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Publication numberUS3747603 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 24, 1973
Filing dateNov 3, 1971
Priority dateNov 3, 1971
Publication numberUS 3747603 A, US 3747603A, US-A-3747603, US3747603 A, US3747603A
InventorsAdler B
Original AssigneeAdler B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cervical dilators
US 3747603 A
Abstract
A surgical kit includes a set of cervical dilators having probes of different diameters and handles of identical size and configuration and color coded to the probe diameter. Each dilator is integrally formed of a synthetic polymer and includes a downwardly angulated probe of uniform diameter except at its distal end where it is tapered to the axis between 0.5 DEG and 1.5 DEG from between 0.5-2.0 inches from its rounded tip for a distance between 0.5 and 2.0 inches. A handle is formed at the probe proximate end and is relatively flat with a finger accommodating depression in its lower face and is provided with a circular shield adjacent the probe.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 Adler [451 July 24, 1973 CERVICAL DILATORS [76] Inventor: Barry G. Adler, 49 Pomona Rd.,

Suffern, N.Y. 10901 [22] Filed: Nov. 3, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 195,138

52 us. Cl. 128/341, 128/303.11 [51] Int. Cl. A6lm 29/00, A61b 17/36 [58] Field of Search 128/341, 303.11, 1 128/304 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,144,220 6/1915 Maguire 128/341 3,648,683 3/1972 Brodie 128/341' 241,569 5/1881 Stohlmann et al 128/341 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 205,105 10/1924 Great Britain 128/341 146,784 7/1920 Great Britain 128/341 14,428 11/1885 Great Britain 128/341 OTHER PUBLICATIONS Comprehensive Guide to Purchasing Cat. No. 65 Mueller & Co. 1963 Page 250 RD76M8 1963.

Primary Examiner-Aldrich F. Medbery Attorney-Hyman Berman et al.

[57] ABSTRACT A surgical kit includes a set of cervical dilators having probes of different diameters and handles of identical size and configuration and color coded to the probe diameter. Each dilator is integrally formed of a synthetic polymer and includes a downwardly angulated probe of uniform diameter except at its distal end where it is tapered to the axis between 05 and 1.5? from between 0.5-2.0 inches from its rounded tip for a distance between 0.5. and 2.0 inches. A handle is formed at the probe proximate end and is relatively flat with a finger accommodating depression in its lower face and, is provided with a circular shield adjacent the probe.

lllClaims, 9 Drawing Figures Patented July 24, 1973 INVENTOR. Bmznv 1- flbLfiR FIG.8

1 CERVICAL DILATORS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates. generally to improvements in surgical instruments and it relates particularly to an improved set of cervical dilators.

In the performance of therepeutic abortion the dilation of the cervix is the most time-consuming and dangerous part of the procedure, the greatest problems occurring with dilation in the nulliporous patient. In dilating the cervix, oncethe cervix opens and admits the dilator, there tends to be a thrust as a result of the pressure applied by the surgeon and the consequentleap forward is the cause of perforation and there is a very high incidence of laceration. The cervical dilators heretofore available and proposed possess numerous drawbacks and disadvantages. While cervical dilators are generallyprovided in graduated-sizes they are of such construction asto be awkward to handle and manipulate and difficultfor complete control by the operator and they are usually highly uncomfortable and frequently painful to'the patient who generally requires either general or local anesthesia. Furthermore, with the conventional cervical dilator, it is difficult to sense itsposition and the state andcondition of the surrounding surface and these dilators otherwise leave muchto be desired. i I

SUMMARY OF THEINVENTION mum sensing and control independently ofthe size thereof. I

.A further object of the present invention is to provide an improved cervical dilator in which minimum pain and discomfort is caused the patient and the need for either local or general anesthesia is generally obviated.

Still a further object of the present invention is to provide cervical dilators of the above nature character ized by the minimum danger of perforation or laceration with their use, their high reliability, versatility and adaptability and their low cost.

The above and other objects of the present invention will become apparent from a reading of the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing which illustrates a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

In a sense the present invention contemplates the provision of a surgical kit comprising a plurality of cer vical dilators, each dilator including a nonlinear elongated probe terminating at its distal end in a rounded tip and provided at its proximate end with a handle of and 2.0 inches long at an angle to the longitudinal axis of the probe of between 05 and l.5. The probe is preferably bent intermediate its ends to form a curved elbow delineating the probe into linear proximate and distal sections. The handle is substantially flat and provided with a finger accommodating recess in its top face and is separated from the probe by a circular shield. The handles are color coded to correspond to the different probe diameters.

The improved cervical dilators permit a procedure with optimum sensing and control and a minimum danger of perforation or laceration, substantially independently of the nature and condition of the patient. The patient experiences a minimum of pain and discomfort thereby greatly obviating the need for localor general anesthesia.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a front elevatlonal view of a cervical dilator embodying the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view thereof; i

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken along line 3 3 in FIG. 2; i

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary bottom plan view of the dilator handle section;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view takenalong line 5- 5 in FIG. 1;

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED I EMBODIMENT Referring now to the drawing which illustrates a pre; ferred embodiment of the present invention, the reference numeral 10 and 10A generally represent two of the improved cervical dilators of a kit or set thereto which differ from each other primarily in the diameters of the probe sections of the dilators and are otherwise substantially identical in shape and dimensions as will be hereinafter set forth. The improved set of cervical dilators may include any desired number of dilators, the probe diameters varying by any desired uniform or varying increment, for example, the probe diameters may vary by 1 or k millimeter increments and, for example, from 5 millimeters to 12 millimeters diameter. Each of the cervical dilators 10 is advantageously formed by injection molding of a synthetic organic theremoplastic polymeric resin, such as nylon, polyolefins, for example medium or high impact polypropylene or the like. 7

The cervical dilator includes a handle 11, a probe 12 and a shield 13 between the handle 11 and probe 12. The handle 11 extends longitudinally from shield 13 and has a curved trailing free edge 14 parallel longitudinal side edges 16 and leading edgesl7 which converge from side edges 16 to the rear face of shield section l3proximate its outer border. The handle 11, for a major part of its length from shield 13 is transversely upwardly convex and of substantially uniform thickness to provide a finger accommodating recess 18 in its underface, the leading face 19 of the recess18 being downwardly curved and the rear face 20 thereof being likewise downwardly curved to a flat underface at the trailing end of handle 11. The top face 22 of handle 11 is smoothly curved along its border to the handle peripheral face. The handle 11 has a number or other indicia 23 formed in a face thereof identifying the diameter of the probe 12, for example it may be a number equal to the probe diameter in millimeters. in addition the handle 11 is colored in whole or in part to likewise provide an indication of the probe diameter.

The probe 12 is an elongated angulated rod of circular transverse cross section and includes a linear proximate section 24 and a linear distal section 26 joined by an intermediate curved elbow section 27, the proximate section being colinear with handle 11 and the distal section 26 being downwardly forwardly inclined. The angle between the proximate and distal sections 24 and 26 is advantageously between 8.0 and 18.0, for example 12 in the illustrated embodiment. The diameter of the probe 12 is, except for the distal end portion 28 thereof, of substantially uniform diameter, for example 0.256 inch.

The distal end portion 28 starts between 0.5 and 1.5 inches from the distal end of the probe, for example 1 inch, and tapers uniformly at a section 29 for at least 0.5 inch for example, 0.7, at an angle A to the probe longitudinal axis (see FIG. 9) of between 05 and l.5, for example 49. Thereafter the taper increases at an increasing rate as at 30, for example at a radius of curvature of 0.650 inches to a rounded tip 32. It is important to note that the slight taper at section 29 a short distance rearwardly of the probe tip greatly improves the application and manipulation of the cervical dilator.

The length of the probe section 26 is advantageously between 1.5 and 3.2 inches, for example, 2.7 inches, and the length of the handle is about 1 '4 inches and its width'is about 34 inch.

The cervical dilator A is, except for the diameter of the probe 33 thereof and the specific dimensions of the distal'portion 34 of probe 33, identical with the dilator 10 and is another of the set of cervical dilators. For example, in the dilator 10 the diameter of the probe 12 is about 0.256 inch and in the dilator 10A the diameter of the probe 33 is about 0.453 inch. In both probes l2 and 33 the tapered distal portions 28 and 34 respectively start 1 inch rearwardly of the ends of the probes. The length of the uniform tapered section 28 is about 0.7 inch and the diameter decreases from a diameter D1 of 0.256 to a diameter D2 0.236 inch or about 0.02 inch and the length of the uniform tapered section 34 is about 0.58 inch and decreases from a diameter D1 of 0.453 inch to a diameter D2 of 0.433 inch, likewise about 0.02 inch. in the illustrated embodiment the dilator kitincludes eight dilators in which the probes vary in diameter by l millimeter increments from 0.217 inches to 0.472 inches, it being noted that other increments may be used, for example, 0.5 millimeter increments. The handle 36 and shield 37 of dilator 10A is similar in shape and dimensions to handle 11 and shield 13 as are the handles and shields of the other dilators. The handle 36 is colored and carries indicia indentifying the probe diameter.

The improved cervical probe is employed in the known manner. However by reason of the construction and the uniformity of the handles much higher and informative sensing is realized, a much greater degree of control in handling and manipulation achieved. Moreover, considerably less pain and discomfort is experienced by the patient.

While there have been described and illustrated preferred embodiments of the present invention it is apparent that numerous alterations omissions and additions may be made without departing from the spirit thereof What is claimed is:

l. A surgical dilator comprising:

a. an elongated probe having a substantially rounded b. a tapered section commencing at said rounded tip and extending along said probe for a distance of between 0.5 and 1.5 inches;

0. said tapered section having a taper defined by an angle A with respect to the longitudinal axis, where A has a value between 0.5" and l.5.

2. The surgical dilator set forth inclaim 1, wherein said probe comprises a section of uniform diameter contiguous to said tapered section.

3. The surgical dilator set forth in claim 2, further including a flat handle at the end of said probe remote from said rounded tip, said handle having a finger depression therein.

4. The surgical dilator set forth in claim 2, wherein I said probe is bent intermediate its ends at an angle of between 8 and 18, forming a first probe portion comprising said handle and part of said section of uniform diameter and a second probe portion comprising said rounded tip, said tapered section and the remaining part of said section of uniform diameter.

5. The surgical dilator set forth in claim 4, further including a circular shield between said probe and said handle.

6. The surgical dilator set forth in claim 1, wherein said probe is formed of a synthetic organic polymeric resin.

7. A plurality of surgical dilators as set forth in claim 1 assembled into a kit, the probe diameters of each of said dilators being different and the configurations thereof being otherwise substantially the same.

8. The kit set forth in claim 7, wherein said probe diameters are graduated in one millimeter increments.

9. The kit set forth in claim 8, further including indicia on each dilator denoting its probe diameter.

10. The kit set forth in claim 9, wherein said indicia comprises color coding.

Patent Citations
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US241569 *Apr 11, 1881May 17, 1881 pfarre
US1144220 *Nov 12, 1914Jun 22, 1915 Diagnostic-sound.
US3648683 *Jun 29, 1970Mar 14, 1972Brodie NathanReversible intra-vas device
GB146784A * Title not available
GB205105A * Title not available
GB188514428A * Title not available
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *Comprehensive Guide to Purchasing Cat. No. 65 Mueller & Co. 1963 Page 250 RD76M8 1963.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4386602 *May 17, 1977Jun 7, 1983Sheldon Charles HIntracranial surgical operative apparatus
US4671916 *Nov 13, 1985Jun 9, 1987Hamas Robert SColored plugs in surgical instruments
US4790314 *Mar 16, 1988Dec 13, 1988Kenneth WeaverOrifice dilator
US4841653 *Nov 23, 1987Jun 27, 1989Mike NegleyIdentification of work pieces
US5573529 *Oct 31, 1994Nov 12, 1996Haak; Benjamin A.Color coded medical instruments
US6592515Aug 24, 2001Jul 15, 2003Ams Research CorporationImplantable article and method
US6884212May 8, 2003Apr 26, 2005Ams Research CorporationImplantable article and method
US7517313Jun 22, 2004Apr 14, 2009Ams Research CorporationImplantable article and method
US8597290Apr 20, 2010Dec 3, 2013Mederi TherapeuticsMethod for treating fecal incontinence
US8696661 *Dec 20, 2007Apr 15, 2014Mederi Therapeutics Inc.Systems and methods for treating dysfunctions in the intestines and rectum that adapt to the anatomic form and structure of different individuals
US8702586Oct 4, 2011Apr 22, 2014Ams Research CorporationImplantable article and method
EP0504090A1 *Mar 13, 1992Sep 16, 1992de la Cruz Josť CoboDisposable stick for stimulating defecation in children
EP1754503A1 *Aug 15, 2006Feb 21, 2007Nicola Regan GreenwoodVaginal dilator
WO1992014396A1 *Feb 10, 1992Sep 3, 1992Baxter IntDisposable cervical dilators
WO1993018713A1 *Mar 14, 1992Sep 30, 1993James F HodgsonUterine retractor
WO1996013209A1 *Oct 31, 1995May 9, 1996James T DiffendalColor coded medical instruments
WO2003022169A1Sep 12, 2002Mar 20, 2003Scimed Life Systems IncSystem for identifying medical devices
WO2009127185A1 *Mar 31, 2009Oct 22, 2009Geuder AgHand-held medical appliance
Classifications
U.S. Classification606/191, 606/193
International ClassificationA61B17/00, A61M29/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M29/00, A61B2017/00482
European ClassificationA61M29/00