Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3746003 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 17, 1973
Filing dateSep 23, 1971
Priority dateApr 20, 1970
Also published asCA983801A1, DE2119172A1, DE2119172B2, DE2119172C3, US3634924
Publication numberUS 3746003 A, US 3746003A, US-A-3746003, US3746003 A, US3746003A
InventorsB Bett, L Blake, C Lieber
Original AssigneeAmerican Hospital Supply Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Multi-lumen balloon catheter
US 3746003 A
Abstract
A multi-lumen tube is extruded from a thermoplastic material having a memory characteristic. An end portion of the tube is heated sufficiently to soften the plastic and permit the end portion to be drawn out to a reduced diameter. A pair of metal ferrules is placed on the reduced end portion in predetermined positions spaced a short distance apart. Then the reduced portion is heated in relaxed condition cuasing it to re-expand and lock the ferrules in place. Balloon inflation openings are formed communicating with one of the lumens. A sleeve of balloon material is secured by bindings over the ferrules. In one embodiment the tube is limp and the balloon is utilized as a sail to flow carry the catheter through a vein into and through the heart and into the pulmonary artery. This application is directed to the article resulting from the described method of manufacture.
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Umted States Patent 1 1 3,746,003 Blake et al. 1 July 17, W73

[ MULTl-LUMEN BALLOON CATHETER [75] Inventors: Lawrence W. Blake, Newport j f 'f g' g Truluck Beach;Bruce D. Bett, Capistrano tmmey ee c ermer 0m Beach; Clement E. Lieber, Yorba Linda, all of Calif.

[73] Assignee: American Hospital Supply Corpora- [57] ABSTRACT tion, Evanston, Ill.

[22] Filed; Sept 23, 1971 A multi-lumen tube is extruded from a thermoplastic material having a memory characteristic An end por- PP' N05 183,104 tion of the tube is heated sufficiently to soften the plas- Related s Application Data tie and permit the end portion to be drawn out to a re- [62] Division of No 29 889 A r 20 1970 Pat NO duced diameter. A pair of metal ferrules is placed on 3 634 p the reduced end portion in predetermined positions spaced at short distance apart. Then the reduced por- 52 US. Cl 128 349 B is heated in relaxed condition cuasing Int I A61m/25/00 expand and lock the ferrules in place. Balloon inflation [58] Field of 325 344 openings are formed communicating with one of the 349 6 lumens. A sleeve of balloon material is secured by bindings over the ferrules. In one embodiment the tube is [56] References Cited limp and the balloon is utilized as a sail to flow carry the catheter through a vein into and through the heart UNITED STATES PATENTS and into the pulmonary artery. This application is difi' at rected to the article resulting from the described a 2,930,377 3/1960 Cowley 128/344 method manufacture 3,634,924 1/1972 Blake et al. 128/349 B X FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 8 Clams 9 Drawmg F'gms $82,423 10/1924 France 128/246 llq I [/1 I/lI/I II IIIIIIII PAIEN TED JUL 1 7 SHEEI 1 0F 2 INVENTORS NCE w.

AKE

BL T LAWRE BRUCE BgJ LEME 6 D. BET

NT E. Ll EBER flitorney MULTI-LUMEN BALLOON CATHETER CROSS-REFERENCES TO RELATED APPLICATIONS This application is a division of copending application Ser. No. 29,889, filed Apr. 20, 1970, now US. Pat. No. 3,634,924.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to multi-lumen ballon cathethers and to an improved flow directed catheter.

In catheters which are very small in diameter the balloon cannot be formed by a dipping process as are the balloons on the larger drainage catheters. The most satisfactory balloon construction has proved to be a very thin elastic sleeve secured at its ends to the catheter tube by windings of fine thread. There is a tendency, however, for the plastic in the thin wall sections of a small tube to yield and creep under the pressure of the windings, choking off the lumens in the tube. This makes it difficult to construct a multi-lumen catheter of small enough size to pass freely through small arteries and veins and especially when the catheter tube is soft and limp as in the case of aflow directed catheter.

Objects of the invention are, therefore, to provide an improved multi-lumen ballon catheter, to provide improved flow capacity in small multilumen catheters, to provide an improved support for the balloon windings, and to provide an improved flow directed catheter.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In the present construction, multi-lumen catheter tubes are economically produced by extrusion of a thermoplastic material having a memory characteristic. The novel process steps comprise heating an end portion of the tube sufficiently to permit drawing out said portion of the tube to reduce diameter, applying a pair of metal ferrules over the reduced diameter portion of the tube, heating said end portion of the tube sufficiently to re-expand the tube and lock the metal fer rules in place, applying an elastic sleeve-type of balloon and binding end portions of the balloon over the metal ferrules.

The plastic material under the ferrules is thus not subject to the binding pressure and does not yield or creep causing constriction of the lumens. Catheters of very small size may be made in this manner and the method is of particular advantage in making flow directed catheters having a soft andlimp tube. This application is directed to the article resulting from the described method of manufacture.

The invention will be better understood and additional objects and advantages will become apparent from the following description of the preferred embodiments illustrated in the accompanying drawings. Various changes may be made, however, in the details of construction and arrangement of parts and in the details of the method and all such modifications within the scope of the appended claims are included in the invention. The present catheters are not limited to use in veins and artieris but may also be used in the biliary system and elsewhere as will be understood by persons skilled in the art.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a schematic illustration of the first step in the method of the invention;

FIG. 2 illustrates a second step;

FIG. 3 illustrates a third step;

FIG. 4 illustrates a fourth step;

FIG. 5 illustrates the final step;

FIG. 6 is a longitudinal sectional view of the completed catheter tip;

FIG. 7 is a view on the line 7--7 in FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is a view on the line 8-8 in FIG. 6; and

FIG. 9 is a longitudinal sectional view of a flow di* rected catheter embodying the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Tube 10 is formed as an extrusion of a suitable thermoplastic material having a memory characteristic such as polyvinyl chloride. This extrusion contains a large through lumen 11 of approximately semicircular shape in cross section as shown in FIG. 7 and a small circular balloon inflation lumen 12. The extrusion is cutoff to the desired length and the end portion which is to receive the balloon is heated with hot water 13 as shown in FIG. I. The heated and softened portion of the tube is then drawn by pulling in opposite direction with the fingers as indicated by arrows 14, causing the softened portion 15 to neck down to reduced diameter. This drawing step does not impair the integrity of the lumens 11 and 12.

After the drawing step, end portion 16 is cut off as shown in FIG. 2 and a pair of rigid ferrules 20 and 21 of suitable material such as stainless steel is placed on necked portion 15. These circumferential bands are placed in appropriate position for the balloon windings and the necked portion of the tube is re-expanded by heating with heat lamp 22 as shown in FIG. 3. In this re-expansion step, utilizing the memory characteristic of the plastic, necked portion 15 returns to its original diameter forming shoulders 25 which securely lock the ferrules 20 and 21 in place in indentations in the tube. The ferrules preferably have an outside diameter slightly less than the original diameter of the extrusion.

The memory characteristic referred to is theresult of crystalline structures set up within some of the polymer chains. When such material is heated under tension, these chains tend to untangle and straighten out. As long as the yield point is not exceeded, i.e., the chains are not broken, the material will return to its original form if reheated and not constrained. One of the advantages of polyvinyl chloride for the present purpose is that it will undergo a great deal of elongation before reaching its yield point.

The re-expansion step in FIG. 3 also restores the lumens 11 and 12 to approximately original size. A cylindrical plug 26 of suiatable material such as polyvinyl chloride is secured in lumen 12 by a solvent bonding material. This plug is of sufficient length to extend from the cut end 27 of the tube to a point a short distance on the proximal side of ferrule 21.

Then a round wire 30 is inserted temporarily in lumen 11 as indicated in FIG. 4 and a tapered tip 31 is formed on the end of the tube by a heated die. The heat of the die causes the outer end portion of plug 26 to lose its identity and merge into the material of the tube as indicated by broken lines at 32. in FIG. 6. When the tip forming operation is completed, wire 30 is removed leaving a round opening 11a at the end of lumen 11. In the tip forming operation wire 30 is held in concentric axial position within the tube so that opening Illa will be in the center of the tube.

A plurality of balloon inflation openings 33 are formed intersecting the lumen 12 and an elastic balloon sleeve 35 is pulled over the tube. The ends of the balloon sleeve are secured by windings 40 of suitable material such as Dacron (Trademark) thread overlying the ferrules 20 and 21 as shown in FIG. 5. These ferrules provide a solid backing for the windings whereby the lumens l1 and 12 are not constructed regardless of the tightness of the windings. Windings 40 may be substantially contained within the indentations in the tube created by the ferrules whereby the baloon portion of the catheter has approximately the same diameter as the rest of tube 10. Thus, as shown in FIG. 6, both the inside and outside diameters of ferrules 20 and 21 may be less than the outside diameter of tube 10.

In use, the catheter is passed through a vein or artery or other body lumen until the tip reaches the area under investigation. The proximal end of the catheter tube, not shown, is equipped with the usual fittings providing fluid connections with the lumens l1 and 12. The introduction of baloon inflation fluid under pressure into lumen 12 expands the baloon 35 sufficiently to occlude the body lumen. Lumen 11 may be utilized for injection of therapeutic or diagnostic agents, sampling of a body fluid or pressure monitoring.

The extrusion may contain more than two lumens and a second baloon may be applied to the tube in the same manner on the proximal side of baloon 35 if desired.

FIG. 9 shows a highly flexible catheter embodying the invention for introduction percutaneously into a peripheral vein for flow guide catheterization of systemic veins, the right heart and pulmonary vessels. Tube 50 is extruded from a suitable thermoplastic material having a memory characteristic, such as soft polyvinyl chloride. The method steps essentially as shown in FIGS. 1 to are utilized for application of the two rigid ferrules 51 and 52 of a suitable material such as staniless steel. The catheter tube has a baloon inflation lumen 53 and a through flow lumen 54, the tube being flexible to the extent of being completely limp.

For application of the ferrules, the distal end portion of the tube is heated and drawn out to shrink its diameter as shown in FIG. 1 and the ferrules applied as shown in FIG. 2. The heating step in FIG. 3 utilizes the memory characteristic of the plastic to re-expand the tube, forming shoulders 55 which lock the ferrules in place in indentations in the tube. A longitudinal baloon inflation slit 56 intersecting the lumen 53 is formed by a rotary cutter. The end of lumen 53 is closed by a plug 57 and a contoured tip 58 is die formed on the end of the tube as described in connection with FIG. 4. Ferrule 52 is positioned very close to the end of the tube for a reason which will presently appear.

The distal end of balloon 60 is everted under Dacron (Trademark) winding 61 overlying ferrule 52 and winding 62 overlying ferrule 51 is applied to the proximal end of the balloon as shown. When the baloon is inflated it assumes the shape as shown in broken lines at 60a having a fold forming an annular bulge at 65 which preferably projects beyond and, in any event, forms a guard around the tip end 58 of the catheter tube. Tip 58 is contained in a dimple in the end of the balloon.

A second balloon may also be provided, if desired, spaced a short distance in a proximal direction from the balloon and inflated from lumen 53 or from a second balloon inflation lumen. If such case, four ferrules would be applied as shown in FIG. 2 instead of two ferrules. The tube 50 may also include additional lumens 54. When there are two balloons, there may be an additional lumen having an external port opening between the two balloons. There may also be a still further lumen having an external port opening on the proximal side of the second balloon, if desired.

Balloon 60 acts as a sail to transport appropriate sensor devices in the catheter into the central circulation. The balloon forms a blunt body which is subjected to the drag force of the blood flowing past it, causing the balloon to pull the catheter along with it. For example, with the balloon deflated, the catheter may be inserted into an ante-cubital or other peripheral vein. When the balloon is inflated, it will flow carry the catheter thorugh the right heart chambers and into the smaller radicals of the pulmonary artery so that pulmonary capillary wedge pressure may be measured. If the balloon is deflated at this point, pulmonary arterial pressures are measured; when the balloon is inflated, wedge pressure is again seen. The catheter is allowed to advance to the desired destination. Thus, the catheter in FIG. 9 may be used for pressure monitoring, blood sampling or infusion without fluoroscopy and with a minimal hazard to the patient. The field of use is in no way limited, however, to the particular example described.

When the balloon 60 is inflated, the annular bulge prevents point contact of the tip of the catheter tube with the heart or artery wall. The presence of the balloon around the tip of the catheter alters the catheter system from one with a point force to one with forces dispersed over a surface. This markedly reduces the incidence and significance of ventricular extra-systoles which are occasioned by the pressure of a catheter tip on the endocardial and the subendocardial tissues. This is of critical importance in the management of seriously ill patients in whom an arrhythmia, even of transient duration, may prove to be fatal.

Having now described our invention and in what manner the same may be used, what we claim as new and desire to protect by Letters Patent is:

l. A balloon catheter comprising a relatively soft plastic tube having a balloon inflation lumen therein, the wall of said tube having a balloon inflation opening therein communicating with said lumen, a rigid circumferential band indented in the outer surface of said tube on the distal side of said opening, a rigid circumferential band indented in the outer surface of said tube on the proximal side of said opening, an elastic sleeve balloon surrounding said tube and having end portions overlying said bands, and bindings securing said end portions of said balloon to said bands, said bands underlying and supporting said bindings on said soft tube and preventing collapse of said lumen.

2. A catheter as defined in claim I wherein said tube has a second lumen therein in side by side relation to said balloon inflation lumen.

3. A catheter as defined in claim 1, said bands having both inside and outside diameters less than the outside diameter of said tube.

4. A catheter as defined in claim 1, said balloon inflation opening comprising a longitudinal slit in said tube.

5. A catheter as defined in claim 1, wherein the distal end of said balloon is everted causing an annular bulging fold in the balloon to surround the distal end of said tube when the balloon is inflated.

6. A balloon catheter is comprising a plastic tube having a balloon inflation lumen therein, a pair of rigid ferrules indented in the outer surface of said tube in longitudinally spaced relation adjacent the distal end of said tube, an elastic sleeve balloon having opposite end portions overlying said ferrules, and bindings securing said balloon to said ferrules, the wall of said tube havtion opening comprising a longitudinal slit in said tube.

7 3 1 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE v n n i CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent N 3,7 6, 3 Dated Julv 17. 1973 Inventofls) T Lawrence W. Blake, Bruce D. Bett and Clement E. Lieber It isicertifiedihet [error eppears in the above-identified patent and that :seid Lettere Patent are hereby contacted as shown below:

T 1 plain [Sf'l'AbstTactQ "cussing" should read causing- T Column 1; line 26, "ballon should read balloon ----5 T line 61, I "artieris" should read arteries h Column 2! line 514, "suiatable" should read suitable Column 3, line 10, "constructed" should read constricted lines 13, 23, 2h, 29, 30, hl, 51 and 61 (second occurrence) "baloon" should read balloon line hl, "staniless" should read stainless Column h, line 20, thorugh" should read through Column 5, line 5 (claim 6) "is comprising" should read 9- comprising The following claims should be included: i

9. A catheter as defined in claim 6 including a through flow lumen in T said tube in addition to said balloon inflation lumen T T 10 i A catheter as defined in claim 6 having substantially uniform out side diameter, said bindings being substantially contained in said indented portions-of said tube On the cover sheet, after the Abstract '8 Claims?" should read 10 Claims Signed sealed this 22nd day of January 197b,.

j (SEAL) Att-est:

EDWARDLM. FLET HER, JR. T RENE D. TEGTMEYER T Att esting Officer 1 I Acting Corrnnissioner of Patents V T

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US669910 *Mar 16, 1900Mar 12, 1901Joseph Parker BallIrrigating vaginal syringe.
US2930377 *Jun 2, 1958Mar 29, 1960Baxter Don IncSurgical tube
US3448739 *Aug 22, 1966Jun 10, 1969Edwards Lab IncDouble lumen diagnostic balloon catheter
US3634924 *Apr 20, 1970Jan 18, 1972American Hospital Supply CorpMethod of making multilumen balloon catheter
FR582423A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3812860 *Apr 5, 1973May 28, 1974Int Paper CoRetention catheter
US3937225 *Feb 4, 1974Feb 10, 1976Siemens AktiengesellschaftElectrode adapted for implantation
US4147169 *May 2, 1977Apr 3, 1979The Kendall CompanyBalloon catheter with balloon retaining sleeves
US4240433 *Jul 22, 1977Dec 23, 1980Bordow Richard AFluid aspiration device and technique for reducing the risk of complications
US4368739 *Apr 29, 1981Jan 18, 1983Nelson Jr Richard LLong intestinal catheter
US4543963 *Nov 22, 1983Oct 1, 1985Gessman Lawrence JMethod and apparatus for differentiating antegrade from retrograde P-waves and for preventing pacemaker generated tachycardia
US4575371 *Apr 16, 1982Mar 11, 1986Percy NordqvistUrinary catheter
US4577634 *Jul 2, 1985Mar 25, 1986Gessman Lawrence JMethod and apparatus for alleviating paroxysmal atrail tachycardia
US4692141 *Jan 29, 1986Sep 8, 1987Mahurkar Sakharam DDouble lumen catheter
US4733669 *May 24, 1985Mar 29, 1988Cardiometrics, Inc.Blood flow measurement catheter
US4770652 *Jul 18, 1986Sep 13, 1988Mahurkar Sakharam DMethod and apparatus for using dual-lumen catheters for extracorporeal treatment
US4808155 *Sep 16, 1987Feb 28, 1989Mahurkar Sakharam DSimple double lumen catheter
US5024655 *Sep 5, 1989Jun 18, 1991Freeman Andrew BEpidural catheter apparatus and associated method
US5042976 *Jan 12, 1988Aug 27, 1991Terumo Kabushiki KaishaBalloon catheter and manufacturing method of the same
US5084016 *Oct 23, 1990Jan 28, 1992Freeman Andrew BEpidural catheter apparatus with an inflation fitting
US5197951 *Feb 27, 1986Mar 30, 1993Mahurkar Sakharam DSimple double lumen catheter
US5211631 *Jul 24, 1991May 18, 1993Sheaff Charles MPatient warming apparatus
US5221255 *Oct 16, 1991Jun 22, 1993Mahurkar Sakharam DReinforced multiple lumen catheter
US5279598 *May 12, 1992Jan 18, 1994Sheaff Charles MPatient warming methods
US5336205 *Feb 25, 1993Aug 9, 1994Target Therapeutics, Inc.Flow directed catheter
US5348536 *Aug 2, 1993Sep 20, 1994Quinton Instrument CompanyCoextruded catheter and method of forming
US5364358 *Nov 5, 1991Nov 15, 1994Cardio-Search LimitedDevice for controlling the inflation of a balloon catheter
US5374245 *Apr 28, 1993Dec 20, 1994Mahurkar; Sakharam D.Reinforced multiple-lumen catheter and apparatus and method for making the same
US5403291 *Aug 2, 1993Apr 4, 1995Quinton Instrument CompanyCatheter with elongated side holes
US5451206 *Sep 20, 1994Sep 19, 1995Quinton Instrument CompanyTriple lumen catheter
US5489278 *Jan 30, 1995Feb 6, 1996Quinton Instrument CompanyCatheter with elongated side openings
US5538512 *Jul 8, 1994Jul 23, 1996Zenzon; Wendy J.Lubricious flow directed catheter
US5556390 *Mar 7, 1995Sep 17, 1996Quinton Instrument CompanyCatheter with oval or elliptical lumens
US5639276 *Sep 23, 1994Jun 17, 1997Rapid Development Systems, Inc.Device for use in right ventricular placement and method for using same
US5697965 *Apr 1, 1996Dec 16, 1997Procath CorporationMethod of making an atrial defibrillation catheter
US5720293 *May 18, 1994Feb 24, 1998Baxter International Inc.Diagnostic catheter with memory
US5730733 *May 31, 1996Mar 24, 1998Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Flow assisted catheter
US5797869 *Jun 7, 1995Aug 25, 1998Vas-Cath IncorporatedMultiple lumen catheter
US5807269 *Jun 7, 1995Sep 15, 1998Baxter International Inc.Thermodilution catheter having a safe, flexible heating element
US5830196 *Sep 19, 1996Nov 3, 1998Tyco Group S.A.R.L.Tapered and reinforced catheter
US5857976 *Jun 7, 1995Jan 12, 1999Baxter International Inc.Thermodilution catheter having a safe, flexible heating element
US5899892 *Nov 7, 1997May 4, 1999Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Catheter having distal fiber braid
US5947939 *Mar 14, 1997Sep 7, 1999Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Flow assisted catheter
US5961511 *Oct 28, 1998Oct 5, 1999Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Catheter having LCP reinforced distal portion
US5984946 *Feb 27, 1998Nov 16, 1999Gupta; MukeshDiagnostic and guiding catheter
US6193705Sep 3, 1999Feb 27, 2001Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Flow assisted catheter
US6206849Aug 25, 1998Mar 27, 2001Vas-Cath IncorporatedMultiple lumen catheter
US6280423Feb 23, 1999Aug 28, 2001Scimed Life Systems, Inc.High flow rate dialysis catheters and related methods
US6332892Mar 2, 1999Dec 25, 2001Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Medical device with one or more helical coils
US6355001May 13, 1996Mar 12, 2002Edwards Lifesciences CorporationThermodilution catheter method using a safe, flexible heating element
US6387052Apr 19, 1993May 14, 2002Edwards Lifesciences CorporationThermodilution catheter having a safe, flexible heating element
US6582390Nov 8, 2000Jun 24, 2003Endovascular Technologies, Inc.Dual lumen peel-away sheath introducer
US6595966May 16, 2001Jul 22, 2003Scimed Life Systems, Inc.High flow rate dialysis catheters and related methods
US6620202Oct 16, 2001Sep 16, 2003Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Medical stent with variable coil and related methods
US6656146Apr 27, 1999Dec 2, 2003Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Medical device with tail(s)
US6676623May 4, 2001Jan 13, 2004Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Drainage devices and methods
US6719804Oct 24, 2001Apr 13, 2004Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Medical stent and related methods
US6849069Nov 6, 1996Feb 1, 2005Boston Scientitfic CorporationMedical device with tail(s) for assisting flow of urine
US6945950Sep 12, 2003Sep 20, 2005Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Ureteral stent with small bladder tail(s)
US6991614Apr 4, 2003Jan 31, 2006Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Ureteral stent for improved patient comfort
US7008438Jul 14, 2003Mar 7, 2006Scimed Life Systems, Inc.Anchored PTCA balloon
US7014626Jun 24, 2003Mar 21, 2006Endovascular Technologies, Inc.Dual-lumen peel-away sheath introducer
US7037345Jun 27, 2003May 2, 2006Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Medical stent with variable coil and related methods
US7229429Mar 27, 2001Jun 12, 2007Vas-Cath Inc.Multiple lumen catheter
US7254946Apr 12, 1995Aug 14, 2007Edwards Lifesciences CorporationThermodilution catheter having a safe, flexible heating element
US7291180Jan 27, 2004Nov 6, 2007Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Medical stent and related methods
US7331933Dec 31, 2002Feb 19, 2008Advanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.Balloon catheter with a compression member for balloon bonding
US7410602Apr 22, 2003Aug 12, 2008Namic/Va, Inc.High flow rate dialysis catheters and related methods
US7510523 *Dec 16, 2004Mar 31, 2009Fujinon CorporationMethod for fixing one of balloon and tubular member, and medical equipment
US7537562Jan 28, 2005May 26, 2009Fujinon CorporationEndoscope apparatus
US7678154Jan 9, 2006Mar 16, 2010Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Ureteral stent for improved patient comfort
US7695466 *Jul 14, 2006Apr 13, 2010Beisel Robert FStylet free flexible-tip epidural catheter and method of making
US7704245Apr 13, 2004Apr 27, 2010Cook IncorporatedLarge diameter delivery catheter/sheath
US7785290Aug 7, 2006Aug 31, 2010Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc.Non-shortening high angle wrapped balloons
US7833154 *May 5, 2005Nov 16, 2010Olympus CorporationAutoclave sterilization-compatible endoscope
US7951206 *Nov 5, 2007May 31, 2011Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Medical stent
US7968038Mar 8, 2010Jun 28, 2011Cook Medical Technologies LlcLarge diameter delivery catheter/sheath
US8460240Aug 7, 2006Jun 11, 2013W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc.Inflatable toroidal-shaped balloons
US8529581 *Dec 4, 2012Sep 10, 2013J. Mathieu MassicotteMethod and device for extracting objects from the body
US8585640Jun 28, 2010Nov 19, 2013W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc.Non-shortening high angle wrapped balloons
US8597566Jul 24, 2009Dec 3, 2013W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc.Non-shortening wrapped balloon
US8636690Nov 2, 2009Jan 28, 2014W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc.Catheter balloons with integrated non-distensible seals
US20130096571 *Dec 4, 2012Apr 18, 2013J. Mathieu MassicotteMethod and device fo extracting objects from the body
EP0376451A2 *Nov 6, 1989Jul 4, 1990C.R. Bard, Inc.Dilatation catheter with fluted balloon
EP1543856A1 *Dec 14, 2004Jun 22, 2005Fujinon CorporationMethod for fixing a balloon to a tubular member, and medical equipment
EP1559362A2 *Jan 28, 2005Aug 3, 2005Fujinon CorporationEndoscope apparatus
EP2412399A1 *Aug 1, 2007Feb 1, 2012Gore Enterprise Holdings, Inc.Methods of forming catheter balloons with integrated non-distensible seals
WO1985003251A1 *Jan 25, 1985Aug 1, 1985Wirsbo Bruks AbMethod of manufacturing a plastic tube
WO2004060469A1 *Dec 23, 2003Jul 22, 2004Advanced Cardiovascular SystemBalloon catheter with a compression member for balloon bonding
WO2007011768A2 *Jul 14, 2006Jan 25, 2007Robert F BeiselImproved stylet free flexible-tip epidural catheter and method of making
WO2008021003A1 *Aug 1, 2007Feb 21, 2008Gore Enterprise Holdings IncCatheter balloons with integrated non-distensible seals
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/102.2
International ClassificationA61M25/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M25/1034, A61M2025/1065
European ClassificationA61M25/10G2
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jan 30, 1990ASAssignment
Owner name: BAXTER INTERNATIONAL INC.
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:BAXTER TRAVENOL LABORATORIES, INC., A CORP. OF DE;REEL/FRAME:005050/0870
Effective date: 19880518
Mar 2, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: BAXTER TRAVENOL LABORATORIES, INC. A CORP. OF DE
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:AMERICAN HOSPITAL SUPPLY CORPORATION INTO;REEL/FRAME:004760/0345
Effective date: 19870126