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Publication numberUS3748760 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 31, 1973
Filing dateDec 14, 1971
Priority dateDec 28, 1970
Also published asCA958423A1, DE2063968A1
Publication numberUS 3748760 A, US 3748760A, US-A-3748760, US3748760 A, US3748760A
InventorsSchnell L
Original AssigneeSchuttgutfoerdertechnik Ag
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dredging machinery with swinging double ended scoop
US 3748760 A
Abstract
A floating dredge has a downwardly extending discharge line terminating in a double ended scoop, with the discharge line being supported at its upper end for bi-directional swinging movement of the scoop; the scoop having a pivoted double ended scraper blade which alternatively opens one end of the scoop while closing the other.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Schnell 1451 July 31,1973

1 1 DREDGING MACHINERY WITH SWINGING DOUBLE ENDED SCOOP [75] Inventor: Ludwig Lorenz Schnell, Aufhausen,

Germany [73] Assignee: Schuttgutforderlechnik AG,

Zug/Schweiz, Switzerland [22] Filed: Dec. 14, 1971 [211 App]. No.: 207,923

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Dec. 28, 1970 Germany P 20 63 968.3

[52] 11.8. CI. 37/58, 37/71 [51] Int. Cl... v E02f 3/92 [58 Field of Search; 37/71, 124, 58; 172/712 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,690,239 11/1928 -Nic0l..... ..37/S8X 927,690 7/1909 Singleton 37/58 1,068,934 7/1913 Sackett 37/58 548,242 10/1895 Wood et a1. 37/71 UX 3,681,862 8/1972 DeKoning et a1 37/58 2,995,842 8/1961 Korste 37/58 2,763,940 9/1956 Madgwick, Sr. 37/58 2,414,797 1/1947 Brown 37/58 2,657,481 11/1953 Larsen 37/124 Primary ExaminerRobert E. Pulfrey Attorney-George H. Mitchell, Jr. et al.

[5 7 ABSTRACT A floating dredge has a downwardly extending discharge line terminating in a double ended scoop, with the discharge line being supported at its upper end for bi-directional swinging movement of the scoop; the scoop having a pivoted double ended scraper blade which alternatively opens one end of the scoop while closing the other.

10 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures ill/l [I] Ill.

PAIENIE JUL 3 I 975 SHEET t [If 4 DIREDGING MACHINERY WITH SWINGING DOUBLE ENDED SCOOP The present invention relates to machinery for dredg ing sand, gravel, or other similar loose materials from underwater bottoms, and generally comprises a horizontally reciprocatingly movable dredging scoop attached to the lower end of a discharge line which is sup ported at its upper end by an articulated joint attached to a floating structure. The assembly also includes a line for conducting pressurized fluid, such as air or" water to the lower end of the discharge line for conveying materials upwardly to the surface. I

In conventional dredges the loose materials are sucked into the dredging scoop by the partial vacuum created by the flow of pressurized madium at the intake of the scoop and are carried up through a discharge line with the pressurized fluid. A disadvantage of these dredges is, that only such materials as can be easily sucked into the scoop will be removed. It is only to a limited extent that materials that are strongly adherent to the bottom will be removed. a

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide dredging machinery capable of removing a maximum of materials from the bottom of a body of water regardless of the type of material and its location.

This object is accomplished by providing a downwardly depending discharge line having a scoop at its lower end which can be reciprocatingly moved in a horizontal path to provide a scrapingaction on the material to be removed. The scoop, furthermore, is provided with oppositely disposed openings and a double ended pivotal scraping blade which is operable to alternatively uncover the opening facing the direction of movement while simultaneously closing the opposite one.

In order to increase the capacity of the apparatus it is also advantageous to provide the leading edges of the double ended blade with a series of teeth.

It is also advantageous to protect the scoop against possible damage by placing one, or more, protective arms across the respective inlet openings attached to the leading edges of the blade to prevent the entry of large rocks, debris, or other oversized materials which might otherwise clog the openings.

A further feature of the invention consists in the fact that the upper end of the discharge line is secured to a stationary support on the floating structure by means of a ball bearing journalled support with the material being discharged from the line by a right angled elbow pipe.

In order to obtain additional freedom of movement of the discharge line it is also advantageous to provide a flexible articulated coupling near the upper end of the line which will allow the discharge line to swing in a direction at right angles to the principal path of reciprocating movement determined by the journalled support.

Other objects and advantages will be apparent to those skilled in the art from the following detailed description in connection with the attached drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a view in elevation of a preferred form of a device according to the invention, for dredging sand, gravel or other similar loose materials;

FIG. 2 is a detail view, partly in section and on an enlarged scale, of the scoop shown in FIG. 1;

I I FIG. 3 is an end view of the scoop taken from the left for dredging sand, gravel or other similar loose materi als is generally indicated by numeral 10. This device comprises a floating raft like vessel 12, preferably formed by a pair of parallel pontoons 14 joined to each 'other by transverse connecting pontoons 16 indicated by dotted lines. That portion of the raft towards the left in FIG. I is left open to permit entry of a barge or other means for carrying away material discharged.

Approximately at the middle of the raft 12 a baffle tank 18 is provided into which the loose material removed by a scoop is fed through a discharge line 20. The material, such as gravel, sand or the like, is conveyed from this baffle tank to a drainage chute 22. The drained material is then transported, for example, to a storage place located ashore by means of conveyor belts, barges, or the like (not shown).

Two lifting jacks 24 and 26 are mounted on the vessel 12 at the left and at the right of the baffle tank 18, respectively, and at approximately the same distance therefrom. Each one of these lifting jacks is provided with a motor-driven winch 28 and 80, respectively, and cables 32 and 34, whose free endsare secured to a scoop 36, are rolled around these winches. The lifting jacks also serve to assist in securing the two ontoons 14 to each other. I

As shown in FIG. I, a feed line 38 is provided to convey a pressurized medium, for example water or pressurized air, to the scoop 36. The pressurized water fed into line 38 is obtained directly from the river or the lake by means of an intake 40, and is conveyed to the scoop 36 by a pressure pump 42 mounted on the battle tank 18.

Iin FIGS. 2 to 4 the scoop 36 is shown on an enlarged scale. The discharge line 20 is connected to a housing 44 of the scoop 36, which has for example the shape of a truncated pyramid and is provided at its lower end with an inlet 46 opposite to the discharge line 20. This inlet comprises a double-ended scraping blade 48 provided at its opposite ends with teeth 59 (FIG. 3). The

scraping blade 48 is rotatably mounted in the center of the lower portion of the housing 44 and is provided.

with two curved elongated upwardly projecting arms 52 fixed to the upper surfaces 45 and 47 of thefblade."

As shown in FIG. 3, the two narrow sides ofthehousing 44 are provided with openings 49 and 51 adapted to receive the respective ends of the reciprocating scraping blade 48. Further, the scraping blade 48 is also guided in its reciprocating movement by means of the two arms 52 which move between guide blocks 54 located above the side openings 49 and 51.

As particularly shown in FIG. 2, the scraping blade 48 is rotatably mounted on a conduit 58, connected with the feed line 38 for pressurized medium, by means of a hollow shaft 56. The conduit 58 is provided with an upwardly directed opening 60 on the inside of the scoop 36 to prevent the opening 60 from becoming closed during movement of the scraping blade. The hollow shaft 56 is provided at its upper portion with an opening 62 which is larger than the opening 60 of the conduit 58 so that it is always completely open regardless of the position of the scraping blade 48.

Reciprocating movement of the scraping blade 48 is accomplished by the alternative application of force to the cables 32 and 34. These cables lead from the respective winches 28 and 30 and pass downwardly over the outside of rollers 80, mounted at the extremities of pivotally mounted levers 78, and each is connected at its lower free end to a pulley 64. These pulleys carry the medial portion of the respective cable loops 66 and 68. 7, Connected at the ends of the hollow shaft 56, which projects outwardly of the scoop housing, are a pair of bell crank levers having arms 70 and 72 and the terminal ends of cable loop 66 are connected to arms 70, while the ends of cable loop 68 are connected to arms 72.

As shown in FIG. 3, the arms 70 are outwardly offset so that the spacing between the two arms 70 is larger than between the arms 72. This permits the two cable loops 66 and 68 to cross each other (FIG. 2) without touching and prevents abrasion and wear.

As further shown in FIG. 3, the housing 44 of the scoop 36 as well as the lower end of the feed line 38 which is outwardly offset to connect with the inlet conduit 58 at the side of housing 44 are provided with outwardly projecting spikes 74 which contribute to the housing 44. Subsequently the whole scoop 36 will move towards the left as a result of the pulling force of the cable, that is to say, in the direction of the open side opening 49. Theside opening 51 at the right hand side isnoviclosed by the scraping blade 48.

The "movement of the scoop 36 towards the left in FIG/2, in cooperation with the action of the spikes 74 and the teeth 50, secured to the scraping blade 48, causes loose material to be scratched from the packed grounder soil and to be introduced through the open side opening 49 into the inside of the scoop 36. This loose material is conveyed upwards through the line 20 and into the baffle tank 18 by means of the pressurized medium fed into the inside of the housing 44 through the pressure line 38, the inlet conduit 58 and the openings 60 and 62.

After a certain period of time, such as for example ten seconds, the actuating cylinder 76 shown at the right hand side in FIG. 1 is actuated, which causes the cable 34 to be pulled out of the water a certain distance by the lever 78. At the same time, the cable 32 is released by the actuating cylinder 76 shown at the left hand side in FIG. 1, so that the scraping blade 48 is now rotated clockwise, thus closing the side opening 48 and simultaneously opening the side opening 51 located at the right hand side. As the pulling action of cable 34 increases, the upper surface 45 of the scraping blade 48,

loosening of the material which is to be scraped away from the bottom of a river or a lake.

, The alternating forces applied to the cables 32 and '34, which causes the reciprocating movement of the scraping blade 48 and also the scoop 36 in a manner which will be described later, is accomplished by respective actuation of cylinders 76, either pneumatically or hydraulically. Each cylinder 76 is connected to a respective lever 78 whose pivotal support is preferably in alignment with the axis of each winch 28 and 30. The free ends of the levers 78 are provided with rollers 80 to act on the cables 32 and 34. The reciprocating movement of the scoop 36 is accomplished by the alternative swinging movement of the levers 78, and thus the drums of the winches 28 and 30-need not necessarily be rotated since their axes are the same as the axes of the levers 78.

Since the actuation of cables 32 and 34 is achieved by means of the actuating cylinders 76 which work simultaneously but in opposite directions, a single source of pneumatic or hydraulic fluid under pressure is sufficient to actuate both cylinders, such as for example a pressure pump and a suitable arrangement of control valves.

When the actuating cylinder 76, shown at the left hand side in FIG. 1, causes the lever 78 to rotate clockwise, thiscauses the scraping blade 48 to be swung counterclockwise about the inlet conduit 58, due to the action of the cable 32, cable loop 66 and bell crank arms 70. Due to the crosswise arrangement of cable loops 66 and 68, the cable loop 68 and cable 34 are pulled downwards, so that the lever 78 at the right hand side in FIG. 1 also pivots clockwise towards its starting position. As a result of the pulling' action of cable 32 the side opening 49 of housing 44, which is on the same side as the cable 32 and which is shown at the left hand side in FIG. 2, is opened.

The scraping blade 48 keeps turning until its right hand upper surface 47 abuts against the upper edge of the side opening 51 provided at the right'side of the shown in FIG. 2,,abuts against the upper edge of the side opening 49 and closes this opening, so that now the scoop 36 moves towards the right with the side opening 51 open, so that it scrapes the loose material and takes it in. '7

' The curved arms 52 protruding upwards from the scraping blade 48 at both sides thereof prevent excessively large lumps of loose material from entering into the interior of the housing 44 through the side opening which happens to be open and which might block the discharge line 20. Of course, instead of a single arm 52 on each side, several horizontally spaced arms could be provided in form of a rake.

As already mentioned, the loose material taken into the scoop 36 is conveyed upwards through the discharge line 20 and into the baffle tank '18 mounted on the raft 12. Since the discharge line 20 is rigidly connected to the scoop 36 so that it also swings during the reciprocating movement of the scoop, it is necessary to provide an articulated support at the upper end of the discharge line 20. Such a joint is shown in FIG. 5.

The discharge line 20 is flanged to a support frame 86, and an elastic intermediate member 84, which will be described later, is interposed in the discharge line just below this support. The connection between the discharge line 20 and thebaffle tank is accomplished by means of an elbow 88 which is also flanged to the support frame 86. This support frame 86 which is rigidly connected to the discharge line 20 is pivoted to a support structure 94 by means of two ball-bearing journals 90 and 92. The supportstructure can be rigidly connected to the baffle tank 18 or else be movable vertically on the tank framework by means of a motordriven block and tackle arrangement 96, schematically indicated in FIG. 1. This up and down movement of the support structure 94 and, consequently, of the support frame 86, makes it possible to vary the depth of the scoop 36 connectedto the discharge line 20 and has the advantage that the scoop can easily be pulled up out of any pit which might be caused by the dredging r I operation. This upward movement of the scoop can be assisted by simultaneous pulling action on thecables by winches 28 and 30. 1

As shown in FIG. 5, only one end of theelbow 88 is fixedly secured. to. the support frame 86, whereas the other angled end of thepipe passes through the-.ball bearing joint and through an opening 98 of the'-support structure 94 without contacting them, and discharges into the baffle tank 18.

This arrangement permits the discharge line 20 to be reciprocated in both directionsin response to the actuation of the cables.

Sometimes it is necessary tomove the scoop Y36 and the discharge line20 out of the plane of reciprocation defined by the cables'32and 34. For this purpose the elastic intermediate portion 84 is provided in the line 20 (FIGS. 5 and 6). This elastic intermediate portion 84 comprises a resilient bellows 100 provided with head flanges 102 arranged at the opposite ends thereof. A pair of intermediate flanges, 108 are provided with brackets which are pivotally connected togetheratl-l0 andthese two flanges are respectively interposed between the two head flanges102 and 104 at the upper end of the bellows, and between flanges 102 and 106 at the lower end of the bellowseBoth flange groups are fixedly secured to each other by means of screws (not shown). The pivotal connection 110, whose axis of rotation is-preferably located in the middle of the bellows 100, is secured to the intermediate flanges 108 for example'by welding. I

The elastic intennediate bellows portion 84 permits the discharge line 20-to be not only reciprocated in the plane of movement defined by the cables 32 and 34, but also to be-swung transversely out of this plane during the operation of the device, which may benecessary if the scoop. should hit solid, immovable material during operation, suchas a rock which would push the scoop 36 sideways.

Accordingto another embodiment of the articulated connection, the plate 95 of the support structure 94 can be pivotedby means of a joint 97, indicated in dotdashed lines in FlG. 5, to a vertical plate 99 which can be moved up anddown along the baffle tank 18. The joint 97-has the same purpose as the elastic intermediate portion 84. However, provision must'be made that the joint can be locked in order to avoidan undesired rotating movement of the support structure 94 during lifting movement thereof by theblocloand-tackle 96, since otherwise the rotating movement could cause damage to the elbow'88' if it should abut against the opening 98 in the vertical supporting plate 99.

What is claimed is: a

l. Dredging apparatus, for removing material from the bottom of a body of water comprising, a vertically disposed discharge line having a dredging scoop housing at the lower endthereof, said housing having a pair of oppositely-disposed intake openings for material to be removed, a double ended scraping blade secured to said housing for movement between a first position to obstruct one of said openings and to clear the other of saidopenings and; a secondposition to clear said one opening and to obstruct said other opening,-feeding means to supply fluid under pressure tothe interior of said housing to convey removed material upwardly through saiddischarge line, and means to reciprocatingly move said dredging scoop housing and discharge line along a path-generally facing said openings in the cable means being divergently spaced away from each other, and means to alternatively apply pullingforce to the respective one ends of the cable means, said scraping blade being secured to the scoop housing for pivotal movement 7 about an axis midway between the ends thereof, said one ends of the cable means being connected with 'said scraping blade to move the blade between said first and second positions in response to said alternative applications of force, said dredging scoop housing also including a horizontal transversely disposed hollow conduit in communication with said feeding means, said scraping blade being substantially flat and including a medially disposed hollow member surrounding said hollow conduit in pivotal relation 1 thereto, said hollow conduit and member being provided with" openings generally in alignment with each other to permit unobstructed flow of pressurized fluid to said discharge .line.

2. The invention defined in claim 1, said axis of movement being ,substantiallyhorizontal and the opposing ends of the blade are provided with outwardly projecting teeth.

3. The invention defined in claim 1, wherein said dredging scoop housing is provided with at least one elongated member extendingacross a medial portion of each of said intake openings to prevent the entry of oversized objects. v

4. The invention defined in claim 1, wherein said dredging scoop housing is provided with at least one laterally outwardly projecting spike for engagement with material exteriorly of the housing,

5. The, invention defined in claim 1, wherein the upper end of said discharge line is mounted for pivotal movement about a fixed horizontal axis transverse to said path. i

6. The invention defined in-claim 5, wherein said mounting for the discharge line includes a support frame pivotally journalled in support structure by ball bearing means, and said support frame also includes an elbow pipe connected with the discharge line to.discharge material at one side thereof.

7. The invention defined in claim 5, wherein a portion of said discharge line includes articulated coupling means to provide limited swinging movement of the lower end of the discharge line transversely with respectto said path.

8. Dredging apparatus for material from the bottom of a body of water comprising, a vertically disposed discharge line having a dredging scoop housingat the lower end thereof, said housing having a pair of oppositely disposed intake openings for material to be removed, a double ended scraping blade secured to said housing for movement between a first position to obstruct one of said openings and to clear the other of said openings and a second position to clear said one opening and to' obstruct said other opening, feeding means to supply fluid under pressure to the interior of said housing to convey removed material upwardly through said discharge line, and means to reciprocatingly move said dredging scoop housing and discharge line along a path generally facing said openings in the housing and to alternatively move said scraping blade between said first and second positions, said means to reciprocatingly move the dredging scoop housing including a pair of cable means connected at their one ends with said scoop housing, the other end of said cable means being divergently spaced away from each other, and means to alternatively apply pulling force to the respective one ends of the cable means, said scraping blade being secured to the scoop housing for pivotal movement about an axis midway between the ends thereof, said one ends of the cable means being connected with said scraping blade to move the blade between said first and second positions in response to said alternative applications of force, a vertical arm secured to the scraping blade extending across a medial portion of each of said intake openings to prevent the entry of oversizcd objects.

9. Dredging apparatus for removing material from the bottom of a body of water comprising, a vertically disposed discharge line having a dredging scoop housing at the lower end thereof, said housing having a pair of oppositely disposed intake openings for material to be removed, a double ended scraping blade secured to said housing for movement between a first position to obstruct one of said openings and to clear the other of said openings and a second position to clear said one opening and to obstruct said other opening, feeding means to supplyfluid under pressure to the interior of said housing to convey removed material upwardly through said discharge line, and means to reciprocatingly move said dredging scoop housing and discharge line along a path generally facing said openings in the housing and toalternatively move said scraping blade between said first and second positions, said means to reciprocatingly move the dredging scoop housing including a pair of cable means connected at their one ends with said scoop housing, the other ends of said cable means being divergent ly spaced away from each other, and means to alternatively, apply pulling force to the respective one ends of the cable means, said means to alternatively apply pulling force to said cables including means to anchor said other ends of the cable means, a pair of pivotally mounted lever means, the free ends of the lever means being respectively engageable with a cable means to effectively shorten the length of a respective cable means, and fluid pressure means to alternatively actuate said lever means.

10. The invention'defined in claim 9, wherein said means to anchor the other ends of said cable means includes a pair of power-actuated winch means.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTENCATE OF QORRECTEON Patent: No. 7 Dated July 31, 1.973

Inventor(s) Ludwig Lorenz Schnell It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Correct item [73] to read, Assignee: Schiittgutfrdertechnik AG-.

Signed and sealed! this 20th day of November- 1973.

(SEAL) Attest:

EDWARD M.FLETCHER,JR. RENE D. TEGTMEYER Attesting Officer Acting Commissioner of Patents )RM PO-1 050 (10-69) USCOMM-DC 60376-P69 12 us GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE I969 0-366-334.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3994082 *Dec 5, 1974Nov 30, 1976Pneuma International S.A.Air operated dredging apparatus
US4004357 *Mar 13, 1973Jan 25, 1977Giovanni FaldiTwo stroke dredging plant
US4058914 *Dec 15, 1975Nov 22, 1977Kiss Sandor GAlternate flow suction dredge
US4094548 *Jul 19, 1976Jun 13, 1978Schuttgutfordertechnik AgApparatus for conveying and separating loose material
US4227323 *Jan 20, 1978Oct 14, 1980Twin Harbor Dredging Co.Hydraulic dredge suction diversion flap
US4373276 *Feb 17, 1981Feb 15, 1983Schuttgutfordertechnik AgDevice for conveying a slurry, such as sand or gravel or the like, lying under water
US4398361 *Oct 17, 1980Aug 16, 1983Preussag AktiengesellschaftRecovery of sediments from the bottom of the sea by suspended suction pipe
US4642919 *Mar 1, 1985Feb 17, 1987Barrett, Haentjens & Co.Submersible sludge removing apparatus
US5179793 *Oct 15, 1990Jan 19, 1993Wolfgang RohrFloating dredger
US5561922 *Aug 22, 1995Oct 8, 1996Lynch; Robert P.Extrusion dredging apparatus
US5732487 *Apr 1, 1996Mar 31, 1998Dredging InternationalDredge head for dredging sludge by a trailing or pushing motion
Classifications
U.S. Classification37/318, 37/341
International ClassificationE02F3/92, E02F3/90
Cooperative ClassificationE02F3/905, E02F3/9256
European ClassificationE02F3/92T, E02F3/90B