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Publication numberUS3744653 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 10, 1973
Filing dateNov 8, 1971
Priority dateNov 8, 1971
Publication numberUS 3744653 A, US 3744653A, US-A-3744653, US3744653 A, US3744653A
InventorsJensen W
Original AssigneeTurf Vac Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lift dump vacuum apparatus
US 3744653 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 1 Jensen in 3,744, 53 1 Jul 10, 1973 LIFT DUMP VACUUM APPARATUS [75] inventor: William S. Jensen, Rolling Hills,

Calif.

[73] Assignee: Turf-Vac Corporation, Long Beach,

v Calif. 22 Filedz Nov.8, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 196,570

[52] US. Cl 214/502, 15/340, 15/347, 214/8328, 214/508, 298/17 SG [51] Int. Cl B60p 1/34 [58] Field of Search 214/8328, 508, 509, 214/501, 502, 519; 302/58; 15/340, 347, 353;

[56] I 1 References Cited J UNITED STATES PATENTS 11/1924 Bergman 15/340 X 11/1925' Sims 15/340 X 2,518,465 8/1950 Hagen et al..., 24/83.28X 3,300,807 1/1967 Berkowitz..... 15/353 X FOREIGN PATENTS O R APPLlCATlONS 9/1952 Great Britain 298/17 86 Primary Examiner-A1brt J. Makay Attorney-4. F. McLellan et a1.

57 ABSTRACT A mobile lift dump vacuum apparatus which includes a vacuum system on a wheeled frame to pick up debris. A hopper on the frame is movable: from a load position in which it receives debris from a discharge conduit of the vacuum system, to a dump position in which the debris is dumped. Articulated arms .and linkages support the hopper for movement upwardly and rearwardly of r the frame rear wheels for dumping the debris into elevated trash bins and the like. Anti-tip means on the rear of the frame constrain the frame against tipping when the hopper is in the dump position. Actuation of the articulated arms and linkages is coordinated to operate the anti-tip means only in the dump position of the hopper. Vacuum collection bags on the hopper are located for emptying simultaneously with dumping of the de bris in the hopper.

2 Claims, 8 Drawing, Figures LIFT DUMP VACUUM APPARATUS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION and effective manner for dumping the hopper contents into an elevated trash binor truck body.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION According to the present invention, a lift dump vacuum apparatus is provided which includes an elongated mobile frame preferably having the vacuum system mounted on it. This allows debris to be picked up from the surface over which the mobile vacuum apparatus passes. The apparatus also includes a hopper having a load position in which a hopper inlet opening is in registry with a discharge conduit from the vacuum system. Thehopper is movable to a dump position above the load position and in which the hopper is located generally rearwardly of the rear wheels of the frame. Articulated arms and linkages cooperate with a power system, including hydraulic operated cylinders and the like, to raise and move the hopper rearwardly to its dump position. The operation of the hydraulic cylinders is appropriately coordinated and sequenced so that the hopper is raised and tilted, the hopper door is opened for dumping, and simultaneously an anti-tip device is deployed at the rearward extremity of the frame to constrain the frame against tipping while the hopper is in its dump position. In the preferred embodiment, the anti-tip device is automatically deployed when'the hopper is moved toward its dump position.

The usual vacuum bags of the vacuum system are so mounted and oriented on the hopperthat they are upended for and dumped simultaneously with dumping of the hopper contents.

The present apparatus provides an efficient and practicable system for dumping trash and other debris from an-elevated hopper directly, for example, into trash bins, into trucks, over the top of a retaining wall, or onto the top of a compost heap.

Other objects and features of the invention will become apparent from consideration of the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a lift dump vacuum apparatus according to the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of the apparatus of FIG. 1, illustrating the hopper in its load position;

FIG. 3 is a partial side elevational view similar to FIG. 2, but illustrating the hopper in its dump position;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged detail perspective view of the foot or anti-tip device in its operative position;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged detail side elevational view of the anti-tip device of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a rear elevational view of the apparatus of FIG. 1;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged detail view taken along the line DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to the drawings, and particularly to FIGS. 1 through 3, there is illustrated a lift dump vacuum apparatus 10 comprising, generally, an elongated, generally rectangular frame 12 having rolling front support means or wheels 14 and rolling rear support means or wheels 16 which render the frame 12 mobile for travel over turf, pavement, and the like. The apparatus 10 also includes a vacuum system 18 characterized by a discharge conduit 20 from which debris picked up by the vacuum system 18 is discharged. A hopper 22 of the apparatus 10, includes an inlet opening 24 which is in registry with the conduit 20 when the hopper 22 is in the load position illustrated in FIG. 2. The inlet opening 24 moves with the hopper 22 out of registry with the conduit 20 when the hopper 22 moves to its dump position, as best illustrated in FIG. 3.

The apparatus 10 also includes an articulated means 26 which pivotally supports the hopper 22 upon the frame 12 and cooperates with a power system 28 to upwardly and rearwardly move the hopper 22 from its load position to its dump position.

The apparatus 10 further includes a foot or anti-tip device 30 which is located at the rearward extremity of the frame 12 behind the rear wheels 16,and which is operative to constrain the frame: 12 against rearward tipping when the hopper 22 is in its elevated, rearwardly projected dump position.

The frame 12 includes an inner section having a rectangular portion 32, as best seen in FIG. 4, which supports the rear wheels 16. The frame 12 also includes an outer section integral with the inner section and having a pair of transversely spaced, longitudinally extending side members 34 connected at their rearward extremi? ties by an elongated, transverse end member 36..The forward portions of the' frame inner and outer sections are welded or otherwise suitably connected together for structural rigidity by usual channels, beams, braces, fenders, plates, and the like. However, the details of this structure are omitted for brevity since such details form no part of the present invention, other than to support such elements as an operator's console 38 for operating the power system 28, and controls 40 and 42 which are manipulatable to position a downwardly opening vacuum scoop assembly 44 and adjust the size of the entry opening. Debris and trash are drawn into the scoop assembly 44 by operation of a frame mounted blower 46 which develops a vacuum at the scoop lI'lIBLxTl'IC discharge conduit, 20 is coupled to the blower46 and carries the drawn in debris to the inlet opening 24 of the hopper 22. I

The frame 12 also supports a power source or engine 48 which drives the apparatus 10 over turf or pavement, and which also drives the power system 28. The system 28 is preferably a hydraulic system which develops a source of hydraulic fluid under pressure to operate the various hydraulic cylinder assemblies which also form a part of the system 28, as will be seen.

The frame 12 mounts a box-like seat 50 for the operator, and a complemental back rest 52 for the operator is mounted upon the hopper front wall 53 just behind the seat 50.

The inlet opening 24 is formed in the hopper front wall 53 and the adjacent end of the discharge conduit 20 presses against its margins in sealing relation-when the hopper 22 is in its load position. Upon movement of the hopper to its dump position, such inlet opening margins pivot rearwardly with the hopper 22 and out of engagement with the discharge conduit 20.

Details of the scoop assembly 44 and the vacuum system 18 are omitted since they are not part of the present invention. Any scoop or vacuum systems are suitable which are capable of vacuuming up debris andtrash from the turf or pavement over which the apparatus is propelled, and thrusting such debris and trash rearwardly through the discharge conduit 20 into the hopper 22. r

The heavier, solid portions of the trash fall into the bottom of the hopper compartment, which is defined by the front wall '53, a pair of side walls 54, a bottom wall 56, a top wall 58, and a rear wall formed by a hopper door 60.

The articulated means 26 pivotally support the hopper 22 upon the frame 12 and include a pair of L- to the upper edges of the hopper side walls 54. When the hopper is in its load position the lower ends of the braces 74 rest upon the lower, generally horizontal portions of the arms 64, thereby supporting theweight of the hopper 22 and its contents in such load position.

The forward ends of the pairs of arms 78 are pivotally securedto the normally vertically oriented portions of the L-shaped arms 64, one pair on one side of the hopper and the other pair on the other side of the hopper. The arms 78 of each pair are vertically spaced apart in parallel relation, and their opposite ends arepivotally secured to the braces 74 in parallelogram fashion. Consequently, telescoping or retraction of the cylinder as sembly 68 tends to move the hopper 22 upwardly and rearwardly, with the braces 74 moving in generally parallel relation to the upper portions of the arms 64.

The upper extremity of the hopper door 60 mounts a pair of brackets 82 which are hinged upon a pair of short transverse shafts 80 carried at the opposite sides of the hopper 22. The brackets 82 are pivotally coupled to the rods of a pair of hydraulic cylinder assemblies 84 tremities of the arms are similarly welded to a transv verse support tube 72.

As best illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5, the opposite ends of the tube 62 are rotatably disposed through the openings formed by a pair of channel shaped elements 63. The legs of each element 63 are welded to the rearward end of the adjacent frame side members 34, with'the base of the channel shaped element 63 being spaced away from the rear end of the frame side member 34 enough to formthe opening for the associated end of the tube 62.

The lower portions of the L-shaped arms 64 are pivotally secured at approximately their midpoints to the rods of a pair of hydraulic cylinder assemblies 66. The

cylinder portions of the assemblies 66 are pivotally secured to the pair of frame side members 34 forwardly of the rear wheels 16 and generally below the upper, normally vertically oriented portions of the L-shaped arms 64. With this arrangement, extension of the assemblies 66 will pivot the arms 64 upwardly and rearwardly. I

Pivoting of the hopper 22 relative to the arms 64 is accomplished by a hydraulic cylinder assembly 68. The cylinder end of this assembly is pivotally secured to the lower extremity of 'the vertical portion of one arm 64, and the piston end is pivotally secured to the outer end of a crank arm 70. As seen in FIG. 1, the inner end of the arm 70'i s welded to the transverse tube 72 which be seen.

A pair of generally vertically oriented hopper support braces 74 are rigidly secured to opposite sides of the hopper 22 by a pair. of brackets 76 which are fastened whose cylinder portions are rigidly fixed to the hopper side walls 54. Extension of the assemblies 84 opens the door 60 by pivoting it upwardly about the axis of the shafts .80.

As best seen in FIGS. 6 and 7,a plurality of porous, vertically elongated, generally cylindrical vacuum bags 86 are secured at their upper ends to circular fittings 87 which define discharge outlets opening into the upper rearward portion of the hopper 22 at points just above the upper terminus of the hopper door 60. The lower ends of the bags 86 open into a manifold 88 which extends across and is attached to the lower extremity of the' door 60. Collected dirt in the bags tends to drop into the manifold 88. The manifold 88'opens inwardly through the door 60 so that whenthe door is pivoted rearwardly the contents of the bags 86 and manifold 88 drop by gravity downwardly with the trash beingdumped from the hopper 22.

When the hopper 22 is located in its dump position, its weight and the weightof its contents are generally located above and rearwardly of the rear wheels16, undesirably tending to tip the vacuumapparatus}10rearwardly. To constrain the apparatus 10 against such'tipping, the anti-tip device 30 is adapted to be pivoted into position to engage the ground or other supporting surface under the apparatus 10. As best seen in FIGS. 4 and 5, the device 30 includes a pair of transversely spaced apart brackets 90 on opposite sides of the frame 12. The brackets 90 pivotally support the upper ends of a pair of support arms 92. The lower ends of the arms 92 are pivotally connected to arcuate plates which constitute support feet or pads 94. The arms 92 are movable in common by virtue of rigid connection to the opposite ends of a transverse element 96. The element 96 is, in turn, pivotally coupled to, the piston rod of a hydraulic cylinder assembly 98 whose cylinder portion is pivotally carried by the frame inner section 32. Consequently, extension of the assembly 98 pivots the support pads 94 from the dottedposition to the full line position illustrated in FIG. 5.

FIG. 8 illustrates the hydraulic system 28 carried by the frame 12 and by means of which the various hydraulic assemblies are actuated in the proper sequence. Hydraulic fluid is drawn from a reservoir 100, through a usual filter 102, by a conventional hydraulic pump 106 for application to the various hydraulic cylinder assemblies upon operation of one or more of three usual hydraulic valves 108, 110, or 112. i

In operation of the present apparatus 10, and assuming the hopper is full and ready to be dumped, the valve 108 on the console 38 is opened by the operator to apply hydraulic fluid under pressure to one side of the cylinder assembly 98. The return side of the assembly 98 to the valve 108 includes a one-way or check valve 114 which prevents fluid from leaving that side of the assembly 98 until the valve 114 is actuated. The pressurized line to the assembly 98 is connected in parallel to the one side of the cylinder assembly 66 through a pressure override valve 116, while the return line from the assembly 66 to the valve 108 includes a bleed valve 118. With this arrangement, when the operator opens the valve 108, the consequent extension of the assembly 98 pivots the support pads 94 of the anti-tip device 30 into engagement with the ground to prevent tipping of the frame 14 during movement of the hopper 22 from its normal load position to its dump position. Upon attainment of the down position by the pads 94, a pressure build-up occurs in the line which, when it reaches an appropriate level, such as approximately 12 psi for example, causes the vale 116 to be overriden and opened. Fluid then passes to the cylinder assembly 66 to pivot the L-shaped arms 64 upwardly and rearwardly to the position illustrated in FIG, 3. Thus, the arms 64 cannot be raised until the pads 94 first reach their clown or anti-tipping positions.

Next, the operator opens valve 112 to apply fluid under pressure to thecylinder assembly 68. This retracts or telescopes the assembly 68 to pivot the links or arms 78 rearwardly and upwardly and move the hopper 22 to the dump position illustrated in FIG. 3. Operation of the valve 112 is preferably coordinated with r operation of the valve 108 so that pivotal movement of the links 78 occurs in a coordinated, substantially simultaneous manner relative to movement of the arms When the hopper 22 is close to or has reached its dump position, the operator opens cylinder 110 to apply fluid under pressure to the cylinder assembly 84. This pivots the hopper door 60 to the open position illustrated in FIG. 3, simultaneously dumping the contents of both the hopper 22 and the vacuum bags 86.

The hopper 22 is brought back to its load position by first operating the valve 110 in a reverse position. This drains fluid from the opposite side of the cylinder assembly84 to close the hopper door 60. Next, valves 108 and 112 are reversely operated to drain fluid from the cylinder assemblies 98, 66, and 68. However, bleed of the blocking action of the check valve 114.

As best illustrated in FIG. 5, the check valve 114 is mounted on the frame inner section 32 so that theactuating element thereof projects upwardly for engagement and actuation by the hopper 22 when the hopper 22 movesinto its load position. Such actuation then allows fluid to drain from the cylinder assembly 98 to permit the support pads 94 to retract into the positions out departing from the spirit of the invention.

I claim: 1. A lift dump vacuum apparatus comprising:

an elongated frame having rolling front support means and rolling rear support means rendering said frame mobile; I n a vacuum means having a discharge conduit for discharging debris picked up by said vacuum means; a hopper having a load position and a dump position and including an inlet opening in registry with said discharge conduit in said load position to receive power means including portions coupled between said frame and said first pair of arms to pivot said first pair of arms upwardly and rearwardly relative to said frame, and including other portions coupled between said first pair of arms and said secondpair of arms to pivot said hopper upwardly and rearwardly relative to said frame.

2. A lift dump vacuum apparatus comprising:

an elongated frame having rolling front support means and rolling rear support means rendering said frame mobile;

vacuum means having a discharge .conduit for discharging debris picked up by said vacuum'means;

a hopper having a load position and a dump position and including an inlet opening in registry with said discharge conduit in said load position to receive debris in said hopper, said dump position being 10- cated above said load position and generally rearwardly of said rear support means, said hopper further including a door pivotablle toan open position fordumping the contents of said hopper in said dump position;

articulated means including portions pivotally coupled to said hopper and to said frame;

power means coupled to said articulated means and operative to upwardly and rearwardly pivot said hopper from said load position to said dump position; and

vacuum bag means carried by said hopper and having lower ends uncovered upon movement of said door contents of said bags through said lower ends. =1

to said open position to simultaneously dump the

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Classifications
U.S. Classification414/471, 15/340.1, 15/347, 298/17.0SG, 298/17.00R
International ClassificationE01H1/00, B60P1/04, E01H1/08, B60P1/32
Cooperative ClassificationE01H1/0836, B60P1/32
European ClassificationE01H1/08C2, B60P1/32