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Publication numberUS3747593 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 24, 1973
Filing dateJun 12, 1972
Priority dateJun 12, 1972
Publication numberUS 3747593 A, US 3747593A, US-A-3747593, US3747593 A, US3747593A
InventorsW Taylor
Original AssigneeW Taylor
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hand exerciser
US 3747593 A
Abstract
A therapeutic exercising device including a pair of elastic cords joining a pair of hand grip members, the pair of cords being connected to one hand grip member spaced apart a distance greater than the width of the user's hand with the cords connected to the opposite hand grip member spaced apart a distance approximate the width of the user's finger.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 [111 3,747,593 Taylor July 24, 1973 [54] HAND EXERCISER 2,930,614 3/1960 McIntosh 272/82 1 [76] Inventor: Ward T. Taylor, 1537 N. Gow, 6 9/1971 Krewer 272/67 Kans' Primary Examiner-Lawrence W. Trapp [22] Filed: Julie 12, 1972 Attorney-Miller & Brown [211 App]. No.: 262,073

[57] ABSTRACT 52 us. Cl. 128/26, 272/82 A therapeutic exercising device including a P of elas- 511 int. Cl A6lh 1 02 tic ds j g a p of hand p members, the p [58] Field of Search 128/26, 62 R, 67; of cords being connected to one hand p member 272/67 g 32 spaced apart a distance greater than the width of the users hand with the cords connected to the opposite 5 References Cited hand grip member spaced apart a distance approximate the 0f the uSerS finger.

1,945,134 [/1934 Brunk 272/82 7 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures Patented July 24, 1973 HAND EXERCISER BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Over the years there have been a variety of tension type exercising devices which have been utilized by the hands and legs. Most of these devices have incorporated coiled metal springs in varying arrangements. The primary disadvantage with metal springs is that they cannot contact the user during extension due to the pinching caused thereby. The present invention utilizes elastic cords, commonly called bungee cords, which are made up of hundreds of small rubber bands surrounded by a fabric sleeve. Due to the particular spacing of the elastic cords at their juncture with the smaller hand grip member, they provide a secondary function as a massaging means. When the smaller handle is gripped with one finger extending between the pair of elastic cords, the action of the cords on the hand between the knuckles provides a stimulating massage par ticularly useful with arthritic joints.

It is therefore the principal object of the present invention to provide a combined exercising and massaging device with a multiplicity of uses.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an exercising device useful in various isometric exercises.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a safe and inexpensive therapeutic exercising device for use by arthritics, those recovering from broken bones and other surgery cases requiring muscle exercise and massage.

FIG. 1 is a perspetive view of the exerciser with the hands of the user illustrating one method of use;

FIG. 2 is a plan view of the exerciser with portions of one hand grip broken away for detail;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged sectional view taken along lines 3 3 of FIG. 2; and

FIG. 4 is a modified form of the smaller hand grip member.

Referring now to the drawings and more specifically to FIG. I, the hand exercising device is generally identified by reference numeral 10. The exerciser is made up of a pair of round hand grip members 16 and 18, joined by a pair of elastic cords 20 of equal length. While a variety of elastic cords could be used, the cord 20 illustrated in the drawings is a bungee type cord having a core of rubber bands surrounded by a woven fabric sheath 20', as seen in detail in FIG. 3. The larger hand grip member 18 is made up ofa rigid tubular material 22, such as plastic or metal having a pair of lateral holes 30 approximate the ends thereof for receipt of the elastic cord 20. Surrounding the tubular member 22 is a second sleeve of spongy material 24 which readily depresses when gripped by the hand of the user. Located in the ends of the tubular member 22 are a pair of plugs 26 which close the ends of the handle member 18 once the cords 20 are in place. To hold the elastic cord 20 in place in the handle, the end of the cord is doubled back and a wire bale 28 is wrapped around a double portion of the elastic cord which has sufficient size so as not to fit through the hole 30 in the tube 24. The smaller hand grip member 16 is similar in construction to hand grip 18 with the exception that the cords 20 are more closely spaced together a dis tance A, as illustrated in FIG. 2. This distance A is approximately the width of a single finger so that the cords 20 are in alignmentwith the valleys between the fingers, as seen in FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 illustrates a modified form of the smaller hand grip 16 whereby the holes 30A are slot-shaped, extending longitudinally of the handle 16. The slots 30A allow the cords 20 to be moved longitudinally within the hand grip 16 so as to vary the distance A therebetween. This variable spacing has particular utility with users having varying sized hands. While the longer dimension of the slot 30A is greaterthan the diameter of the wire bale 28, the lesser dimension of slot 30A is lesser than the diameter of bale 28 so that the cord 20 is still held in the handle member 16.

OPERATION While the exercising device of the present invention has a variety of combination arm and leg stretching exercises, its primary useage is illustrated by the hand positions in FIG. 1. The elastic cords 20 attached to the smaller hand grip portion 16 pass through the valleys of hand 14 surrounding the knuckle of the middle finger. To exercise the various muscles in both arms and wrists, the hand grip members 16 and 18 are pulled apart, held, and then brought together again. If it is desired to exercise the wrist only, the cords 20 are stretched by merely rotating the right wrist. The secondary function of the cords 20 is a massaging action which takes place on both sides of the main knuckle of the center finger in right hand 14. With the cords 20 in a tension position, the wrist rotation of right hand 14 effects a massaging action to the back of the right hand approximate whatever knuckle joint is surrounded. This massaging action is very beneficial to an arthritic joint aside from being a mere extension exercise. The smaller hand grip 16 can be gripped in any manner so that any of the five fingers is placed between the elastic cords 20, including the thumb. The FIG. 4 embodiment allows a person having a substantially larger hand to adjust the spacing of the cords 20 to fit that particular hand.

Having described the invention with sufficient clarity to enable those familiar with this art to construct and use its general principles, I claim:

1. A therapeutic hand exercising; device comprising:

a first hand grip member havinga pair of lateral openings therein approximate the ends thereof spaced apart a longitudinal distance approximate the width of a users hand; I

a second hand grip member havinga pair of lateral openings therein longitudinally spaced apart a distance approximate the width of the users finger;

a pair of elastic cords connecting the two pairs of openings; and

fastening means holding the ends of the elastic cords in the hand grip members whereby the hand grip members can be gripped in opposite hands and moved apart in parallel spaced relation against the resistance of the elastic cords.

2. A therapeutic hand exercising device as set forth in claim 1, wherein the pair of openings in the second hand grip member are longitudinal slots which allow the elastic cords to be moved in the slots to vary the space between the cords.

3. A therapeutic hand exercising device as set forth in claim .1, wherein the second hand grip has a length approximate the width of the users hand and the latera] openings are equally spaced inwardly from the ends thereof.

4. A therapeutic hand exercising device as set forth in claim 1, wherein the hand grip members have a rigid tubular core and a layer of soft resilient material surrounding the core and the fastening means is a wire bale which doubles back and surrounds the end of the elastic cord.

5. A therapeutic hand exercising device as set forth in claim 1, wherein the hand grip members have a rigid tubular core and a layer of soft resilient material surrounding the core and the fastening means is a wire bale which doubles back and surrounds the end of the elastic cord made up of a group of rubber bands surrounded by a fabric cover.

6. A therapeutic hand exercising device as set forth in claim 1, wherein the fastening means is a wire bale which is bent around a doubled portion of the elastic cords.

7. A therapeutic hand exercising device as set forth in claim 1, wherein the pair of openings in the second hand grip member are longitudinal slots having a width equal to the diameter of the elastic cord and a length approximately twice said diameter, and the fastening means doubles back and surrounds the end of the elastic cord doubling its size.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1945134 *Feb 15, 1933Jan 30, 1934John H BrunkElastic exercising device
US2930614 *Aug 6, 1954Mar 29, 1960Judson C McintoshBody exercising device
US3606316 *May 28, 1969Sep 20, 1971Krewer Semyon EFinger and hand muscle exercise device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4023808 *Jan 12, 1976May 17, 1977Hebert Dalton PResilient force resistor type exercising device
US4609191 *Sep 23, 1983Sep 2, 1986Remme Leroy AArchers exerciser
US4793609 *Oct 6, 1986Dec 27, 1988Healthletics Inc.Exercise device
US4813669 *Sep 14, 1987Mar 21, 1989Dar Products CorporationExercise devices
US4880228 *Oct 14, 1988Nov 14, 1989Dar Products CorporationExercise devices
US4896880 *Sep 9, 1988Jan 30, 1990Dar Products CorporationExercise devices
US4900016 *Oct 14, 1988Feb 13, 1990Dar Products CorporationMethod of use of exercise device
US5125649 *Dec 6, 1990Jun 30, 1992Conrad FullerExercise apparatus utilizing a booster bar and shock cords
US5496244 *Feb 28, 1994Mar 5, 1996Dar Products CorporationHand-held weight not requiring forceful grip
US5662564 *May 15, 1996Sep 2, 1997Nelson; Keith A.Exercise device
US6447464Sep 24, 1999Sep 10, 2002Lifespan Therapy Services, Inc.Therapy device for upper extremity dysfunction
US8870717 *Apr 5, 2011Oct 28, 2014Fitness Stability Dynamics, LlcExercise device
US20070072739 *Sep 20, 2006Mar 29, 2007Leonard Kaufman, Ltd.Hand therapy device
US20070072740 *Sep 28, 2005Mar 29, 2007Leonard Kaufman, Ltd.Hand therapy device
US20110251030 *Apr 5, 2011Oct 13, 2011Daniel Lee PfitzerExercise device
US20120150082 *Dec 9, 2010Jun 14, 2012Eddie DavisDevice for the Therapeutic Treatment of Foot and/or Heel Pain
WO2007038334A1 *Sep 22, 2006Apr 5, 2007Leonard Kaufman, Ltd.Hand therapy device
Classifications
U.S. Classification601/40, 482/126, 482/122
International ClassificationA63B23/12, A63B21/055
Cooperative ClassificationA63B21/00043, A63B21/0552, A63B21/0555, A63B23/12, A63B21/0557, A63B21/0004
European ClassificationA63B21/00D2, A63B21/00D, A63B23/12, A63B21/055D