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Publication numberUS3745704 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 17, 1973
Filing dateDec 6, 1971
Priority dateDec 6, 1971
Publication numberUS 3745704 A, US 3745704A, US-A-3745704, US3745704 A, US3745704A
InventorsCovington J
Original AssigneeCovington J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Storm shutter installation
US 3745704 A
Abstract
There is disclosed a storm shutter installation for a building window wherein channels are affixed to the building adjacent the upper and lower parts of the window. A panel is inserted into the channels by placing the upper edge thereof in the upper channel, elevating the panel until the lower panel edge clears the lower channel, swinging the lower panel edge into alignment with the lower channel and lowering the panel into the lower channel. The lower channel is constructed so that the opening thereof may be positioned on either a horizontal sill or on a slanted sill and aligned with the upper channel. Means are provided for tightly grasping the panel in the lower channel.
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United States Patent [1 1 Covington 1 STORM SHUTTER INSTALLATION [76] Inventor: James B. Covington, 3926 Panama,

Corpus Christi, Tex. 78415 [22] Filed: Dec. 6, 1971 211 App]. No.: 204,874

[52] U.S. Cl. 49/57, 49/463 [51] Int. Cl E06b 9/02 [58] Field of Search 49/57, 61, 463, 50, 49/62, 63; 248/208; 52/202 [5 6] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,158,909 12/1964 Downs 52/202 2,988,786 6/1961 Roos 49/61 3,295,259 1/1967 Dallaire 49/463 X 2,504,702 4/1950 Krantz 49/61 1,657,908 1/1928 Wulftange 52/202 X 1,852,650 4/1932 Halberstadter 248/208 2,629,467 2/1953 Fry 49/463 X FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 687,915 6/ 1964 Canada [451 July 17, 1973 Primary Examiner-Mervin Stein Assistant Examiner-Philip C. Kannan Attorney-'G. Tumer Moller [57] ABSTRACT There is disclosed a storm shutter installation for a building window wherein channels are affixed to the building adjacent the upper and lower parts of the window. A panel is inserted into the channels by placing the upper edge thereof in the upper channel, elevating the panel until the lower panel edge clears the lower channel, swinging the lower panel edge into alignment with the lower channel and lowering the panel into the lower channel. The lower channel is constructed so that the opening thereof may be positioned on either a horizontal sill or on a slanted sill and aligned with the upper channel. Means are provided for tightly grasping the panel in the lower channel.

5 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures PAIENIE JU 1 7197s SHEEI 1 0F 2 r L WK l8 2-1 v i lw 4L J l V I filo 22 O so F so O 66 LEI L L FIG. I

i mil ls 34 FIG. 4

FIG 6 I INVENTOR JAMES B. COVlNGTON ATTORNEY I 'PATENIEB JUL 1 1 ma SHEU 2 BF 2 4/12; M mm L :k m 7 f Y B ATTORNEY STORM SHUTTER INSTALLATION BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The provision of storm shutters and the like for protecting a glass window during inclement weather is well known. Although numerous proposals have been made in the prior art, the presently accepted manner of protecting windows is the laborious approach of nailing or otherwise semi-permanently attaching plywood panels over the window.

Proposals for providing dernountable protective panels over a window are found in U.S. Pat. Nos. 2,568, 195; 2,572,764; 2,878,536 and Canada Patent No. 687,915. U.S. Pat. No. 2,572,764 and Canada Patent No. 687,915 are believed to be the most pertinent disclosures with respect to this invention. U.S. Pat. No.

2,572,764 discloses a downwardly facing channel adjacent the upper part of the window, an upwardly extending flange adjacent the lower part of the window and a protective panel captivated between the channel and the flange. Canada Patent No. 687,915 is somewhat similar and discloses an upper bracket adjacent the upper part of the window, a lower channel adjacent the lower part of the window and a panel secured therebetween to the building.

One feature of this invention is directed toward providing a channel which may rest on either a slanted sill or a horizontal sill. The problem of affixing an article in a generally upright position on both a slanted and a horizontal sill is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 1,852,650.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a front elevational view illustrating the invention in connection with a window, the sill of which is generally flush with the building wall;

FIG. 2 is a partial isometric cross sectional view of the storm shutter installation of FIG. 1 taken substantially along line 2--2 thereof as viewed in the direction indicated by the arrows;

FIG. 3 is a vertical cross sectional view of another embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 4 is a partial isometric view of the upper channel illustrating another embodiment thereof;

FIG. 5 is a partial vertical cross sectional view of one installation according to the invention, illustrating the placement of the lower channel on a horizontal window sill; and

FIG. 6 is a view similar to FIG. 5 illustrating the placement of the lower channel on a slanted window sill.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring to FIG. I and 2, there is illustrated a storn shutter 10 positioned in front of a window 12 which opens through a building wall 14 generall flush with the window sill. The storm shutter 10 comprises as major components a lower channel 16, an upper channel 18 and a panel 20 captivated by the channels l6, 18. The panel 20 is normally stored in any convenient location so that normal access to the window 12 is provided. The channels l6, 18 are placed relative to the window 12 to avoid interfering with normal visibility therethrough and normal opening thereof.

When it is desired to afford protection to the window 12, the panel 20 is taken from its storage location and the upper end thereof inserted into the opening of the channel 18. The panel 20 is elevated into the channel 118 until the lower panel edge clears the lower channel 16. The lower panel edge is then swung toward the window 12 until it is aligned with the opening in the channel 16. The panel 20 is then lowered into the channel 16 thereby completing the placemet of the panel 20. It will be apparent from FIG. 2 that the channels 16, I8 captivate the panel 20.

The lower channel 16 is of generally U-shaped configuration and comprises a first leg 22, a bight 24 and a second leg 26 which is generally convex toward the first leg 22. The second leg 26 conveniently includes a first section 28 merging with the bight 24 and a second section 30 merging with the first section 28 along an apex 32. The lower channel 16 also includes a lip or leg 34 projecting below the plane of the bight 24 as will be more fully apparent hereinafter.

It will be seen from FIGS. 2 and 3 that the lower channel 16 provides an opening 36 for receiving the lower end of the panel 20. It will also be seen that the distance between the apex 32 and the first channel leg 22 defines a minimum distance between the channel legs 22, 26. In one model constructed in accordance with the principles of this invention, the panel 20 has a thickness dimension t of one-half inch, the distance between the apex 32 and the first channel leg 22 is onehalf inch and the distance between the upper edge of the second section 30 and the first channel leg 22 is nine-sixteenths inches. In the model, the depth of the channel 16 from the top of the first leg 22 to the bight 24 is 1 inch. Also in the model, the apex 32 is about three-fourths inches above the bight 24'and the bight 24 is about five-eighths inches in length. It will be apparent, of course, that the principles of the invention are applicable in a storm shutter having panels and channels of various dimension.

The lower channel 16 may be secured adjacent the window 12 in any suitable fashion. Assuming for purposes of illustration that the first leg 22 is to be secured to a vertical wooden abutment, a plurality of beveled openings 38 are provided along the first leg 22 for receiving flathead wood screws. A like plurality of openings 40 are provided, each of which is in alignment with one of the openings 38. It will be apparent that the shank of a screwdriver may be passed through one of the openings 40 to engage a screw adjacent the opening The upper channel 18 is of similar, although not identical, configuration to the channel 16. The channel 18 accordingly comprises a first leg 42, a bight 44 and a second leg 46. The second leg 46 is generally convex toward the leg 42 and includes a first section 48 merging with the bight 44 and a second section 50 merging with the first section 48 along an apex 52. The first and second sections 48, 50 define therebetween an obtuse angle and, together, are convex toward the first leg 42.

It will be seen from FIGS. 2 and 3 that the upper channel 18 provides an opening 54 for receiving the upper end of the panel 20. It will also be seen that the distance between the apex 52 and the first channel leg 42 defines a minimum distance between the channel legs 42, 46. In the model previously mentioned, the distance between the apex 52 and the first channel leg 42 is one-half inch and the distance between the lower edge of the second section 50 and the first channel leg 22 is nine-sixteenths inches. The depth of the channel 18 from the bottom of the first leg 42 to the bight 44 is 2 inches. Also in the model, the apex 52 is about onehalf inch above the bottom of the channel 18. In the model, the bight 44 is about five-eighths inches in length. As previously mentioned, the principles of the invention are applicable in a storm shutter having panels and channels of various dimension. It will be seen that the channels l6, l8 define an area for the reception of the panel 20.

The upper channel 18 may also be secured adjacent the window 12 in any suitable fashion. Assuming for purposes of illustration that the first leg 42 is to be secured to a vertical wooden abutment, a plurality of beveled openings are provided along the first leg 42 for receiving flathead wood screws 56. A like plurality of openings 58 are provided, each of which is in alignment with one of the openings 56. It will b apparent that the shank of a screwdriver may be passed through one of the openings 58 to engage the screw 56 adjacent the aligned opening.

As shown in FIG. 2, the panel 20 is shorter than the distance between the bights 24, 44, and is also shorter than the distance between the bight 44 and the top of the channel 16. Accordingly, the panel 20 can be elevated fully into the channel 18 so that the lower panel edge clears the top of the channel 16 during placement of the panel 20. In the model previously mentioned, the distance between the bight 44 and the top edge of the panel 20 is 1 541 inches. As previousy mentioned, the first step in the placement of the panel 20 is the insertion of the upper panel edge into the opening 54 provided by the channel 18. The panel 20 is inclined slightly to the axis of the opening 54 during insertion. Since the thickness of the panel 20 is preferably substantially equal to the minimum dimension of the opening 54, the leg 46 is preferably cammed away from the leg 42 to allow movement of the panel 20 past the apex 52. When the panel 20 is swung into alignment with the channel 16, the second leg 46 returns to its initial position so that the minimum width of the channel 18 substantially equals the thickness of the panel 20 thereby firmly grasping the panel 20. When the panel 20 is lowered into the channel 16, the second leg 26 thereof may be cammed away from the first leg 22 in the event the thickness of the panel 20 is slightly oversized. In any event, it will be apparent that the lower panel end is grasped by the lower channel 16 along the apex 32.

The panel 20 is illustrated as comprising a plywood sheet. In the model previously mentioned, the plywood has been painted thereby adding slightly to the thickness of the panel 20 and ensuring that the channels 16, 18 grip the plywood. It will be apparent that the panel 20 may be made of any suitable material.

Although the illustration of FIGS. 1 and 2 disclose the panel 20 as being on the outside of the building, there are some situations where it is necessary or desirable to place the panel 20 on the inside of the building covering the window. For example, multi-story office buildings often include large expanses of stationary glass. Breakage of such glass can create significant problems particularly in libraries, file rooms or the like having documents which are susceptible of being blown through the broken window. In such places, the panel 20 may conveniently be placed on the inside of the window to avoid loss of value papers and the like even if the window should break.

Referring to FIG. 1, two distinct features of the invention are illustrated. The panel 20 preferably includes a plurality of fingerholes or apertures 60 so that the panel 20 may conveniently be handled. The fingerholes 66 have an additional function. During episodes of high wind, for example during hurricanes, it is desirable to prevent the air pressure between the panel 20 and the window 12 from changing substantially. The fingerholes 60 assure that the air pressure in the space 62 between the panel 20 and the window 12 remains at substantially atmospheric pressure. The second feature illustrated in FIG. 1 comprises means 64 for laterally restraining the panel 20 within the confines of the channels 16, 18. The restraining means 64 may coinprise aligned apertures 66, 68 in the channels 16, 18 respectively and suitable pins 70, 72. Since the panel 20 is inserted transversely into the panel receiving area, the pins 70, 72 may be permanently affixed to the channels l6, 18.

Referring to FIG. 3, another feature of the invention is illustrated. As previously mentioned, the panel 20 is grasped by the channels l6, 18 along the apexes 32, 52 respectively. The feature illustrated in FIG. 3 provides for more positive gripping of the panel 20 by the channels l6, 18. There is illustrated adjacent the upper and lower ends of the panel 20 one or more protuberances 74, 76 respectively. The protuberances 74, 76 may be provided in any desirable fashion. A convenient approach is the use of wood screws 78, 80 having a semispherical head which comprises the protuberances 74, 76.

In the installation of the panels 20, the approach illustrated in FIG. 3 differs slightly from the approach in FIG. I. When the panel 20 is inserted in the opening 54 of the channel 18 and elevated upwardly thereinto, the protuberances 74 cams the second channel leg 46 away from the first channel leg 42 allowing the protuberance 74 to pass the apex 52. As the protuberance 74 passes the apex 52, the second channel leg 46 snaps toward the first leg 42 with a discernible click. After the lower end of the panel 20 is moved into alignmen with the channel 36, the panel 20 is lowered. As the panel 20 is lowered, the protuberance 74 again moves past the apex 52 at about the same time the protuberance 76 moves under the apex 32. It will be seen that the panel 28 is snapped into the lower channel 16 while the second section 50 is biased against the protuberance 74. It will be appreciated that the panel 20 cannot readily be displaced from the channels 16, 18 with either the arrangement of FIG. 1 or of FIG. 3 since the panel 20 is grasped by the channels.

In FIG. 4 there is illustrated a slightly different embodiment of an upper channel. The upper channel 82 is substantially identical to the channel 18 except that a series of apertures 84 has been provided in the bight thereof in order to secure the channel 82 to a horizontal member above the channel 82. As will be appreciated, suitable screws or other fasteners may be inserted through the apertures 84. The opening into the channel 82 affords suitable clearance for a tool. It will be apparent that the lower channel 16 may be similarly modified to afi'ix the bight 24 to an underlying surface.

Referring to FIGS. 5 and 6, the advantages of the lip or leg 34 is illustrated. In FIG. 5, the window 86 closes against a horizontal sill 88 which spans the window opening across the building wall 90 in a conventional manner. The channel 16 is secured to the sill 88 so that the leg 34 overlaps the front face of the sill 88. It will be apparent that the channel 16, in conjunction with the channel 18, defines an area 92 for the reception of the panel 20. in the particular embodiment illustrated, the area 92 is generally planar which is convenient but not necessary. It will be apparent that the bight 24 and the lip 34 define a enerally triangular area free of obstructions for receiving the sill 88.

Referring to FIG. 6, a window 94 is illustrated as closing against a metal channel 96 which spans the window opening across a brick veneer wall 98. As is typical in brick veneer housing, an inclined brick sill 100 is provided adjacent the window 94. Typically, the sill 100 is downwardly inclined to the horizontal about 7. The leg 34 is of such a length that the area 102, defined by the channels 16, 18, is substantially vertical. It will accord ingly be seen that the provision of the leg 34 orients the opening 36 generally vertically so that the channel 16 may be used on window sills which are either horizontal as illustratedin FIG. 5 or downwardly inclined as illustrated in FIG. 6.

I claim:

1. A storm shutter installation comprising an enclosure window including a sill adjacent the lower part thereof;

a stationary downwardly opening upper channel adjacent the upper part of the window; and

a stationary upwardly opening lower channel resting on the sill and cooperating with the upper channel for supporting and captivating a panel;

the lower channel including means integral therewith for orienting the channel opening generally vertically if the sill is either horizontal or inclined downwardly away from the window, the orienting means comprising a member extending from the bottom of the lower channel away from the upper channel, the bottom of the member providing a support for abutting a downwardly inclined sill for maintaining the lower channel opening generally vertical, the member and the bottom of the lower channel defining a generally triangular section free of obstructions for receiving therein the comer of a generally horizontal sill.

2. The installation of claim 1 wherein the lower channel is of generally U-shaped cross section having vertical legs projecting toward the downwardly opening channel and a horizontal wall spanning the legs, the member projecting away from the upper channel in a direction generally opposite to the leg further from the window.

3. The installation of claim 1 wherein the lower channel includes a first upstanding leg near the window;

a second upstanding leg further from the window;

the second upstanding leg extending below a generally horizontal plane through the lower end of the first leg; and

the lower end of the first leg, the plane and the second leg below the plane defining a generally triangular section free of obstructions.

4. The storm shutter of claim 1 wherein the sill is horizontal and provides a corner, the comer being received in the triangular section.

5. The storm shutter of claim 1 wherein the sill is downwardlyinclined from the window, the bottom of the member being supported on the sill and maintaining the opening generally vertical.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4287683 *Jan 21, 1980Sep 8, 1981Louwenaar David WSolar shield
US4384436 *Sep 10, 1981May 24, 1983Green Michael ACombination hurricane shutter and security grill
US4478002 *Sep 30, 1982Oct 23, 1984Interior Security Corp.Interior security window panel
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Classifications
U.S. Classification49/57, 52/202, 49/61, 49/463
International ClassificationE06B9/02, E06B9/04
Cooperative ClassificationE06B9/04
European ClassificationE06B9/04