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Publication numberUS3748391 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 24, 1973
Filing dateDec 30, 1971
Priority dateDec 30, 1971
Publication numberUS 3748391 A, US 3748391A, US-A-3748391, US3748391 A, US3748391A
InventorsShaffer W
Original AssigneeStromberg Carlson Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Telephone ring-trip circuit
US 3748391 A
Abstract
Ringing signals are applied to a telephone line through a winding of a saturable reactor which is maintained in a saturated magnetic state until driven out of saturation by a DC current which flows through the telephone line upon completion of a DC current path via the telephone when the handset is lifted from its cradle. At that time, an AC signal is induced in another winding of the reactor which is used for enabling the ringing generator to be disconnected from the telephone line and the connection between the calling and called parties to be completed.
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a United States Patent [191 Shaffer [4 July 24, 1973 TELEPHONE RING-TRIP CIRCUIT 2,998,531 8/1961 Kiyaau 307/88 R V [75 Inventor: William E. Shafl'er, Rochester, NY. 1' L Pnmary Examiner-Kathleen H. Claffy [73 Ass1gnee. Stromberg-Larlson Corporation, Assistant Examiner- A|an Faber Rochester Attorney-Charles C. Krawczyk [22] Filed: Dec. 30, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 214,502 [57] ABSTRACT Ringingsignals are applied to a telephone line through [52 US. Cl 179/84 R, 179/18 118, 307/88 R a winding ofa saturable reactor which is maintained in [51] Int. Cl. 11041 9/00, H031; 17/00 a saturated magnetic state until driven out of saturation [58] Field of Search 179/84 R, 18 118, by a DC current which flows through the telephone line 179/84 T, 45, 18 J; 323/48, 49, 45; 336/155, upon completion of a DC current path via the tele- 212; 307/202, 88 R phone when the handset is lifted from its cradle. At that time, an AC signal is induced in another winding of the [56] References Cited reactor which is used for enabling the ringing generator UNITED STATES PATENTS to be disconnected from the telephone line and the 3 247 326 4,1966 Clark connection between the calling and called parties to be 2,039,044 4/1936 Wolfert et al.. 3,512,014 5/1970 Bi'umby et a1. 3,373,291 3/1968 Peterson et al. 12 Clams 3 Dm'mg 3,339,114 8/1967 Kelley et al 307/202 11 x. N P11113111," 11011111 svsm smcmc $151111 A1 41, 40 \Hllll t r 1" Q 1 1----'------, '12 I 12 5/ 9 I (SJ/g 1. L- 26 Z i I 3* L J 11m 11 I 11 l I l 11:11:, l l 10 J PAIENTEI] Jul 2 4 W3 HIMIEIIC FUJI) H (IACIHOINIVE FORCE) TELEPHONE RING-TRIP CIRCUIT BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to telephone ring-trip circuits for providing a signal to interrupt a ringing signal upon detection that a telephone call has been answered.

Ringing signals are used in telephone systems to apprise a telephone subscriber of the presence of an incoming call on his telephone line. A ringing signal consists of periodic ringing burst of AC current having a frequency, for example, of cycles per second with a duration of perhaps 1 second separated by intervals of no current having a duration of perhaps three seconds. When the ringing signal is applied to an audible device in the signalling circuit of a telephone set, each AC ringing burst causes the device to produce an audible sound while each separating interval results in a silent period. The RMS value of the voltage of the AC bursts at the generator terminals is approximately 120 volts which is high enough to produce at least discomfort and possible harm to a called subscriber if he places the telephone receiver to his ear while the ringing signal is applied to the telephone line. It is therefore important that the ringing signal be interrupted as quickly-as possible once a call is answered to avoid applying the ringing signal to the telephone receiver of the called subscriber.

v The interruption of the ringing signal is performed by a ring-trip circuit located in the telephone ringing circuit which detects when a call is answered and thereupon causes the ,ringing generator, which generates the AC ringing current, to be disconnected from the telephoneline. The ringing-signal is applied to the telephone line through the ring-trip circuit and an office battery connected in series with the ringing generator. Until a call is answered and the telephone set communication apparatus is placed across the telephone line by lifting of the handset from its cradle, no path exists for the flow of DC current. DC current is blocked in the telephone signallingcircuit by such as a capacitor or a zener diode. The lifting of the telephone handset by the called'subscriber places a DC load across the telephone line, permitting the flow of DC current which upon detection initiates a signal to interrupt the ringing signal.

In some cases the ringing-signal is interrupted prematurelybefore a telephone call is answered which breaks the connection and leads to telephone customer dissatisfaction since this inconveniences both the calling and called parties and also leads to operating inefficiency since telephone I switching equipment must be used once again to establish the same connection after the telephone number is dialed again. Most present day telephone ring-trip circuits use a ring-trip relay which can be prematurely tripped by an unusually large ringing current and/or a ringing current which is rectified by rectifying components used in various modern telephone signalling schemes. A typical scheme is the key telephone arrangement wherein a number of neon lamps and ringers in different telephone sets respond simultaneously to the ringing signal on a single telephone-line which places a heavy load on the ringing generator. The premature ring-trip problem and its solution in conjunction with the ring-trip relay arefully discussed in a copending application, filed on Oct. 26, I97], for- William E. Shaffer, entitled Telephone Ring-Trip Circuit, Ser. No. 192,020.

The problems involved in designing a reliable ringtrip circuit can be appreciated only if one remembers that the ring-trip circuit must function properly for a wide variety of telephone circuit conditions which are materially changed for each ring-trip operation by the length of the telephone line to be rung as well as the type and number of telephone signalling devicesto be operated simultaneously from the telephone line to which the ringing signal is applied. And since 'the lengths of different telephone lines vary greatly and the combination of signalling devices and signalling schemes are numerous, the design of a ring-trip circuit must incorporate agood deal of flexibility soas to function properly under all thedifferent conditions to be encountered.

Withthe foregoing in mind, it is an'object of the present invention to provide a new and improved ring-trip circuit for detecting when a telephone call is answered.

It is afurther object of the invention to provide a new and improved ring-trip circuit designed with; great flexibility for functioning properlyunder a wide variety of conditions without the liklihood of premature ring-trip operation. 7

It is a still further object of the invention to provide a newand improved ring-trip circuit which is not susceptible to premature ring-trip operation as a result of rectification of the ringing current.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION In accordance with a first embodiment ofv the invention, ringing signals are applied to a telephone. line through a monitor winding of a saturable reactor which is maintained in a saturated magnetic state by a bias winding until driven out of saturation by a DC current. This DC current flows through the telephone'line and the monitor winding upon the completion of a DC current path via the called telephone when the handset is lifted from its cradle, thereby providing an indication that the call has been answered. At that time, a continuously applied AC signal to an input winding of thereactor induces an AC signal in an output winding of the.

reactor which is applied to a control circuit for enabling the ringing generator to be disconnectedfrom:

the telephone line and the connection between the calling and called parties to be completed.

A second embodiment of the invention employstwo saturable reactors with two sets of windings, the ar-' rangement being such as to cancel out the effect of in"- duced voltages in some-of the fwindings from the AC ringing signal through the monitor windings.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 illustrates a first embodiment of the invention. wherein the ring-trip circuit employs a single saturab'le reactor.

FIG. 2 shows a hysteresis curve and the operating.

- DESCRIPTION OE THE "PREF ER-RED' EMBODIMENT As shown in FIG. l, the ring-trip circuitof the inven tion employs a saturable reactor IWwhich hasywou'nd around it four separatewindingss A first windin' which'may be referred to as the monitor winding-is connected between the telephone line 14 which is to be rung and a ringing generator 16 for applying thereto the ringing signal through an office battery 18 which supplies the DC current for detecting when the telephone call is answered. The ringing signal and DC current may be applied to the telephone line 14 through a pair of normally open S contacts (operated closed during signalling) while the calling and called telephone parties are isolated from each other via normally closed S contacts (operated open during signalling). This arrangement is fully detailed in a copending application, filed on Dec. 22, 1970, for Otto Altenburger, entitled Ringing Control Circuit, Ser. No. 100,647, now US. Pat. No. 3,671,678.

A second winding 20 of reactor 10, hereinafter called the bias winding, is connected to a DC power source 22 through a current limiting resistor 24. The number of turns for bias winding 20 and the DC current therethrough produce a sufficient magnetomotive force to drive the reactor into saturation represented by bias point X on a typical hysteresis curve shown in FIG. 2. The reactor 10 is driven far enough into saturation at point X that for most anticipated system conditions the AC ringing current through monitor winding 12 will not be capable of driving the reactor 10 out of saturation, the net magnetomotive force H oscillating about point X between points Y and Y on the hysteresis curve.

A third winding 26, called the input winding, is continuously energized from an AC generator 28. The AC voltage across the input winding 26 is used for inducing an AC voltage in the fourth winding 30 hereinafter referred to as the output winding. Very little, if any, voltage is induced in output winding 30 while the reactor 10 is in a saturated magnetic state. Thus, until the reactor 10 is driven out of saturation, no appreciable output signal appears across the terminals of the output winding 30.

The reactor 10 is driven out of saturation by a DC current which flows through the monitor winding 12 from the office battery 18 along the telephone line 14 via a DC current path which is completed through the closed hookswitch of the connected telephone (not shown) at the called station when the telephone handset is lifted from its cradle. This DC current produces a magnetic field in the reactor 10 which is opposed to the magnetic field produced by bias winding and which is of sufficient strength to mullify the latter. The net magnetic flux produced is small enough so that the reactoris no longer in a saturated state, but operates in the region between the two flat portions of the hysteresis curve of FIG. 2. At this time, an AC voltage is induced in the output winding 30 from the AC voltage across the input winding 26, thereby providing an indication that the telephone call has been answered.

The output signal of output winding 30 can be used with any suitable control circuit for de-energizing the S relay (not shown) to return the S contacts to their normal states, thus, disconnecting the ringing generator 16 from the telephone line 14 and completing the connection between the calling and called parties. For instance, the control circuit shown in FIG. 1 utilizes an arrangement whereby a relay 32 connected in series with a battery 34 and the collector-emitter path of a transistor 36 is energized whenever the transistor 36 is rendered sufficiently conductive by the application of the output signal of output winding 30 across its base and emitter via a full-wave rectifying bridge 38 and a time delay circuit 40. The time delay circuit 40 is designed to avoid premature ring-trip operation by ensuring that the transistor 36 is not enabled by transient voltages which may be induced in output winding 30 as a result of some unusually large AC ringing current which causes the reactor 10 to be intermittently driven into and out of saturation. Such a situation can arise, for instance, in a key telephone arrangement wherein an excessive number of ringers and neon lamps are operated in parallel, thus, placing an inordinately heavy load on the ringing generator 16.

To further safeguard against premature ring-trip and provide additional design flexibility, the ringing current through monitor winding 12 can be limited by placing across its terminals any suitable device, such as a capacitor 42 or a diode 44 connected in series with a zener diode 46 shown as optional features in FIG. 1 via dashed line connections. Since the premature ring-trip problem can arise only when the reactor 10 is driven out of saturation by the AC ringing current during the half cycle that the current produces a magnetic field opposed to that of the bias winding 20, the diode 44 and zener diode 46 are poled for conduction during that half cycle.

In reality, the two flat portions of the hysteresis curve of FIG. 2 which represent saturation regions are not exactly flat, as shown, but sloped so that while operating in these regions, slight voltages can be induced in the input and output windings by the flow of ringing current through the monitor winding 12. The magnitudes of these induced voltages relative to the normal design voltages are small so that any voltage induced in the output winding 30 would not be sufficient to cause relay 32 to operate. These voltages may be undesirable for other reasons, however, such as where portions of the ring-trip equipment are used simultaneously for performing other functions which require greater sensitivity. These undesirable induced voltages are eliminated by a second embodiment of the invention which employs two saturable reactors and two sets of windmgs.

As shown in FIG. 3, a second saturable reactor 48 has wound around it four separate windings which are connected in series with their counterpart windings wound around the first saturable reactor 10 (the same reference numbers are used in FIGS. 1 and 3 for identical components). Thus, monitor winding 50, input winding 52 and bias winding 54 of reactor 48 are connected in series, respectively, with monitor winding 12, input winding 26 and bias winding 20 of reactor 10. The output signal is taken across the series combination of output winding 56 of reactor 48 and output winding 30 of reactor 10.

To facilitate the readers understanding of how this circuit functions, the conventional system of dots is shown in FIG. 3. In accordance with this system, when a varying current enters one of the reactor windings at its dot marked terminal, the polarity of the voltage induced in one of the other reactor windings is positive if the induced voltage is measured from its dot marked terminal to its unmarked terminal. Applying this system and observing how the counterpart windings of reactors 10 and 48 are connected to each other with respect to their dot marked terminals, it is seen that current flowing through monitor windings 12 and 50 induces voltages in the output windings 30 and 56, respectively,

and in the input windings 26 and 52, respectively, which oppose one another in their respective series circuits. Thus, voltages induced in these reactor windings from the flow of ringing current through the monitor windings are cancelled out. Other than this, the ringtrip circuit of FIG. 3 operates exactly the same as that of FIG. 1.

The ring-trip circuit of the invention provides three major advantages over other schemes which utilize a ring-trip relay. First, the impedance of the circuit through which the ringing signal is applied to the telephone line is low (because of the saturated magnetic state of the reactor during signalling) so that the ringing current is not materially affected thereby. This prevents attenuation of the ringing current below a minimum level required for operating the signalling device(s) in a called telephone, a particularly important consideration in conjunction with long telephone lines. Second, because of the nature of the circuit, rectification of the ringing signal caused by various rectifying components used in the signalling devices of many modern telephone sets does not create a premature ring-trip-problem. Third, the combination of the time delay provided in'the control circuit and the optional features for-limiting the ringing current through the monitor winding of the reactor provides great flexibility for designing the ring-trip circuit of the invention to perform properly under a variety of different operating conditions which is an important design consideration. Thus, the invention provides a new and improved ringtrip circuit for detecting when a telephone call is answered.

What is claimed is:

, l. A ring-trip circuit for detecting when a telephonehandset is lifted from its cradle in response to a ringing signal applied to the telephone through the connected telephone line from a ringing generator connected in series with an office battery, comprising:

a saturable reactor;

an input winding of said reactor for receiving a continuous AC signal;

a bias winding of said reactor for receiving a DC current for driving said reactor into a saturated mag netic state;

a monitor winding of said reactor;

circuit meansfor connecting said monitor winding between the telephone line and the ringing generator so that the ringing signal passes therethrough, the arrangement being such that a DC current through said monitorwinding from the office battery upon the completion of a DC current path via the telephone when the handset is lifted produces a magnetic field which drives said reactor out of saturation, and

an output winding of said reactor for providing an output AC signal induced therein whenever said saturable reactor is driven out of saturation.

2. The ring-trip circuit of claim 1 including means connected across said monitor winding for limiting the magnitude of AC ringing current therethrough.

3. The ring-trip circuit of claim 1 including a control circuit connected across said output winding responsive 'to said output signal for actuating said circuit meansto disconnect the ringing generator from the telephone line.

4. The ring-trip circuit of claim 3 wherein said control circuit includes a relay, a transistor and a rectifying circuit connected so that the output of said rectifying circuit renders said transistor conductive thereby energizing said relay whenever said output signal appears across the input of ,said rectifying circuit.

5. The ring-trip circuit of claim 4 wherein said control circuit includes a time delay circuit for delaying the response of said output signal.

6. A ring-trip circuitfor detecting when a telephone handset is lifted from its cradle in response to a ringing signal applied to the telephone through the connected telephone line from a ringing generator connected in series with an office battery, comprising:

two saturable reactors;

an input winding for each reactor;

means for continuously energizing said input windings with an AC signal; bias means for driving each of said two reactors into a saturated magnetic state;

a monitor winding for each reactor;

circuit means for connecting said monitor windings in series with one another between the telephone line and the ringing generator so that the ringing signal passes therethrough, the arrangement being such that a DC current through said monitor windings from the officebattery upon the completion of a DC current path via the telephone when the handsetis lifted produces a magnetic field in each reactor which drives said reactors out of saturation, and i an output winding for each reactor connected in series with one another for providing an output AC signal across the series combination thereof whenever said saturable reactors are driven out of saturation, the arrangement being such that the voltages induced in each of said input windings from said respective input windings are additive and the voltages induced therein from said respective monitor windings are subtractive. e

7. The ring-trip circuit of claim 6 including means connected across the series combination of said monitor windings for limiting the magnitude of AC ringing current therethrough.

8. The ring-trip circuit of claim 6 wherein said bias means comprises a bias winding for eachreactor connected in series with one another to a DC power source.

9. The ring-trip'circuit of claim 6 wherein said means for energizing said input windings includes the series connection of said input windings across which said AC signal is applied.

10. The ring-trip circuit of claim 6 including a control circuit connected across the series combination of said output windings responsive to said output signal for actuating said circuit means to disconnect the ringing generator fromthe telephone line.

11. The ring-trip circuit of claim 10 wherein said output circuit includes a relay, a transistor and a rectifying circuit connected so that the output of said rectifying circuit renders said transistor conductive thereby energizing said relay whenever said output signal appears across the input of said rectifyingcircuit.

12. The ring-trip circuit of claim 11 wherein said output circuit includes a time delay circuit for delaying the response to said output signal.

i I! t t 4 UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK QFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION;

PATENT N0. L 8 r DATED July 2 1973 INVENTOR(S) vt/dilliaun E. Shaffer It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

001. 3, line A8 A "mullify" should read ---nu11if Col. 6, line 36 "input; should read --output-- Signed and Scaled this sixth D y of January 1976 [SEAL] A ttes t:

RUTH C. MASON C. MARSHALL DANN Arresting Officer (ummissimur of'Parenrs and Trademarks UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION PATENT N0. 3,748,391 9 DATED July 2A, 1973 |N\/ ENTOR(S) William E. Shaffer It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Col. 3, line T8 "mullif should read nullify-.

Q Col. 6, line 36 "input" should read ---output-- 0 Signed and Scaled this sixth D y of January 1976 [SEAL] 3 Attest:

RUTH c. MASON c. MARSHALL DANN Arresting Officer Commissioner ofParenrs and Trademarks E O r

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2039044 *Mar 1, 1933Apr 28, 1936Westinghouse Electric & Mfg CoRegulating system
US2998531 *Aug 28, 1956Aug 29, 1961Nippon Telegraph & TelephoneSwitching system of binary phase signal
US3247326 *Aug 30, 1962Apr 19, 1966Ass Elect IndTelephone exchange system ringtripping arrangements
US3339114 *Feb 19, 1965Aug 29, 1967Ite Circuit Breaker LtdStatic overload relay means for use in circuit breakers and having inverse time current characteristics
US3373291 *Aug 21, 1961Mar 12, 1968Glen PetersonMeans for protecting transistors from high voltage pulses
US3512014 *Sep 8, 1966May 12, 1970English Electric Co LtdTrigger circuits
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3878340 *Dec 29, 1972Apr 15, 1975Stromberg Carlson CorpRing trip circuit employing a filter network and a solid state device exhibiting electrical isolation
US3896270 *Dec 7, 1973Jul 22, 1975Gte Automatic Electric Lab IncRinging signal detector circuit
US4156150 *Dec 16, 1977May 22, 1979Bell Telephone Laboratories, IncorporatedCircuit for regulating a DC voltage on which a large AC voltage is superimposed
US4199664 *Mar 24, 1978Apr 22, 1980International Business Machines CorporationTelephone line circuit
Classifications
U.S. Classification379/382, 307/413
International ClassificationH04M19/02, H04M19/00
Cooperative ClassificationH04M19/026
European ClassificationH04M19/02C
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jun 13, 1991ASAssignment
Owner name: GEC PLESSEY TELECOMMUNICATIONS LIMITED, ENGLAND
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNORS:STROMBERG-CARLSON CORPORATION, A DE CORPORATION;PLESSEY-UK LIMITED;REEL/FRAME:005733/0547;SIGNING DATES FROM 19820917 TO 19890918
Owner name: STROMBERG-CARLSON CORPORATION, FLORIDA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:UNITED TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION A CORPORATION OF DE;REEL/FRAME:005732/0982
Effective date: 19850605
Jun 27, 1983ASAssignment
Owner name: GENERAL DYNAMICS TELEPHONE SYSTEMS CENTER INC.,
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:GENERAL DYNAMICS TELEQUIPMENT CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004157/0723
Effective date: 19830124
Owner name: GENERAL DYNAMICS TELEQUIPMENT CORPORATION
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:STROMBERG-CARLSON CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004157/0746
Effective date: 19821221
Owner name: UNITED TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION, A DE CORP.
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:GENERAL DYNAMICS TELEPHONE SYSTEMS CENTER INC.;REEL/FRAME:004157/0698
Effective date: 19830519