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Publication numberUS3748197 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 24, 1973
Filing dateSep 14, 1971
Priority dateMay 27, 1969
Publication numberUS 3748197 A, US 3748197A, US-A-3748197, US3748197 A, US3748197A
InventorsCarey D, Willson J
Original AssigneeRobertshaw Controls Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method for stabilizing and employing temperature sensitive material exhibiting martensitic transistions
US 3748197 A
Abstract
A method for dimension stabilizing temperature sensitive materials exhibiting martensitic transitions for use in control and work performing devices. The method includes subjecting the martensitic-transition material to a greater unit stress than the material would be required to work against in its application to thereby stretch the material beyond its expected deflection, and subsequently completing a number of temperature cycles while the material is in such overstressed condition, through which it is heated to a point above its transition temperature and cooled back to its annealed temperature. After treatment the material operates through complete work cycles with no loss of dimension stability.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States att 1191 Willson et al.

[ July 24, 1973 METHOD FOR STABILIZKNG AND 3,558,369 1 1971 Wang et al 138/133 EMPLOYING TEMPERATURE SENSITIVE MATERIAL EXHIBITING MARTENSITIC Primary Examiner Richard 0 Dean TRANSISTIONS Attorney-Anthony A. OBrien et a1. [75] Inventors: James R. Wlllson, Trumbull, Conn.;

Donald W. Carey, Anaheim, Calif.

[73] Assignee: Robertshaw Controls Company, [57] ABSTRACT Richmond, Va. A method for dimension stabilizing temperature sensi- [22] plied Sept 1,971 tive materials exhibiting martensitic transitions for use [21] Appl. No.: 180,334 in control and work performing devices. The method includes subjecting the martensitic-transition material Related Apphca'mn Data to a greater unit stress than the material would be rel l Division ofser- 3 1 3 27, 1969, Pat quired to work against in its application to thereby stretch the material beyond its expected deflection, and

subsequently completing a number of temperature cy- [52] 148/131 48/115 148/13 cles while the material is in such overstressed condi- [51] lllt, Cl. C22! 1/10 tion, through which it is heated to a point above its [58] Fleld of Search 148/13, 13.1, 131, transition temperature and cooled back to its annealed 148/133 3 temperature. After treatment the material operates through complete work cycles with no loss of dimen- [56] References Cited sion stability UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,594,239 7/1971 Wang 148/13 7 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures IO 18 w 18 L I TM 2o HEAT SOURCE W PAFENIEU 24'975 SHEEI 1 0F 2 FIG. 3

PAIENIEUJULZMBB TEMPERATURE TEMPERATURE sum 2 or 2 ELONGATION METHOD FOR STABILIZING AND EMPLOYING TEMPERATURE SENSITIVE MATERIAL EXHIBITING MARTENSITIC TRANSISTIONS CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION This is a divisional application of pending application Ser. No. 828,243 filed May 27, 1969, now U. S. Pat. No. 3,652,969.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates generally to the dimension stabilization of temperature sensitive materials and, more particularly, to a method for dimension stabilizing temperature sensitive materials exhibiting martensitic transitions for use in control and work performing devices.

Many diversified applications in the systems control art, to mention but one, require a simple, yet efficient heat sensitive element for converting thermal energy into mechanical energy. One of the most obvious applications for such an element is the conventional thermostat used extensively in the control of home and office heating and cooling systems as well as a number of small home appliances. Heretofore, what was considered to be the most effective element for the direct conversion of heat into mechanical energy was the bimetallic couple wherein two metals having dissimilar degrees of thermal expansion are bonded together. While such devices have generally served the purpose, they have not proven entirely satisfactory under all conditions of operation. Some of the more obvious reasons for these limitations are the limited mechanical deflection per degree temperature change, the ineffieient thermo-mechanical energy conversion, and the difficulty of manufacture and standardization.

With recent developments in metallurgy, specifically in the study of thermally sensitive materials which exhibit martensitic transitions, research efforts have been directed toward seeking a better thermo-mechanical conversion element. At this point, while a detailed theoretical explanation of martensitic transition type materials is unnecessary for the purpose of disclosing the present invention, a brief discussion thereof will be described for the sake of clarity. Certain nickel-titanium alloys, for example, containing approximately 53.5-56.5 percent nickel with the remainder being essentially titanium, have been found to undergo a temperature dependent martensitic transition at a particular critical temperature, this temperature being a function of the alloy composition. This transition is produced by applying a load to the material which is sufficientlygreat to produce a greater deflection below its critical temperature than would normally be expected. The structural deformation thus produced causes a molecular change which is accompanied by the liberation of heat. Graphically it has been found that such a structural transition follows a curve of decreasing modulus of elasticity as well as a curve of decreasing modulus of torsion as the temperature decreases. If the material under stress is now heated to a point above its critical temperature, it will move in a direction opposite to the direction in which it has been deformed with the capability to perform useful work. It is important to note, however, that the curves of increasing modulus of elasticity and torsion with increasing temperature are different than the curves observed during the decreasing temperature transition; and, more importantly, the cyclic transition produces certain changes in the physical properties of the material which cause it to take a set after each cycle preventing it from returning precisely to its original position. This periodically increasing offset has, heretofore, proven to be a major inhibiting factor in the development of an acceptable commerical device using a thermo-mechanical element of the type discussed above in the place of the conventional bimetallic element.

OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION It is, therefore, an object of the present invention to provide a method for dimension stabilizing temperature sensitive materials exhibiting martensitic transitions for use in control devices.

Another object of this invention is to provide a stabilized thermo-mechanical conversion element having a closed temperature-deflection loop.

An additional advantage of the present invention is the provision of a stabilizing process permitting the use of materials heretofore impractical for performing control and work functions where closed-loop temperature-deflection cycles are contemplated.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention is summarized in that a method for dimension stabilizing a temperature sensitive material exhibiting a martensitic transition at a critical temperature to perform work upon a load having a particular value includes the steps of applying a force to the material having a value greater than the particular value of the load, and temperature-cycling the material through the critical temperature in a positive and then a negative direction repetitively in succession to complete a plurality of complete cycles.

The inventive concept as well as other objects and advantages of the present invention will become more fully apparent from the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments of the invention when considered in conjunction with the accompanying drawings. I

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 shows a stabilizing apparatus for stabilizing a temperature sensitive material for subsequent use in a control device;

FIG. 2 shows a temperature sensing control device utilizing a pre-stabilized thermal sensor;

FIG. 3 shows a temperature sensing control device including an integral stabilizing means;

FIG. 4 shows a stabilization temperature-elongation curve for the material to be used in the apparatus of FIGS. 1, 2 and 3; and

FIG. 5 shows the closed-loop temperature-elongation curves produced after stabilization by the method and apparatus of the present invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to FIG. 1, there is shown a simplified apparatus operating according to the method of the present invention to pre-stabilize a thermally sensitive material exhibiting a martensitic transition at a critical temperature for subsequent cyclic use in control devices. The structure consists of a cantilevered beam 10 mounted to wall 12 so as to support a load 14 for vertical movement, as shown by the arrow. The load is hung from the beam by a single drawn piece of martensitic transition type wire 16 firmly attached by connectors 18. A radiant heat source 20, the temperature of which can be manually adjusted, is located adjacent the wire 16 within heating proximity thereto.

Before going into the details of operation of the device, it is important to note first that other suitable heat sources may be employed such as direct internal heating by a current flowing therethrough, or the like; and second, the thermally sensitive material 16 may be shaped and mounted in any number of various ways, for example, as a cantilevered beam or a coiled spring, depending upon the operational characteristics desired and the contemplated application of the heat sensing material.

In describing the operation of the device of FIG. 1, reference will be made to the curves illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5. It is further pointed out that the description, below, of the operation of the device of FIG. 1 will serve also to outline the method of the present invention.

FIG. 4 shows a curve illustrating the elongation charactistics of a nickel-titanium wire cycled through its critical temperature a number of times. The apparatus of FIG. 1 can be utilized to produce the abovementioned curves, and, in one experiment, a load of 40,000 pounds per square inch was employed. At temperature T, the load applied to the nickel-titanium wire produces an elongation, measured vertically, of value E As the temperature produced by source 20 is decreased, the material follows segment A, of the curve which illustrates the rapid increase of elongation produced by the load when the material passes through its I critical temperature. As the temperature is then increased through the critical temperature in a positive going direction, the material follows segment A which shows how the alloy tends to return to its original position. This characteristic shape-memory action exhibited by materials such as nickel-titanium is primarily due to the aforementioned martensitic transitions which take place at the critical temperature. As explained above, due to certain molecular changes which take place in the structure of the material when temperature cycled under load, the material does not return precisely to its original elongation E, but decreases only to point E As the material is temperature-cycled again through its critical temperature, segments B and B of the curve are followed showing a further offset since elongation point E is the shortest length the material will then reach. Additional cycle C,-C produces similar results, as expected.

Thus, with a load of 40,000 pounds per square inch, the nickel-titanium alloy wire when utilized in the apparatus of-FIG. 1 will exhibit martensitic transitions during temperature cycling through its critical temperature but at the end of each cycle will not return precisely to its starting point. If, according to the present invention, the wire, which was temperature stabilized at 40,000 pounds per square inch is temperaturecyclcd with -a reduced load of 20,000 pounds per square inch, for example, the curves illustrated in FIG. 5 will be produced. As can be seen, the curves form closed-loops since the elongation of the wire at the end of each cycle is precisely the same as at the beginning thereof. Thus, by temperature-cycling a temperature sensitive alloy of the type referred to above at a load greater than the load to be utilized in the contemplated control device, the material becomes cyclically dimension stabilized and exhibits closed-loop operation required in most heat sensing electrical and mechanical control units.

Referring now to FIG. 2, wherein similar numerals are used to refer to similar components utilized in FIG. 1, there is illustrated an electrical single-pole doublethrow temperature sensitive switch 22. The device employs a temperature sensitive element 16. which has been previously dimension-stabilized by cycling at an increased load in apparatus of the type shown in FIG. I. The mid-point of the wire is coupled to the moveable bar 24, which forms the switchable contact of the electrical switch. The bar 24 is in turn connected to a spring load 26 which is less than the load 14 utilized during the dimension-stabilizing temperature-cycling process performed by the apparatus of FIG. 1. This assures accurate closed-loop operation as explained with reference to FIG. 5. The two fixed contacts 28 and 30 of the switch 22 are shown afiixed to a base or frame member 32.

One typical application of the apparatus shown in FIG. 2 is a conventional thermostat for a home or office heating system. In this application, radiant heat source 20 schematically illustrates the radiant ambient heat produced by the room or area in which the thermostat is mounted and for which the thermostat is designed to monitor. As the temperature of the room decreases below the critical temperature of the wire sensor 16, thereby indicating a need for heat, the wire is allowed to be stretched by load spring 26 which then moves bar 24 away from contact 28 toward contact 30 completing an electrical current path from contact 30 to the contact on bar 24 to thereby initiate operation of the heating unit used (not shown). Furthermore, as the temperature of the room subsequently increases, the temperature sensing wire 16 returns to its initial position, due to its inherent shape-memory, against the force produced by spring 26 to thereby move bar 24 away from contact 30 back to its original position in physical contact with contact point 28. As the temperature of the room fluctuates, the device will continue to cycle indefinitely in the same manner, the wire sensing material 16 remaining in its dimension stabilized condition having once been pre-stabilized according to the principles of the present invention.

In FIG. 3, there is shown a more refined switching apparatus combining the desired operational characteristics of the alloy under present discussion with the stabilization process of the present invention. With this apparatus, an unstabilized nickel-titanium wire, or the like, can be immediately installed in place as element 16 without requiring pre-cyeling in a separate unit. The switch shown in FIG. 3 is basically similar to the unit in FIG. 2 with the exception of a threadably engageable load 34 attached to the lower end of spring 26. In operation an unstabilized sensor wire 16 is placed in the switch as shown and the load 34 is threadably removed from its mounting bore 36 in frame 32, as illustrated. In addition, since the additional load will cause a greater than normal elongation, contact 30 is bent slightly to the dotted position shown in FIG. 3 during this stabilization period. Since load 34 is now applying an additional force to the wire 16 over that applied by spring 26 above, the-device is ready for pre-cyeling to stabilize the wire sensor for subsequent closed-loop operation without the additional load 34. To accomplish the pre-cycling heating of element 16, a controllable electrical power source 38 is shown coupled to the wire whereupon heat will be internally generated therein at the desired times. The unit is then temperature cycled through a number of complete cycles, as typified by the curves of FIG. 4. After this is completed, load 34 is threadably mounted to frame 32 and the contact end of contact 30 is bent back to its operative position, whereupon a decreased force will be applied to the element 16 which then will provide closed-loop operation as exemplified by the curves of FIG. 5. It is noted that radiant heat source 20 and electrical power supply 38 are both provided to apply heat to the temperaturesensitive nickel-titanium element 16; however, other diverse heat sources can be utilized depending upon the particular installation.

In summary, there is shown and described a method for dimension stabilizing and employing temperaturesensitive materials exhibitingmartensitic-transitions at various critical temperatures, such as nickel-titanium, or the like, for use in control and work performing devices where accurate temperature-elongation closedloop operation is required. Thus, control devices utilizing nickel-titanium, for example, as the temperaturesensing element having new, improved, and desired characteristics are made feasible for many diverse and commercially important applications.

Inasmuch as the present invention is subject to many variations, modifications and changes in detail, it is intended that all matter contained in the foregoing description or shown in the accompanying drawing shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

What is claimed is:

l. A method for dimension stabilizing a member formed of temperature sensitive material exhibiting a martensitic transition at a critical temperature so that said member can subsequently perform work with substantially no dimensional change comprising the steps of:

applying to said member a force of a greater unit stress than the member would be required to work against in its application to thereby stretch the member beyond its expected deflection; and

temperature-cycling said member in such overstressed condition by sequentially heating said member to a point above said critical transition temperature and then cooling it back to its annealed temperature repectively in succession for a plurality of complete cycles.

2. The method as recited in claim 1 wherein said temperature-cycling includes at least three complete cycles.

3. The method as recited in claim 2 wherein said member is formed of material which comprises an alloy comprising 53.556.5 percent nickel by weight, the remainder being essentially titanium.

4. The method as recited in claim 2 wherein said material comprises an alloy comprising approximately 55 percent nickel by weight, the remainder being essentially titanium.

5. The method as recited in claim 1 wherein said member is heated by application of external heat thereto.

6. The method as recited in claim 5 wherein said external heat is radiant heat.

7. The method as recited in claim 1 wherein said member is internally heated by passing an electrical current therethrough.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3558369 *Jun 12, 1969Jan 26, 1971Us NavyMethod of treating variable transition temperature alloys
US3594239 *Feb 26, 1968Jul 20, 1971Us NavyMethod of treating unique martensitic alloys
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3948688 *Feb 28, 1975Apr 6, 1976Texas Instruments IncorporatedMartensitic alloy conditioning
US3953253 *Dec 21, 1973Apr 27, 1976Texas Instruments IncorporatedTensile stress, nickel-tantium
US4045254 *Dec 30, 1974Aug 30, 1977Mitsubishi Jukogyo Kabushiki KaishaMethod for toughening treatment of metallic material
US4067752 *Feb 18, 1975Jan 10, 1978Raychem CorporationAustenitic aging of metallic compositions
US4140553 *Mar 10, 1977Feb 20, 1979Mitsubishi Jukogyo Kabushiki KaishaMethod for toughening treatment of metallic material
US4304613 *May 12, 1980Dec 8, 1981The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyTiNi Base alloy shape memory enhancement through thermal and mechanical processing
US4405387 *Jul 27, 1982Sep 20, 1983Bbc Brown, Boveri & Company LimitedProcess to produce a reversible two-way shape memory effect in a component made from a material showing a one-way shape memory effect
US4631094 *Nov 6, 1984Dec 23, 1986Raychem CorporationOver deforming, expanding transformation hysteresis; ternary with niobium
US5990777 *Aug 5, 1998Nov 23, 1999The Whitaker CorporationShape-memory wire actuated switch
US6239686 *Aug 6, 1999May 29, 2001Therm-O-Disc, IncorporatedTemperature responsive switch with shape memory actuator
US6396382 *Sep 10, 1999May 28, 2002Levingard Technologies, Inc.Thermally actuated control device
US6762669 *Mar 18, 2002Jul 13, 2004C.R.F. Societa Consortile Per AzioniShape memory actuator with bi-stable operation
US6972659 *May 6, 2003Dec 6, 2005Alfmeier Praezision AgReusable shape memory alloy activated latch
US7082890May 3, 2004Aug 1, 2006Alfmeier Prazision Ag Baugruppen Und SystemlosungenGauge pointer with integrated shape memory alloy actuator
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US7350762Mar 10, 2006Apr 1, 2008Alfmeier Präzision Baugruppen und SystemlösungenFlow control assemblies having integrally formed shape memory alloy actuators
US7748405Sep 3, 2004Jul 6, 2010Alfmeler Prazision AG Baugruppen und SystemlosungenSystem, method and apparatus for reducing frictional forces and for compensating shape memory alloy-actuated valves and valve systems at high temperatures
US8319596 *Mar 19, 2010Nov 27, 2012GM Global Technology Operations LLCActive material circuit protector
US8754740 *May 20, 2009Jun 17, 2014GM Global Technology Operations LLCCircuit implement utilizing active material actuation
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EP0062365A1 *Mar 11, 1982Oct 13, 1982BBC Aktiengesellschaft Brown, Boveri & Cie.Process for the manufacture of components from a titanium-base alloy, the component obtained this way, and its use
EP0086011A2 *Jan 26, 1983Aug 17, 1983BBC Aktiengesellschaft Brown, Boveri & Cie.Process for generating a reversible two-way memory effect in a component made from an alloy showing a one-way effect
EP0187452A1 *Nov 6, 1985Jul 16, 1986RAYCHEM CORPORATION (a Delaware corporation)A method of processing a nickel/titanium-based shape memory alloy and article produced therefrom
WO2002013221A1 *Jul 30, 2001Feb 14, 2002Kautz StefanElectromechanical component
Classifications
U.S. Classification148/563
International ClassificationH01H61/01, F03G7/06, H01H37/32, C22F1/00, H01H37/00, H01H61/00
Cooperative ClassificationF03G7/06, H01H61/0107, C22F1/006, H01H37/323
European ClassificationF03G7/06, C22F1/00M
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
May 28, 1991ASAssignment
Owner name: BANKERS TRUST COMPANY, NEW YORK
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:ROBERTSHAW CONTROLS COMPANY A CORP. OF DELAWARE;REEL/FRAME:005758/0075
Effective date: 19900730