, their melting points do not generally rise above about F. when applied to the substrate and cooled. Specific examples of cationic materials, useful in formulating the substrate coatings herein, are given in Example IX.

OUTER COATING The fabric softening compositions herein additionally comprise a third component, which is a substantially solid outer coating comprising from 30% to 100% by weight of a fabric softener. The term fabric softener, as used herein, means either a single fabric softener or an admixture of two or more compatible fabric softeners. When the fabric softener is less than 100% by weight of the outer coating, the balance can comprise other fabric finishing additives (e.g., anti-static agents, flame retardants, brighteners, fungicides, perfume, etc.), solvents (e.g., isopropyl alcohol, isopropyl alcohol-water mixtures, methanol, ethanol, acetone etc.), or plasticizers (e.g., chlorinated methyl esters, epoxides, or ethoxides, and the like). Thus, the outer coating comprises the fabric softener and other compatible fabric finishing additives, solvent, etc., if any. By definition of the substrate coating, the outer coating is, at least, substantially in contact with the substrate coating as opposed to the substrate, and, at

most, the outer coating is completely in contact only with said substrate (inner) coating.

The melting point of the outer coating is affected by the melting point of the fabric softener employed therein, and, when the outer coating comprises 100% by weight fabric softener, is the same as the melting point of the fabric softener. When the substrate coating employed in a composition herein has a melting point above about 170 F., it is essential that the outer coating then have a melting point equal to or less than about 170 F.; additionally, it may be desirable to employ an outer coating having a melting point below about 170 F. to achieve the preferred embodiments of the invention disclosedabove.

Fabric softeners having melting points above about 170 F. can be utilized in the outer coating, along or with melting point depressors, e.g., solvents and/ or plasticizers. From 10% to 300% by Weight of the high melting fabric softener of a volatile solvent (e.g., isopropyl alcohol or an isopropyl alcohol-water mixture) can be employed to obtain a substantially solid fabric softening composition wherein the outer coating has a melting point under 170 F.

The fabric softeners, as more particularly described hereinafter, used in the outer coatings of fabric softening compositions herein, can be selected from the following broadly denoted classes of compounds which contain at least one long chain group:

(1) Cationic quaternary ammonium salts and imidazolium salts;

(2) Nonionic compounds, such as tertiary phosphine oxides, tertiary amine oxides, ethoxylated alcohols and alkyl phenols, and ethoxylated amines;

(3) Anionic soaps, sulfates and sulfonates, for example, fatty acid soaps, ethoxylated alcohol sulfates, sodium alkyl sulfates, alkyl sulfonates, sodium alkylbenzenesulfonates, and sodium or potassium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonates;

(4) Amphoteric tertiary ammonium compounds;

(5) Zwitterionic quaternary ammonium compounds; and

(6) Compatible mixtures of one or more compounds of these classes.

Particularly preferred fabric softeners herein are the cationic quaternary ammonium salts which have the general formula R1 R2 N R/ R3 simply as alkyl) containing from 1 to 3 carbon atoms,

R represents benzyl, or an alkyl containing from 1 to 20 carbon atoms, or alkoxypropyl or hydroxy substituted alkoxypropyl radicals (hereinafter referred to simply as alkoxy) wherein the alkoxy contains from 12 to 20 carbon atoms, and R represents an alkyl containing from 12 to 20 carbon atoms. The carbon chains of R and R whenever R represents a chain of from 12 to 20* carbon atoms, can be straight or branched, and saturated or unsaturated.

Because of their known softening efficacy, the most preferred cationic fabric softeners are dialkyl dimethyl ammonium chloride or alkyl trimethyl ammonium chloride wherein the alkyl contains from 12 to 20 carbon atoms and are derived from long chain fatty acids, especially from hydrogenated tallow. The term tallowalkoxy, used herein, means an alkyl ether radical wherein the alkyl essentially contains from 16 to 18 carbon atoms. Specific examples of the particularly preferred cationic fabric softeners are given in Example IX hereinafter.

Other cationic fabric softeners of Formula 1 are known and include variables wherein R and R can also represent a phenyl radical or a hydroxy substituted alkyl of from 1 to 3 carbon atoms.

Cationic quaternary imidazolinium compounds are also preferred as fabric softeners in the compositions herein. These compounds conform to the formula:

\ \C R5 R4 wherein R is an alkyl containing from 1 to 4, preferably from 1 to 2, carbon atoms, R is an alkyl containing from 1 to 4 carbon atoms or a hydrogen radical, R is an alkyl containing from 8 to 25, preferably at least 15, carbon atoms, R; is hydrogen or an alkyl containing from 8 to 25, preferably at least 15, carbon atoms, and X is an anion, preferably methyl sulfate or chloride ions. Other suitable anions include those disclosed with reference to the cationic fabric softeners of Formula 1. Particularly preferred are those compounds of Formula 2 in which both R, and R are alkyls of from 16 to 25, especially 16 to 18 and 20 to 22, carbon atoms.

Many other cationic quaternary ammonium fabric softeners, which are useful herein, are known; for example, alkyl [C to C ]-pyridinium chlorides, alkyl [C to C ]-alkyl [C to C ]-rnorpholinium chlorides, and quaternary derivatives of amino acids and amino esters.

Other particularly preferred fabric softeners include Zwitterionic quaternary ammonium compounds which have the formula:

wherein R and R are each methyl, ethyl, 11-propyl, isopropyl, 2-hydroxyethyl or 2-hydroxypropyl, R is a 20 to 30 carbon atom alkyl or alkenyl radical (hereinafter referred to simply as alkyl) and wherein said alkyl or alkenyl contains from 0 to 2 hydroxyl substituents, from 0 to 5 ether linkages, and from 0 to 1 amide linkage, and R is an alkylene group containing from 1 to 4 carbon atoms with from 0 to 1 hydroxyl substituents; particularly preferred are compounds wherein R is a carbon chain containing from 20 to 26 carbon atoms selected from the group consisting of alkyls and alkenyls and wherein said alkyls and alkenyls contain 0 to 2 hydroxyl substituents. Specific examples of the particularly preferred compounds of this class are given in Example IX hereinafter.

The compounds of Formula 3 are disclosed more particularly in a copending application entitled Textile Treating Compounds, Compositions and Processes for Treating Textiles, by Charles B. McCarty, Ser. No. 648,527, filed June 5, 1967, the disclosure of which provides methods of preparing these compounds and is fully incorporated hereinto.

Other Zwitterionic compounds useful as fabric softeners in the compositions herein are known and include Zwitterionic synthetic detergents as represented by derivatives of aliphatic quaternary ammonium compounds wherein one of the four aliphatic groups has about 8 to 20 carbon atoms (particularly 16 to 18 carbon atoms), another contains a water-solubilizing group (e.g., carboxy, sulfato or sulfo groups). Each aliphatic group can be either straight-chain or branched-chain, preferably straight. A more detailed disclosure of these compounds can be found in US. Pat. 3,213,030, (Francis Diehl) issued Oct. 19, 1965, the disclosure of which is incorporated by reference herein.

Nonionic tertiary phosphine oxide compounds are also preferred fabric softeners for use in the novel fabric softening compositions herein. These compounds have the generic formula wherein R is alkyl, alkenyl, or monohydroxyalkyl having a chain length of from 20 to 30 carbon atoms, and wherein R and R are each alkyl or monohydroxyalkyl containing from 1 to 4 carbon atoms; particularly preferred are tertiary phosphine oxides in which R is alkyl, alkenyl, or monohydroxyalkyl having a chain length of from 20 to 26 carbon atoms, and wherein R and R are each methyl, ethyl, or hydroxyethyl groups.

Specific examples of particularly preferred fabric softeners of this class are given in Example IX hereinafter.

The C to C nonionic tertiary phosphine oxides are disclosed more particularly in the aforementioned McCarty application, wherein methods of preparing these compounds are also given.

Other nonionic tertiary phosphine oxides useful herein are known and include the nonionic synthetic detergents having the same formula as that of Formula 4 above wherein R is an alkyl, alkenyl, or monohydroxyalkyl or from 10 to 20 carbon atoms, and wherein R and R are each alkyl or monohydroxyalkyl of from 1 to 3 carbon atoms. The C to C tertiary phosphine oxides are more particularly described in the aforementioned Diehl patent.

Nonionic tertiary amine oxides are also useful as fabric softeners and can be utilized in the compositions of the present invention. These nonionic compounds have the formula:

wherein R represents a straight or branched chain alkyl or alkenyl containing from 20 to 30 carbon atoms and from 0 to 2 hydroxyl substituents, from 0 to ether linkages, there being at least one moiety of at least 20 carbon atoms containing no ether linkages, and 0 to l amide linkage, and wherein R and R are each alkyl or monohydroxyalkyl groups containing from 1 to 4 carbon atoms and wherein R and R can be joined to form a heterocyclic group containing from 4 to 6 carbon atoms; particularly preferred are those wherein R is a straight or branched alkyl, alkenyl, or monohydroxyalkyl containing 20 to 26 carbon atoms and wherein R and R are each methyl, ethyl, or hydroxyethyl groups.

Specific examples of the particularly preferred compounds of this class are given in Example IX.

The tertiary amine oxides of this class and methods of their preparation are also disclosed more particularly in the aforementioned McCarty application.

Other tertiary amine oxides useful herein are known and include compounds corresponding to Formula 5 above wherein R is an alkyl of 8 to 20, particularly 16 to 18, carbon atoms, and R and R are methyl or etthyl radicals; the Cg to C nonionic tertiary amine oxides are disclosed in more detail in the above-referenced Diehl patent.

Nonionic ethoxylated alcohol compounds are also useful as fabric softeners and are preferred in the fabric softening compositions herein. These compounds have the generic formula:

wherein R represents an alkyl of from 20 to 30 carbon atoms, and X is an integer of from 3 to 45.

The particularly preferred ethoxylated alcohol compounds of this class are the condensation products of reacting from 3 moles to 45 moles of ethylene oxide with one mole of eicosyl alcohol, heneicosyl alcohol, tricosyl alcohol, tetracosyl alcohol, pentacosyl alcohol, or hexacosyl alcohol. Specific examples of the particularly pre- 12 ferred ethoxylated alcohols are given in Example IX hereinafter. Other preferred ethoxylated alcohols are the condensation products of from 3 moles to 45 moles of ethylene oxide and 1 mole of heptacosyl, octacosyl, nonacosyl, or triacontyl alcohols. Specific examples are listed in Example IX.

These compounds and methods of their preparation are more particularly disclosed in the above-mentioned McCarty application.

Also suitable for use as fabric softeners in the compositions herein are nonionic synthetic detergents as represented by the polyethylene oxide condensates of aliphatic alcohols containing from 8 to 20 carbon atoms and alkylphenols wherein the alkyl contains from 8 to 20 carbon atoms. Particularly preferred are the condensation products of 1 mole of tallow alcohol with 20 moles and with 30 moles of ethylene oxide. The Diehl patent discloses these compounds in more detail.

Other preferred fabric softeners for use in the outer coatings of the compositions herein are ethoxylated amines of the general formula Rg3 I-Y wherein Y is an ethoxylated group of the type -(C H O) H, wherein X is an integer of from 1 to 50, wherein R is hydrogen, Y, or an alkyl having from 1 to about 4 carbon atoms, and wherein R is an alkyl having from about 12 to about 30 carbon atoms.

Also preferred as fabric softeners in the compositions herein are anionic ethoxylated alcohol sulfates and anionic sulfonates.

The preferred ethoxylated alcohol sulfates have the generic formula wherein X is an integer of from 1 to 20, M is an alkali metal (e.g., Na, K, Li), ammonium or substituted ammonium cations, and wherein R is an alkyl containing from 20 to 30 carbon atoms.

The particularly preferred anionic ethoxylated alcohol sulfate fabric softeners are the sodium and potassium salts or the monoethanol, diethanol, or triethanol ammonium salts of the sulfated condensation product of from 1 to about 20 moles of ethylene oxide with one mole of eicosyl alcohol, heneicosyl alcohol, tricosyl alcohol, tetracosyl alcohol, pentacosyl alcohol, or hexacosyl alcohol. Specific examples of these particularly preferred anionic softening compounds are given in Example IX.

Other preferred anionic ethoxylated sulfate compounds are the sodium or potassium salts or monoethanol, diethanol, or triethanol ammonium cations of the sulfated condensation products of from 1 to 20 moles of ethylene oxide with one mole of heptcosyl alcohol, octacosyl alcohol, nonacosyl alcohol, and triacontyl alcohol.

Anionic synthetic detergents as represented by alkyl sulfates of the formula wherein M is an alkali metal and R is an alkyl of from 8 to 20 carbon atoms are also useful as fabric softeners herein. These compounds are disclosed in detail in the above-referenced Diehl patent.

The preferred anionic sulfonates have the general formula wherein M is an alkali metal or a substituted ammonium cation, and R is an alkyl containing from 20 to 30 carbon atoms. The particularly preferred anionic sulfonates are those in which R is an alkyl containing from 20' to 26 carbon atoms. Examples of the particularly preferred compounds are given in Example IX.

The anionic ethoxylated alcohol sulfates and the anionic sulfonates mentioned above can be prepared by the method disclosed in the aforementioned McCarty application, wherein said compounds are more particularly disclosed.

Other anionic sulfonates useful as fabric softeners herein are the synthetic detergents as represented by, among others, sodium or potassium alkylbenzenesulfomates and sodium alkylglycerylethersulfonates having the configuration of Formula 9 above, wherein R is an alkylbenzene or alkylglycerylether with the alkyl containing from 10 to 20 carbon atoms. These compounds are more particularly described in the above-mentioned Diehl patent.

Anionic soaps, i.e., the sodium salts of long-chain fatty acids, such as lauric, myristic, palmitic, stearic, and arachiodonic acids, can also be used as the fabric softener in the compositions herein, and many such compounds are known in the art.

Additionally, ampholytic synthetic detergents of the formula wherein R is an alkyl of from 8 to 28 carbon atoms, A is the same as R or hydrogen, and B is a watersolubilizing group (particularly 50 can be used as fabric softeners in the compositions herein. These compounds are more particularly disclosed in the abovereferenced Diehl patent.

Other fabric softeners are known in the art and can be used herein. For example, guanidines and guanidine salts are useful fabric softeners; betaines and substituted betaines are similarly useful fabric softeners.

The admixture of one or more fabric softeners of one class with one or more compatible fabric softeners of another class can be used in the compositions herein; when such admixtures are used herein, the amount of fabric softener of any one class can range from 1% to 99%, as desired, by weight of the admixture. Examples of admixtures suitable for use herein are given in Example IX.

The fabric softener used in the outer coating is a compound or an admixture of compounds having a different composition than that of the substrate coating. That is, when the substrate coating consists essentially of a nonionic material, the outer coating can contain a single fabric softener which is one other than the nonionic material of the substrate coating, or it can contain an admixture of two or more compatible fabric softeners, which admixture can include the nonionic material of the substrate coating; further, when the substrate coating consists essentially of a cationic material, the outer coating can contain a single fabric softener which is other than the cationic material of the substrate coating, or it can contain an admixture of two or more compatible fabric softeners, which admixture can include a cationic material of the substrate coating.

Other fabric finishing additives can also be used in combination with the fabric softeners herein. Although not essential to the invention herein, certain of these additives are particularly desirable and useful, e.g., perfumes, brightening agents, shrinkage controllers, antistatic agents, and spotting agents. Other additives can include anti-creasing agents, soil releasing agents, fumigants, lubricants, fungicides, and sizing agents. Specific examples of possible additives disclosed herein can be found in any current Year Book of the American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists. Any additive used should be compatible with the fabric softener.

The amounts of many fabric finishing additives (e.g., perfume and brighteners) that can be used in combination with the fabric softener generally range from 0.01%

14 to 3% by Weight of the outer coating. Other additives (e.g., anti-static agents, anti-creasing agents, sizing agents, and soil-releasants) can be used in amounts ranging from 0.01% to 40%, preferably from 5% to 25%, by weight of the outer coating.

The fabric softening compositions herein comprise a coated substrate having an outer coating. Treatment of the substrate can be done in any convenient manner and many methods are known in the art.

In a preferred method of making the fabric softening compositions herein, the substrate coating is applied to the substrate by a method generally known as padding; more specifically, a roll of the substrate is unwound and passed through a trough, containing the substrate coating in liquid state and is then passed through squeeze rollers to remove excess substrate coating. The substrate is then cooled until the substrate coating is substantially solid and is then passed through a series of transfer rolls, the bottom rollers of which sit in a trough which contains the liquified outer coating. This method can provide compositions herein having either one or both sides containing an outer coating; preferably, the outer coating is applied to both sides. This procedure involves the application of the substrate and outer coatings to the substrate in liquid form; thus, the cationic or nonionic materials used in the substrate coating, and the fabric softener used in the outer coating, Which are normally solid or substantially solid at room temperatures, should first be melted and/or solvent treated. Methods of melting and/or solvent-treating the substrate or outer coatings are known and can easily be done to provide a satisfactory treated substrate.

In another preferred method, the substrate and outer coatings, in liquid form, are placed into separate pans or troughs which can be heated, if necessary, to maintain the coatings in liquid form. To the liquified outer coating is then added any desired fabric finishing additives. The substrate is unrolled and passed, first, through the pan containing the liquified substrate coating; the substrate is then solidified by cooling and passed through the trough containing the liquified outer coating. The substrate can then be passed through squeeze rollers to remove excess outer coating and provide the substrate with a desired amount of the outer coating per given area of substrate. The treated substrate is then cooled to room teinperaure, afer which it can be folded, cut or perforated at uniform lengths, and subsequently packaged and/or used.

The squeeze rollers and transfer rolls used herein are those in similar use in the paper and paper making art. They can be made of hard rubber or steel. Preferably, the rollers are adjustable, so that the orifice between their respective surfaces can be regulated to control the amount of both inner and outer coatings applied to the paper.

In another method, the substrate coating (in liquid form) is sprayed onto the substrate as it unrolls and excess substrate coating is then removed by squeeze rollers or by a doctor-knife; after solidifying the substrate coating, the outer coating (in liquid form) can then be applied by the same technique.

Other variations of manufacturing the compositions herein include the use of metal nip rollers, onto the leading or entering surfaces, on which the liquified substrate or outer coating is sprayed; this variation additionally involves the use of metal rollers which can be heated to maintain the substrate or outer coating in the liquid phase. When the substrate in the fabric softening compositions herein is a multi-ply paper, a further method is to separately treat the individual plies of the paper with the substrate coating and adhesively join the treated plies with a known adhesive-joiner compound; the outer coating can then be applied to the paper structure.

The amount of the substrate coating which is used to treat the substrate varies depending upon the substrate. Generally, enough substrate coating is applied to the substrate such that any fibers of the substrate are substantially completely coated; at most, the substrate coating is applied to the substrate in an amount which will completely coat any fibers of the substrate and completely fill any free space of the substrate, whereby a film of the substrate coating along the surfaces of the substrate is achieved. Substrate characteristics, which affect the amount of substrate coating to be applied to the substrate, are absorbent capacity, thickness, fiber density, and free space. The amount of the substrate coating necessary to achieve the desired level of substrate treatment increases or decreases proportionally with an increase or decrease in the absorbent capacity, thickness, and any free space of the substrate; the amount of substrate coating applied to the substrate increases or decreases inversely proportionally with an increase or decrease in any fiber density. Preferably, the substrate coating is applied to the substrate in an amount sufficient to substantially completely coat any fibers of the substrate and to substantially completely fill any free space among the fibers of the substate; for example, when a non-woven cloth having a basis weight of 1.5 to 3 grams per 100 square inches is used as a substrate herein, about 2 to 3 grams of the substrate coating per 100 square inches of the substrate are required to achieve the preferred level of substrate treatment.

In applying the coatings to the substrate, the total amount of the substrate and outer coatings applied to the substrate is in the ratio range of 10:1 to 1:2 by weight of the dry substrate. Preferably, the total amount of the coatings is from about :1 to about 1:1, particularly 4:1, by weight of the substrate. Generally, the amount of the total substrate and outer coating ranges from about .5 gram to about 40 grams per 100 square inches of the substrate, with small amounts of the coatings being used on light Weight substrates, such as non-woven cloths, and large amounts on heavy substrates, such as heavy paper.

The following examples will serve to further illustrate the preparation of the fabric softening compositions of the invention herein:

' In Examples I, II, III, IV, V, and VI, the substrate is a non-woven cloth designated Stock A. More particularly, Stock A is a dry-laid, non-woven cloth comprising about 70% regenerated cellulose (American Viscose Corporation) and about 30% hydrophobic binder-resins (Rhoplex HA-S on one side of the cloth, Rhoplex HA16 on the other; Rohm & Haas, Inc). The cloth has a thickness of about 4 to 5 mills, a basis weight of about 26 grams per square yard, and weighs about 2 grams per 100 square inches. The fibers are about inch in length, about 1.5 denier and are oriented substantially haphazardly. The fibers were lubricated with sodium oleate.

Stock B is a water-laid non-woven cloth which has a basis weight of about 18 grams per square yard. The fibers are regenerated cellulose, about 2 inches in length, about 1.5 denier, and are lubricated with a standard textile lubricant. The fibers comprise about 70% of the nonwoven cloth by weight. The fibers, which are substantially aligned are bound by HA-8 as the binder resin, which comprises about 30% by weight of the cloth. The cloth weighs about 1.8 grams of per 100 square inches.

The brightening agent employed in Example VI was 4,4'-bis (4-anilino-6-dihydroxyethylamino s triazin-Z-yl amino)-2,2'-stilbenedisulfonic acid.

The anti-static agent employed in Examples I, II, IV, V, VI, and VII is an ethoxylated amine trade-named J-S Antistat; the anti-static agent employed in Example VIII is an ethoxylated amine trade-named Scotch Antistat.

The trade-named fabric softener used in the examples herein is used as commercially obtained. Adogen 448 is a substantially solid formulation consisting essentially of, in parts by weight, 75 parts cationic fabric softener (ditallowdimethylammonium chloride), 18 parts isopropyl alcohol, and 7 parts water.

The paper substrate, used in Example VII is a high density one-ply paper having a basis weight of about 32 pounds per 3,000 square feet and being formed from a mixture of groundwood and kraft bleached wood-pulps.

In all examples, the compositions and softening formulations are expressed in parts or percentages by weight unless otherwise noted.

EXAMPLE I A non-woven cloth substrate, Stock A, is wrapped about a hollow, tubular cardboard core, and a rod is passed through the core and held so as to allow the substrate to easily unroll.

A nonionic substrate coating, having a melting point of about 114 F., is prepared by melting 200 grams of substantially solid, waxy, polymer of ethylene glycol (Carbowax 1540; M.P. about 114 F.) in a container set into a water bath heated to F.

The substrate coating is applied to the substrate by means of a padding machine. This machine, Atlas Laboratory Wringer (Model No. LW-391, Type llW-l) made by Atlas Electrical Devices Company, Chicago, 111., is commercially available and is especially adaptable to small scale use. The machine basically comprises two hard rubber rollers mounted so that their surfaces touch (fit flush together). Pressure can be exerted onto the rollers and adjusted by means of weights. A trough-like pan under the rollers is so constructed as to provide guiding members along its length for feeding or leading the substrate into the rollers. The liquified substrate coating is then placed into the pan, and the pan is heated to about 150 F. to keep the substrate coating in a liquid state. The substrate is unrolled and passed submersed through the substrate coating in the pan. The substrate, traveling at a rate of 5 to 6 feet per minute, is then directed upward and through the turning rollers onto which no weights are exerted and which squeezes off excess substrate coating. The turning rollers continuously pull the substrate through the rollers and, after solidifying (or substantially solidifying) the treated substrate, provides a substrate having its fibers substantially completely coated and its free space substantially completely filled and having about 2 grams of Carbowax 1540 per 100 square inches of the substrate.

The substrate, containing the solidified substrate coating, is then passed through a pair of transfer rollers which consists essentially of a pair of hard rubber rollers, the bottom roller sitting in a trough which contains the liquified outer coating which is a formulation (MP. F.) consisting of:

As the treated substrate passes through the turning rollers, the outer coating formulation adheres to the bottom roller and is brought into contact with the face-down side of the passing substrate, thereby achieving a fabric softening composition having an outer coating on only one of its sides. After solidifying, the opposite side of the substrate is then passed face-down through a second pair of transfer rollers and solidified to achieve a fabric softening composition having an outer coating on both sides.

This latter composition is substantially solid, stable to decomposition, not runny or dripping, and which, although waxy to the touch, does not cause the composition to stick together when folded. The fabric softening composition has an outer coating of about 6 grams per 100 square inches of substrate. The total amount of inner and outer coatings is about 8 grams per 100 square inches of substrate, and results in a weight ratio of 4:1 by weight of the substrate.

Prior to rerolling, the fabric softening composition can be perforated at desired uniform lengths, or instead of rerolling, the composition can be cut at desired lengths and packaged as individual sheets.

A 12-inch by 8%-inch sheet of this composition is tested for softening performance in an automatic Kenmore 800, electric clothes dryer; satisfactory fabric softening and fabric softener release are achieved and there is no staining of the fabrics, which are left with a pleasant perfume odor and no static cling.

A similar fabric softening composition is obtained when Adogen 448 is substituted for the outer coating formulation used above and results in a fabric softening composition having an outer coating with a melting point of about 140 F.

EXAMPLE II Following the procedure in Example I and substituting the substantially solid, waxy nonionic TAE (M.P. about 115 F.) for the Carbowax 1540 therein, a fabric softening composition is obtained in which the total amount of the coatings is about 8 grams per 100 square inches of substrate, providing about a 4:1 Weight ratio by weight of the substrate. This composition contains about 1.65 grams of inner coating and about 6.35 grams of outer coating per 100 square inches of substrate.

A 12-inch by 8 /s-inch sheet of this composition is tested for softening performance in an automatic clothes dryer and achieves results similar to those achieved in Example I.

A similar composition can be made by substituting eicosyltrimethylammonium chloride for the C20 22 HAPS used in the outer coating above.

EXAMPLE III The procedure of Example I are repeated, substituting the following formulation (M.P. about 155 F.) for the outer coating therein:

C20 23 HAPS-ratio 1.311 C20 2g 37% Adogen 448--to Adogen 448 respectively 13.5% isopropyl alcohol 1.5% perfume Following the procedures of Example I, a fabric softening composition is prepared having 2 grams of the substrate coating per 100 square inches of substrate and 7.3 grams of the outer coating per 100 square inches of the substrate; the composition has a total substrate and outer coating weight ratio of about 5:1 by weight of the substrate.

The fabric softening composition is tested in an automatic dryer for softening performance. Fabric staining does occur but is significantly less than the fabric staining caused by any of the earlier referenced prior art compositions; it is believed that less staining is observed in the compositions herein (as opposed to prior art compositions) which employ an admixture of fabric softeners in which one of the fabric softeners is a cationic quaternary ammonium compound, because of the dilution effect of the admixture. The treated fabrics, however, exhibit a pleasant perfume odor and no static cling.

Similar compositions can be achieved by substituting for the outer coating used above, fabric softener admixtures (M.P. about 120 F.) of Adogen 448 and TAE wherein the Adogen 448 is present in a weight ratio of 3:1 and 2:1 by weight of the TAE EXAMPLE IV The procedures of Example II are repeated substituting the following formulation (M.P. about 155 F.) for the outer coating therein:

Percent 'Wherein the alkyl contains a mixture of from 30 to 22 carbon atoms; this compound is hereinafter designated 020-22 The fabric softening composition prepared has a substrate coating of about 2 grams per square inches of substrate and an outer coating of about 5.2 grams per 100 square inches of substrate, providing a total substrate and outer coating weight ratio of about 3.5 :1 by weight of the substrate.

When this composition is tested for softening performance in an automatic clothes dryer, results similar to that of Example I are achieved.

EXAMPLE V The procedures of Example IV are repeated substituting Carbowax 1540 for the TAEgg. The resulting fabric softening composition contains about 2 grams of the substrate coating per 100 square inches of substrate and about 5.9 grams of the outer coating per 100 square inches of the substrate, thereby providing a total substrate and outer coating weight ratio of about 4:1 by weight of the substrate.

EXAMPLE VI The procedures of Example III are repeated substituting the following formulation (M.P. about 155 F.) for the outer coating formulation therein:

Percent C2042 HAPS 62 Anti-static agent 19 Isopropyl alcohol 18 Perfume .7 Optical brightener .3

EXAMPLE VII Utilizing the procedure of Example I, a paper substrate is substituted for the non-woven Stock A used therein and the following formulation (M.P. about 155 F.) is substituted for the outer coating therein:

Percent C2042 HAPS 60 Anti-static agent 15 [[sopropyl alcohol 24 Perfume 1 The fabric softening composition prepared contains about 4.6 grams of the substrate coating per 100 square inches of the substrate and about 8 grams of the outer coating per 100 square inches of the substrate, thereby providing a total substrate and outer coating weight ratio of about 4:1 by weight of the substrate.

The fabric softening composition tested for softening performance in an automatic dryer and achieves results similar to that of Example 1.

EXAMPLE VIII The procedures of Example I are repeated, substituting for the substrate, the substrate coating, and the outer coating therein, the following:

( 1) A water dissolvable paper (Dissolvo Paper); (2) Adogen 448 (M.P. about F.) as the substrate coating; and

(3) An outer coating having the following formulation (M.P. about 150 F):

20 EXAMPLE IX The following fabric softening compositions are pre- Percent pared as follows: C2042 HAPS 5 Afioll of the substrate is set up so that it can easily Q Ul'llO ri geht 2 The substrate coating is melted or solvent-treated and Perfume I placed into a trough which is heated to maintain the substrate coating in a liquid state. The substrate, at a rate The fabric softening composition prepared essentlally of 5 to 6 feet per minute, is passed Submersed through the consists of a substrate having a weight of about 3 grams per 10 li ifi d Substrate coating in the trough and then through 100 square inches, a substrate coating of about 1.85 grams th Squeeze ll of a dd hi u f the type P 100 Square inches of substrate, and an outer coatme scribed in Example I. The rollers are ad sted to squeeze of about 1.4 grams per 100 square inches of substrate, out excess substrate coating and to provide the substrate thereby Providing a total substrate and outer coating h Sutfielellt Substrate eoatlhg t0 suhstahtlally b2 weight ratio of about 1:1 by weight of the substrate. pl y Coat e fibers 0f the Substrate and to tially completely fill the free space of the substrate. The The above procedures are repeated and a fabric soften btained which has a substrate of treated substrate s then sohdified (1. e., cooled). mg composmon 1S 0 b The outer coating 1s prepared by liquifymg (e.g., meltabout 3 grams per 100 Square i a su Strate Goa mg ing or solvent-treating) the fabric softener and is applied of about grams per 100 Square Inches of Substrat? and to the substrate containing the inner coating by means of an Outer coatmg of about grams Per 100 Square Inches transfer rollers, the outer coating being applied to both of substrate, thereby Provldmg a total amount of sides of the treated substrate. The resulting composition strate and outer coatings in a weight ratio of about 1.4:1 is lidifi d (ggq by cooling to room temperature or by Weight of th u st below or by evaporating off a substantial amount of the When a 12-inch by 8 /s-inch sheet of each of the above solvent); when tested for softening performance in an two compositions is added to the final rinse cycle of an automatic clothes dryer, the fabric softening composition automatic washer, the fabrics loaded therein absorb the provides satisfactory fabric softening and exhibits satisfacsubstrate and outer coatings which disperse into the rinse tory fabric S f ener re a ewater, and the substrate dissolves. The fabrics are soft and In the table below, the S11hSt1'ate p y in P exhibit no Static cling trons 1-25 and 126 -150 1s nonwoven cloth Stock A; the Non-woven cloth Stock B can be substituted for non- .Substrate utlhzed composfmons 1 and cloth Stock A in Examples I through VI above to 18 non-woven cloth Stock B, Compositions 51 through h 75 employ the paper substrates of Example VII above; achieve fab11c softening compositions equivalent to t ose compositions 76 through 100 use an finch by 10% inch of examples' woven cloth (Cannon terrycloth washcloth), weighslmllaflya Woven cloth w terry cloth) and ing 22.8 grams, as the substrate; and, Compositions 101 P y absorbent toweling Paper can be Substltuted the through 125 employe, as the substrate, a two-ply toweling non-woven cloth S c A o e above eXamples and, paper having a basis weight of about 32 pounds per 3,000 when provided with a substrate and outer coating having square feet (the weight of 100 square inches of the a weight ratio within the range of from 2:1 to 1:10 by toweling paper is about 2.8 grams) taught in the aforeweight of the woven cloth or multi-ply absorbent paper, tioned Wells patent. Except for the woven cloth subprovide fabric softening compositions equivalent to those straws, the substrates p y in the Compositions are f Said eXamp1eS sh/ee ts og about 10()) square inches in area (about 12" x By repeating the above examples and using a padding 3 m lmenslons machine having tape wrapped about both ends of one In the table, the ratio of the substrate to the total roller so as to increase the orifice between the rollers, the fi g of Substrate and coatings Is by welght and b trate coating of the above examples can be applied to t 6 SH mate outef coatmg amounts are expressed s b h grams. The melting points of the substrate and outer coatthe substrates in an amount to achieve a su strate aving ings are an about or above; an asterisk refers 1ts fibers co p y coated h Its free Space completely to a cationic or nonionic substrate coating or to an outer filled W h t e suhetrate Coetlngi whereby a film of the coating that melts within the range of from about F. Substrate fh 1s Present on the Surfaces h to about F. A double-asterisk refers to a casubstratedd y, When a 0! 10110mm Welght 1S tionic or nonionic substrate coating or to an outer coating exerted Onto the rollers 0f the P g machine, the 55 which has been admixed with a suflicient amount of isoorifice between the rollers is decreased, resulting in a subpropyl alcohol or an isopropyl alcohol-water mixture to strate having additional amounts of the substrate coating achieve a melting point within the range of from about squeezed out and providing a substrate having its fibers 100 F. to about 170 F. The term inner coating used substantially completely coated. in the table refers to the substrate coating.

TABLE Ratio of substrate Inner Outer toinner C mpocoating, coating, and outer sition Inner coating (nonionic) Inner coating (cationic) amount Outer coating fabric softener amount coatings 1 Carbowax1540" 2 Tallowtrimethyl ammonium chloride... 4 1:3 Cerbowax 1000 1.5 Tallowdimethly (3-tallowalkoxypropyl) 8 -1:5

ammonium chloride. 3; Carbowax 1500 2 Tallowdimethyl (3tal10walkoxy-2 10 1:6

hydroxypropyl) ammoniumnhloride. & Carbowax 4000" 3 Ditallowdimethyl ammonium chloride 5 1:4 5 Carbowax 6000 2 Ditiallflotwdimethyl ammonium methyl 8.5 -1:5 6 Condensation product of 1 mole 1 Ei cosglgfimethyl ammonium chloride.-. 3.5 -1;'2

steairt acid and 20 moles ethylene 7 c densation product of 1 mole 4 Dieicosyldimethyl ammonium chloride 5 1:4.5

stearic acid and 30 moles ethylene oxide.

TABLE continued chloride."

A- ..-H-T- Mn ,.Ret .o substrate Inner Outer to inner Compo- .I coating, coating, and outer ition Inner coating (nonionic) Inner coating (cationic) amount Outer coating fabric softener amount coatings 8 Condensation product 01 1 mole -2 Dodecyltrimethyl ammonium chloride..', 6 1:4

I palgiitic acid and 40 moles ethylene i v V o e. I II I 9 Condensation product of 1 mole ,.1.-8 Didodeoyldimethyl ammonium 4.3 122.5

niiyistio acid and 35 moles ethylene chloride. o e.

10 Condensation product of one mole 2 "Ietredeeyltrlmethyl ammonium 8.7 1:2.9 013i acid and 45 moles' ethylene chloride" 0 B.

11 Condensation product oi one mole 2.8 Ditetradeeyldimethyl ammonium 8.5 1:4.6

pxialmid tic acid and 20 moles ethylene chloride. v I c e.

12 Condensation product of one mole 1.5 Pentadecyltrimethyl ammonium 8.5 1:2.5

stgelric acid and 50 moles ethylene chloride; I I I 13 Condensation product of one mole 2 Dipentede'cy1dimethylammonium. 6.7 1:4.3

tellov;1 alcohol and 10 molesoi ethylchloride. i eneo e. I t

14 Condensation product of one mole 2 Didodecyldiethyl ammonium "5.4 1:11.?

eicosylalcohol and 50.moles ethyl- I chloride.v J v V eneoxi e.

15 Condensation product of one mole 1.5 Didodecyldipropyl'ammonium 4 I 1:2.7

I IBUTYiiiAIC/O HOI and85mo1es oiethylchloride.

16 Condensation product of one mole ZQDitetrhdeyldi hyl amm m I coconut fatty acid and 85 moles of chloride." j I I ethylene oxide. t

17 Condensation product of one mole 2 Ditetradeoyldipropyl ammonium I 8 II I 1:5 stsairic acid and 25 moles ethylene chloride.

o e. I I I 18 Conyensation product of one mole 1. 7 l)it al1owdiethyl ammonium chloride.--..' 7 -1:4.4

stearic acid and 35 moles ethylene 1, I v I I o e. v v

19 Condensation product of one mole =2 Ditellowdipropyl ammonium chloride-.. 10 1:6

. siea ric acid and40moles ethylene I II I I 20 Condensation product of one mole 2.3 Tallowdi ethyl benzyl ammonium I 8.8 1:5.5

. sieiairic acid and 45 moles ethylene chloride.

o e. I 21 Carbowex 4000 1.9 Tallliiwdiethyl benzyl ammonium 6.7 I 1:4.3

c or e.

22 Condensation product of one mole 1.9 Dodecyltrimethyl ammonium methyl 8.7 1:5.8

S3311? acid and 50 moles ethylene sulfate.

73 Condensation product of one mole 2.2 jDidodeoyldiethyl ammoniumacetate.-.. 9 1:5.0

tallow fatty acid and 50 molesw I. v I ethylene oxide. I v

24 Condensation product of one mole 2.1 Tellowtrimethyl ammonium acetate-..- 12 1:1

pg l nitie acid and 35 moles ethylene 25 Condensation product of one mole 2 'Tallowdimethyl benayl ammonium 5.6 1:3.8

palmixiiig acid and 83 moles of ethyl- 7 nitrite. v eneo e.

26 Condensation product of one mole 1.7 Ditallowdipropyl ammonium phos- 6 1:4.3

pglgnitio acid and 25 moles ethylene v p phate.

e. I 27 Condensation product of one mole 2 8 (N eicosyl-NN-dimethylammonio)-2- 7 1:5

pg lanitic acid and moles ethylene hydroxypropane-l sulionate. o v 28 Carbowax1540' 7 1.5 8-(N-eieosyl-N,N-dimethylammonio)- 9 -1:8

propane-l-sulfonate. t 29 Ditellowdimethyl am- 1.8 8-[N-eicosyl-N N-di(2-hydroxyethyl) 12 1:7.6

I monium ehloridefifr amm on iol-2- ydroxypropane-i- "'s onae.," v an 031113 2 8-(N-docosyl-N,N-dimethy1ammonio)-2 9'.9 1:6.6

. I I p hydroxypropane-l-sultonate.

31 Condensation product of one mole 1.8 8-(N docosyl-N,N-dimethylamm0nio)- 16 I. 1:9.6

leiijlayl alcoholandmmoles ethylene v7 propaue-l-sulionate. I p o e. I L 1 32 Condensation product oiimolelaurbl 2 8-[N-doo0syl-N,N-bis-(2-hydroxyethyl) I 6 1:4.4

alcohol and 40 moles ethylene ammonio]-2-hydroxypropane-1- I oxide. sulionate. 33 TAEio' 1.6 S-(N-tetracosyi-N,N-dimethylam- 1:8,1

' monio)-2-hYdroxypropane-l-sulionate. I

34 Condensation product otlmclelanryl 2.2 .3-(N-tetracosyl-N,N-dimethylam- I I 9.2 116.3

alfiolho l and 25 moles ethylene monio)-propane-1-sulionate.- I

35 Condensation product oilmolelauryl 1.4 S-IN-tetracosyl-N N-bis-(2-hydrory- '9 I I -1;6

I alcohol and 20 moles ethylene ethy1)ammonio -2-hydroxypropane-1- oxide; II V l I unsulionatev I 36 Carbowax 1000 1.8 8F(N-hexacosyl-N,N-dimethylam- .6 1:48

- v v monio)-2-hydroxypropane-1-sulionate. J

37 Condensation product oilmolelauryl 1.8 8-(N-hexaeosyl-N,N-dimethylam-" v 6 v 1:43

alcoholand29molesethyleneoxide. H mcnio)-propane-1-sullonate.

88- Ditallowdimethyl 2.1 8-(N-eicosyl-N ethyl-N-methylam- 8 1:5.6

I ammoniumv monio)-2-hydroxypropane-l-sulionate.

chloride." I 39-.-- Condensation product of one mole 1.8 8-(N-dooosyl-N-ethyl-N-methylam- 7.2 1:5

myristyl alcohol and 30 moles H -monio)-2-hydroxypropaue-1- ethylene oxide. sulionate. I v

40. Condensation product 011 mole oleyl 2.2 8-(N-tetracosyl-N-ethyl-N-methylam- 9 1:6.2

alcoholand iomolesethyleneoxide. I I monio)-2-hydroxypropanel-sulionate.

41 Condensation product of l-mole 1.7 8-(N-heneicosyl-N,N-dimethylam- 12 1:7.6

sififirylalcoholandiomolesethylene I monio)-2-hydr0xypropane-1-sulionate. o e. I I 1 42 Condensation product of 1 mole 2.1 8-(N-trioosyl-N,N-dimethylammonio)- 8.7 1:4.9

sigeerylalcoholandmolesethylene z-hydroxypropane-l-sulionate. I I oe. r I

43. I Tellowdimethyl (3- 7 3-(N-tricosyl-N-ethyl-N-methylam-' 6.7 1:4.7

tallowgi koxypropyl) monio)-2-hydroxypropane-1-sulionate. I ammo um I TABLE-Continued Ratio oi substrate Inner Outer to inner Compo: V I I coating, coating, and outer sition Inner coating (nonionic) Inner coating (cationic) -amount-- Outer-coating fabric softener amount coatings 44- Tallowdimethyl (3- 2 8-(N-tric0syl-N,N-di1nethylammonio)- 7 1:5

fl k KY- propane-l-sulionate. hydroxyprop ammonium v chloride. 45 Condensation product of 1 mole tallow 1.8 3- (N -pentacosyl-N,N-dimethylam- 8. 4 1:5. 7

alcohol and moles ethylene oxide. v 111?;110)-2-hydr0XY-PIODBI1B-1-.

. su onate. 46. Condensation product of 1 mole 1. 8 3-{N-(2-methoxydocosyl)-N,N- 7. 2 1:5

stearyl alcohol and 47 moles ethylene dixnethylammonio]-2-hydroxyoxide. propane-i-sulionate. 47 Carbowax 6000 1. 3 3-(N heptacosyl-N,N-dimethylam- 6 1:4

- monio)-propane-1-sulionate. 48 Condensation product of l mole tallow 2 3-(N-octacosyl-N,N-dimethyl-am- 6. 7 1:4. 8

' alcohol and 40 moles ethylene oxide. monio)-2hydroxypropaned-sulfonate. 49 Condensation product of 1 mole tallow 1. 6 3-(N-nonaeosyl-N,N-dimethylam d 5. 4 '1: 3. 9 j I alcohol and moles ethylene oxide. monio)-2-hydroxypropane-sulionate. 50 Condensation product oi'l mole tallow 1. 6 3-(N-triacontyl-N,N-dimethylain- 8. 1 1:5. 4

alcohol and 15 moles ethylene oxide. monio)-propane-l-sul1onate. 51 TAEz 1. 4 3-[N-(3,5-dioxatetraoosyl)-N,N- 6 1:2. 5

dimethyl .ammoniol-2-hydoxyjpropane-l-suiionate. 52 Carbowax 15402. 2 Eicosyldimethyi phosphine oxide 8. 1 1:3. 4 53 Condensation product of 1 mole cetyl 1. 8 Eicosy1di(2-hydroxy ethyDphosphine 6. 4 1:2.7

alcohol and moles ethylene oxide. oxide. 54- Ditallow dimethyl am- 2. 4 Docosyldimethylphosphine oxide 6. 7 1:3

I 1 monium chloride." v 1 v 55 Condensation product of 1 mole cetyl 1. 4 Docosyldi(2-hydroxyethyl)phosphine 8 "1:3. 1 alcohol and 10 moles ethylene oxide. oxide. 56 Condensation product of 1 mole-coco- 1.7 Tetrecosyldimethyl phosphine-oxide-- 6. 4 1:2. 7

11518131001101 and moles ethylene o e. 57 Ditallow dimethyl am- 2. .Hexacosyldimethylphosphine oxide 4.8. 1:23

monium sulfate." a 58 Condensation product 01 1 mole of 1. 9 Eicosyldiethylphosphine oxide 5.6 1:2. 5 lagiiaie cid and moles ethylene o e. 59 Condensation product of 1 mole laurlc 1.9 Docosyldiethylphosphine oxide 7. 8 1:3. 2

acig and 20 moles of ethylene I 0x e. 60 Condensation product of 1 mole lauric 2. 6 Tetracosyldi(Z-hydroxyethyl)phosphine 9 1:3.9

acid and 30 moles ethylene oxide. oxide. 61 'IAEHMU 3 Eicosylmethylphosphine oxide. 8 1:3. 7 62 Carhowax 1540" 2. 1 Heneicosyldimethylphosphine oxide 5. 3 1:2. 5 63 Ditallow dimethyl am- 27 B-Hydroxyeicosyldimethylphosphine 6.7 1:8. 1

. monium chloride. oxide. 64 Condensation product of 1 mole laurlc 1 9 fl-Hydroxydocosyldimethylphosphine 6 1:2. 6

acid and 35 moles ethylene oxide. do. 65 Condensation product of 1 mole lauric 1. 4 Heneicosylmethylethylphosphine 7. 6 1:3

acid and 25 moles ethylene oxide. oxide." 66.. TAEm" 2. 5 Docosylmethylethylphosphine oxide.-.- 9. 7 1:4. 1 67.. Condensation product oi 1 mole myris- 2. 5 Tricosyldiethylphosphiue oxide" 9 1 :3. 8

tic acid and 50moles ethylene oxide. p 8.. Condensation product oi 1 mole myris- 3 Trlcosyldimethylphosphine oxide. 8 1:3. 6

tie acid and 20 moles ethylene oxide. 9.. Condensation product of 1 moletetra- 2. 2 Tetraooeyldi(2-hydxoxyethyl)phosphine 6.9 1:3

co sgl alcohol and 50 moles ethylene oxide. o e. Y

Condensation product of 1 mole 1.9 Pentacosyldimethylphosphine oxide.... 9.9 1:3.9 tetracosyl alcohol 7 and 10 moles ethylene oxide. I Y t. 71 Condensation product "of '1 mole 2.2 IiilicosylmethyI-Z-hydroxybutylphos- 7 1:3 tetracosyl alcohol and 35 moles phine oxide.

ethylene oxide. v 72 Condensation product of eicosyl alco- 2.9 Eioosyldibutylphosphine oxide 8.3 1:3.7

hol and 50 moles ethylene oxide. i 73 Condensation product of eicosyl aloo- 2. 6 Docosyhnethyl-3-hydroxybutylphos- 6. 9 1:3. 2

. hol and 10 moles ethylene oxide. phine 0. de. 74 Condensation product oi 1 mole eicosyl 2. 1 Hexacosyldiethylphosphine oxide 7. 1 1 :3. 1

alcohol and 30 moles ethylene oxide. v v 75 E2 2. 7 Heptacosyldimethylphosphine oxide. 8. 9 1:39 76.. TAE2' 30 Octacosyldiethylphosphine oxide..- 67 1:42 177-. Carbowax 1540 33 Triacontyldimethylphosphine oxide..--- 79 -1:5 7R Ditallowdimethyl am 54 Eicosyl-bis-(p-hydroxyethyl) amine 115 1:7. 4

' monium chloride. oxide. 79 Condensation product of 1 mol myris- 28 Elcosyldimethylamine oxide 70 1:4. 3

ticdalcohol and 50 moles ethylene on e. 80 Condensation product of 1 mole myris- 40 Docosyldimethylamlne oxide... 101 1:6. 2 tixeidalcohol and 10 moles ethylene I o e. 81 Carbowax 6000 21 Docogyl-bis-(fi-hydroxyethyhamine 54 1:3. 3

- ox e. 82 Condensation product oi 1 mole lauryl 27 Tetracosyldimethylamine oxide 54 1:3. 6

alcohol and 50 moles ethylene oxide. 4 83 Tallow dimethyl (3- 20 Tetracosyl-bis-(B-hydroxyethyl)amine 68 1:3.9

' tallowalkoxy-2- oxide.

hbdroxy propyl) am: monium chloride." 84 Condensation product of tallow alco- 35 Hexacosyldimethylamine oxide 94 1:5. 7

hol and 40 moles ethylene oxide. 85 Propyl amide.'... 22 fleigfsyhbis-(fi-hydroxyethyDamine 44 1:29

o e. 86 Beef marrow wax. 22 2-hydroxyeicosyidimethylamine oxide... 70 1:4 87 Beet tallow wax 43 Eicosylmethylethylamine oxide 91 1:5. 9 88.. Beeswax 31 Eicosyldiethylamine oxide 81 1:5 89 Ditallowdimethyl am- 18 2-hydroxyeicosyidiethylamine oxide- 31 1:2. 1

monium chloride. ,9 0 Candelilla wax 25 Heneicosyldimethylamine oxide 39 1:3.2 91.. Chinese vegetable tallow 19 Heneicosyldiethylamine oxide H 62 1:35 92.. Horse fat 21 Docosyldiethylamine oxide 51 123.4 93.... Japan wax. 33 -Tricosyldimethylamine oxide 74 1:4. 7 94 Myrtle wax 20 Tx'icosyldiethylamine oxide. 50 1:3- 1

TAB ETC W WQ" Ratio of substrate Inner Outer to inner Compoating, coating, and outer sition 7 Inner coating (nonionic) r Inner coating (cationic) amount ,Outercoating fabric softener amount coatings 95. Palm wax 39 Tetracosyldiethylarnine oxide 81 1:5. 3 W001 fat 16 B-hydlroxytetracosyldimethylamine 46 1:2. 7

x1 e. Butter fat 16 Pentacosyldimethylamine oxide 50 112.9 Chicken fat. Hexacosyldiethylamine oxide 51 1:3.1 Fatty tissue lard oil Eicosglmethyl(2-hydroxypropyl)amine 1:3.9

0x1 e. l-monosteariu 1 25. Docosylbutylmethylamine oxide 38 1:2.8 101 Condensation product of 1' mole decyl 4 2-docosenyldimethylamine oxide" 10 1:5

phenol and 40 moles ethylene oxide. 1 102 Condensation product of 1 mole decyl 2. 8 2-methoxydocosyldimethylamine oxide 5. 6 1:3

phenol and 25 moles ethylene oxide. 103 Condensation product of 1 mole octyl 3 Heptacosyldimethylamine oxide" 7 1:3. 6

' phenol and 50 moles ethylene oxide. 104 Condensation product of 1 mole octyl 1.9 Octacosylmethylethylamine oxide".-.. 9 1:3. 9

phenol and 25 moles ethylene oxide. 105 Condensation product of 1 mole do- 2.5 Octacosyldiethylamine oxide" 11 1:48

decgl phenol and 35 moles ethylene on e. 106 Ditallowdimethyl am- 3 Nonacosyldimethylamine oxide 8 1:3.9

- monimn sulfate." 107 TAEw' 2.8 'Iriacontyldiethylamine oxide 6 1:3. 1 108 Condensation product of 1 mole tetra- 2.8 3,fi-dioxaoctacosyldimethylamine 6 1:3. 1 deicdyl phenol and 35 moles ethylene oxide."

' oxe. 1 109 Condensation product of 1 mole hexa- 3. 2 2-11ydroxy-4-oxatetracosyldimethyla- 5.4 1:3. 9

deicgl phenol and 30 moles ethylene 1 mine oxide. ox e. 110; Condensation product of 1 mole 01 00- 3 6-stearamidohexyldimethylamine 7.9 1:3. 9

tadecyl phenol and 50 moles ethyoxide. lene oxide. 1 111-- Condensation product of 1 mole of oc- 4. 5 Hexacosyldiethylamine oxide" 6. 3 1:3. 9

tadecyl phenol and 25 moles ethylene oxide. 112 Carbowax 1540 5 Eicosglmethyl(2-hydroxypropyl)amine 11 1:5.9

0x1 e. 113.-- Tglgh ioqfiilfi; Adogen 4 Docosylbutylmethylamine oxide 8 1:4.3 114.- Hexadecanal". 3 2-docosenyldimethylamine oxide 6 1:3.2 115 Agog? 60318, 40%; 2.8 2-methoxydocosyldimethylamine oxide.. 7 1:3.5

30, no 116.;. 1,3-dlstearin 3 Heptacosyldimethylamineoxide 8.4 1:4.1 Glyceryl monolaurete 2 Octacosylmethylethylamine oxide 6. 9 1:3. 2 1,3-dicaprin- 4 Octacosyldiethylamine oxide*".... 6.9 1:3.9 1-monocaprin.. 1. ,3. Nonacosyldimethylamine oxide..- 10.1 1:4.7 l-monoarachidin. 2 Trlacontyldiethylamine oxide 8 1:3.6 l-monopalmitin 3 3.6-dioxaoctacosyldimethylamine oxide- 8 123.9 1-dimyristin-. 4.2 2rhydroxy-4-oxatetracosyldimethyla- 7.9 1:4.3

, 'mine oxide." 1,3-distearln 3.4 fi-stelaanl idohexyldimethylamine 7.4 1:4.2

. OX e. Dodecanal'- r 2. 4 (-22 HAPS 8 1:3. 7 Hexadecyldimethyl 2. 3 Tallowdimethyl (3-tallow) a1koxy-2- 9. 3 1:4. 1

benzyl ammonium hydroxypropyl) ammonium chloride; chloride." 126 Carbowax 1000' 3 .030-22 APS 6.7 v 1:4.9

127 r Ditallow dimethyl 3 Condensation product of 3 moles ethyl- 7.2 1:5.1

7 ammonium chloride. 351a 1iaxlide plus 1 mole of heneicosyl w coo. 128 Y 3 .Tallowdimethyl (3- 2.4 Condensation product of 9 moles ethyl- 8.1 1:5.3

tallowalkoxypropyl) ene oxide plus 1 mole eicosyl alcohol. 1 ammonium chloride.-... 7 129 .Hexadecyldimethyl- 3.4 Condensation product of 12 moles ethyl- 8.4 1:5.9 i ammonium chloride): ene hoiride plus 1 mole hexacosyl v aco o 130 TAE20* r 2.7 Condensation product of 15 moles ethyl- 6.6 1:4.7

7 v ene oxide plus 1 mole tetracosyl I j alcohol..- V 131 Carbowax1540 2.1 Condensation product of 20 moles of 7.9 1:5 ethyleiie oxide plus 1 mole pentacosyl a co 0 132 Pentyl analide. j 1 2 Condensation product of 30 moles of 8.1 1:5.1 v 1 1 .ethylene .oxide plusl mole. tricosyl 1 alcohol. 133 Carhowax 6000' 1..8..Condensation product of 5 moles of 7.9 1:4.8 v ethygeiie oxide plus lmoleof nonacosyl a co 0 134 Oleamide... "*r 1.3 Condensation product. of 6 moles of 8.9 1;5.1

. ethylene oxide and 1 mole of heptacosyl alcohol." 135- N-isobutyl amide o! peiargonic acid. 1.7- Condensation product of 9 miles of 7.3 1:4.5 1 v ethylene oxide plus 1 mole of octacosyl alcohol." 136 N-isobutyl amide of cepric:acid..'...: .2.1. Cond ens ation product of 20 moles-oi 8.1 1;5.1

' ethylene oxide plus 1 mole of-hepta- I cosyl alcohol." 137 N-isobutyl amide oi undecanoic acid 1.8 Condensation product of 30 moles of 6.9 1:4.4 v ethylene oxide plus 1 mole eicosyl alcoho1. 138- N-isobutyl amide oflauric acid 2.4 Condensation product of 20 moles of 8.7 1:5.6

ethylene oxide plus 1 mole hexacosyl 1 1 alcohol. 139..:.:..-- N-cyclopenty 2.4 Condensation product of 30 moles of 5.6 1:4

. ethylene oxide plus 1 mole of trlacontyl alcohol." 140...... N-cyclopentyl sfearemide 3 .Condensationproduct 01.40 moles of 5.4. 1:4.2

- v ethylene oxide plus 1 mole of none- 1 cosyl alcohol." 141... T-AEmE 2.8 Sulfated condensation product of lmole 6.3 124.6 of ethylene oxide plus 1 mole of tetra- I I 1 cosyl alcohol. 142..;:...- N-methyl pentadeeylamide. 2 Sulfated condensation product of 3 6 1:4

. moles of ethylene oxide plus 1 mole of hexacosyl alcohol.

TABLE-Continued Ratio of substrate Inner Outer to inner Compocoating, coating, and outer sition Inner coating (nonionic) Inner coating (cationic) amount Outer coating fabric softener amount coatings 143...... N-methyl decyl mir 2.1 Suifated condensation product of9moles 6.7 1:3.9

of ethylene oxide plus 1 mole of tricosyi alcohol. 144..;..-:- N-methyl dodecylamide- 2.4 Sulfated condensation product of 12 moles 6. 9 1:4. 7

of ethylene oxide plus 1 mole of eicosyl alcohol. 145 N-Inethyl tetradecylamide-.:::.:;:::.:-: 1.7 Suliated condensation product of 16 6 1:3.9

. moles of ethylene oxide plus 1 mole of pentacosyl alcohol. I 146 Dodecyl anilide 2 Sulfated condensation product of 5.4 1:3.7

moles of ethylene oxide plus 1 mole of heneicosyl alcohol. 147 Ditallowdimethyl 2.3 Sodium or potassium 2-acetoxydocosyl 6.7 1:4.5

ammonium sulfonate. chloride. 14 Decyl anihrie 2.3 Ammonium 2-acetoxydocosylsulio- 4.1 1:3.2

na e. 14 Octyl anilirle 1.8 Diethanolammonium 2-acetoxydocosyl- 7.7 1:3.9

sulfonate. 150 TAEza*- 2.1 Sodium or potassium 2-acetoxytricosyl- 6 1:4.9

sulfonate. 151 TAE 1.5 sorlililum or potassium 2-acetoxytetracosy1- 7 1:4.7

s ona e. 152 Carbowax 4000* 1.3 Sodium or potassium 2-acetoxypentaco- 8 1:5. 1

sylsulfonatc. I 1.7 Sodium or potassium 2-acetoxyhexaco- 6.7 1:4.7

sylsulionate. 2 Sodium or potassium 2-acetoxyheptaco- 5.4 1:4. 1

sylsulfonate. 2.4. Sodium or potassium Z-acetoxyoctacosyl- 6 1:4.7

sulionate. 156 Tallowdimethyl (3- 2 2-acetoxynonacosylsulionate 8 1:5.6

tallowalkoxy-2- hydroxypropyl) ammonium chloride." 157 l Tal1owdimethy1(3- 2.4 2-aeetoxytriacontylsulionate 6.3 1:4.8

tallowalkoxypropyl) ammo um chloride. 158...-.-... Condensation product of 1 mole 2.1 2-acetoxyheneitrlaeontylsulionate 7.4 1:53

si agyl alcohol and moles ethylene o e. 159... 'IAEao"--- a 1.4 2-acetoxydotriacontylsuifonate 6.4 1:4.3 0 TAEao"- 2.8 Sodilum or potassium 2-aeetoxydocosyl- 8. 1 1:6.1

su ona e. 1m Ditallowdimethyl am- 1. 8 .Ditallowdimethyl ammonium chloride, 7 1:4. 9

momum chloride. 65%; tallowdimethyl phosphine oxide,

162 Carbowax1540 2 Eicosyltrimethyl ammonium chloride, 6.6 1:4.8

. H 30%; hexacosyldimethyl amine oxide, 163 TAEao"-- 2 Eicosyl trrimethi'l ammonium chloride, 1:5

a; a0, 1M Ditallowdimethyl arn-v 1.8 Ditallowdimethyl ammonium chloride, 6.2 1:4.4

monium chloride. 3 (N -tallow-N,N-dimethylam- I genie)-2-hydroxypropane-lsulionate,. I 165 C -0n alkyldimethyl amine oxide"*.-:-:...:-:.:.....;..--.:.-- 2 Ditallowdimethyl ammonium chloride, 7.4 1:5.2 20%; eicosyldimethylamine oxide,

o- 166 Carbowax 1000" A 1.4 Ditallowdimethyl ammonium chloride, 7.9 1:5.2

75%; cm, HAPS,25 167 Condensation product of lmole of tal- 2.1 Eicosyltrimethyl ammonium chloride, 7.9 1:5.6 I low alcohol and 40 moles of ethylene 3-(N-doeosyl-N-ethyl-N-methyloxide. afimnonisgz2-hydroxy-propane-l-sulona e, 168 TAE Z- 1.1 Sulfated condensation product of9moles 6.1 1:4

. of ethylene oxide plus 1 mole of eicosyl alcohol, 50%; condensation product of 9 moles of ethylene oxide plus lmole eicosyl alcohol, 50%. 169... TAEaon W 1.9 so?? 2-acetoxydocosy1sulionate,40%; 4.1 1:3.3

:0, 170 Condensation product of 1 mole of 2 Sodium 2-acetoxydoeosylsulfonate, 8 1:5.6

stealric acid and 50 moles ethylene tietracosyldimethylphosphine oxide, ox: e. 171 Tallowdimethyl(3-tal- 1.5 Diethanolammonium 2-acetoxydocosyl a 124.4

lowalkoxypropyl) sulionate, dodecyldimethylamine ammonium oxide, 25%. chloride. j 172..:::-.;- Carbowax 1540 1.8 Dggicylbenzenesulionate, 45%; 'IAE, 9.3 1:6.2

173....:.. Condensation product of1 mole lauryl 1. 7 3-(N-eicosyl-N,N-dimethylammonio)-2- 8. 7 1:5. 8

alcohol and 20 moles ethylene oxide. hydroxypropane-l-sulionate, 70%;

condensation product of 30 moles of ethylene oxide plus 1 mole tricosyla co 0 174..:::.. Carbowax 6000 2 3-(N-docosyl-Nfldimethylammonio)- 4 1:3.3

- 2rdiygsdrog5 ropane-l-sulionate, 65%;

30, 0- 175. 020-22 alkyldimethylamine oxide.-::::;::::::..:::::::::: 2. 1 3-(N-tetracosyl)-N,N-dimethylam- 6. 9 1:5

, monio)-2-hydroxypropane-l-sulionate,-

gig); tallowdimethylamine oxide,

176..--.." Palmitic acid 1.5 020-21 HAY 5.3 1:3.8 177 Laurie acid 2 0 2 HAPS". 4. 9 1:3. 8 178 Myristic acid 1.5 Gnu-22 APB 6. 1 1:4. 2 179 Stearic acid* 1.6 Tallowdimethyl(3-tailowalkoxy-2-hy- 8.3 1:5.5

droxypropane) ammonium chloride. 180 Arachidic acid* 1.9 Ditallowdimethyl ammonium chloride-.- 7.1 1:5 Nonadecylic acid" 1.4 TAEw....-= 6. 7 1:4. 5 Eicosyl alcohol 2. 2 Eicosyl dimethyl amine oxide 4. 7 1:3. 8

TABLE-Continued Ratio of substrate Inner Outer to inner Compocoating, coating, and outer sition Inner coating (nonionic) Inner coating (cationic) amount Outer coating fabric softener amount coatings 183 Heneicosyl alcohol* 1.8 TAE 6 1:3.8 184.. Heptadecyl alcohol* 1. 8 Tallow trimethyl ammonium chloride.-- 6. 2 1:4. 4 185-. Docosyl alcohol. 1.5 020-22 HAPS 7.8 1:5.2 186.- Tridecylie acid 1.8 3-(N-doc0syl-N,N-dimethylammonio)- 7.2 1:5

Z-hydroxypropane-l-sultonate. 187 Pentadecylic acid- 2 Eicosyldimethylphosphine oxide 6 1:4. 4 188 Oleic acid 1. 4 Ditallow dimethyl ammonium 7 1:4. 7

chloride." 189 Octadecyl alcohol"- 1.3 Czo-zzHAPS 7 1:4.7 190.. Cetyl alc l 2 020-22 APB 6.3 1:4.6 191 Heptadecanoic acid* 1. 8 Condensation product of 1 mole of eicosyl 5. 4 1:4

alcohol with 30 moles of ethylene oxide. 192. Heneicosanoic acid 2 Condensation product of 1 mole of 7.2 1:5. 1

hexacosyl alcohol with 20 moles ethylene oxide. 193.- Melissic acid- 1.7 0-11 HAPS" 7.3 1:5 194.- l-tn'acontanol, 1.6 TAEa 6.1 124.3 195 Behenic acid 1.5 Tallowdimethyl (S-tallow alkoxy-2- 7.1 1:4.8

hydroxypropane) ammonium chloride. 196 Lignoceric cid 1.6 6 1:42 197 Hyenie acid 2 7 1:5 198 Cerotic acid 1.8 TAEm"- 6 1:43 190 Ceryl alr-nhnl 1.7 Condensation product of 1 mole of 5.2 1:3.8

The compositions herein can additionally be used in a variety of other ways. For example, the sheet or length of a composition herein canbe used to manually wipe off fabrics which are prone to exhibit static electricity (e.g., the polymeric vinyl fabrics used generally in automobile upholstery and cushions and in simulatedleather coats orother wearing apparel); the composition can be used as it is formulated-0r can first be moistened with ordinary tap water (i.e., from a faucet) before wiping, and this method is generally suitable for other synthetic fabrics, such as is often found on furniture. After wiping with the compositions herein, it isdesirable to wipe off the upholstery or other substance treated with a dry, ordinary wiping cloth, rag, or the like to remove excess or undried fabric softening left on the upholstery.

, Moreover, compositions herein can be used in a dryer for the purpose of imparting anti-static properties to such items as socks, ladies stockings, sweaters and other items made of synthetic fabrics. When so used, it is not necessary that the clothes be first wetted; thus, the garments can be treated without the tuifing or balling-up of the fabric fibers that often occurs when such fabrics are wetted.

Further, the fabric softeners (especially the cationic quaternary ammoniumcompounds and the nonionics, anionics, and Zwitterionics of C to- C alkyl range) used in the compositions herein exhibit surfactant properties which make the compositions herein very useful, for example, in cleaning metallic surfaces and leather in wearing-apparel, shoes and other objects. For this purpose the composition is preferably wetted before application and the cleansed surface or leather wiped dry.

All of the above examples are intended to illustrate particular embodiments of the invention herein, and it is understood that they did not limit said invention. Further, other embodiments within the scope of-the invention herein will be obvious to those skilled in the art.

Having particularly described the invention in detail, what I now claim is: i

1. A process for softening freshly washed fabrics in an automatic rotary drum, clothes dryer; comprising the steps of:

(a) loading said fabrics into the dryer drum and adding tallow alcohol with 40 moles of ethylene oxide.

a length or sheet of a fabric softening composition to said dryer, the fabric softening composition consisting essentially of:

(1) a paper, woven cloth or non-woven cloth substrate; (2) a substantially solid, waxy substrate coating, which consists essentially of a substantially solid, waxy cationic or nonionic material; and .(3) a substantially solid outer coating which comprises from about 30% to by weight of a fabric softener; wherein said fabric softener is a compound or an admixture of two or more compounds having a different composition than the substrate coating material; wherein at least one of the substrate and outer coatings has a melting point of no more than about F.; and, wherein the weight ratio of the substrate to the total amount of the subgtrate coating and outer coating ranges from 2:1 to 1:1 .7

(b) operating said dryer with a drying temperature ranging from about 75 F. to about 170 F., thereby causing the inner coating of said fabric softening composition to liquify and release the outer coating of said fabric softening composition, whereby the action of the clothes dryer provides maximum and frequent contact of the fabrics with the fabric softening composition to effect softening of the fabrics. 2. The process of claim 1 wherein the substrate is paper. 1

3. The process of claim 1 wherein the substrate is a non-woven cloth.

. ing consists essentially of a substantially solid, waxy cationic material.

6. The process of claim 1 wherein the substrate coating has a melting point within the range of from about 75 F. to about 170 F.

7. Theprocess of claim 1 wherein the fabric softener is 7 selected from the group consisting of:

(a) quaternary ammonium and imidazolium salts; (b) Zwitterlonic quaternary ammonium compounds;

(0) amphoteric tertiary ammonium compounds;

(d) anionic soaps;

(e) alkyl sulfates;

(f) alkyl sulfonates;

(g) alkyl benzene sulfates;

(h) alkyl benzene sulfonates;

(i) ethoxylated alcohol sulfates;

(j) alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonates;

(k) nonionic tertiary amine oxides;

(l) tertiary phosphine oxides;

(m) ethoxylated alcohols;

(11) ethoxylated alkyl phenols;

(o) ethoxylated amines; and

(p) compatible mixtures thereof.

8. The process of claim 2 wherein the substrate is a one-ply paper having a basis weight of about 32 pounds per 3,000 square feet.

9. The process of claim 3 wherein the non-woven cloth is a water-laid or dry-laid non-woven cloth and consists essentially of lubricated cellulosic fibers, said fibers having a length of from about 7 inch to about 2 inches and a denier of from about 1.5 to about 5 and being partiall oriented haphazardly, adhesively bonded together with binder-resin which is at least substantially hydrophobic, wherein said fiber and said binder-resin respectively constitute about 70% and about 30% by weight of the non-woven cloth, said cloth having a basis Weight of from about 18 to about 30 grams per square yard.

10. The process of claim 9 wherein the non-Woven cloth is dry-laid and the fibers are regenerated cellulose which are about /4 inch in length with a denier of about 1.5 and are adhesively bonded together with a nonionic selfcrosslinking acrylic polymer, said non-woven cloth having a basis weight of about 26 grams per square yard.

11. The process of claim 4 wherein the nonionic material is selected from the group consisting of:

(a) polymers of polyethylene glycol having an average molecular weight of from about 950 to about 7,500;

(b) the condensation product of one mole of an aliphatic alcohol having from about 10 to about 24 carbon atoms with from about 10 to about 40 moles of ethylene oxide;

(0) the condensation product of one mole of an aliphatic carboxylic acid having from about 10 to about 18 carbon atoms with from about 20 to about 50 moles of ethylene oxide;

(d) aliphatic carboxylic acids having from about 12 to about 30 carbon atoms;

(e) aliphatic alcohols having from about 16 to about 30 carbon atoms;

(f) the condensation product of one mole of an alkyl phenol, wherein the alkyl chain has from about 8 to about 18 carbon atoms, with from about 25 to about 50 moles of ethylene oxide;

(g) glycerides, selected from the group consisting of monoglycerides, diglycerides, and mixtures thereof;

(h) amides, selected from the group consisting of:

(i) propyl amide,

(ii) N-methyl amides having an acyl chain length of from about 10 to about carbon atoms,

(iii) oleamide,

(iv) amides of ricinoleic acid,

(v) N-isobutyl amides of pelargonic, capric, un-

decanoic, or lauric acids,

(vi) N-(Z-hydroxyethyl) amides having a carbon chain length of from about 6 to about 10 carbon atoms,

(vii) pentyl anilide,

(viii) anilides having a carbon chain length of from about 7 to about 12 carbon atoms, and

(ix) N-cyclo pentyllauramide and N-cyclopentylstearamide; and,

(i) the condensation product of 1 mole of a primary or secondary amine having at least about 12 carbon atoms with from 1 to about 100 moles of ethylene oxide.

12. The process of claim 5 wherein the cationic material is ditallowdimethylammonium chloride.

13. The process of claim 6 wherein the substrate coating has a melting point within the range of from about F. to about 170 F.

14. The process of claim 13 wherein the substrate coating has a melting point within the range of from about 100 F. to about F.

15. The process of claim 13 wherein the substrate coating substantially completely coats the fibers of the substrate and substantially completely fills the free space of said substrate.

16. The process of claim 7 wherein the fabric softener is selected from the group consisting of 3-(N-alkyl-N,N- dimethylammonio)-2-hydroxypropane-l-sulfonate and 3- (N-alkyl-N,N-dimethylammonio)-propane 1 sulfonate, wherein the alkyl is a mixture of alkyls having from 20 to 22 carbon atoms.

17. The process of claim 7 wherein the fabric softener is an admixture of 3-(N-alkyl-N,N-dimethylammonio)-2- hydroxypropane-l-sulfonate, wherein the alkyl is a mixture of alkyl groups having from 20 to 22 carbon atoms, and ditallowdimethylammonium chloride.

18. The process of claim 7 wherein the outer coating has a melting point of not more than about F.

19. The process of claim 18 wherein the outer coating has a melting point within the range of from about 100 F. to about 170 F.

20. A process for softening freshly washed fabrics in an automatic rotary drum, clothes dryer, comprising the steps of:

(a) loading said fabrics into the dryer drum and adding a length or sheet of a fabric softening composition to said dryer, the fabric softening composition consisting essentially of:

(1) a dry-laid, non-woven cloth substrate comprising about 70% regenerated cellulosic fibers and about 30% hydrophobic binder-resins, said fibers having a denier of about 1.5 and a length of about inch and being oriented substantially haphazardly and lubricated with sodium oleate, said non-woven cloth substrate having a thickness of about 4 to 5 mils and a basis weight of about 26 grams per square yard;

(2) a substrate coating which consists essentially of a substantially solid, waxy, nonionic condensation product of one mole of tallow alcohol with 20 moles of ethylene oxide, having a melting point of about 115 F., said substrate coating substantially completely coating the fibers of said substrate and substantially completely filling the free space of said substrate;

(3) a substantially solid outer coating having a melting point below about 170 F. and comprising 60% by weight of 3-(N-alkyl-N,N-dimethylammonio)-2-hydroxypropane-l-sulfonate, where said alkyl is a mixture of alkyls having from 20 to 22 carbon atoms; and wherein the weight ratio of said non-woven cloth substrate to the total amount of said substrate coating and outer coating is about 1:4;

(b) operating said dryer with a drying temperature ranging from about 75 F. to about 170 F., thereby causing the inner coating of said fabric softening composition to liquify and release the outer coating of said fabric softening composition, whereby the action of the clothes dryer provides maximum and frequent contact of the fabrics with the fabric softening composition to effect softening of the fabrics.

21. A process for softening freshly washed fabrics in an automatic rotary drum, clothes dryer, comprising the steps of:

(a) loading said fabrics into the dryer drum and adding a length or sheet of a fabric softening composition to said dryer, the fabric softening composition consisting essentially of:

(1) a dry-laid non-woven cloth substrate comprising about 70% regenerated cellulosic fibers and about 30% hydrophobic binder-resins, said fibers having a denier of about 1.5 and a length of about inch and being oriented substantially haphazardly and lubricated with sodium oleate, said non-woven cloth substrate having a thickness of about 4 to 5 mils and a basis weight of about 26 grams per square yard;

(2) a substrate coating which consists essentially of a substantially solid, waxy, nonionic polymer of polyethylene glycol having an average molecular weight of from about 1,300 to about 1,600 and having a melting point of about 114 F., said substrate coating substantially completely coating the fibers of said substrate and substantially completely filling the free space of said (b) operating said dryer with a drying temperature rangin from about 75 F. to about 170 F., thereby causing the inner coating of said fabric softening composition to liquify and release the outer coating of said fabric softening composition, whereby the action of the clothes dryer provides maximum and frequent contact of the fabrics with the fabric softening composition to effect softening of the fabrics.

23. A process for softening freshly washed fabrics in (a) loading said fabrics into the dryer drum and adding a length or sheet of a fabric softening composition to said dryer, the fabric softening composition consisting essentially of:

(1) a paper substrate, said paper being a one-ply paper made from a mixture of groundwood and kraft bleached wood pulps and having a basis 'weight of 32 pounds per 3,000 square feet;

substrate; (2) a substrate coating which consists essentially (3) a substantially solid outer coating which has a of a substantially solid, waxy nonionic polymer melting point below about 170 F. and comof polyethylene glycol having an average molecprises 60% by weight of 3-(N-alkyl-N,N-dimethular weight of from about 1,300 to about 1,600 ylammonio) 2 hydroxypropane l-sulfonate, and having a melting point of about 114 R, where the alkyl is a mixture of alkyls having said substrate coating substantially completely from 20 to 22 carbon atoms; and wherein the coating the fibers of said substrate and substanweight ratio of said non-woven cloth substrate tially completely filling the free space of said to the total amount of said substrate coating and substrate; outer coatings is about 1:4; (3) a substantially solid outer coating which has (b) operating said dryer with a drying temperature a melting point below about 170 F. and comrang ng from about 75 F. to about 170 F., thereby prises 60% by weight of 3-(N-alkyl-N,N-dicausing the inner coating of said fabric softening methylammonio) 2 hydroxypropane-l-sulfocomposition to liquify and release the outer coating nate, where the alkyl is a mixture of alkyls of said fabric softening composition, whereby the having from 20 to 22 carbon atoms; and wherein action of the clothes dryer provides maximum and the weight ratio of said non-woven cloth subfrequent contact of the fabrics with the fabric softemng composition to effect softening of the fabrics.

strate to the total amount of said inner and outer coatings is about 1.4;

22. A process for softening freshly washed fabrics in an automatic rotary drum, clothes, dryer, comprising the steps of:

(b) operating said dryer with a drying temperature ranging from about 75 F. to about 170 F., thereby (a) loading said fabrics into the dryer drum and adding a length or sheet of a fabric softening composition to said dryer, the fabric softening composition consisting essentially of:

( 1) a dry-laid, non-woven cloth substrate, comprising about 70% regenerated cellulosic fibers and about 30% hydrophobic binder-resins, said fibers having a denier of about 1.5 and a length of about /4 inch and being oriented substantialcausing the inner coating of said fabric softening composition to liquify and release the outer coating of said fabric softening composition, whereby the action of the clothes dryer provides maximum and frequent contact of the fabrics with the fabric softening composition to effect softening of the fabrics.

24. A process for softening freshly washed fabrics in an automatic rotary drum, clothes dryer, comprising the steps of:

(a) loading said fabrics into the dryer drum and adding 3 p f y and lubricated With sodium 6- a length or sheet of a fabric softening composition Sflld Hon-Woven 010th Substrate having a to said dryer, the fabric softening composition conthickness of about 4 to 5 mils and a basis weight sisting essentially of:

of about 26 grams per square yard; (1) a dissolvable paper substrate;

(2) a substrate coating which consists essentially (2) a substrate coating which consists essentially of a substantlany 5011i Q Y, IlOniOnic P y of a substantially solid, waxy, cationic ditallowof P Y y glycol havlng an verage molecdimethylammonium chloride, having a melting U131: Welght fI0II1 1,300 to about 00 an point of about 140 F., said substrate coating having a melting polnt of about 114 F., said substantially completely coating the fibers of the substrate coating substantially completely ooatsubstrate and substantially completely filling the ing the fibers of said substrate and substantially free space of said substrate; completely filling the free space of said sub- (3) a substantially solid outer coating which has strate; a melting point below about 170 F. and coin- (3) a substantially solid outer coating which has prises 57% y Weight of 3 Y a melting point below about 170 F. and commethylammonio) 2 hydroxypropane-l-sulfoprises 85% by weight of a fabric softener ad- Fate, Where the alkyl is a mlxture of alkyls mixture consisting of 3-(N-alkyl-N,N-dimethylmg m 20 22 cafbml atoms; and Wherem ammonio) 2 hydroxypmpane Lsulionate the weight ratio of sand paper substrate to the Where the alkyl is a mixture of alkyls having total amount of said substrate coating and outer from 20 to 22 carbon atoms, and ditallowdicoating 15 about 1:1;

methylammonium chloride in a weight ratio of about 1.3: 1, respectively; and wherein the weight ratio of said non-woven cloth substrate to the total amount of said substrate coating and outer coating is about 1:5;

(b) operating said dryer with a drying temperature ranging from about 75 F. to about F., thereby causing the inner coating of said fabric softening composition to liquify and release the outer coating of said fabric softening composition, whereby the action of the clothes dryer provides maximum and 3,650,816 3/1972 Rudy et a1. -117109 frequent contact of the fabrics with the fabric softening compositoin to efiect softening of the fabrics. WILLIAM MARTIN, Primary Examiner References Cited 5 T. G. DAVIS, Asslstant Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS US. Cl. X.R.

3,442,692 5/1969 Gaiser 117120 117-76 P, 76 T, 139.5 CQ, 139.5 F, 140 R

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3936538 *Sep 25, 1974Feb 3, 1976Calgon Consumer Products Company Inc.Polymeric film dryer-added fabric softening compositions
US3984335 *Jan 16, 1975Oct 5, 1976Basf Wyandotte CorporationCompositions for souring and softening laundered textile materials and stock solutions prepared therefrom
US4057673 *Nov 10, 1975Nov 8, 1977Colgate Palmolive CompanyFabric conditioning with improved composition containing a plasticizer
US4060505 *Aug 27, 1976Nov 29, 1977Basf Wyandotte CorporationCompositions for souring and softening laundered textile materials and stock solutions prepared therefrom
US4073996 *Feb 24, 1976Feb 14, 1978The Procter & Gamble CompanyFabric treating articles and processes
US4095946 *Mar 25, 1977Jun 20, 1978The Procter & Gamble CompanyArticle for cleaning and conditioning fabrics
US4118525 *Mar 25, 1977Oct 3, 1978The Procter & Gamble CompanyArticle and method for fabric softening and static control
US4122019 *May 25, 1977Oct 24, 1978Phillips Petroleum CompanyMethod and apparatus for crimping synthetic thermoplastic fibers
US4170678 *Aug 30, 1978Oct 9, 1979A. E. Staley Manufacturing CompanyMultiple use article for conditioning fabrics in a clothes dryer
US4297406 *Feb 1, 1979Oct 27, 1981Lever Brothers CompanyProduct for treating fabric
US5480567 *Jan 14, 1994Jan 2, 1996Lever Brothers Company, Division Of Conopco, Inc.Surfactant mixtures for fabric conditioning compositions
USRE34062 *Oct 3, 1984Sep 15, 1992Lever Brothers CompanyFabric softening composition contains water-insoluble surfactant and aliphatic mono-carboxylic acid
DE2731080A1 *Jul 9, 1977Jan 19, 1978Procter & GambleKleiderausruestungsgegenstand
EP0033134A1 *Jan 22, 1981Aug 5, 1981Henkel Kommanditgesellschaft auf AktienMeans for the after-treatment of washed linen in a clothes dryer
EP0145438A2 *Dec 4, 1984Jun 19, 1985THE PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANYLaundry additive products
Classifications
U.S. Classification427/11, 427/242
International ClassificationD06M23/02, D06M13/00, C11D17/04, D06M13/46, D06M23/00, C11D3/00
Cooperative ClassificationD06M13/46, C11D17/047, D06M23/00, C11D3/001, D06M23/02
European ClassificationC11D3/00B3, D06M23/02, D06M13/46, D06M23/00, C11D17/04B6
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Dec 6, 1983PSPatent suit(s) filed