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Publication numberUS3747150 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 24, 1973
Filing dateSep 24, 1971
Priority dateSep 24, 1971
Publication numberUS 3747150 A, US 3747150A, US-A-3747150, US3747150 A, US3747150A
InventorsS Kozub
Original AssigneeS Kozub
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf cart having shoe cleaning brush attached to wheel
US 3747150 A
Abstract
A double-sided brush construction including mounting structure for securing the brush to a golf cart wheel or the like with the brush disposed in a plane generally normal to the medial plane of the wheel and supported to one side of the latter for rotation therewith and with the axis of rotation of the wheel at least generally coinciding with the medial plane of the brush.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 Kozub GOLF CART HAVING SHOE CLEANING BRUSH ATTACHED TO WHEEL [76] Inventor: Stanley S. Kozub, 6559 W. Maple Ave., R. D. No. 5, Geneva, Ohio 44041 [22] Filed: Sept. 24, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 183,368

[52] U.S. CI 15/105, 15/34, 15/106,

15/161, 280/158, 280/DIG. 6 [51] Int. Cl. A47l 23/22, A63b 57/00 [58] Field of Search 15/21 A, 34, 36,

15/42,107,112,113,160,161,49C,79,105, 106; 280/165, DIG. 6

[5 6] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,226,750 1/1966 Leonard 15/161 3,134,118 5/1964 Chovinard 15/79 1,042,532

10/1912 Case 15/79 [111 3,747,150 [451 July 24, 1973 3,050,760 8/1962 Darnell 15/113 3,028,617 4/1962 Racina 15/112 X 3,288,488 11/1966 Shinn 280/165 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 739,999 11/1955 Great Britain 15/21 A 139,510 2/1920 Great Britain 15/49 C 691,385 5/1953 Great Britain 15/106 Primary ExaminerDaniel Blum Attorney-Clarence A. OBrien and Harvey B. Jacobson et al.

[57] ABSTRACT A double-sided brush construction including mounting structure for securing the brush to a golf cart wheel or the like with the brush disposed in a plane generally normal to the medial plane of the wheel and supported to one side of the latter for rotation therewith and with the axis of rotation of the wheel at least generally coinciding with the medial plane of the brush.

12 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures PAIENIE0JuL24 ms 3,741,150

' sum 1 m 2 BY (am/Weave 19m GOLF CART HAVING SHOE CLEANING BRUSH ATTACHED TO WHEEL In order for a golfer to assume a good, firm and comfortable stance, the spikes of his shoes must be clean. A build up of grass and dirt between the spikes at either end of the golf shoe can throw a golfer off balance and inasmuch as golf is such a precise game, it is desirable for a golfer to assume at least generally the same stance veach time the same type of stroke is to be made. By

. sumed. In such an instance, there are so many variables that repetitious practice cannot be carried out for the purpose of mastering a particular golfing movement andthus the golfer is forced to attempt to concentrate on all phases of hisstroke at the same time with little or no chance of masterming a particular phase of his stroke and then proceeding to attempt to master some other phase of his stroke.

It is accordingly the main object of this invention to provide a means whereby a golfer may conveniently clean the soles of his shoesbetween. the spikes thereof each time he selects a different club from his bag of clubs.

Another object of this invention, in accordance with the immediately preceding object, is to provide a golf shoe sole cleaning device of the brush type and mounted upon one wheel of a golf cart in a manner such that rotation of the wheel during movement of the golf cart from one shot location to another will result in the shoe sole cleaning device being automatically cleaned or freed of dirt and grass clinging thereto as a result of the last cleaning operation.

Yet another object of this invention is to provide a golf shoe cleaning brush with mounting means whereby the brush may be readily mounted on various different types of golf cart wheels.

A final object of this invention to be specifically enumerated herein is to provide an apparatus which will conform to conventional forms of manufacture, be of simple construction and easy to use, so as to provide a device that will be economically feasible, long lasting and relatively trouble-free.

These together with other objects and advantages which will become subsequently apparent reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout, and in which:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary perspective view of one wheel support portion of a golf cart having a wheel journaled therefrom and with a first form of the instant invention mounted on the golf cart wheel;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken substantially uponthe plane indicated by the section line 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged plan view of one side of the brush of the instant invention with the mounting structure for supporting the brush from an associatedgolf cart wheel illustrated in horizontal section;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical sectional view taken substantially upon the plane indicated by the section line 44 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is an exploded perspective view of a disc-type golf cart wheel and a first form of mounting adapter lllustrated in exploded position;

FIG. 6 is a vertical sectional view taken substantially upon the plane passing through the center of the mounting adapter illustrated in FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a spoked golf cart wheel illustrating the mounting adapter of FIGS. 5 and 6 mounted thereon;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view illustrating the manner in which the adapter is engaged with the spokes of the wheel illustrated in FIG. 7; and

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of a second form of spoked golf cart wheel with the adapter in exploded position relative thereto.

Referring now more specifically to the drawings, the numeral 10 generally designates a first form of disctype golf cart wheel which is illustrated in FIG. 1 as journaled from a wheel support portion 12 of a conventional form of golf cart referred to in general by the reference numeral 14. The wheel 10 includes a solid rubber tire 16 extending about its outer periphery and also a central sleeve portion 18 defining a diametrically enlarged threaded counter bore 22 at one end.

The wheel 10 includes inner and outer side panels 24 and 26 and the counterbore 22 is recessed inwardly of the outer side panel 26.

With attention now invited more specifically to FIGS. 3 and 4 of the drawings, there may be seen a brush referred to in general by the reference numeral 28 and including a generally rectangular panel-like body 30 which may be constructed of any suitable material, such as plastic, metal or even wood. The body 30 includes a blind bore 32 formed in one end edge 34 and an externally threaded mounting sleeve 36 having an end wall 38 at one end and a mounting stud 40 projecting centrally outwardly of the end wall is supported from the body 30 with the mounting stud 40 secured in the blind bore 32 by means of a through pin 42.

Of course, the wheel 10 may be mounted on the corresponding axle portion 43 (FIG. 3) of the golf cart by the conventional method utilizing a cotter pin or other similar fastener passed through the outer end of the axle upon which the sleeve portion is journaled and the cotter pin may be recessed within the counterbore and also the sleeve 36 after the latter is threaded into the counterbore 22. In this manner, a more or less conventional disc-type wheel may be constructed to readily accept the brush 28 of the instant invention and to sup port the brush 28 from the wheel in a manner such that the medial plane of the brush is disposed generally normal to the medial plane of the wheel and the axis of rotation of the wheel generally coincides with the media plane of the brush.

One side face of the body 28 is provided with stiff, resilient, tapered bristles 44 which are spaced reasonably close together and the other side face of the brush is provided with similar bristles 46 which are spaced further apart than the bristles 44. Of course, the bristles 44 and 46 taper toward their outer ends and the inner ends of the bristles 44 and 46 are anchored in suitable bores 48 formed in and opening outwardly of the opposite side faces of the body 30.

In operation, the brush 28 is secured to the wheel 10 in the manner previously described and the brush may thereafter be utilized to clean the undersurfaces of the soles of golf shoes between the spikes depending therefrom. Then, after the golf shoes have been cleaned and the cart is being rolled to the next location where a golf shot is to be made, the rotation of the brush 28 with the wheel 10 will cause whatever dirt and grass are clinging to the bristles 44 and 46 to fall therefrom, the wide spacing between the bristles 44 and 46 and also the tapering of the bristles 44 and 46 serving to allow ready release of mud and packed grass from between the bristles 44 and 46 during rotation of the wheel 10.

With attention now invited more specifically to FIGS. and 6 of the drawings, there will be seen a second golf cart wheel referred to in general by the reference numeral 50 and which is identical to the wheel except that it does not include the counterbore 22. Instead, the wheel 50 has been modified in that the outer side panel 52 thereof has been provided with three equally spaced apertures 54 about the center sleeve 56 extending through the wheel 50.

An adapter referred to in general by the reference numeral 60 is provided and includes a hollow frustoconical body 62 provided with a central axially projecting internally threaded integral sleeve portion 64 on its minor diameter end. The body 62 is provided with two sets of circumferentially spaced and extending slots 66 and 68 and three self-tapping screws 70 are provided. The sleeve portion 64 is internally threaded as at 72 and adapted to have the sleeve 36 threadedly engaged therein. In order to secure the adapter 60 to the outer side panel 52 of the wheel 50, the three self-tapping screws 70 are secured through the slots 66 and threadedly engage in the apertures 54.

With attention now invited to FIGS. 7 and 8 of the drawings, it may be seen that the adapter 60 may also be secured to certain of the spokes 76 of a spoked wheel. In order to secure the adapter 60 to the spoked wheel, contoured attaching straps 80 including hooked ends 82 and apertured ends 84 are secured to the periphery of the body 62 by means of fasteners 86 secured through the slots 66 and the apertured ends of the straps 80 while the hooked ends 82 of the straps 80 are hooked about selected spokes 76.

On the other hand, in FIG. 9 of the drawings, the adapter 60 has been provided with three circumferentially spaced notches 88 spaced about its periphery for seating engagement on spokes 94 and three of the threaded fasteners 90 are secured through the slots 66 and the apertures 92 formed in the three spokes 94 of a cast wheel referred to in general by the reference numeral 96.

Of course, the inner slots 68 formed in the body 62 of the adapter 60 may be utilized in conjunction with apertures corresponding to the apertures 54 and 92 spaced closer to the center of the corresponding wheels. In any event, the brush 28 may be readily supported from the adapter 60 in substantially the same manner the brush 28 is supported from the side panel 26 of the wheel 10.

The threads of the counter bore 22 as well as the threads 72 of the sleeve portion 64 are left-handed threads and the threads on the exterior of the sleeve 36 are also left-handed threads. Accordingly, if the brush is mounted on the right-hand wheel of the cart as the user of the brush approaches the cart, a rearward scraping movement of the users shoe soles across the brush will not tend to unscrew the brush from the wheel of the cart. Also, the brush is made for ready removal from the wheel of the cart in order that it may be removed when desired and stored in a pocket of the associated golf bag.

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described, and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. In combination with a golf cart including a ground engageable support wheel having a substantially unobstructed outer side, a body including one generally flat side having elongated stiff bristles supported and projecting endwise outwardly therefrom providing a golf shoe cleaner, and means supporting said brush body from the central portion of said outer side of said wheel for rotation therewith and with said one side of said brush body facing laterally of the center axis of said wheel.

2. The combination of claim 1 wherein said bristles are tapered toward their free ends.

3. The combination of claim 1 wherein said brush body includes a second side opposite said one side, and further elongated stiff bristles supported from and projecting endwise outwardly from said second side of said brush body.

4. The combination of claim 3 wherein the bristles on said one side of said brush body are spaced closer together than the bristles on the second side of said brush body.

5. The combination of claim 4 wherein said brush body is generally panel-like in configuration.

6. The combination of claim 5 wherein said bristles are tapered toward their outer free ends.

7. The combination of claim 1 wherein said wheel includes a central threaded bore opening endwise outwardly of said one side of said wheel, said means supporting said body from said one side of said wheel comprising an edgewise outwardly projecting externally threaded member removably threadedly engaged in said bore and carried by said brush body.

8. A golf shoe cleaning apparatus comprising a brush body including one side having elongated stiff bristles supported and projecting endwise outwardly therefrom, a support wheel, and means supporting said brush body from the central portion of one side of said wheel for rotation therewith and with said one side of said brush body facing laterally of the center axis of said wheel, said wheel including a central threaded bore opening endwise outwardly of said one side of said wheel, said means supporting said body from said one side of said wheel comprising an edgewise outwardly projecting externally threaded member removably threadedly engaged in said bore and carried by said brush body, said wheel including a central journal sleeve portion extending axially therethrough, said threaded bore comprising a counterbore formed in the corresponding end of said sleeve portion.

9. A golf shoe cleaning apparatus comprising a brush body including one side having elongated stiff bristles supported and projecting endwise outwardly therefrom, a support wheel, and means supporting said brush body from the central portion of one side of said wheel for rotation therewith and with said one side of said brush body facing laterally of the center axis of said wheel, said wheel including a central threaded bore opening endwise outwardly of said one side of said wheel, said means supporting said body from said one side of said wheel comprising an edgewise outwardly projecting externally threaded member removably threadedly engaged in said bore and carried by said brush body, a wheel mounting adapter, said wheel mounting adapter comprising a generally frusto-conical body including a central endwise outwardly projecting internally threaded shank at its minor diameter end portion defining said counterbore, said frusto-conical body having at least one set of circumferentially extending and spaced arcuate slots formed therein, and fastener means secured through said slots and anchored to said one side of said wheel.

10. The combination of claim 9 wherein said one side of said wheel is defined by a disc half having a plurality through which said fastener means are engaged.

l t l

Patent Citations
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US3028617 *Apr 7, 1960Apr 10, 1962Racina Joseph LGolf shoe cleat cleaner
US3050760 *Mar 16, 1961Aug 28, 1962Darnell Beryl ECleaner
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5310201 *Jul 1, 1993May 10, 1994Routh Finis AVehicular foot brush
US5437075 *Sep 22, 1994Aug 1, 1995Pvm Enterprises, L.L.C.Self-storing shoe cleaning brush
US6076222 *Feb 17, 1998Jun 20, 2000Jolly; William A.Athletic shoe cleaner
US6243907Jun 16, 1999Jun 12, 2001James F. WagnerGolf shoe cleaning device
US6254693 *Aug 9, 2000Jul 3, 2001Brian C. DawsonGolf equipment storage device and method of using the same
US6256830Nov 8, 1999Jul 10, 2001William A. JollyAthletic shoe cleaner
US6302269Aug 10, 1999Oct 16, 2001Richard S. RischBrush implement
US6374449Mar 22, 2000Apr 23, 2002William A. JollyAthletic shoe cleaner
US6553603Apr 4, 2000Apr 29, 2003William A. JollyAthletic shoe cleaner
US6733016 *Jul 3, 2002May 11, 2004Hyoung Koo ChungCombination golf club cleaner and bag holder
US6869150Jul 19, 2002Mar 22, 2005Zygmunt James PtasinskiTire step
US7513519 *Oct 23, 2006Apr 7, 2009Sharpe David LFootwear cleaning apparatus adapted for adjustable attachment to vehicle running boards and steps
US8015654 *Dec 19, 2003Sep 13, 2011Syracuse UniversityHand and fingernail cleaning apparatus
US8413287 *Oct 27, 2010Apr 9, 2013Craig ArledgeGolf equipment cleaning method and device
US8635733 *Jun 29, 2012Jan 28, 2014Wunderbrush, LlcGolf club head and golf shoe cleaner
US8819883May 28, 2012Sep 2, 2014Lm Golf Australia Pty Ltd.Golf club cleaning device
US8887345 *Feb 3, 2012Nov 18, 2014Mark GonzalezCadet
US20030098561 *Jul 3, 2002May 29, 2003Chung Hyoung KooCombination golf club cleaner and bag holder
US20060123572 *Dec 19, 2003Jun 15, 2006Norman FaiolaHand and fingernail cleaning apparatus
US20080092318 *Oct 23, 2006Apr 24, 2008Sharpe David LFootwear cleaning apparatus adapted for adjustable attachment to vehicle running boards and steps
US20090152857 *Dec 16, 2008Jun 18, 2009Easley David ADebris removal system
US20110099736 *Oct 27, 2010May 5, 2011Craig ArledgeGolf equipment cleaning method and device
US20130198985 *Feb 3, 2012Aug 8, 2013Mark GonzalezCadet
WO2012162730A1 *May 28, 2012Dec 6, 2012Lm Golf Australia Pty LtdGolf club cleaning device
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/105, 280/164.2, 15/106, 15/161, 280/DIG.600, 15/36
International ClassificationA47L23/22, A63B57/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S280/06, A47L23/22, A63B57/0087
European ClassificationA47L23/22, A63B57/00W