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Publication numberUS3746449 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 17, 1973
Filing dateOct 6, 1970
Priority dateOct 6, 1970
Also published asCA949743A1, DE2149870A1, DE2149870B2, DE2149870C3
Publication numberUS 3746449 A, US 3746449A, US-A-3746449, US3746449 A, US3746449A
InventorsSchick F
Original AssigneeDuro Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Headlight tester
US 3746449 A
Abstract
A device for use in determining the location of an edge of a pattern of a light source while either testing the alignment or aiming the low beam of a light source such as a No. 2 headlight, characterized by a pair of vertically spaced photoelectric devices which are located on a support such as a screen or board with one device above and one device below a predetermined desired position for the upper edge of the high intensity zone of a pattern of the light source and a second pair of photoelectric devices disposed on a separate support or the same board or screen on opposite sides of a predetermined desired position for the left edge of the high intensity zone of the pattern. Each pair of photoelectric devices is connected to a meter means such as a milliammeter which is capable of indicating a difference in the output of the two photoelectric devices of each pair. By relatively moving the pattern and the pairs of photoelectric devices either by aiming the headlight or by moving the support for the pairs of photoelectric devices to produce the greatest indication on the milliammeter, the edge, either the upper edge or the left edge of the high intensity zone, is aimed to coincide with the predetermined desired position.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1.

Schick July 17, 1973 HEADLIGHT TESTER [57] ABSTRACT 75 lnvemor; Frederick Schick Springfield L A device for use in determining the location of an edge of a pattern of a light source while either testing the alignment or aiming the low beam of a light source such [73} Asslgnee' Dura corporatlon Springfield as a No. 2 headlight, characterized by a pair of verti- [22] Fil d; O 6, 1970 cally spaced photoelectric devices which are located on a support such as a screen or board with one device [21 1 Appl. No.: 78,367 above and one device below a predetermined desired position for the upper edge of the high intensity zone of a pattern of the light source and a second pair of [52] US. Cl. r. 356/121 hotoelectric devices disposed on a separate support or {Sl Int. Cl. G01] 1/00 the game board or screen on opposite sides of a predel i Field Of Search 5 termined desired position for the left edge of the high 250/219 DR intensity zone of the pattern. Each pair of photoelectric devices is connected to a meter means such as a milli- [56] References Cited ammeter which is capable of indicating a'difference in UNITED STATES PATENTS the output of the two photoelectric devices oteach pair. By relatively moving the pattern and the pairs of 2,643,l l7 6/1953 Frisbie et al. 350/2l9 WD photoelectric devices either by aiming the headlight or yi i g g by moving the support for the pairs of photoelectric de- 310771139 2/1963 rzdh et al. .11: .11: 356/121 vices produce the greatest indium the mmiam Primary Examiner-R0nald L. Wibert Assistant Examiner-Conrad Clark At!0rney-Hill, Sherman, Meroni, Gross & Simpson meter, the edge, either the upper edge or the left edge of the high intensity zone, is aimed to coincide with the predetermined desired position.

4 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the lnvention The present invention is directed to an aiming or testing device and particularly to the photoelectric means used therewith.

2. Prior Art Proper alignment of a headlight or headlights on an automobile is required by various local, State and Federal requirements and correct alignment is concerned with the upper horizontal and left vertical edges of the high intensity zone of the headlight beam pattern. One lighting inspection code requires alignment of the low beam light pattemsuch as that of a number 2 type headlight so the upper horizontal edge of the high intensity zone of the headlight is at the height of the horizontal centerline of the headlight whenthe pattern is projected on a screen at a distance of 25 feet. The code also requires that the left edge of the high intensity zone of the pattern be displaced approximately 2 inches to the right of the vertical centerline of the headlight to minimize glare to oncoming drivers during nighttime driving conditions.

Many types of devicesand methods for properly aiming headlights and testing headlight alignment have been proposed. One method utilizes mechanical devices mounted on the built in aiming pads around the edge of the face of the headlight lens to position the plane of the aiming pads in correct relationship with the horizontal and vertical axes of the headlamp. However, due to manufacturing tolerances such as irregular beam patterns and variations in alignment of the plane of the aiming pads with the beam pattern edges, considerable variations in heart! aim can result.

A second method for either aiming headlights or testing headlight alignment utilizes a screen having reference marks or lines and the operator visually locates the edges of the high intensity zone of the light beam with respect to the predetermined reference lines. However, such a method requires a darkened work area and is subject to operator errorsdue to judgment variations between operators as to the position of the edge of the high intensityzone.

A third method utilizes a device having photoelectric sensitive cells arranged in a pattern to indicate the center of the high intensity zone of the lamp. In such a device, the aiming of the center of the high intensity zone is believed to properly aim the left-hand vertical edge and the upper horizontal edge. However, due to variations in the size and shape of the zone, such devices do not necessarily provide consistent aiming of the lefthand vertical edge and the upper horizontal edge. This method can use an apparatus which is positioned adjacent to the headlight and examples of the type of apparatus are illustrated in U.S. Pat. No.2,29l,l l4, Pat. No. 2,308,095 and U.S. Pat. No. 2,714,327. This method has also been used with an aiming screen such as disclosed in US. Pat. No. 3,077,139.

A fourth method for aligning the left-hand vertical edge and the upper horizontal edge of high intensity zone of a headlight beam utilizes a projection board and an arrangement of photoelectric cells such as disclosed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,386,333 and 3,467,473. In both of these patents three cells are aligned on a vertical line and three cells are placed on a horizontal line in a particular arrangement with regard to the desired reference lines for both the upper horizontal edge and the left-hand edge of the high intensity zone. In the device disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,386,333, the. output of each of the three cells is connected to a computer amplifier which obtains a factor or quantity by dividing the output of the cell disposed furthest in the high intensity zone by the difference of the intermediate cell minus the output of the cell disposed on the reference line.

When the edge is properly aimed, the quantity or factor has a minimum value. In the device disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,467,473, the outputs of the three cells are placed in a computer amplifier which takes the second differential of the output to give an indication which has its maximum value when the edge is properly aimed. Both of these systems are expensive to produce due to the electronic equipment necessary to utilize the outputs of the photo cells in the required mathematical formulas.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention comprises an arrangement of photoelectric cells for determining the location of an edge of a beam pattern from a light source and is utilized while either testing the alignment of a light source such as a headlight or aiming an edge of a beam pattern from the light source. The photoelectric cells are arranged on a support means such as'a screen or board as a spaced pair with a desired reference line or desired position for the edge extending therebetween and a pair of photoelectric cells is connected to a meter means, such as a milliammeter, which is connected in a manner to determine the difference in the output of the two photoelectric cells which difference is at a maximum when the edge of the high intensityzone coin cides with the predetermined reference line or desired position.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a lamp testing and aiming device capable of determining the location of an edge of the high intensity zone of a headlight-and aiming it at the proper position.

Another object of the presentinvention is to provide a device for headlight aimingand testing which determines the location of theedges of a headlight high intensity zone regardless of variations in the structure of the headlight.

A still further object of the present invention is a device for locating the edges of a highintensity zone of a headlight regardless of the operator's skill.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a device for locating the edges of the high intensity zoneof a light source which device is relatively inex pensive to manufacture.

Other objects, features and advantages of the invention will be readily apparent from the following description of a preferred embodiment thereof although variations and modifications may be effected without departing from the spirit and scope of the novel concept of the invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a plan view of the aiming board of the present invention;

FIG; 2 is a circuit diagram for the present invention;

FIG. 3, is a diagrammatic view showing the invention as used with a condensing lens and a smaller board or screen; and

FIG. 4 is a plan view of the board or screen of FIG. 3.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS The principles of the present invention are particularly useful in a headlight aiming and testing system for an automotive vehicle headlight which includes an aiming board or screen generally indicated at in FIG. 1. The board 10 has a horizontal line 1 1 which is a predetermined reference line for an upper horizontal edge 12 of the high intensity zone 13 of the light beam pattern. A second reference line 14 is a vertical line placed on the board at the predetermined position for the left vertical edge 15 of the high intensity zone 13.

One method of using this system would be to have photoelectric cells supported by the board 10 in which the headlight of the vehicle is located 25 feet in front of the board 10 with the horizontal centerline of the headlight coinciding with the horizontal reference line 1 l and with its vertical centerline located at a predetermined distance to the left of the reference line 14. As mentioned above, in one recommended procedure for testing or aiming, the vertical centerline of the headlight should be 2 inches to the left of the reference line 14. According to this recommended procedure, a tolerance of plus or minus 2 inches is allowed on the location of the upper horizontal edge 12 with respect to the reference line 11 and a tolerance of 2 inches to the left and 4 inches to the right is allowable in the position of the edge 15 with respect to the reference line 14.

To determine the position of the horizontal upper edge 12 and the left-hand edge 15 of the high intensity zone 13, four light-sensitive means such as photoelectric cells or devices 17-20 are utilized. The light sensitive means are of a type that convert light energy into electromotive force or to state it in another manner create electrical energy when exposed to light which amount of energy is proportional to the intensity of light being projected on the cell.

The photoelectric devices 17 and 18 are arranged as a pair and are vertically spaced from each other on a line extending substantially transversely to the horizontal reference line 11. As illustrated, the device 17 is disposed below the line 1 l and the device 18 is positioned above the line 11. The devices 19 and 20 are arranged on a horizontally extending line which is transverse to the reference line 14 which extends therebetween. As illustrated, the reference lines 11 and 14 which pass between the pairs of photoelectric devices are at a predetermined distance from each of the photoelectric devices of their respective pairs.

To measure the output of each of the two pairs of photoelectric devices, a meter means such as a milliammeter 23 or 24 is provided. The meter'23 is electrically connected to the photoelectric device 17 by leads 25 and 26 and is connected to the photoelectric device 18 by leads 27 and 28. The meter 24 is connected to the photoelectric device 19 by leads 30 and 31 and to the photoelectric device 20 by leads 32 and 33. As illustrated, each of the meters 23 and 24 has an indicating needle and preferably is a center null type meter.

As best illustrated in FIG. 2, a circuit diagram show ing the electrical connection for the photoelectric devices 19 and 20 to the meter 24 is illustrated. The photoelectric device 19 has its negative terminal connected to terminal of the milliammeter 24 by lines 41 and 42 and has a positive terminal connected to the terminal 43 of the meter 24 by lines 45 and 46. The photoelectric device 20 has its negative terminal connected to the terminal 43 of the meter 24 by lines 46 and 47 and terminal 40 of the meter 24 is connected by lines 42 and 48 to the positive terminal of the device 20. Thus, if both photoelectric devices 19 and 20 are creating an electromotive force, the current flow from the device 19 through the milliammeter 24 is opposite to the current flow of the photoelectric device 20.

With the photoelectric devices 19 and 20 arranged with respect to the reference line 14, the device 19 is located in the area of the high intensity zone 13 of the light beam and therefore is producing electromotive force. On the other hand, the photoelectric device 20 is outside of the zone 13 and is thus producing either none or a very small amount of electrical current. When the edge 15 of the zone 13 is moved to the left, the amount of light projecting on the device 20 increases so that its current output increases. Furthermore, the projecting of light on the device 20 causes a reduction in the internal resistance of the device 20 which allows a portion of the current produced in the device 19 to flow through the device 20 and reduce the amount of current flowing through the meter 24. Since the milliammeter 24 is indicating the relative difference between the two currents which are flowing in opposite directions through the meter, its reading will be changed as the output of electromotive force from the device 20 increases. If the edge 15 of the zone 13 is moved to the right of the line 14, the amount of light being projected on the device 19 decreases causing a decrease in its electromotive force which causes a lowering of the current flow therefrom.

To locate the edge 15 with respect to the line 14, the operator moves the light beam horizontally to the left and then to the right and determines the maximum reading on the meter 24. At the maximum reading, the edge 15 will be aimed to coincide with the reference line 14. If the edge is moved to the left, the output from the device 20 is increased and causes a drop in the reading of the meter. If the edge 15 is movedto the right, the intensity of the light projected on the device 29 decreases causing a decrease in the output to cause a reduction in the meter reading or indication.

The electrical circuitry for the devices 17 and 18 and the meter 23 is exactly the same as the previously described circuitry. Thus, the edge 12 is aimed at the desired line 11 when the reading of the meter 23 is at a maximum. If the edge 12 is moved upward from the desired position, the photoelectric device 18 will increase its output which passes through the meter 23 in a direction opposite to the output of the device 17 and will reduce the reading of the meter. If the edge 12 is moved below the line 11, the output of the device 17 decreases resulting in a decrease indication from the meter 23. Thus, to properly aim the edge 12 at the line 11, the operator of the system moves the high intensity zone 13 vertically up and down and determines the maximum meter reading and then resets the adjustment screws on the headlight to obtain that predetermined maximum reading.

In another method of practicing the invention, the screen 10 is replaced by a small aiming board or screen 10a which is used in conjunction with a condensing lens C which reduces the size of the light pattern from a light source L (FIG. 3). The screen is a support means for photoelectric devices 17a 20a (FIG. 4) which devices are arranged on the screen a in a manner similar to the arrangement of the photoelectric devices l7-20 in FIG. 1 with devices 17a and 18a on opposite sides of position or reference line 11a and connected to meter means 230 and the devices 19a and 20a on opposite sides of a reference or position line 14a and connected to meter means 24a. The photoelectric devices may be mounted on the front surface of the screen or behind the screen and exposed to the light beam through suitable apertures 51-54 therein (FIG. 4). Instead of using apertures, the screen may be translucent so that light passing therethrough impinges on the photoelectric devices.

Since the condensing lens C reduces the size of the pattern 13a, the screen 100 is positioned relatively close to the light source L which may be a headlight or other light source such as a fog light or spot light. The distance between the screen 10a and light source L is determined by the characteristic of the condensing lens C and is adjusted to have the effect of the 25 feet as previously explained.

In this form of the apparatus, the screen 10a is positioned in a zero position with respect to the light source by support structure not illustrated, so that a properly aimed headlight will have its left vertical edge coincide with line 14a and upper horizontal edge coincide with the line 1 la. To test the alignment of the headlight, the screen 10a is moved to the right and left and then up and down by appropriate means in the support structure to obtain the maximum readings on meter 24a and 230, respectively, which readings determine when the left vertical edge and upper horizontal edge of the high intensity zone of the headlight being tested coincide with the predetermined position. lines 140 and 11a respectively. By measuring the amount and direction of the movement of the screen 10a from the zero position in both the vertical and horizontal direction on an appropriate scale which is calibrated to show the corre' sponding distance of movement at 25 feet and which scale is provided on the support structure, the amount of error in the alignment of the light source from a proper alignment can be determined. If an error exists, the screen 10a is returned to the zero position and the headlight adjusted to properly aim the left vertical edge and the upper horizontal edge at the position lines 14a and 1 la respectively. Thus the screen or board 10a can be used in a device for either testing the alignment of a light source alone or testing and correctly aiming the light source to be in the proper alignment.

In the above-described embodiment, the board or screen 10a acts as a support means for the two pairs of photoelectric devices 17a-20a which support means is movable in a support structure. Instead of using a screen or board 100 as a support means, each pair of photoelectric devices can be mounted on a separate support means such as a bracket with the desired position or reference line disposed between the devices of each pair. Each of the brakets is movably mounted in the support structure by means such as calibrated knobs with one bracket being movable along a horizontal line and the other bracket being movable along a vertical line. The means for moving the brackets have an appropriate scale which is calibrated toshow the corresponding distance of movement at 25 feet and which scales provide the amounts of error of the alignment of both the horizontal edge and vertical edge of a light source from a proper aligned position. Thus, the arrangement of the brackets with their pairs of photoelectric devices can be used either for testing the alignment of a light source alone or for testing and correcting a light source to be in a proper alignment as described hereinabove.

As mentioned hereinabove, an advantage of the present system over those of the prior art is its simplicity and inexpensive manufacturing costs. Another advantage is that although the pairs of photoelectric devices such as 17 and 18 should be of similar characteristics, manufacturing variations therein will not effect the re sults during either testing or aiming of a headlight. Therefore, there is no necessity for calibrating the photoelectric devices of each pair with respect to each other. Thus the frequently required calibration of some prior art systems is not required by the photoelectric system of the present invention.

Although minor modifications and variations may be suggested by those versed in the art, it should be understood that I wish to embody within the scope warranted hereon all such modifications as reasonably and properly come within the scope of my contribution to the art.

I claim as my invention:

1. In a system for determining a location of an edge of a high intensity zone of a light pattern of a light source such as a headlight of an automobile, the improvement comprising:

a pair of light sensitive means for sensing the intensity of the light projected thereon;

means for supporting said pair of light sensitive means in a spaced apart relationship on a line extending transversely to the edge of the high intensity zone with a predetermined positionlocated therebetween so that when the edge of the high intensity zone coincides with the position, one of said pair is outside of the high intensity zone and the other of said pair is in said high intensity zone; meter means;

means connecting said pair of light sensitive means with one another and with said meter means in a manner for indicating the difference in the intensity of the light sensed by each of said pair of light sensitive means so that the maximum indication of difference occurs when the edge of high intensity zone coincides with said position;

each of said light sensitive means comprising a photoelectric device having a negative terminal and a positive terminal;

the negative terminal of one of said devices being connected to the positive terminal of the other of said devices; said connected negative and positive terminals being connected to one terminal of said meter device; and

the remaining terminals of said devices being connected to another terminal of said meter device;

whereby electromotive force current from the device which will be normally located in said intensity zone when the edge thereof is on said predetermined position is opposite to the current flow of the device which is normally outside of said intensity zone when said edge is on said position.

2. A headlight aiming device for use in a system to determine the location of an edge of a light source such as an edge of a high intensity zone of a light pattern of a headlight of an automotive vehicle, comprising:

a pair of light sensitive means for sensing the intensity of light projected thereon by converting light energy into electromotive forces;

means for supporting the pair of light sensitive means;

meter means for measuring the electromotive forces generated by the pair of light sensitive means;

said pair of light sensitive means being disposed on said supporting means on a line extending transversely to the edge of said light high intensity zone and having a predetermined position located therebetween;

said pair of light sensitive means being coupled to each other and said meter means being connected to each of said pair of light sensitive means in a manner to register the difference of the electromotive forces produced thereby so that relative movement of thesupporting means and the edge of the high intensity zone to coincide with the predetermined position creates a maximum indication on the meter means;

each of said light sensitive means comprising a photoelectric device having a negative terminal and a positive terminal;

the negative terminal of one of said devices being connected to the positive terminal of the other of said devices;

said connected negative and positive terminals being connected to one terminal of said meter means; and

the-remaining terminals of said devices being connected to another terminal of said meter means;

whereby electromotive force current from the device which will be normally located in said intensity zone when the edge thereof is on said predetermined position is opposite to the current flow of the device which is normally outside of said intensity zone when said edge is on said position.

3. In a system for determining the location of both a horizontal and a vertical edge of a high intensity zone of a light pattern of a light source such as a headlight of an automobile, comprising:

a pair of lightsensitive means for sensing the intensity of the light projected thereon;

means for supporting said pair of light sensitive means in a spaced apart relationship on a line extending transversely to the edge of the high intensity zone with a predetermined position located therebetween so that when the edge of the high intensity zone coincides with the position one of said pair is outside of the high intensity zone and the other of said pair is in said high intensity zone;

meter means;

means connecting said pair of light sensitive means with one another and with said meter means in a manner for indicating the difference in the intensity of the light sensed by each of said pair of light sensitive means so that the maximum indication of difference occurs when the edge of high intensity zone coincides with said position;

second means for determining the location of a second edge with respect to a second predetermined position;

said second means comprising a pair of light sensitive means for sensing the intensity of the light projected thereon;

means for supporting said second pair of light sensitive means in a spaced apart relationship on a line extending substantially transversely to the second edge of the pattern with said second predetermined position located between the second pair of light sensitive means;

second meter means;

means connecting said second pair of light sensitive means with one another and with said second meter means in a manner indicating the difference in the intensity sensed by each of the second pair of light sensitive means so that the maximum indication of difference by said second meter means occurs when the second edge coincides with the second position;

the light sensitive means of both pairs converting light energy into electromotive force and wherein the indication of each of the meter means is a difference of the magnitude of the electromotive force created by the pair of light sensitive means connected thereto;

said light sensitive means of each pair comprising a photoelectric device having a respective negative terminal and a'respective positive terminal; the negative terminal of one of said devices in each pair being electrically connected with the positive terminal of its pairmate and to one terminal of the meter means associated with that respective pair;

the remaining terminals of each respective pair of photoelectric devices being connected to another terminal of the associated meter means, each of said meter means being a center null type meter; and j the arrangement being such that one of the devices of each pair is normally located within said high intensity light zone pattern when said edges are in substantial coincidence with said predetermined positions and the remaining device of each pair is outside of said zone. 4. A headlight aiming device for use in a system to determine the location of an edge of a light source such as an edge of a high intensity zone of a light pattern of a headlight of an automotive vehicle, comprising:

a pair of light sensitive means for sensing the intensity of light projected thereon by converting light energy into electromotive forces;

means for supporting the pair of light sensitive means;

meter means for measuring the electromotive forces generated by the pair of light sensitive means;

said pair of light sensitive means being disposed on said supporting means on a line extending transversely to the edge of said light high intensity zone and having a predetermined position located therebetween;

said pair of light sensitive means being coupled to each other and said meter means being connected to each of said pair of light sensitive means in a manner to register the difference of the electromotive forces produced thereby so that relative movement of the supporting means and the edge of the high intensity zone to coincide with the predetermined position creates a maximum indication on the meter means;

a second pair of light sensitive means for sensing the intensity of light projected thereon by converting light energy to electromotive forces;

a second means for supporting the second pair of light sensitive means;

a second meter associated with the second pair of light sensitive means;

said second pair of light sensitive means being mounted on the second supporting means on a line extending transversely to the first pair and being spaced apart with a second predetermined position located therebetween;

said second pair of light sensitive means being coupled to each other and said second meter means being connected to each of the light sensitive means of the second pair in a manner to indicate the difference in the electromotive forces generated therein so that the relative movement of the high intensity zone and the supporting means to have an edge coinciding with each of said firstmentioned position and a second position creates a maximum indication on each of said meter means;

the light sensitive means of both pairs converting light energy into electromotive force and the indication of each of the meter means is a difference of the magnitude of the electromotive force created by the pair of light sensitive means connected thereto;

said light sensitive means of each pair comprising a photoelectric device having a respective negative terminal and a respective positive terminal;

the negative terminal of one of said devices in each pair being electrically connected with the positive terminal of its pairmate and to one terminal of the meter means associated with that respective pair; and

the remaining terminals of each respective pair of photoelectric devices being connected to another terminal of said meter means, each of said meter means being a center null type meter; and

the arrangement being such that one of the devices of each pair is normally located within said high intensity light zone pattern when said edges are in substantial coincidence with said predetermined positions andthe remaining device of each pair is outside of said zone.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4092071 *Mar 18, 1976May 30, 1978Cibie ProjecteursPhotoelectric determination of the cut-off of a light beam from a motor vehicle headlamp
US4712914 *Jan 10, 1986Dec 15, 1987Westinghouse Electric Corp.Device for characterizing wide angle beams
US4744655 *Apr 14, 1986May 17, 1988Societe d'Automatisme et de Reglage OptiqueMethod and device permitting facilitation of the lateral angular adjustment of a vehicle headlight
US4907877 *Nov 9, 1988Mar 13, 1990Yutaka FukudaLight destribution of headlight beam
US4973155 *Jul 27, 1989Nov 27, 1990Mazda Motor CorporationMethod of aiming adjustment for headlights of automotive vehicles
US5164785 *Feb 8, 1991Nov 17, 1992Hopkins Manufacturing CorporationHeadlight aiming apparatus and display
US5331393 *Dec 11, 1992Jul 19, 1994Hopkins Manufacturing CorporationMethod and apparatus for locating a specific location on a vehicle headlamp
US5373357 *Oct 21, 1992Dec 13, 1994Hopkins Manufacturing CorporationHeadlight aiming method using pattern framing
US5485265 *Sep 2, 1994Jan 16, 1996Hopkins Manufacturing CorporationVehicle headlight aiming apparatus
US7876427Jan 17, 2009Jan 25, 2011Stephen Waller MelvinHeadlamp alignment detection using a network of independent sensor units
US8004663Jan 25, 2011Aug 23, 2011Stephen Waller MelvinHeadlamp aim detection with sensors independent from host control unit
US8125628Jan 17, 2009Feb 28, 2012Lones Joe JLight baffling apparatus for headlamp sensor
US8184275Aug 22, 2011May 22, 2012Stephen Waller MelvinVehicle headlamp monitoring using a network accessible user interface
US8422004Dec 8, 2011Apr 16, 2013Ford Global Technologies, LlcAutomotive headlamp aiming insensitive to intensity variations
CN100580394CNov 18, 2005Jan 13, 2010佛山市南华仪器有限公司Lower beam detecting method of vehicular head light detector and detecting mechanism thereof
DE3700061A1 *Jan 2, 1987Jul 16, 1987Westinghouse Electric CorpEinrichtung zum bestimmen der charakteristiken eines optischen strahlenbuendels
EP0200072A1 *Apr 14, 1986Nov 5, 1986SOCIETE D'AUTOMATISME ET DE REGLAGE OPTIQUE Société à responsabilité limitéeMethod and device for controlling the angular and lateral position of a vehicle light
Classifications
U.S. Classification356/121
International ClassificationG01M11/06
Cooperative ClassificationG01M11/06
European ClassificationG01M11/06
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Feb 4, 1988AS06Security interest
Owner name: WEAVER CORPORATION
Owner name: WEAVER CORPORATION, A DE CORP.
Effective date: 19870820
Feb 4, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: WEAVER CORPORATION, A DE CORP.
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:WEAVER CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004845/0229
Effective date: 19870820
Sep 23, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: WEAVER CORPORATION, FORDS MILL ROAD, PARIS, KY. 40
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:DURA CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004180/0721
Effective date: 19830815
Jun 21, 1982ASAssignment
Owner name: TA ACQUISITION CORP. SOUTHFIELD, MI A CORP. OF CA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:DURA CORPORATION A NY CORP.;REEL/FRAME:004011/0573
Effective date: 19820212