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Publication numberUS3746323 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 17, 1973
Filing dateJan 19, 1971
Priority dateJan 19, 1971
Publication numberUS 3746323 A, US 3746323A, US-A-3746323, US3746323 A, US3746323A
InventorsH Buffington
Original AssigneeH Buffington
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Device for mixing gases with liquid
US 3746323 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

O Umted States Patent 1 r111 3,746,323 Buffington [4 1 July 17, 1973 [54] DEVICE FOR MIXING GASES WITH LIQUID 2,263,892 11/1941 Schuer 261/DIG. 7 X Inventor: Herman L. Buffingto, 0 2,218,635 10/1940 Borgc 261/122 Partridge Road, Spartanburg, S.('T. FOREIGN PATENTS 0R APPLICATIONS [22] Filed: Jan. 19, 1971 193,886; 11/1937 Switzerland 261/122 PP N04 1072758 Primary ExaminerTim R. Miles Assistant ExaminerWilliam Cuclhlinski, Jr. 52 US. Cl. 261/122, 26l/D1G. 7 Attorney-Bailey and Dvrity [51] Int. Cl C02d 1/00 [58] Field of Search 261/122, DIG. 7; 57 ABSTRACT 55/410; 277/209 A device for mixing gases with a liquid carried in an r elongated vertical vessel for creating a large mass of 5 References Cited small bubbles which rise upwardly within the liquid to UNITED STATES PATENTS be absorbed thereby. The device can be readily disas- 3,573,295 5/1971 Hudson 26l/l22 sembled for cleaning, and has a filter medium therein 3,472,425 10/1969 B ooth et al. 26l/DlG. 7 X which minimizes clogging of the diff i main body 2,774,621 12/1956 Kllbourne, Jr. 277/209 X 1 3,637,197 1/1972 Hudson 261 /DlG 7 X 3 Claims, 7 Drawing Figures PAIENTEU l 1 1 m5 SHEU 1 [If 2 INVENTOR.

HERMAN L.BUFF|NGTON f/Illl/lf/l/flllf ATTORNEYS Pmcmmmm 3.746.323 sum 2 m 2 INVENTOR. HERMAN L. BUFFINGTON ATTORNEYS DEVICE FOR MIXING GASES WITH LIQUID This invention releates to a device for mixing gases with liquids, and more particularly to a device which can be readily assembled and disassembled, and can be readily carried within the bottom of a vessel.

One of the problems with stones and various other gas dispersing devices heretofore used, is that there is no means for readily providing access within the device so that foreign matter which may enter the device can be removed and prevented from clogging the stone or porous material used to disperse the gas. There are many stones and apparatus for mixing gases in liquids and some such devices are illustrated in U.S. Pat. No. 2,733,056 granted to Marky on Jan. 31, 1956, U.S. Pat. No. 2,226,958 granted to Zahm et al. on Dec. 31 1940, U.S. Pat. No. 3,472,425 granted to Booth et al. on Oct. 14, 1969 and U.S. Pat. No. 2,081,029 granted to Young on May 18, 1937. While these devices teach the broad idea of dispersing gas carbon dioxide within a liquid so as to produce a carbonated liquid, the material through which the gas is forced to produce the mass of bubbles-is not protected so as to minimize contamination and clogging by foreign matter.

"Accordingly, it is an important object of the present invention to provide a gas dispensing apparatus which can be readily assembled and placed in a vessel for dispersing gas in a mass of bubbles so that such can be absorbed within the liquid. Another important object of the present invention is to providea gas dispersing apparatus which can be readily disassembled so as not to become a health hazzard through continuous contamination with foreign matter. I i

Another important object of the present invention is to provide a gas dispersingapparatus which incorporates a filter and a pair of concave members carried in an overlying relationship so that gas can be fed in the center of the top member and the lower concave member diverts the gas radially outwardly therefrom in a uniform pattern. H w

The constructiondesigned to carryout the invention will be hereinafter described, together with other features thereof.

The invention will be more readily understood from a reading of the following specification and by reference to the accompanying drawings forming a part thereof wherein, an example of the invention is shown and wherein:

FIG. 1 is a side cross-sectional view illustrating a vessel equipped with a gas dispersing apparatus constructed in accordance with the present invention,

FIG. 2 is an enlarged cross-sectional view illustrating a gas dispersing device constructed in accordance with the present invention,

FIG. 2A is a plan view of the gas dispersing device constructed in accordance with the present invention,

FIG. 2B is a fragmentary enlarged cross-sectional view of a modified form of the gas dispersing device,

FIG. 3 is a plan view illustrating the top of the vessel,

FIG. 4 is a central verticalsection through the upper portion of the device of FIG. 1, taken along lines 4-4, and

FIG. 5 is a vertical section through the upper portion of the vessel, with the internal parts shown in end elevation.

Referring in more detail to the drawings, and in particular FIGS. 1, 2 and 2A, there is illustrated a device for mixing gases with a liquid comprising an elongated vertical vessel having a bottom therein adapted to be filled with the liquid with which the gas is to be mixed. The gas is suppled from any suitable conventional pressurized source of gas. The device includes a first concave disc-shaped member A carried adjacent the bottom of the vessel facing upwardly. A secon concave disc-shaped member B, which is complementary in size with the first concave member A, is carried in overlying relationship and faces the first concave member A. A threaded fitting is carried by the first concave member and extends upwardly. A threaded coupling is carried by the second concave disc-shaped member for engaging the threaded fitting for drawing the second concave disc-shaped member into contact with the first concave disc-shaped member A so as to define a cavity therein. Sealed means is interposed between the peripheral edges of the first and second concave members A and B, respectively. The second concave member B has a porous body. Tubular means extend between the pressurized source of gas and the threaded coupling for conveying gas from the pressurized source of gas into the cavity formed by the concave members. The gas is forced through the porous body into the liquid carried within the vessel creating a large volume of gas bubles which are mixed with the liquid. Any foreign matter entering the vessel through the tubular means is collected in the cavity. The first concave member can be separated from the second concave member B. by disengaging the threaded coupling from the fitting so as to provide access to the cavity in order to remove any foreign matter that may have collected therein.

Referring to the drawings in detail, FIG. 1 shows a gas charger, generally designated 10, consisting of an elongated cup-shaped vertical vessel or tank, generally designated 12, adapted to contain the liquid, such as water, to becharged with gas, such as carbon dioxide, and closed by a flanged cover plate 14 bolted or otherwise secured to the top of the tank 12. The gas charger 10 illustrated is so constructed that all of itscomponents are attached to the cover plate 14 so asto be capable of being withdrawn as a self-contained unit from the tank 12. The cover plate 14 is drilled and threaded with a gas inlet port 16, a liquid inlet port 18,.and a liquid outlet port 20 into which are threaded pipe fittings 22, 24 and 26, respectively for gas supply, water supply and water discharge, respectively. The cover plate 14 (FIG. 3) is also drilled centrally at 27 to receive the casing 28 of a tubular vent valve 30 tightly secured therein and threaded at its upper end to receive a gas vent fitting 32 to which is connected a coiled small bore vent-flow-retarding tube 34 (FIG. 1). Connected to the gas supply fitting 22 is a tubular coupling 36, to the lower end of which is secured one end of a coiled small bore gas supply tube 38, the other end of which issecured to a coupling 40 (FIG. 5). to which .is connected the rearward or upper end of a flexible gas supply tube 42 of resilient material, such as resilien'tpolyethylene synthetic plastic. The coupling 40 is bolted to the under side of the cover plate 14. A gas supply tube 42 passes through a pinch valve 44 on its way downward to the diffuser generally designated by the reference charac ter 43.

The diffuser 43 includes a first concave disc-shaped member A and a second concave disc-shaped member B complementary in size and shaped with the first concave member carried in overlying relationship with the first concave member A. A threaded coupling 45 is carried by the concave member A and extends through the bottom thereof. The coupling 45 has an enlarged head 45a which fits flush against the outer surface of the concave member A. The fitting 45 extends through a closely fitted hole into the cavity within the diffuser. The upper end of the fitting 45 has a vertical bore 45b extending therethrough which terminates in a plurality of radially extending bores 450 which direct the flow of gas coming therethrough into the cavity of the diffuser. The upper end of the fitting 45 is threaded so that a threaded coupling 46 extending through and carried by the second disc-shaped concave member B can be attached thereto. The threaded coupling 46 has an enlarged cylindrical head 46a which rests against the outer surface of the upper concave member B. A reduced diameter portion 46b extends through a closely fitted opening in the concave member B and has internal threades thereon which engage the threads on the fitting 45. The coupling 46 has an elongated bore extending therethrough for allowing the passage of gas from the supply tube 42 to the bores in the fittings. A sleeve 47 has a lower end threaded within the bore ex tending through the enlarged head 46a. The other end of the sleeve 47 extends above the enlarged head 46a for receiving the tube 42.-The tube 42 may be slipped over a reduced end of the sleeve 47 for securing such thereto. A plastic seal C is interposed between the peripheral edges of the first and second concave members A and B. Integral with the seal C is a plastic cylindrical filter member 49 which prevents trash that may enter through the bore 450 into the cavity from clogming and restricting the flow of gas through the porous concave member B. This filter medium may be constructed of any suitable material, and in one particular embodiment is integral with the seal C and is a criss-cross plastic mesh. The entire body of the concave member B is porous and is constructed of sintered steel. The porosity of the sintered steel can be varied so as to regulate the size of the bubbles desired which subsequently controls the rate of gas that will be absorbed in the liquid. The concave shape of the member B allows the mass of bubbles created by the gas flowing through the porous body to be diverted over a wider area than the normal stone type of diffuser. Also, the porousity of the main body of the concave member B can be so selected so that in combination with the regulating tube 38 produces the desired amount of pressure within the vessel.

The tubular member 42 which supports the diffuser is secured to a vertical gas charged liquid discharge pipe 52 by a bracket 49. The lower end of the discharge pipe 52 is open to the liquid chamber 54 within the vessel 12. The upper end of the liquid discharge pipe 52 is secured by a threaded coupling 58 FIG. 4) to the lower end of the threaded liquid discharge port 20 and the cover plate l4.

The pinch valve 44 (FIG. which controls the flow of gas through the flexible gas supply tube 42 consists of a tubular casing 58 (FIGS. 1 and 5) which is bored longitudinally for the reception of a reciprocable valve plunger 60, the upper end of which is pushed into and out of pinching engagement with the gas supply tube 42 by the forward end extension 62 of one of the arms 64 of a U-shaped valveoperating yoke 66 having a bridge portion or connection portion 68. The arms 64 are pivotcd at 70 near their forward ends 62 to slotted space parallel posts 72 secured to and depending from the cover plate 14. As a consequence, downwardly or clockwise swinging of the yoke arms 64 around their pivots pushes the pinch valve plunger 60 upward into pinching engagement with the gas supply tube 42 to shut off the flow of gas therethrough.

Near its junction with the side arms 64, the bridge portion 68 of the valve-operating yoke 66 is drilled to receive the hooked inner ends of tension coil springs 74 (FIGS. 4 and 5), the forward ends of which are hooked over the grooved outer ends ofa cross pin 76 which extends transversely through the drilled forward ends of a channel vent-valve-operating lever 78. The ventvalve-operating lever 78 is connected to an open container 80 which rises and falls with the level of liquid within the vessel. As the container drops its pulls the vent-valve-operating lever 78 downward and simultaneously activates the valve operating yoke 65 to pinch the restriction tube 42 closed.

In operation of the gas charger 10, let it be assumed that the fitting 34 is connected to a pressurized source of water of sufficient pressure to operate the device, that the fitting 22 is connected to a source of compressed gas, such as carbon dioxide and that the fitting 26 is connected to the faucet or other device for dispensing the gas charged liquid produced by the gas charger 10. At this time, both the tank 12 and the cup 80 are empty, and the vent valve 30 is in its closed position by the upward pull of the springs 82 so that its plunger 86 is in its raised position. When the operator turns on the water, it flows through the fitting 24 downward into the cup 80 immediately below it (FIG. 1) against a splash disc 88 filling the cup with water. The weight of the cup and water therein pulls the rod 88 downward. This action simultaneously swings the valve-operating yoke 66 downward around its pivots 70, the end extension 62 of one arm 64 thereof pushing the pinch valve plunger 60 upward within its casing 58, closing the pinch valve 44 by pinching the flexible gas supply tube 42 and opening the vent valve 30, as described below.

The downward swinging of the valve operating yoke 66 by its flexible connection through the tension springs 74 to the cross pin 76 on the vent-valveoperating lever 78 swings past dead center" thereof, namely from above the longitudinal axis thereof to below that axis, whereupon the tension of the spring 74 causes the vent valve operating lever 78 to swing suddenly downward with a snap action opening the vent' valve 30 to the atmosphere through the vent flow retarding tube 34. Meanwhile, the operator has turned on the gas control valve (not shown) which controls the flow of gas from the carbon dioxide cylinder or other gas supply source to the gas supply fitting 22.

The continued flow of water after filling up the cup 80 overflows its rim (FIG. 1) and consequently fills the tank chamber 54 with water. As the water level in the chamber 54 of the tank 12 continues to rise past the water filled cup 80, the latter gradually loses weight by Archimedes principle until' it is no longer heavy enough to counteract the upward force exerted by the tension suspension springs 82. As a result, the springs 82 pull upward on the central rod 88, whereupon the central rods 88 push upward causing the vent valve 30 to close.

Simultaneously with the closing of the vent valve 30, the upward swinging of the valve operating yoke 66 around its pivots 70 causes the end extension 64 on one arm thereof to move downward (FIG. 1) whereupon the pinch valve plunger 60 also moves downward in its casing 58, releasing its pinching action upon the resilient gas supply tube 42. The gas pressure within the gas supply tube 42 rounds out the tube from its previously pinched condition above the pinch valve plunger 60, causing the gas, such as carbon dioxide, to flow freely downward through the gas supply tube into the cavity of the diffuser 43. The gas streams outward and upward through the water or other liquid within the tank chamber 54 from the myriad of tiny pores in the difiuser disc 50 thereby charging the water with the gas.

When the operator opens the faucet or other valve in the pipe (not shown) connected to the gas charged water outlet fitting 26, such as when filling tumblers with soda water, the gas pressure beneath the cover plate 14 acting against the top surface of the liquid within the tank chamber 54 forces the gas charged liquid upward through the open end of the liquid discharge pipe 52 and outward through the fitting 26 to the place where it is being dispensed. The consequent fall in the liquid level within the chamber 54 of the tank 12 after repeatedly drawing upon the gas charge liquid therein eventually leaves the liquid filled cup 80 above the liquid level outside it, whereupon it regains its weight and the weight of the water within it.

The weight now pulls down on the central rod 88 to again shift the valve operating yoke 66 downward so as to again close the pinch valve 40 and cut off the incoming gas fiow while opening the vent valve 30 to discharge the gas in the upper end of the tank chamber 54 while it is being refilled with water or other liquid from the liquid supply fitting 24.

FIG. 2B illustrates a modified form of the invention wherein, the gasket C provides a more positive seal than the gasket illustrated in FIG. 2. The gasket C may be constructed of any suitable polymeric material, and has an enlarged end portion 49a against which the outer perimeter of the concave members A and B are drawn tightly thereagainst. The concave member is shown in the sealed position, while the concave mem ber B is shown spaced from the gasket C so as to show the gasket in the uncompressed state. In operation the the concave member B is brought tightly against the gasket similar to concave member A. The gasket extends inwardly from the enlarged head49a, and has a bead 49b carried on the upper and lower surfaces thereof. When the concave members A and B are drawn tightly against the gasket C a positive seal is provided between the bead 49b and the concave members as well as between the enlarged head 49a and the outer edge of the concave members B. This produces a more positive seal. A filter medium 49 is carried by the inner edge of the gasket C similar to that illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 2A.

While a preferred embodiment of the invention has been described using specificterms, such description is for illustrative purposes only, and it is to be understood that changes and variations may be made without departing from the spirit or scope of the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In a device for mixing gases with a liquid comprising an elongated vertical vessel having a bottom therein adapted to be filled with said liquid with which said gas is to be mixed, a pressurized source of gas, a first con cave disc-shaped member carried adjacent the bottom of said vessel facing upwardly, a second concave disc shaped member complementary in size and shape with said first concave member carried! in overlying relationship and facing said first concave member, a threaded fitting carried by said first concave member extending upwardly, a threaded coupling carried by said second concave disc-shaped member engaging said threaded fitting for drawing said second concave disc-shaped member closely adjacent said first concave disc-shaped member for defining a cavity therebetween, seal means interposed between the peripheral edges of said first and second concave members, said second concave member having a porous body, tubular means extending between said pressurized source of gas and said threaded coupling for conveying gas from said pressur' ized source of gas into said cavity formed by said concave members, said gas being forced through said porous body into said liquid carried in said vessel creating a large volume of gas bubbles for being mixed with said liquid and any foreign matter entering said vessel through said tubular means is collected in said cavity, said threaded coupling having a bore extending therethrough, said threaded fitting having a bore therein with one end communicating with said bore extending through said coupling and another end terminating in said cavity for conveying gas to a. lower portion of said cavity, a filter medium carried in said cavity between said another end of said bore and said second concave member for preventing foreign matter from reaching said porous body, and said first concave member being capable of being separated from saidsecond concave member by disengaging said threaded coupling from said fitting for allowing access to said cavity for cleanmg.

2. The device as set forth in claim 1, wherein said porous body of said second concave memberis constructed of sintered stainless steel.

3. The device as set forth in claim 1, wherein said seal means has an enlarged head against which said peripheral edges of said first and second concave members are carried, and a pair of opposed beads carried by said seal means for engaging said first and second concave members for providing a positive seal therebetween.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4006205 *Oct 14, 1975Feb 1, 1977Etter Berwyn EMeans for applying additives to industrial gas
US4093681 *Dec 13, 1976Jun 6, 1978Eaton CorporationMotorless carbonator
US4171069 *Jun 29, 1977Oct 16, 1979Mcquay-Perfex Inc.Beverage dispenser
US4225537 *Jun 3, 1976Sep 30, 1980Stephen MartonffyCarbonating device
US4271097 *Sep 20, 1979Jun 2, 1981Bruce GarrardGas and liquid ad-mixing system
US4313897 *Jan 30, 1980Feb 2, 1982Bruce GarrardGas and liquid admixing system
US4520950 *Jun 29, 1982Jun 4, 1985Cadbury Schweppes Public Limited CompanyIn-home drink dispenser
US4555371 *Jun 29, 1982Nov 26, 1985Cadbury Schweppes, PlcCarbonator for a beverage dispenser
US5021250 *May 26, 1989Jun 4, 1991Filtercold CorporationApparatus and method for dispensing purified and carbonated liquids
US5183595 *Dec 9, 1991Feb 2, 1993Schuessler Karl HDevice for gassing liquids
US5766490 *Jan 24, 1996Jun 16, 1998Life International Products, Inc.Oxygenating apparatus, method for oxygenating water therewith, and applications thereof
US5814222 *Mar 31, 1995Sep 29, 1998Life International Products, Inc.Oxygen enriched liquids, method and apparatus for making, and applications thereof
US5885467 *Nov 24, 1997Mar 23, 1999Life International Products, Inc.Method and apparatus for making oxygen enriched liquids
US5904851 *Jan 19, 1998May 18, 1999Life International Products, Inc.Oxygenating apparatus, method for oxygenating liquid therewith, and applications thereof
US6164632 *Aug 5, 1999Dec 26, 2000Mitsubishi Rayon Co., Ltd.Method for the preparation of a carbonate spring
US6390456 *Nov 30, 2000May 21, 2002Sen-Yung LeeBubble generating device
WO2003052046A2 *Dec 18, 2002Jun 26, 2003Anatoly Anatolyevich KutyevIndividual means for producing oxygen cocktail and the oxygen cylinder therefor
WO2003052046A3 *Dec 18, 2002Sep 18, 2003Anatoly Anatolyevich KutyevIndividual means for producing oxygen cocktail and the oxygen cylinder therefor
Classifications
U.S. Classification261/122.1, 261/DIG.700
International ClassificationB01F3/04
Cooperative ClassificationY10S261/07, B01F3/04808
European ClassificationB01F3/04C8G
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 13, 1987AS04License
Owner name: GERLACH INDUSTRIES, INC.
Owner name: SPECIALTY EQUIPMENT COMPANIES, INC.
Effective date: 19861110
Apr 13, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: SPECIALTY EQUIPMENT COMPANIES, INC.
Free format text: LICENSE;ASSIGNOR:GERLACH INDUSTRIES, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004701/0709
Effective date: 19861110
Owner name: SPECIALTY EQUIPMENT COMPANIES, INC.,STATELESS
Mar 7, 1984ASAssignment
Owner name: GERLACH INDUSTRIES, INC., 85 AND NEW CUT ROAD, SPA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:TANNETICS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004236/0530
Effective date: 19831117
Mar 7, 1984AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: GERLACH INDUSTRIES, INC., 85 AND NEW CUT ROAD, SPA
Owner name: TANNETICS, INC.
Effective date: 19831117