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Publication numberUS3748702 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 31, 1973
Filing dateJun 15, 1972
Priority dateJun 15, 1972
Publication numberUS 3748702 A, US 3748702A, US-A-3748702, US3748702 A, US3748702A
InventorsBrown C
Original AssigneeBrown C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automated pipe handling apparatus
US 3748702 A
Abstract
An apparatus in which gripping members are moved hydraulically to grip and release a well pipe. The apparatus may be employed to hold the pipe vertically, to impart a rotary motion to the pipe or to serve as a back-up preventing rotary motion of the pipe. Camming and wedging surfaces are provided to increase the grip on the pipe as the forces tending to move the pipe relative to the gripping members increase.
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[111 3,748,702 [45] July 31, 1973 United States Patent 1' Brown 24/249 DP 24/263 DB UX 24/263 DL UX 24/263 KH X 24/263 DH UX 24/263 DG X 24/263 DQ "t u n m n U" mmmm m m m m mm" ee e S mk l ww y eamha ff ZBSCBMBBH 3 34603 2 354556677 999999999 111111111 l/l/l/l/l 224 31- 56 426908524 600890757 ,J 72759 690 94 932977 1 1 15 19 15 122222333 4 m &7 K7 X .G ,6 ,m m mm N w 2 A mw 7 H B 9 E 1 P W5 4 m w 1 u we e 1 s i u a CF 1 2 T J A H O R o N 0A m TP 6 m. UP M D. AA 1 F A l 1 1 4 6 2 l 5 7 2 2 .l. .l. .l l.

Related US. Application Data [63] Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 181,067, Sept. 16,

Primary Examiner-Donald A.Griffm Attorney-Carlos A. Torres 19 71, which is a continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 206,259, Dec. 9, 1971, which is a continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 229,041, Feb. 24, 1972.

[57] ABSTRACT An apparatus in which gripping members are moved hydraulically to grip and release a well pipe. Th

.. 24/263 DG, 24/263 DL F161 7/00 6 pp 2 v 24/249 ratus may be employed to hold the pipe vertically, to DH impart a rotary motion to the pipe or to serve as a backup preventing rotary motion of the pipe. Camming and [52] US. [51] Int. [58] Field of Search.;..................

24/263 DK, 263 D0, 263 DA, 263 CA DB, 263 DG, 263 DL, 263 KB the pipe as the forces tending to move the pipe relative to the gripping members increase.

[56] References Cited wedging surfaces are provided to increase the grip on UNITED STATES PATENTS rig Figa'ras 1,280,850 10/1918 Robichaux etal. 24/263 CA ux M 1,844,378 24/249 DP 25 Claims, 18 Draw] 2/1932 Campbell........................

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SHEET 8 0F 9 PATENIED JUL 31 I975 SHEET 9 0F 9 AUTOMATED PIPE HANDLING APPARATUS CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention The invention relates to powered means for gripping a cylindrical member to control the rotaryand axial movement of the member. The primary intended applisuch motion. Conventional slips of the type described operate to prevent only downward movement of the pipe. The gripping heads in snubbers employ slips which prevent axial movement of the pipe in either di-. rection. The snubber is equipped withmeans for moving the well pipe in either axial direction. In such de-i vices, it is desired to employ positively acting gripping means to ensure a firm grip which is independent of the presence of axial force in the pipe or the direction of such force. In addition, positive release means are also required to fully retract the gripping members of the snubber away from the pipe which is to be rotated or cation of the invention is in the field of well construction to regulate or control movement of drill strings, production tubing strings, casing and other cylindrical members employed in the drilling and completion of wells. The apparatus of the present invention may be employed to prevent a tubular well member from being moved vertically, or from being rotated, or if desired, to impart axial or rotary motion to the well conduit.

2. Brief Description of the Prior Art In the well drilling and completion art, devices employed to grip and hold pipe in a rotary table to prevent such pipe from moving downwardly through the well bore are commonly referred to as slips. Conventional, manually operated slips include wedge shaped members which are designed to be manually positioned between a conical seat in the rotary table and the pipe which is to be gripped. Friction producing teeth along the internal surface of the slips engage the pipe and the downward force exerted by the weight of the pipe wedges the slips between the pipe and seat forcing the slips radially inwardly which in turn cause the teeth to grip the pipe. Slips having the described conventional design depend upon the weight of the pipe for the production of radial gripping forces.

Forces which tend to rotate the pipe with respect to the slips or se'at tend to displace conventional slips upwardly away from the conical seat which in turn reduces the gripping force exerted by the slips. For this reason, conventional slips disposed in the conical seat of a rotary table cannot safely be employed to impart rotary motion of the table to a drill string supported by the slips. A similar problem is encountered where conventional slips in a conical rotary seat are employed to resist rotation of the pipe.

In addition to the foregoing problems, conventional slips, designed to be employed in the conical seat of a rotary table must be manually positioned and retrieved. The weight and construction of the slips makes them difficult to handle and manual placement and retrieval of the slips can be a dangerous undertaking.

In general, conventional, manually operated slips in which the gripping force exerted against the well pipe is produced by the weight of the pipe acting through a conical seat are unsatisfactory for situations where rotary motion or upward vertical motion of the pipe is to be regulated. Moreover, the difficulty and danger associated with manual operation of conventional slips renders such devices undesirable.

Where well forces sufficient to elevate the well pipe are anticipated, suitable means are required to prevent seat are undesirable for use with such electric power' swivel since they lack the ability to form a back-up during the making and breaking of pipe connections, they must be manually operated, they'rely on axial forces in the well pipe for generating a radial gripping force and they cannot prevent upward vertical movement of the well pipe.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The pipe handling apparatus of the present invention provides an automated means for controlling the rotary and axial movement of cylindrical members such as well pipes. Gripping and release of slip teeth in the apparatus is controlled by a powered drive which regulates the gripping force between the slip teeth and the well pipe thereby eliminating the need for pipe weight to produce the required radial gripping forces.

Camming and wedging means are provided in the apparatus to further increase the radially directed gripping forces between the slip teeth and the well pipe as the forces tending to move the pipe relative to the teeth increase. The powered means controlling the grip of the slip teeth maintain a constant gripping force on the well pipe even when there are no forces tendingto move the well pipe relative to the slip teeth. Thus, the automated gripping means of the present invention is effective to grasp and hold the well pipe without the need for any rotary or axial movement of the pipe.

The slip teeth employed in the apparatus of the present invention are positively retracted out of engagement with the well pipe when it is desired to permit the well pipe to rotate or move axially through the apparatus thereby preventing damage or wear to the slip teeth and the well pipe. In the preferred form of the invention, positive retraction of the slip teeth is effected through a sliding dovetail lock formed between cooperating componentswhich are radially fixed and axially movable with respect to each other.

tending to rotate the pipe and the teeth with respect to each other increase.

In one form of the invention, an upper set of slip teeth is designed to engage the well pipe to prevent axial movement of the pipe while a second, lower set of slip teeth is designed to engage the well pipe to impart rotary motion to the pipe. The upper set of slip teeth may include circumferentially developed teeth to resist axial movement of the well pipe while the lower set preferably includes longitudinally aligned or developed teeth to resist rotary motion of the pipe.

Another embodiment of the invention includes a large diameter gripping area formed above a smaller diameter gripping area so that drill pipe having a standard upset and drill collars, normally having a uniform outside diameter throughout their entire length may both be gripped and held by the same apparatus.

A third embodiment of the invention is equipped with a fluid driven motor to impart a rotary motion to the well pipe in addition to securing the well pipe against axial movement. Upper and lower, oppositely tapered seating surfaces cooperate with the slip teeth to resist both upward and downward movement of the well pipe through the assembly and camming surfaces increase radial gripping forces as the pipe resists rotation.

A fourth embodiment of the invention includes doubly tapered, V-shaped wedges which move two housing segments toward and away from each other to efi'ect gripping and release of an encircled well pipe. Camming means provided on the internal surface of the housing segments provide increased radial gripping forces for increased resistance to pipe rotation. Wedging surfaces acting with the slip teeth increase gripping forces in response to movement of the well pipe in either axial direction. The fourth form of the invention also includes a fluid driven motor for imparting rotary motion to the gripped well pipe.

From the foregoing, it will be appreciated that a primary object of the present invention is to provide an automated apparatus for controlling movement of a well pipe where such control is effected independently of the forces acting on the well pipe.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an automated pipe handling apparatus which increases the gripping forces exerted on a well pipe as the forces tending to move the well pipe relative to the apparatus increase.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide fluid powered, linearly movable wedging members to control radial movement of slip teeth through a pipe handling apparatus.

An object of the present invention is to provide slip teeth which are positively retracted away from a well pipe when release of the pipe is desired so that the pipe may be rotated or moved axially without damaging the slip teeth or the pipe.

One of the important objects of the present invention is to provide an automated apparatus for applying a controlled gripping force on an encircled well pipe in such a way that the gripping force is independent of any other forces acting on the pipe.

Also an object of the present invention is to apply controlled gripping force by vertical, non-rotary movement of bodies against inclined bearing surfaces to produce radial movement of slip teeth.

The foregoing and other features, advantages and objects of the invention will become more apparent from the following specification, drawings and the related claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a vertical section, taken along the line 1-1 of FIG. 3, illustrating one form of the pipe handling apparatus of the present invention as it appears in pipegripping position;

FIG. 2 is a view similar to FIG. 1 showing the assembly in the pipe-released position;

FIG. 3 is a horizontal cross section taken along the line 3-3 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a partial plan view taken along line 4-4 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a detail view illustrating the manner of securing mating segments of the assembly together;

FIG. 6 is a vertical elevation, in quarter section, illustrating a modified form of the pipe handling means of the present invention in pipe-released position;

FIG. 7 is a view similar to FIG. 6 illustrating the assembly in pipe-gripping position;

FIG. 8 is a partial horizontal cross section taken along the line 8-8 of FIG. 6;

FIG. 9 is a partial horizontal cross section taken along the line 9-9 of FIG. 7;

FIG. 10 is a partial horizontal cross section taken along the line 10-10 of FIG. 6;

FIG. 11 is a partial horizontal cross section taken along the line 11-11 of FIG. 7;

FIG. 12 is a horizontal cross section of a third embodiment of the present invention illustrated in pipe gripping position;

FIG. 13 is an elevation partially in section, taken along the line 13-13 of FIG. 12;

FIG. 14 is a horizontal cross-section of a fourth embodiment of the present invention illustrated in pipegripping position;

FIG. 15 is a vertical quarter section taken along the line 15-15 of FIG. 14;

FIG. 16 is a vertical quarter section taken along the line 16-16 of FIG. 14;

FIG. 17 is a plan view, partially broken away illustrating a modified, hydraulicly openable form of the pipe handling means of the present invention in closed position; and

FIG. 18 is a view similar to FIG. 17 illustrating the pipe handling means in open position.

DESCRIPTION OF THE ILLUSTRATED EMBODIMENTS The form of the invention illustrated in FIGS. 1-5 is indicated generally at 10. In FIG. 1, the apparatus 10 is illustrated secured to a stationary support structure F, which may be, for example, the floor of a conventional drilling rig. Bolts B or other suitable means may be employed to anchor the assembly 10 securely to the floor F to prevent rotary or axial movement of the assembly. The components of the assembly 10 are illustrated gripping the upper end of a conventional drill pipe indicated generally as P.

The operative components of the assembly 10 include a plurality of wedge shaped bodies 11 which are moved axially by hydraulic cylinders 12. If desired, pneumatic, electrical or mechanical drives may be employed to provide the action of the cylinders 12. In the preferred form of the invention, four hydraulic cylinders 12 are employed to impart axial motion to eight wedge shaped bodies 11, however, it will be appreciated that any suitable number of such cylinders and wedge bodies may be employed.

The wedge shaped bodies 11 are engaged by and are movable axially with respect to vertically fixed, radially movable seating bodies 13. The wedge bodies are secured to the seating bodies by T-shaped tongues 13a formed on the seat bodies 13 which are received in correspondingly shaped grooves 11a formed in the wedge bodies 11. inwardly tapered bearing surfaces 11b on the wedge members-slide along similarly tapered or inclined bearing surfaces 13b on the seat members 13. As the wedge members 11 are elevated relative to the seating bodies 13, the bodies 11 are moved radially outwardly away from the pipe P. The engagement between the tongues 13a and grooves 11a permits axial movement of the wedge bodies 11 relative to the seat bodies 13 while simultaneously pulling the wedge bodies 11 toward a radially retracted position as they are raised upwardly. When the cylinders 12 are activated to force the wedge bodies 11 downwardly over the seating bodies 13, engagement of the tapered bearing surfaces 13b and 11b forces the wedge bodies radially inwardly.

In the form of the invention illustrated in FIGS. 1-5, an upper set of gripping slip teeth 14 and a second lower set of slip teeth 15 are carried on dies secured to the radially inner surfaces of the wedge bodies 11. The teeth 14 and 15 are circumferentially developed, and are upwardly directed to resist downward pipe movement. When the hydraulic cylinders 12 are powered to move the wedge bodies 11 into the position illustrated in FIG. 1, the teeth 14 engage a pipe box or upset P' formed at the upper end of the drill pipe P to prevent relative movement between the pipe P and the wedge bodies 11. Annular, tapered collar segments 14a engage the tapered lower end of the upset P to assist in providing axial support for the drill pipe P. The dies holding teeth 14 and 15 and the collar segments 14a are in dovetail engagement with the bodies 11 and are held vertically on each of the wedge bodies 11' by bolts 14b. The lower set of teeth 15 preferably do not grip or engage the shank P" of the well pipe P when the teeth 14 are in pipe gripping position with the pipe upset.

Referring to FIG. 2, a drill collar DC is illustrated in position within the apparatus 10. When the components of the assembly are moved to the pipe gripping position, the lower teeth engage the body of the drill collar. Drill collars are commonly employed at the lower end of a drill string to'provide weight directly above the drill bit. By providing separate sets of teeth 14 and 15 with different diameter gripping areas, a single apparatus 10 may be employed in combination with suitable collar segments 14a for gripping an upset P formed at the upper end of a conventional joint-of drill pipe while also providing means forgripping a drill collar which might also be in the same string but which has a uniform cross-sectional diameter and is not equipped with an upset. It will be appreciated that the use of the collar segments 14a is desirable in apparatus designed to handle conventional drill pipe since the collar segments engage the pipe below the upset to provide axial support in addition to the support provided by the frictional engagement of the upper teeth 14. It will be understood also that the lower set of teeth 15 may be employed to grip the shank of a conventional drill pipe where it is desired to secure the pipe at some point intermediate its ends.

From the described construction of the apparatus 10, it will be appreciated that a gripping force is exerted against the cylindrical member engaged by the teeth 14 by powering the, hydraulic cylinders l2 to draw the wedge members 11 downwardly with respect to the seat bodies 13. The gripping force exerted by the slip teeth exists irrespective of forces present in the drill pipe P. It will also be appreciated, however, that downwardly directed forces in the well pipe P also tend to draw the wedge bodies 11 further downwardly with respect to the seat bodies 13 to increase the radially directed gripping forces acting on the well pipe. By this means, increasing forces acting axially downwardly on the pipe produce an increasing gripping force between the slips and the pipe.

The assembly 10 is designed primarily to prevent the pipe P from rotating as another pipe section is being threaded into or unthreaded from the upper end of the pipe. Such operation occurs, for example, when the length of the drill'string is being increased by adding a joint of drill pipe or when the drill pipe is being disassembled as it is removed from the well. Powered wrenches, hydraulic or electric power swivels or other means are employed to rotate the pipe sections being joined to or removed from the pipe section P. Substantial forces are developed in the pipe P during these procedures and the apparatus 10 is designed to overcome these forces to prevent the pipe P from rotating as the pipe section being removed or added is rotated.

FIG. 3 best illustrates a camming means included in the apparatus 10 for increasing the grip on the pipe P as the pipe tends to rotate with respect to the slip teeth 14. The wedge bodies 11, seating bodies 13 and slips 14 and 15 form a composite gripping assembly which is confined to move radially between guide bodies 16. The eight guide bodies 16 and the eight composite gripping assemblies form a second composite inner body which may rotate within limits with respect to a fixed, outer tubular housing The inner wall of the housing I 17 is provided with cam surfaces'formed by alternating ridges 18 and valleys 19. The seating bodies 13 are equipped on their radially outer surfaces with curved camming surfaces. 130. The camming surfaces 130 cooperate with the internal cam surface of the housing 17 to increase the radially directed gripping forces acting between the slip teeth and the well pipe as the well pipe tends to rotate with respect to the friction teeth. For example, as the well pipe P tends to rotate as well pipe is being added to or removed from the drill string,

the inner body tends to rotate in the same direction. As

this occurs, the cam surfaces on the seating bodies 13 begin to move along the internal cam surface of the stationary housing 17 which causes each seating body and wedge assembly to be moved radially inwardly as the associated cam surface 130 moves from a valley 19 to a ridge 18. It will be appreciated that the increased radially directed gripping force is produced for rotation of the pipe P in either direction. I

From the foregoing, it will be understood that the apparatus 10 provides means for increasing the radially directed forces acting on the drill pipe P as the forcestending to move the pipe relative to the slips increase. While the apparatus 10 has been described for use as a back-up device which is intended to prevent rotation of a pipe, it should be noted that if desired, the apparatus 10 may be mounted on a rotating assembly to impart rotary motion to the pipe P. In the latter application, as the pipe P resisted rotation, the camming action would tend to increase the grip exerted by the slip teeth against the pipe. Similarly, the assembly 10 may act to elevate the pipe P if it is mounted on a vertically movable structure. The same interchangability applies to each of the embodiments described herein.

Linear motion of the hydraulic cylinders 12 is conveyed to the wedge bodies 11 by an annular plate 18 which is secured to piston rods 12a extending from the hydraulic cylinders 12. Annular plates 19 and 20 held in position by bolts 21 form a circumferential groove employed to engage a circumferential lip 18a on the plate 18 to permit rotary motion of the plate 18 with respect to the cylinders 12. Radially formed slots 18b in the plate 18 permit ears 11c extending upwardly from the top of wedge bodies 11 to move radially as the slip bodies 11 move radially. Roll pins 22 extend through the ears 11c and across the top of the slots 18b to secure the wedge bodies 11 to plate 18 so that the bodies move axially with the plate. Set screws 22a hold the pins 22 in position on the ears 11c. The plate 18 is also equipped with a central, circular bore 180 to accommodate the pipes or other cylindrical members which are to be gripped by the slip teeth 14 and 15.

A top plate 24 is secured to the upper end of the housing 17 to prevent the seat bodies 13 from moving axially upwardly through the housing. The plate 24 is centrally apertured to receive the pipe P and is also equipped with eight recesses 24b formed radially outwardly from the central aperture to permit the wedge bodies 11 to move axiallythrough the plate. Bolts 25 or other suitable means extend through slot 25a formed in the plate 24 to secure the plate axially with respect to the housing 17. Bolts 24a extend directly through the plate 24 into the guides 16 so that the plate 24 rotates with the guides, wedge bodies, seating members and slips. The slots 25a receiving the bolts 25 are required to permit the plate 24 to rotate relative to the fixed housing 17. A base plate 26 is secured by bolts 27 or other suitable means to the lower end of the housing 17. The guides 16 extend upwardly from an annular base ring 29 which is supported by roller bearings 30 for rotation over an inwardly directed annular lip 26a formed about the central aperture of the base plate 26. A set screw 31 secures a shaft 30a which mounts the roller bearings 30 in position.

The cylinders 12 are secured to the base plate 26 by any suitable means. Hydraulic supply lines 32 and 33 supply pressurized hydraulic fluid below and above pistons 34 in each of the cylinders 12 to move the pistons upwardly or downwardly respectively, through cylinders 12. The pistons 34 are attached to the rods 12a so that movement of the pistons is imparted to the rods which in turn impart the movement to the plate 18 and wedge bodies 11 as previously described.

As best illustrated in FIG. 3, the housing 17 is preferably formed as two semi-cylindrical segments 17a and 17b joined together at their ends by pins 35 which extend through radial ears 36 and 37 projecting from the segments 17a and 17b, respectively. The base plate 26 is notched at 26b to permit the assembly to be hinged open on the pin 35 adjacent the notches 26b. Two of the guides 16 are divided to form components 16a carried on one half of the assembly and matching components 16b carried on the other half of the assembly.

The plate 24 which is also divided into two components is positioned so that bolts 24a extend through one segment of the plate into guide segments 16a and 16b and bolts 24a" extend through the other plate segment into the second divided guide segment 16. By this means, the guide segments 16a and 16b forming a single guide 16 are locked to each other to form a rigid unit. To swing the assembly open, it will be appreciated that the bolts 24a and the bolts 24a" must be removed.

FIGS. 6-11 illustrate a modified form of the invention indicated generally at 40. The apparatus 40 includes an upper set of slip teeth 41 and a lower set of teeth 42. The assembly 40 is adapted to be carried in a conventional rotary table RT. Slip teeth 41 in the assembly 40 are horizontally developed and upwardly directed to grip a well pipe P extending centrally through the assembly 40 for arresting vertical movement of the pipe and slip teeth 42 are vertically developed to engage the pipe when the rotary table RT is rotated to impart rotary motion to the pipe. While the friction producing means have been described as teeth, any suitable friction producing means may be employed in any of the embodiments of the invention. The slip teeth 41 and 42 are removable and are preferably held fixed radially to their respective supporting bodies by a dovetail engagement. The upper set of teeth 41 is carried on four wedged shaped bodies 43 which are moved axially by two hydraulically powered cylinders 44. Referring jointly to FIGS. 6 and 8, wedge bodies 43 move through a seating body 45 which includes four inwardly tapering seating surfaces 46 formed at the outer ends of radial recesses 46.

As best shown in FIGS. 7, 8 and 9, seating body 45 is formed from two mating semi-cylindrical segments 45a and 45b held together at their ends by braces 45' which are U-shaped in cross section and form a dovetail engagement with each of the two segments. The seating body 45 is equipped with a second set of inwardly inclined bearing surfaces 460 formed at the ends of recesses 46' which are designed to be employed with different size wedge bodies for handling smaller diameter pipe. FIG. 7 illustrates the upper and lower slip teeth engaging the pipe. As thedownwardly directed forces acting on the pipe increase, the wedge bodies 43 are drawn downwardly along the tapering bearing surface 46 to increase the force of the grip exerted on the pipe. Each of-the wedge bodies 43 is maintained in contact with a surface 46'by two pins 47 extending from the sides of recesses 46 into grooves 48 formed in the sides of the wedge bodies 43. Laterally extending bores 47a are employed to position the pins 47 during the assembly of the apparatus 40.'As the wedge bodies 43 move axially, the pins 47 slide through the grooves 48 to maintain external bearing surfaces 43a on the wedge bodies 43 in engagement with the bearing surfaces 46 on the seat body 45. Engagement of the pins 47 with the grooves 48 thereby ensures full radial retraction of the wedge bodies 43 when the hydraulic cylinders 44 are at the upper end of their stroke.

Referring jointly to FIGS. 6 and 10, the lower slip teeth 42 are carried by a radially movable slip assembly which includes a slip holding body 51 and cam rollers 52 supported on a vertical shaft 53. Axial and radial bores are provided through the shaft 53 to provide access for lubricating oil. Bolts 42a hold the dies having teeth 42 in position on the holding body 51. The slip dies are held on the bodySl by a tongueand groove engagement so that the dies may be replaced as the teeth wear out. The body45 is equipped with four radial slots 54 which support and guide the four slip assemblies. The slip assembliesand guide body 45 are surrounded by the lower end of a tubular, composite main housing body 55 which extends from the top of the seat body 45 to the base of the assembly 40. As seen best in FIG. 9, the housing 55 is formed of two mating semicylindrical segments held together at one end by a U- shaped bracket 55g. The other-ends of the two housing segments are pinned together bypin 55h to form a .hinging connection. As seen best in FIGS. 10 and 11,

a cam surface 55' is formed along the internal wall of the housing body 55. The housing body is rotatable with respect to the guide body 45 and the slip assemblies which causes the rollers 52 to ride along the internal camming surface 55. The cam surface 55' is formed from four symmetrical cam surfaces, each of which includes cam surfaces 55a, 55b, 55c, 55b and 550' As the housing body 55 rotates relative to the cam rollers 52, the rollers advance from the position illustrated in FIG. 10 to the surface 55b and 550 or 55b and 550', respectively, depending upon the direction of rotation.

As the rollers contact the decreasing diameter camming surfaces, the slip assemblies associated with the rollers are moved radially inwardly causing them to grip and firmly engage the pipe extending through the center of the assembly. Rollers 56 at the lower end of the cam roller assembly engage a cam surface 57 carried by the main housing body 55 and similar rollers 56' at the upper end of the cam roller assembly engage a similar cam surface 59 also carried by the main housing body 55 to return the cam rollers 52 and attached slip carrying bodies 51 and slip teeth 42 to their radially retracted positions as the main housing is rotated back toward a position aligning the cam rollers with the cam surfaces 55a. By this means, the slip assemblies are positively retracted when the main housing 55 is rotated with respect to the slip assemblies in a direction which permits retraction of the slip assemblies.

The assembly 40 includes a conventional annular bushing 58 which is set in an opening in the rotary table RT. As best illustrated in FIGS. 8 and 9, ears or projections 58a and 58b extend radially outwardly from the bushing 58 and are received in radial grooves formed in the rotary table RT to prevent the bushing from rotating with respect to the rotary table. The bushing 58 is preferably formed from two semi-cylindrical components 58c and 58d. Conventional locks 60 are employed to selectively secure the main housing 55 to the bushing 58. The locks 60 include key segments 60a which are rotated into and out of slots 60b in the main housing 55 to selectively secure or release the main housing with respect to the bushing 58.

Referring to FIGS. 6 and 7, rollers 61 bolted to the seating body 45 provide resistance to upwardly directed bearing forces exerted by the seat body 45 against an annular bearing track 55d formed on the internal surface of the main housing 55. Roller bearings 62 carried on shafts 63 act as thrust bearings for downwardly directed forces exerted by the seat body 45 against a bearing track 55e formed on the main housing body 55. Along the internal surface of the base of the main housing body, rollers 64 carried on vertically aligned shafts 65 provide friction reducing, centering means for use when the assembly 40 is being rotated about a stationary pipe or when the assembly 40 is stationary and the pipe is being rotated with respect to the assembly. The rollers-64 and shafts 65 are carried in a centering body 64a which is secured to the housing 55 by bolts 64b to form the lower end of the housing 55.

The hydraulic cylinders 44 are mounted on two radially extending ears 55f secured to the main housing body 55. Fluid supply lines 44a and 44b admit pressurized hydraulic fluid into cylinders 44c to move pistons 44d upwardly or downwardly, respectively. Rods 44e connected to the pistons 44d communicate the axial movement of the pistons to an annular ring 66. The rods-44e are secured to the ring 66 by bolts 44f. Rollers 67 carried by the ring 66 support an annular head collar 68 for rotary motion with respect to the'collar 66. A centrally apertured support plate 69 rigidly secured to the head collar 68 is employed to support the upper end of the wedge segments 43. Roll pins 70 extend through ears 43b projecting upwardly from the wedge bodies 43 to secure the wedge bodies for axial movement with the plate 69. The cars 43b extend through radially developed plate slots 690 which accommodate radial movement in the slip ears as the slips are moved axially. The plate 69 is provided with a central opening 71 which receives the pipe to be handled.

A tubular indexing sleeve 72 is rigidly secured to the plate 69 and telescopes over the upper end of main housing 55. Two indexing pins 73 extend radially outwardly from the housing 55 and project into centralizing windows 72a formed in the sleeve 72. The windows 72a function to rotate the sleeve 72 as the cylinders44 are extended by bringing tapered bearing surfaces 72b or 720 into engagementwith the pins 73 causing the pins to drop into a lowermost surface 72d formed at the base of windows 72a. Rotation of the tubular body 72 is transferred to the attached plate 69 which in turn rotates the wedge bodies 43 and seat body 45. With the pins 73 in the lower window surface 72d, the lower set of slip teeth 42 is fully retracted at the same time that the upper set of teeth 41 is retracted.

In operation, hydraulic power is supplied through line 44b to drive the rods'44e downwardly. Downward movement of the rods is transferred through the annular plate 66, rollers 67 and plate 69 to the tops of the wedge bodies 43. As the wedge bodies 43 movedownwardly, the outer bearing surfaces 43a' ride against the seating surfaces 46 formed in the seating body 45 causing the wedge bodies 43 to move radially inwardly. This inward radial movement continues until the slip teeth 41 carried on the wedge bodies 43 firmly grip the well pipe extending through the center of assembly 40. When the wedge bodies 43 are pulled downwardly, the pin 73 is free to rotate to a limited extent within the window 72a which allows the camming action to take place. Once the assembly has been gripped, power is supplied to the rotary table RT causing the table and assembly 40 to rotate. As the table and assembly begin rotating, the well pipe extending vertically through the assembly tends to resist the rotation causing the seating body 45 to tend to rotate with respect to the main housing body 55. This relative motion causes the camming wheels 52 to move up against the camming surfaces 55b or 55b, depending upon the direction of rotation, which in turn drives the holding bodies 51 radially inwardly until the slip teeth 42 engage the pipe. The force exerted by the teeth 42 against the pipe extending through the assemblies increases as the pipe tends to resist rotation. By this means, the slip teeth 42 act as the primary gripping force transferring the rotary motion of the table RT to the pipe permitting the upper set of teeth 41 to function primarily to provide axial support for the well pipe.

When release of the well pipe is desired, hydraulic fluid is supplied through the lines 44a to lift the pistons 44d causing the wedge bodies 43a to move upwardly and radially away from the encircled well pipe. Engagement of pins 47 in the grooves 48 causes the wedge bodies to remain in contact with the seating surface 46 as the slips are retracted. During the upward movement of the wedge bodies, the centering pins 73 ride against the surfaces 72b or 720 causing the outer housing 55 to assume the position which permits the lower slip teeth 42 to retract fully.

Any suitable means may be employed to transferhydraulic pressure from a stationary source to the rotatable cylinders 44. In this regard, if desired, the cylinders 44 secured to the housing 55 by bolts 44c may be secured to a non-rotating, external support by radially extending the ring support 66. Thus, the cylinders 44 may be mounted on the stationary rig floor and secured to the collar 68 through suitable connections which extend radially from the ring 66 to the cylinders.

FIGS. 12 and 13 illustrate a third embodiment of the invention indicated generally at 80. The embodiment 80 is designed primarily to impart rotary motion to a pipe P. To this end, a base plate 81 is secured to a stationary support by any suitable means. Hydraulic cylinders indicated generally at 82 move wedge shaped bodies 83 axially through the assembly 80 to cause radial movement of slip teeth 84 carried on slip holders 85 which in turn are mounted on seating bodies 86. A dovetail engagement between the seating bodies 86 and wedge bodies 83 causes the wedge bodies and attached slip teeth to retract radially as the wedge bodies 83 move linearly in an axial direction. The slip teeth 84 are carried in dies which are held to the slip holder 85 by a dovetail engagement between the two components. The slip teeth 84 are formed on two separate dies, one of which has upwardly directed teeth and the other downwardly directed teeth to thereby ensure gripping of the pipe for forces exerted in either axial direction. A removable bolt 87 holds the dies carrying the teeth 84 in position and may be removed to permit replacement of the dies. A second bolt 88 extends through the slip teeth holder 85 and into the seating body 86 to maintain the holder 85 in position. Suitable spring means 89 resiliently bias oppositely tapered bearing surfaces on the upper and lower external surfaces of the slip body 85 against mating seating surfaces on the seating body 86. Limited axial movement of the slip holder 85 with respect to the seat body 86 is permitted to increase the gripping force exerted by the teeth 84 against the pipe P as the pipe tends to move in either axial direction after having been gripped by the teeth 84.

The axial movement of the cylinder 82 is transmitted to the wedge body 83 through piston rods 82a, annular collar 90, and upper plate 91. The plate 91 is equipped with radially extending slots 91a through which the axially movable wedging bodies 83 may be raised and lowered. The plate 91 also functions to maintain the slip holding bodies 86 axially stationary while the wedge bodies 83 are moved upwardly. The plate 91 is secured with respect to the collar 90.by a ring 92 and an inwardly projected lip 90a on the collar 90 to permit the plate 91 to rotate relative to the collar 90. Friction re-.

ducing brass rings 93 are positioned above and below the collar 91 in the recess formed by the ring 92 and lip 90a. The collar 90 is secured to the rods 82a" by nuts 82b which engage the ends of the rod. Bolts 94 secure the plate 91 to the axially movable wedge bodies 83. The bolts 94 extend through radial slots 91 in the plate 91 to permit radial movement between the wedge bodies 83 and the plate 91. A centrally apertured plate 91a is secured by bolts 91a to the upper end of guide bodies 95. The plate 91 prevents the seat bodies 86 from moving upwardly. Radial grooves 91a" formed in the plate 91apermit the wedge bodies 83 to be raised upwardly by the plate 91.

The lower ends of the guides 95 are secured to an annular base plate 96. The base plate 96 rests on the base 97a of a tubular housing body 97. A bushing 96a welded to the base plate 96 cooperates with the base I plate 96 to form a recess within which the bottom portion 97a of the housing 97 and the radially inner portion of the base plate 81 are received. A friction reducing brass ring 98 is positioned between the bushing 96a and the base plate 81. Ball bearings 99 are disposed between the base 97a and the base plate 81 to support the housing 97 for rotary motion with respect to the base plate. Resilient annular seals 100 and 101 protect the ball bearings 99 from foreign matter. A grease fitting 102 is positioned in the base of plate 81 to provide bearings 101 with lubricant.

The housing 97 is rotated by a fluid motor 103 mounted on a plate 104 secured to the base plate 81 by any suitable means. The motor 103 is preferably reversible and may be pneumatically or hydraulically powered, or may be driven by an electrical motor or otherwise. A small drive gear 105 extending from the drive shaft of the motor 103 engages a larger gear 97b which encircles the base of housing 97. Meshing of the teeth in the gear 105 and gear 97b imparts the rotary motion of the motor 103 to the housing 97.

Referring to FIG. 12, the housing 97 is equipped with internal camming surfaces 97c. The composite inner assembly formed by the slips and guide bodies is rotatable relative to the housing 97 and as such rotation takes place, the camming surfaces force the wedging bodies 83, seating bodies 86, slip holders and slip teeth 84 radially inwardly to increase the grip exerted on the pipe P. Shoulders 83a on the wedge bodies 83 engage shoulders formed on the guides to limit the radially inward movement of the slips.

In operation, the slips are retracted by supplying fluid through a lower conduit opening into the hydraulic cylinder 82 which forces the rods 82a upwardly which in turn raises the plate 91 and the wedge bodies 83. The tongue and groove engagement between the wedge bodies 83 and the seat bodies 86 positively retracts the seat bodies as the wedge bodies are elevated.

When it is desired to grip the pipe P, hydraulic fluid is supplied through a line opening above the pistons secured to the rods 82a to force the rods downwardly. The downward motion is transmitted to the wedge bodies .83 which causes the tapered bearing surfaces between the wedge bodies and the seat bodies 86 to move the seat bodies radially inwardly until the slip teeth 84 engage the pipe P. The doubly tapered seating surfaces between the seating bodies 86 and the slip holders 85 cause upwardly or downwardly directed forces on the pipe P to increase the radial gripping force exerted by the slip teeth 84 against the pipe P.

Once the pipe P has been gripped by the slip teeth 84, the motor 103 may be activated to impart rotary motion to the housing 97. Resistance to rotation in the pipe P causes the composite inner assembly formed by the slip teeth, slip holders 85, seat bodies 86 and wedge bodies 83 to resist the rotation of the housing 97. This in turn causes the wedge bodies 83 to move along the camming surfaces 97c tending to further increase the inwardly directed forces. acting on the slip teeth to thereby increase the gripping force acting on the pipe P.

Referring to FIGS. 14-16, a modified form of the invention is illustrated generally at 110. The assembly 110 is designed primarily to impart rotary motion to a well pipe and toprevent vertical movement of the pipe. However, like all of the modificationspreviously described, the assembly 110 may be employed as a backupwhich prevents rotation of a=drill pipe or as a device to grip and elevate the-pipe. Referring jointly to FIGS. 14 and 15, the assembly 110 includes two hydraulically poweredcylinders 111 which raise and lower two doubly tapered, wedge shaped members 112 between movable housing sections 113-and stationary support sections 1 14. Axial movement of the members 112 imparts a radial movement to the-housing segments 113. The internal walls of the housing segments 1 13are provided with cam surfaces 113a which cooperate with cam rollers 115 mounted on seatbodies 116 to move slip teeth 117 carried on slip holders 118 radially inwardly as resistance to rotation of the pipe P by the slips 1.17 is increased. The slip holders are resiliently centered by upper and lower leaf springs 118a and bolts 11 8b extend through oversize bores in the holders to permit limited axial movement of the holders while securing them to the seat bodies 116. I v

A motor 119 which may be a fluid motor, electric motor or other prime mover imparts rotary motion to a ring gear 120 affixed to an annular base member 121. Bolts 113 secure the sections 114 to the plate 121. The plate 121 is mounted by roller bearings 122 for rotary motion through a circular base plate 123. The cylinders 111 are secured to the plate 123 by bolts 111'. At the upper end of the assembly 110, vertical movement of the wedge members 112 is induced by vertical'movement of rods 111a secured to the wedge members 112 by an annular ring 124, rollers 125 and a head plate 126. The rollers 125 permit rotational movement of the head piece 126 with respect to the cylinders 1 11. Bolts 127 extend through radial slots 126a formed in the head plate 126 to secure the wedge members 112 to the head plate while permitting limited radial movement of the wedge members..Bolts 128 connect a top plate 129 to the top of housing segments 113 through radial'slots 129a to fix the plate to the top of the housing while permitting radial housing movement. Bolts 130 secure the plate 129 to the top of support sections 114. Theplate 129 functions to keep the guide bodies 1 18, seat bodies 116, slip holders 118 and slips 117 confined axially within the housing segments 1 13. The segments 113 are in turn secured to the base member 121 by plate segments 131 which extend throughslots 132 in the housing and are bolted to the member 121 by bolts 133. The inner edges 131a of plates 13] engaging the slots 132 are paralled so that the housing segments slide along theplates in a straight line.

engagement with the well'pipe P. Once the pipe has been gripped, rotary motion imparted by themotor 119 is transmitted to the pipe P through the engaged slips. A tongue and groove engagement formed between the wedge bodies 112 and the housing segments 113 and support'members 114 ensures radial retraction of the slips as the wedge members 112 are raisedaxially. The double taper provided by the downwardly converging bearing surfaces on the wedge members 112 produce an increased ratio of radial slip movement for a given axial wedge movement as compared with a single tapered wedge having a vertical bearing surface and a single inclined bearing surface. Doubly tapered, axially movable wedge members may be employed in anyof the embodiments described" herein with appropriate modification. Such members are particularly suited for use with slips intended to prevent axial movement of the pipe in both axial directions.

Theassembly is particularly suited for use when a small diameter tubing string or the like is handled, and thereafter as part of the completion procedure, larger diameter well conduits such as tubing hangers or the like are to be run into the well. The assembly 1 10 is also designed to accommodate a very large range of well pipe size thereby eliminating the need to disassemble slips and insert different size wedges or slip teeth when changing from one size well pipe to another. In each of the described embodiments, the. gripping assemblies may be removed while the pipe is extending through the assembly without requiring that a free end of the pipe be passed through the assembly. Thus, where the well pipe is suspended from a conventional block and tackle or an electric power swivel or other device, and it is desired to replace or remove the gripping assembly, the assembly can be disassembled, split open and removed. Each of the assemblies also may be quickly and easily modified by inserting new size wedges, slip holders, seats or other components as required to handle different type or size pipe. 7

Referring jointly to FIGS.17 and 18, a modified assembly is indicated generally at 210. The assembly 210 is generally similar to that illustratedin FIGS. 1-4 of the drawing but has been modified to include a hydraulically actuated powering device indicated generally at 211. The device 211 is designed to be'employed to pivot the two mating semi-cylindrical segments of the pipe-handling apparatus 210 about a pin 212,. An assembly pin (not illustrated) similarto the pin 212 may be employed to lock the two segments together until it is desired to open the assembly. A mounting ear 213 secured to one semi-circular base segment 214 holds one end of a cylinder 215 while a second car 216 sc- .cured to a second semi-circular base segment 217 mounts a piston rod assembly 218. Suitable pivoting means at the ends of the cylinder mount and piston assembly mount permit the cylinder and piston assembly to expand and contract linearly while imparting a pivotal motion to the two segments 214 and 217. Hydrauliclines 219 and 220 provide fluid to the cylinder 215 to expand and contract the device 211 by driving the piston rod assembly 218 through the cylinder 215 in a conventional manner.

FIG. 18 illustrates the piston assembly contracted or foreshortened by the application of pressurized hydraulic fluid through the line 220 which causes the two halves of the assembly 210 to pivot about the pin 212. Reverse movement of the piston rod assembly 218 is effected by introducing pressure fluid through the line 219.

The modification 210 is particularly well suited for use where it is desired to lower large diameter components through the slips and thereafter reengage smaller diameter well pipe in a normal fashion. In addition, the hydraulic opening device 211 functions to open the assembly 210 about the pin 212 when it is desired to replace or repair internal components of the slip assembly.

The foregoing disclosure and description of the invention is illustrative and explanatory thereof, and various changes in the size, shape and materials as well as in the details of the illustrated construction may be made within the scope of the appended claims without departing from the spirit of the invention.

I claim:

1. An automated apparatus for handling an axially extending cylindrical member comprising:

a. friction means for engaging and gripping said member; I

b. powered drive means for moving said friction means into gripping engagement with said member;

0. axially inclined bearing surface means included with said drive means for moving said friction means radially inwardly into gripping engagement with said member as said bearing surface means moves axially;

. housing means;

e. guide means carried in said housing means for directing the radial movement of said friction means through said housing means; camming means carried in said housing means for moving said friction means radially inwardly as said friction means rotate with respect to said housing means whereby the radially directed gripping forces between said friction means and said member increase as the forces tending to rotate said friction means with respect to said member increase;

g. wedge shaped body means carrying a portion of said bearing surface means and movable axially with respect to said housing means; and

h. fluid driven piston means connected with said wedge shaped body means for moving said body means axially.

2. An automated apparatus as defined in claim 1 further including connecting means between said friction means and said housing means for moving said friction means radially outwardly out of gripping engagement with said member as said wedge shaped body means moves axially.

3. An automated apparatus as defined in claim 1 further including axial wedging means for increasing the radially directed gripping forces between said friction means and said cylindrical member as the forces tending to move said member axially with respect to said friction means increase.

4. An automated apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein said friction means include a first diameter gripping area and a second, smaller diameter gripping area.

5. An automated apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein said friction means include first friction means for supporting said member axially and second friction means for rotating said-member.

6. An automated apparatus as defined in claim 5 wherein said second friction means includes said camming means.

7. An automated apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein said friction means includes slip means having inclined bearing surfaces adapted to engage and slide against inclined seating surfaces whereby axial movement of said slip means relative to said seating surfaces moves said slip means radially.

8. An automated apparatus as defined in claim 7 wherein:

a. said seating surfaces include oppositely inclined upper and lower seating surfaces; and

b. said slip means include oppositely inclined upper and lower bearing surfaces adapted to engage and slide against said upper and lower seating surfaces respectively whereby upward or downward axial movement of said slip means with respect to said seating surfaces moves said slip means radially to increase the radially directed forces exerted against said member. 1

9. An automated apparatus as defined in claim 8 further including retraction means connected with said drive means for moving said friction means radially outwardly out of gripping engagement with said member as said bearing surface means moves axially.

10. An automated apparatus as defined in claim 9 further including means for rotating said friction means whereby said cylindrical member is rotated when engaged by said friction means.

11. An automated apparatus as defined in claim 10 wherein: a

a. said housing means is separable into first and second segments; and

b. said wedge shaped body means includes first and second bodies connected with said first and second segments to move said components radially as said body means is moved axially.

12. An automated apparatus as defined in claim 11 wherein each of said first and second bodies include oppositely tapered converging bearing surfaces for effecting radial movement of said housing segments as said first and second bodies are moved axially.

13. An automated apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein:

a. said housing means is separable into first and second segments; and

b. said wedge shaped body means includes first and second bodies connected with said first and second segments to move said components radially as said body means is moved axially.

14. An automated apparatus as defined in claim 13 wherein each of said first and second bodies include oppositely tapered converging bearing surfaces for effecting radial movement of said housing segments as said first and second bodies are moved axially.

15. An automated apparatus for handling an axially extending cylindrical member comprising:

a. friction means for engaging and gripping said member;

b. powered drive means for moving said friction means into gripping engagement with said member;

c. axially inclined bearing surface means included with said drive means for moving said friction means radially inwardly into gripping engagement with said member as said bearing surface means moves axially; and I d. camming means for increasing the radially directed gripping forces between said friction means and said cylindrical member as the forces tending to rotate said friction means with respect to said member increase, said friction means further including first friction means for supporting said member axially and second friction means for rotating said member.

16. An automated apparatus as defined in claim 15 wherein said second friction means includes said camming means and said first friction means includes axial wedging means for increasing the radially directed gripping forces between said first friction means and said cylindrical member as the forces tending to move said member axially with respect to said first friction means increase.

l7. An automated apparatusas defined in claim 16 further including means for rotating said friction means whereby said cylindrical member is rotated when engaged by said friction means.

18. An automated apparatus for handling an axially extending cylindrical member comprising:

a. friction means for engaging and gripping said member;

b. powered drive means for moving said friction means into gripping engagement with said member;

c. axially inclined bearing surface means included with said drive means for moving said friction means radially inwardly into gripping engagement with said member as said bearing surface means moves axially; I

d. means for rotating said friction means whereby said cylindrical member is rotated when engaged by said friction means;

e. first slip means included in said friction means for supporting said cylindrical member axially, said first slip means including axial wedging means for increasing theradially directed gripping forces between said first slip means and said cylindrical member as the forces tending to move said member axially with respect to said first slip means increase; and

f. second slip means included in said friction means for engaging and rotating said cylindrical member as said friction means is rotated, said second slip means including camming means for increasing the radially directed gripping forces between said second slip means and said cylindrical member as the forces tending to rotate said second slip means with respect to said member increase.

19. An automated apparatus for handling an axially extending cylindrical member comprising:

a. friction means for engaging and gripping said member,

b. powered drive means for moving said friction means into gripping engagement with said member;

c. axially inclined bearing surface means included with said drive means for moving said friction means radially inwardly into gripping engagement with said member as said bearing surface means moves axially;

d. means for rotating said friction means whereby said cylindrical member is rotated when engaged by said friction means;

e. first slip means included in said friction means for supporting said cylindrical member axially;

f. second slip means included in said friction means for engaging and rotating said cylindrical member as said friction means is rotated;

g. housing means;

h. guide means carried in said housing means for directing the radial movement of said friction means through said housing means;

i. camming means carried in said housing means for moving said second slip means radially inwardly as said second slip means rotates with respect to said housing means whereby the radially directed gripping forces between said second slip means and said cylindrical member increase as the forces tending to rotate said second slip means with respect to said member increase;

j. wedge shaped body means carrying a portion of said bearing surface means and movable axially with respect to said guide means; and

k. inwardlytapered seating surfaces formed on said guide means cooperating with said wedge shaped body means for moving said first slip means radially.

20. An automated apparatus as described in claim 19 further including fluid driven piston means for moving said wedge shaped bodies axially to control gripping and release of said cylindrical member by said first slip means.

21. An automated apparatus as descirbed in claim 20 wherein said means for rotating includes means for mounting said apparatus within a rotary table whereby rotary motion of said rotary table is transmitted to said friction means.

22. An automated apparatus as described in claim 21 wherein said first gripping means includes circumferentially developed teeth and said second gripping means includes longitudinally developed teeth.

23. An automated apparatus as defined in claim 1 further including:

a. assembly means for separating said apparatus into first and second segments whereby said apparatus may be closed and opened about said axially extending member; and

b. powered separating means for opening and closing said first and second segments.

24. An automated apparatus as defined in claim 23 wherein said powered separating means includes fluid actuated, linearly expandible and contractable cylinder and piston means.

25. An automated apparatus as defined in claim 24 wherein:

a. said assembly means includes pivot pin means securing one end of said first and second segments for pivotal movement; and

b. said powered separating means extends from said first to said second segments to pivot said segments about said pin means as said separating means is expanded or contracted linearly.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification188/67
International ClassificationE21B19/10, E21B19/00, E21B19/16, F16L55/00
Cooperative ClassificationE21B19/16, E21B19/10, F16L55/00
European ClassificationF16L55/00, E21B19/10, E21B19/16
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 1, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: VELCRO INDUSTRIES B.V., NEIUWE WETERINGSTRAAT 38,
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:VELCRO USA, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004871/0369
Effective date: 19870930
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:VELCRO USA, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004871/0369
Owner name: VELCRO INDUSTRIES B.V.,NETHERLANDS
Apr 5, 1982ASAssignment
Owner name: HUGHES TOOL COMPANY A CORP. OF DE
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:BROWN OIL TOOLS, INC. A TX CORP.;REEL/FRAME:003967/0348
Effective date: 19811214