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Publication numberUS3744723 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 10, 1973
Filing dateJun 5, 1969
Priority dateJun 5, 1969
Publication numberUS 3744723 A, US 3744723A, US-A-3744723, US3744723 A, US3744723A
InventorsD Davis
Original AssigneeD Davis
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pipe cleaning nozzle
US 3744723 A
Abstract
The front end of a pipe cleaning nozzle body has a plurality of peripherally spaced fluid pressure jet ports therethrough arranged on axes which converge forwardly about a forwardly projecting tip to provide fluid pressure jets for dislodging solids accumulations in the pipe. Additional fluid pressure jet ports extend outward through the side of the body on axes which diverge angularly rearward to provide fluid pressure jets which assist forward movement of the nozzle and rearward expulsion of solids removed from the pipe.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 Davis 11 3,744,723 1 July 10, 1973 PIPE CLEANING NOZZLE [76] Inventor: Donald W. Davis, 9500 NE. 72nd Avenue, Vancouver, Wash. 98665 [22] Filed: June 5, 1969 [21] Appl. No.: 830,656

[52] US. Cl 239/543, 239/560, 239/D1G. 13 [51] Int. Cl. BOSb l/26, F23d 11/36 [58] Field of Search 239/556, 543, 106, 239/544; 134/166 C, 167, 167 C, 168 C, 169 C; 15/ 104.06

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,803,425 5/1931 Cunningham [34/167 C UX 1,855,646 4/1932 Oberhuber 15/104.06 2,318,769 5/1943 Freeman et a1 239/543 X 2,568,347 9/1951 Lundelius 134/167 C X 2,647,800 8/1953 Bumam et al. 239/543 2/1956 Pletcher 134/167 C X 2,735,794 2,964,248 12/ 1960 O'Brien et al. 239/544 3,080,265 3/1963 Maasberg 134/167 C X Primary Examiner-Lloyd L. King Attorney-Oliver D. Olson [5 7 ABSTRACT V The front end of a pipe cleaning nozzle body has a plurality of peripherally spaced fluid pressure jet ports therethrough arranged on axes which converge forwardly about a forwardly projecting tip to provide fluid pressure jets for dislodging solids accumulations in the pipe. Additional fluid pressure jet ports extend outward through the side of the body on axes which diverge angularly rearward to provide fluid pressure jets which assist forward movement of the nozzle and rearward expulsion of solids removed from the pipe 3 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures PATENTEDJ (975 3. 744. 723

FIG. I v v NTOR AGE NT DONALD w. DAVIS INVE PIPE CLEANING NOZZLE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to nozzles for removing solids accumulations from pipes by high velocity fluid jets, and more particularly to a nozzle of the class described having a novel construction affording substantially improved cleaning efficiency.

Pipe cleaning nozzles provided heretofore are characterized by inefficient cleaning action, requiring excessive time to achieve satisfactory results. Further, they are characterized by creating a back pressure which requires excessive manual effort to overcome the resulting resistance to forward movement of the nozzle through a pipe.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In its basic concept the nozzle of the present invention provides a plurality of high velocity fluid pressure jets which converge forwardly about a forwardly projecting tip to effect removal of solids from pipes with maximum speed and efficiency. Additional high velocity fluid pressure jets are directed angularly rearward to assist forward movement of the nozzle through a pipe and rearward expulsion of solids removed from the pipe.

It is by virtue of the foregoing basic concept that the principal objective of the present invention is achieved, namely to overcome the disadvantages of prior nozzles, as discussed hereinbefore.

The foregoing and other objects and advantages of the present invention will appear from the following detailed description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawing of the preferred embodiments.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING from the left in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a view in transverse section taken on the line 3-3 in FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a view in transverse section taken on the line 4-4 in FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary view in longitudinal section taken on the line 5-5 in FIG. 2.

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on the line 6-6 in FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary view in longitudinal section, similar to FIG. 5, showing a modified form of pipe cleaning nozzle embodying the features of this invention.

FIG. 8 is a view in transverse section taken on the line 8-8 in FIG. 7.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring first to the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 1-6, the pipe cleaning nozzle includes a hollow body 10 closed at its forward end by an integral transverse wall 12. The internal chamber 14 defined by the body and wall communicates with a source (not shown) of fluid under pressure by such means as an elongated pipe 16. The pipe is coupled to the body by such means as welding, or by the interengaging threads illustrated.

The source of fluid pressure generally is a source of high pressure water. However, it may be any other suitable liquid, air or other gas.

Extending through the front wall 12 of the body are a plurality of peripherally spaced jet ports 18 which communicate at their rearward ends with the chamber 14. There are three such ports in the embodiment illustrated. These ports are disposed with their longitudinal axes 18 converging forwardly of the body. Although these axes may be arranged to intersect at a common point on the longitudinal axis 10' of the body, it is preferred that they be offset angularly with respect to the longitudinal axis of the body (FIGS. 2 and 6) so that they do not intercept the latter axis. It has been found that this arrangement contributes beneficially to the speed and efficiency of removal of solids accumulations within a pipe.

Projecting forwardly from the front end of the body, and formed integral therewith, is a tip 20. Although the tip is illustrated as being of conical shape, it may be cylindrical, triangular, square, or any other shape desired. Further, the tip need not taper forwardly, as illustrated, the only requirement being that it not intercept the converging axes 18' of the jet ports 18.

In the embodiment illustrated the conical tip 20 converges forwardly from the outer periphery of the transverse wall 12. An elongated groove 22 is provided in the tip in registry with each of the jet ports 18. These grooves provide unobstructed channels for the high velocity fluid pressure jets emitted from the ports 18.

In the preferred embodiment illustrated, there is also provided a plurality of peripherally spaced fluid pressure jet ports 24 which communicate at their inner ends with the chamber 14 and which extend outwardly through the body angularly rearward with respect to the body. These ports provide rearwardly directed jets of high velocity fluid under pressure. These jets perform a dual function. First, they provide a thrust in the direction assisting forward movement of the nozzle through a pipe being cleaned, thereby materially reducing the manual effort required to move the nozzle for wardly through the pipe. Second, they accelerate the flow of fluid rearwardly through the pipe to assist the removal of dislodged solids from the pipe.

In the embodiment illustrated there is also provided a plurality of peripherally spaced fluid pressure jet ports 26 which communicate at their inner ends with the chamber 14 and which diverge outwardly through the front wall 12 of the body. These ports provide high velocity jets of fluid under pressure which are directed angularly forward to impinge upon the inner surface of the pipe being cleaned, to assist the fluid pressure jets through the converging ports 18. If desired, these forwardly diverging ports 26 may be omitted.

In the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. l-6 the tip 20 is made integral with the body 10. In the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 7 and 8 the tip is provided as a separate element adapted to be secured removably to the body. To this end the rearward portion of the tip is provided with a non-circular stem 28 arranged for removable reception in a correspondingly non-circular opening through the front wall 12 of the body. An internally threaded bore in the stem receives the threaded shank 30 of an attaching screw. The head 32 of the screw overlaps the adjacent portion of the inner surface of the front wall 12, for securingthe tip firmly to the body. A

gasket 34 is interposed between the screw head and front wall to provide a fluid tight seal.

The non-circular stem 28 and opening serve to orient the tip rotationally so that the grooves 22 register properly with the jet ports 18, as will be understood. If the configuration of the tip is such that its entire periphery is confined within the axes 18' of the ports 18, a circular stem and opening may be utilized.

The nozzle of the present invention functions effectively to clean pipes with maximum speed and facility. In this regard the term pipe as employed herein and in the appended claims in intended to include all types and varieties of pipes, tubings and conduits from which it is desired to remove solids accumulations resulting from simple plugging by debris, water hardness accumulations, chemical corrosion accumulations and many other factors.

In use, the nozzle is connected to a source of fluid under high pressure, as by means of a long pipe 16. With fluid under pressure being ejected through the ports as high velocity jets, the tip end of the nozzle is inserted into the pipe to be cleaned. The forwardly converging jets emitted from ports 18 function to break loose the solids accumulations forwardly of the tip 20 in a radially expanding manner. Although the tip may be employed as a ram or chisel in breaking up the solids, it has been found in most instances that maximum disruption of solids is achieved by the action of the converging jets. Thus, the tip serves primarily as a depth gauge by which to properly position the converging jets. In this regard the operator moves the nozzle forward in the pipe until the tip engages the solids accumulation, and then retracts the nozzle a distance predetermined to position the converging jets for optimum action.

The forwardly diverging jets from the ports 26 assist the converging jets from the ports 18 in breaking up the solids and removing the last traces from the inner surface of the pipe. The ejected fluid from these ports entrain the solids and flows rearward through the pipe. This rearward flow of fluid is enhanced by the jets emitted from the rearwardly directed ports 24. In addition, the jets from these ports provide a forward thrust to the nozzle, thereby minimizing the manual effort required for moving the nozzle forwardly through the pipe.

To illustrate the effectiveness of the nozzle of the present invention, it has been found by comparative tests with nozzles of the prior art that more thorough cleaning of a given length of substantially identically plugged pipes is achieved with the nozzle of the present invention in about one-fifth to about one-tenth the time required with nozzles of the prior art, and with significantly less manual effort on the part of the-operator.

It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various changes may be made in the size, shape, number and arrangement of parts described hereinbefore. For

example, it has been explained hereinbefore that the axes 18' of the jet ports 18 may be arranged to converge to a common point on the longitudinal axis 10 of the nozzle body, forwardly of the tip 20. The illustrated offset arrangement of these axes is preferred,

since the spiral action of the jets has a greater disruptive effect on the solids accumulation in the pipe. In similar manner, the jet ports 24 and 26 may be directed radially outward through the body, rather than angularly as illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 4. The arrangement illustrated is preferred since it provides a spiral motion to the jets to enhance removal and expulsion of solids from the pipe. The number of jet ports may be varied, as desired, as will be understood. The foregoing and other changes may be made without departing from the spirit of this invention.

Having now described my invention and the manner in which it may be used, I claim:

1. A pipe cleaning nozzle comprising a. a body having an external cross section smaller than the internal cross section of a pipe to be cleaned, for movement of said body freely through said pipe to be cleaned,

b. the body having a front wall and an internal cham-- ber adapted to be coupled, independently of the pipe to be cleaned, through an elongated supply pipe to a source of fluid under pressure,

c. a tip on the front wall of the body projecting forwardly therefrom, and

. a plurality of peripherally spaced fluid pressure jet ports through the front wall of the body communicating at their inner ends with the chamber and arranged on forwardly converging axes which are disposed outwardly of the tip and which may inersect each other only forwardly of it, for providing unobstructed convergence of high velocity jets of said source fluid forwardly of the tip.

2. The pipecleaning nozzle of claim 1 wherein the jet ports converge forwardly on axes offset angularly with respect to the longitudinal axis of the body so as not to intercept said latter axis.

3. The pipe cleaning nozzle of claim 1 including a plurality of peripherally spaced fluid pressure jet ports through the body communicating at their inner ends with the chamber and arranged on axes extending angularly outward in the rearward direction of the body, for directing high velocity jets of said source fluid rearwardly relative to the body simultaneously with-said forwardly converging jets, to assist forward movement of the body through the pipe to be cleaned and to accelerate the flow of said source fluid rearwardly through the pipe to be cleaned for assisting rearward removal of dislodged solids from said pipe.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1803425 *Jan 16, 1930May 5, 1931Mary CunninghamNozzle
US1855646 *Jul 3, 1928Apr 26, 1932Franklin Dev CorpSlug for cleaning condenser tubes
US2318769 *Nov 6, 1941May 11, 1943Rockwood Sprinkler CoMethod of making nozzles
US2568347 *Sep 21, 1946Sep 18, 1951Charles LundeliusDrain line cleaner
US2647800 *Mar 31, 1949Aug 4, 1953Thompson W BurnamFire extinguishing nozzle and distributor head
US2735794 *Jul 8, 1952Feb 21, 1956 fletcher
US2964248 *Nov 18, 1955Dec 13, 1960Spraying Systems CoPlural orifice fan shaped spray nozzle
US3080265 *Oct 26, 1960Mar 5, 1963Oskar Maasberg FaProcess and apparatus for cleaning waste-disposal systems
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4206313 *May 30, 1978Jun 3, 1980S. D. MeoPipe cleaning nozzle
US4403735 *Jul 31, 1980Sep 13, 1983Rolls Royce LimitedFluid operated nozzles for generation of vibrations in liquids
US4764180 *Jan 22, 1987Aug 16, 1988The Pullman Peabody CompanyMethod of manufacturing jet nozzles
US4819314 *Jul 11, 1988Apr 11, 1989The Pullman Peabody CompanyJet nozzles
US5421904 *Jan 7, 1994Jun 6, 1995Carlson; Gilbert B.Cleaning debris from sewage drain pipes; inserting a nozzle having a pipe-like body and having apertures on the sidewalls and at the end
US5706842 *Mar 29, 1995Jan 13, 1998The United States Of America As Represented By The Administrator Of The National Aeronautics And Space AdministrationBalanced rotating spray tank and pipe cleaning and cleanliness verification system
US7011158 *Sep 5, 2003Mar 14, 2006Jerry Wayne Noles, Jr., legal representativeMethod and apparatus for well bore cleaning
US20100025051 *Sep 20, 2007Feb 4, 2010Danfoss A/SSpray head for uniform fluid distribution
US20100206343 *Feb 12, 2010Aug 19, 2010Honda Motor Co., Ltd.Nozzle and foreign matter removing device
EP0030927A1 *Dec 10, 1980Jun 24, 1981Förenade FabriksverkenBlowing nozzle
WO2009024628A1 *Jun 20, 2008Feb 26, 2009Carracedo Alberto GonzaloDrain rehabilitation system using high-pressure water
WO2010089165A1 *Jan 11, 2010Aug 12, 2010Dürr Ecoclean GmbHLance
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/543, 239/DIG.130, 239/560
International ClassificationB08B9/053, B05B1/14, B05B13/06
Cooperative ClassificationY10S239/13, B05B1/14, B05B13/0627
European ClassificationB05B13/06C, B05B1/14