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Publication numberUS3749097 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 31, 1973
Filing dateDec 14, 1970
Priority dateDec 14, 1970
Publication numberUS 3749097 A, US 3749097A, US-A-3749097, US3749097 A, US3749097A
InventorsH Grow
Original AssigneeGrow B, Grow C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Internal combustion engine control
US 3749097 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Enied @tsites Patent [w] Grow us] an at, i973 [75] Inventor: Harlow B. Grow, Pacific Palisades,

Calif.

[73] Assignees: Craig II. Grow, Pacific Palisades;

Eruce W, Grow, Manhattan Beach, Calif. part interest to each [22] Filed: Dee. I4, 11970 21 Appl. No: 97,527

[52] LLS. Cl IZE/IIIIE: It, 123/2531, 123/253 [51] Int. CI. E026] 113/00 [58] FieIiI oi Search 123/253, 25.31, I23/106 [56] heterenees (Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 688,245 12/1901 Hayes 123/253 898,512 9/1908 Schreber 123/253 1,349,952 8/1920 Hammond 123/253 1,491,376 4/1924 Bochet 123/253 2,319,858 5/1943 Grow 123/253 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 11,483 11/1910 Great Britain 123/2531 Primary Examiner-Laurence M. Goodridge Assistant Examiner-Ronald E. Cox Atwmey--I:Vi1Iiam Ii. Maxwell [57] AIES'IIIKAICT A fuel injection system for Diesel cycle or compression ignition internal combustion engines wherein fuel injection remains volumetrically constant and potency of the fuel is varied dependent upon the required power application. A constant stroke and constant volume injector pump is operated in timed relation to the engine crankshaft rotation, with a fuel mixing and displacement unit for each engine cylinder involved. The struc- 2% CIninns, 9 Drawing Figures ii HNTEERNAL COIi llhlUli'llllOl l lENGlIhllE (CONTROL The primary object of this invention is to provide means whereby fuel can be delivered into Diesel engine cylinders at constant volume with variable heat or power potential; and involves improvements related to my US. Pat. No. 2,319,953 entitled METHOD AND MEANS FOR CONTROLLlNG COMBUSTlON EN- GlNES dated May 25, 1943. it is the constant volume injection principle which is utilized and to the end that the pressure volume curve of the engine is improved and uncontrolled pressure changes therein eliminated, and as a consequence malting it"possible to deliver smoother power at higher rates in engines of lighter construction. However, the constant volume solid injection herein disclosed is to be distinguished from the constant volume cycle of the Otto cycle engines wherein a mixture of air and combustible fuel is drawn into a cylinder and compressed therein before ignition. i am herein concerned with the compression ignition engine, improved so as to more closely approach theoretical perfection. in practicing this invention, the injected fuel is a homogenous mixture of at least two liquids, one such as oil or fossil fuel with its full compliment of constituents and properties which afford a maximum power potential commonly rated in British thermal units (Btu), and one such as water (preferably treated, for example, modified or pure or distilled water) with its lesser potency or inert or partially inert properites insofar as combustibility is concerned. Ac cordingly, an improvement herein disclosed is the ad vantageous utilization of a maximum or peak performance fuel as the one liquid to be admixed or used totally when so required, and of a minimum or low performance fuel as the other liquid to be admixed or used totally when so required. As is recognized as a quality of Diesel engines, this invention does not in any way adversely affect the advantages of the surplus of combustion air (oxygen) and the resultant thorough combustion characteristic thereof.

An object of this invention is to provide an injection system for Diesel cycle engines which charges each cylinder during its power stroke with an equal volume of variable Btu (power) liquid. The system is controllable (Btu value) so that the charges can be varied from stroke to stroke.

Another object of this invention is to provide a Diesel injection system of the character referred to that mixes a liquid fuel such as oil into'a liquid dilutant such as water, to establish a homogenous solution which is then injected as a constant volume charge into the engine cylinder. With the present'invention, the mixing is performed .at lower pressures while filling the pump followed by high pressure injection ascircumstances require.

it is another object of this invention toprovide a Diesel injection system of the character referred to that averages the charge potency from injection to injection, whereby sudden change is made impossible. in carrying out this invention a unique dual chamber cylinder and piston-ram pump is provided and the admixture of fuel and dilutant is transferred openly between said dual chambers, for mixture and/or homogenization, storage, and subsequent displacement for injection by said ram.

it is still another object of this invention to provide a Diesel injection system of the character referred to that is adapted to receive proportionate charges of fuel and dilutant, for example maximum Btu fuel and minimum Btu fuel, the singular or plural use of which makes up a full constant volume charge for subsequent injection throughout a consistently optimum arc of injection. With this inventive concept the two liquids can be administered in various ways without adverse efiect upon engine power, since the above mentioned averaging compensates for momentary discrepancies (for example in metering). Therefore, momentary inaccuracy in metering can be tolerated, and the proportionating timing can be applied simultaneously or sequentially and without high tolerances, as may be desired.

An adjunct of the foregoing objects is that sudden changes in fuel-dilutant cannot occur with consequent smoothness of operation, the constant volume injection eliminates the usually accepted peak pressures resulting from the explosive characteristics of fuel injection accompanied by ignition lag, and all to the end that pealr pressures are reduced so that lighter weight engine structures become permissible, while increasing the potential power output through all speed ranges due to the closer realization of a true constant pressure Diesel cycle.

The various objects and features of this invention will be fully understood from the following detailed description of the typical preferred forms and applications thereof, throughout which description reference is made to the accompanying drawings, in which:

lFlGS. ll, 2 and 3 are pressure-volume diagrams as shown by indicator cards, FIG. 1i being a composite diagram of the Carnot, Diesel and Otto cycles, FIG. 2 being variations of the normally injected Diesel cycle and HO. 3 being variations of the Diesel cycle affected by the constant volume injection of the present invention.

FlG. 4 is a cross sectional elevation of the fundamentals involved in a Diesel engine embodying the injector of the present invention.

FIG. 5 is a schematic diagram illustrating the combined mechanical fluid and electrical systems that are involved.

FIGS. 6, 7, ii and 9 are detailed sectional views of the various forms of the invention respectively.

This disclosure requires an understanding of various internal combustion cycles and the pressure-volume diagrams thereof as depicted graphically on the indicator cards developed for that purpose. Three such card diagrams are shown in FKGS. i1, 2 and 3 of the drawings; FlG. J1 illustrating the theoretical envelope curves embracing the Carnot, Diesel and Otto cycles; FIG. 2 illustrating the variations that occur in the normally injected Diesel cycle; and MG. 3 showing the improvements realized by the constant volume variable potency injection of the present invention.

Referring to HO. )1, a two cycle envelope is shown and which is much the same for all internal combustion engines. The point of ignition a indicates the start of the combustion process that adds heat-to the working fluid. if the theoretical Carnot cycle could be achieved by adding heat isothermically, the lowermost constant temperature line a-b would have bounded the top of the pressure volume curve. The other extreme is the Otto cycle which is quite successful but with recognized disadvantages which need not be discussed herein, and the uppermost constant volume line ac bounding the top of the pressure-volume curve. The Diesel cycle is shown as a compromising constant pressure line a-d which theoretically bounds the top of the pressure-volume curve but which in practicality does not, for various reasons that will now be pointed out.

The a-d constant pressure curve of FIG. ll leads us to believe that the Diesel engine operates on constant pressure during fuel injection, but this ideal is not realized in practice since indicator cards show ignition lag followed by sharply rising peak pressures resulting from the explosive characteristics of the said ignition. Referring now to FIG. 2, a typical four cycle Diesel envelope is illustrated with its characteristic pressure peak following ignition as a result of ignition lag. The theoretical constant pressure curve a d is represented by several dimensional distances along said curve, namely in degrees of rotation 1, 2 and 3 which represent the degrees of crank rotation during conventional fuel injection, for full load condition (I) and two partial load conditions (2 and 3). The dimension ll represents the practical maximum degree of rotation for constant pressure (volume) fuel injection, while dimension 2 represents a lesser degree of rotation from point a where cut-off of the injection occurs; and while dimension 3 represents the minimum degree of rotation for idle speed. It will be apparent that speed and load control is provided for, but at great costs and resulting in rough engine operation; due to loss of the constant pressure characteristics and all of which requires heavy engine structures in order to cope with peak loads as they are imposed by over injection at insufficient engine speeds.

Referring now to FIG. 3 and the present invention, a typical four cycle Diesel envelope is illustrated but with a reduced pressure peak following ignition and characterized by a continued elevation of the top curve of the envelope terminating at the one cut-off line d (a vertical line on the chart). The distance 1 remains the same for all power settings, while the pressure drops between points a and d, dependent upon the potency of the fuel-dilutant which is injected at a constant rate. For example, line 4 corresponds to previously described line 2, representing a diluted injection for a lesser load than the maximum load line extending between a and d; while line 5 represents a fully diluted idle speed injection corresponding to previously described line 3. Note that fluid injection at a constant rate or volume occurs between point a and cut-off line d.

In accordance with the present invention, I have provided a new fuel injector adapted to be located close to the engine cylinder to be injected, for accomplishing the constant volume variable potency charging of said engine cylinder operating on the Diesel cycle wherein constant pressure operation is sought as a theoretical goal. I now disclose a practical fuel mixing and pump device which involves for one and each engine cylinder, a pump cylinder A, a partition B separating the cylinder into dual chambers X and Y, a ram C entering the cylinder and positioning the piston therein, means D reciprocating the same in timed relation to rotation of the engine, a metered fuel supply means E, a metered fuel dilutant supply means F, and a valved injector means G opening into the engine cylinder. The idea of means embodied in the physical elements of the device involves the dual chambers X and Y, a transfer chamber in which the fuel and fuel dilutant are mixed, and a storage chamber in which fuel mixture not injected is remixed and stored. This remixing and storage concept provides for an averaging of a fuel-dilutant potency over a number of engine cycles dependent upon the swept volumes of the said chambers. In practice, the

transfer chamber which receives and delivers fluids can have a substantially complete swept volume, whereas the storage chamber which stores previously metered fuel and fuel dilutant has a remaining unsw ept volume thereby holding consecutively metered charges of fueldilutant mixture or portions thereof and mixing and averaging them over a number of engine cycles.

The Diesel engine can vary widely and in each instance involves a frame 10 journaling a crankshaft 11 and carrying a cylinder 12 closed by a head 13 and in which a piston 14 reciprocates according to the angular displacements of the crank connected to the piston by a rod M. Whether two or four cycle, there is a maximum number of degrees following the ignition point (a) through which fuel injection can occur (a-d), and it is this number of degrees which is the constant employed by the means D hereinafter described.

The pump cylinder A has an inner diameter wall 15 accurately turned about a central axis, the cylinder opening having substantial length and closed at opposite ends by heads 16 and 17, at least one of which is removable for disassembly. In the case illustrated, the lower head 17 incorporates the various fluid passages therein that are involved with the means E, F and G, while the upper head 16 incorporates a guide bore 18 therein which reciprocally carries the ram C. Except for certain features of the aforementioned means E, F and G the cylinder A is closed by entry therein of the ram C.

The partition B is preferably a piston that is operable in the cylinder A and has an outer diameter wall 19 accurately turned about the central axis and of substantially lesser length than the distance between the heads of the cylinder. In practice, the partition-piston B is a disc-shaped element with flat spaced and parallel top and bottom faces 20 and 21 disposed in planes normal to said axis. As is preferred (excepting the form of FIG. 6) and conducive to fluid induction and mixing, the piston B is attached to the ram C, and is preferably integral therewith. The piston faces 20 and 21 remain spaced from the heads 16 and I7 respectively thereby establishing'the dual chambers in the cylinder A, the storage chamber X and the transfer chamber Y. Referring specifically to FIG. 6 of the drawings, the partition B is a fixed element which separates the two chambers X and Y; transfer, mixing and injection of liquid being dependent entirely upon movement of the ram C. It is the transfer chamber Y which receives metered amounts of fuel-dilutant for comingling, and it is the storage chamber X which averages the changes in meter. The capacity for averaging by the chamber X is dependent upon its remaining unswept volume and accordingly the said chamber is sizeable. As shown, the ram C enters the chamber X.

The ram C that enters the cylinder A is effective in its movements upon the fluids in both chambers X and Y. Although it is feasible to fix the piston B immovably in the cylinder A as disclosed in FIG. 6, it is preferred to attach the piston to the ram C so that the volumetric displacement varies alternately between the two chambers X and Y, the total volume being alternately increased and decreased by reciprocal movement of the ram C. That is, withdrawal with the ram from the cylinder chambers increases the total volumetric displacement, while re-entry therein decreases the same. However, the fluid flow is unobvious and in accordance with the invention involves open fluid communication between the chambers X and Y. The open fluid communication can take various forms, for example a passage via the exterior of the cylinder wall 13 and extended between the chambers X and Y as shown in FIG. 9, or for example a loose fit between the cylinder wall 15 and the outer diameter 19 of the piston as shown in FIG. 7, and preferably a port 22 extending through the partition or piston B between the faces 20 and 21 thereof as shown in FIGS. 5, 6 and 8. It is the free passage of fluid between chambers X and .Y which is provided, and a feature of the combination of parts is the entry of the ram C into the upper chamber X, the ram being of substantial diameter 23 to slide through the guide bore 18 and except in the FIG. 6 disclosure of lesser diameter than cylinder wall 15 so as to form an annulus defining the chamber X. The chamber Y remains a full diameter cylinder-shaped cavity.

The means D reciprocating the ram C in timed relation to rotation of the engine can vary in form and construction and it is shown as a cam and tappet drive means. Thus, the ram has a tappet 25 that extends from the cylinder guide bore 18 to engage and follow a cam 26 that revolves with a shaft 27 driven at half engine speed (four cycle timing) through timing gears (not shown), the latter being driven by the crankshaft 11. It will be apparent how the lobe of the cam 26 shifts the tappet 26 so as to project the ram C into the chamber X and move the piston B thereby to augment the chamber X while diminishing the chamber Y. A return spring 29 can be employed to return the tappet, the characteristic feature being the uniformity of stroke.

The metered fuel supply means E and metered fuel dilutant supply means F operate cooperatively to supply' or replenish a full injection charge to the chamber X following each constant volume injection therefrom. To this end, the means E involves a valve 30 adapted to intermittently admit fuel, and the means F involves a valve 31 adapted to intermittently admit fuel-dilutant. Essentially, the valves 30 and 31 are alike and are opened in inversely balanced degree or for variably balanced time intervals; all for the purpose of completely replenishing the augmenting chamber Y. Accordingly, the means E supplies fuel, for example, oil from a constant pressure supply 32; while the means F supplies dilutant for example water, from a constant pressure supply 33. Depending upon the liquid viscosities involved, the said constant pressures are set at suitable levels and/or the liquids are supplied through orifices of suitable diameter. Therefore, the chamber Y augmentation draws the fuel-dilutant mixture into it, the two liquids being pressurized so as to flow thereinto.

Referring to the metering valves 30 and 31 and the constant pressure supplies 32 and 33, constant pressure is established by means of pumps 34 and 35 that deliver the liquids through pressure regulators 36 and 37 respectively. In practice, the discharge apertures remain constant as does the regulated pressure. In one form (not shown) the amount of delivered liquid in each instance varies according to the time during which the valves 30 and 31 are fully opened, for example, a sequential opening of one valve 30 at the beginning'of the intake stroke followed by opening of the other valve 31 which closes at the end of the intake stroke. In another form (not shown) the pressures to the valves 30 and 31 are inversely varied by the regulators 36 and 37, in

which case the valves 30 and 31 are simultaneously and fully opened during the entire inlet stroke of the ram and piston.

The preferred coordination between means E and F involves the variable orifice metering valves 30 and 31 as they are shown in FIG. 3, in which case the electrical potential applied to retract the needle $0 from the valve seat and against a return spring 62 opens the valves inversely varied amounts. The said electrical potential is controllably determined by a rheostat 43 wherein the opposite terminals 43 and M of the resistance are connected to valve opening solenoids 45 and 46 respectively, and whereinthe moving contact 67 thereof operates between the said terminals. A contactor 50 revolves with the shaft 2'7 and cam 26 and which conducts current during the intake stroke of the ram C and piston B.

The valved injector means G involves a nozzle that opens into the engine cylinder 12 at the combustion chamber thereof, and has a check valve 55 that prevents the return of fuel-dilutant mixture into chamber Y. Consequently, the delivery is forward at all times through a tube or the like which delivers a suitably potent charge into the engine cylinder for burning.

From the foregoing, it will be seen that fossil fuel such as oil is admixed into a dilutant such as water or a partially inert fuel, as for example mineral oil or a specially prepared liquid such as a silicone based material which does not fully vaporize and which is recoverable in an exhaust scrubber (not shown) and reused. Referring to FIGS. 5 through 9 and the general proportions of the injector unit, it is significant that the chamber Y is of greater cross sectional area than the effective cross sectional area of chamber X. The differential in area is due to the entry of the ram C into the chamber X and carrying the piston B as a reciprocating partition separating the interconnected chambers. Therefore, there is no displacement through movement of piston B, and a greater displacement of fluid occurs at chamber X than at chamber Y through movement of the ram C, there being a lesser discharge from chamber X through port 22 and into chamber Y than intake into chamber Y when the latter chamber is augmenting. And, there is a subsequent charging of chamber X through port 22 equal to the preceding discharge from chamber Y when the latter chamber is diminishing. Thus, the chamber X breathes from and into chamber Y receiving therefrom the prevailing admixture of fueldilutant. During augmentation of chamber Y the two diverse liquids are introduced by pressured means E and F, and the liquids are impinged one against the other by disposing restricted orifices of the several streams in opposition to each other as shown. For example, the port 22 is diagonally disposed and thereby swirls the liquid into the chambers X and Y respecively, thereby intimately agitating the liquids together,.Also, the two streams, fuel and dilutant, are disposed so that one intersects the other, thereby forcefully bringing the two streams together into colliding engagement. The impingement and consequent cavitation results in a thorough mixing and/or homogenization at relatively low pressure within the augmenting chamber Y, followed by transfer and further comingling of the admixture with precedent mixed charges in the augmenting chamber X.

The valves 30 and 31 are also check valves which stop reverse flow of liquid, while the valve 35 does the therein.

same. Consequently, isolation of the pump unit from the relatively high injection pressures and/or combustion chamber pressures is inherent, and with the result that the controlled admixing of the two or more fuels is at lower pressures. When the chamber Y is augmenting it is isolated from the engine cylinder 12 by the check valve 55, during which time the valves 30 and 31 are opened so as to meter fuel-dilutant into chamber Y while previously averaged admixture are transfered into chamber Y from the storage chamber X. During this augmentation of the transfer chamber Y the prevailing pressures are established solely by the fuel supply means E and F, at relatively low pressures as compared with injection pressures. Conversely, when the chamber Y is diminishing it is isolated from said supply means E and F by virtue of the check valves 30 and 31, during which time the check valve 55 passes the prevailing averaged and admixed fuel-dilutant into the combustion chamber of the cylinder 12. Thus, precision high pressure fueldistribution is virtually eliminated and is replaced by direct averaging injection into the engine cylinder, thereby eliminating the high costs of the usual injector system, the cost of which have equaled and/or exceeded the costs of the prime mover engines serviced thereby.

Having described only typical preferred forms and applications of my invention, I do not wish to be limited or restricted to the specific details herein set forth, but wish to reserve to myself any modifications or variations that may appear to those skilled in the art.

Having described my invention, I claim:

1. Full stroke fuel pump injection for a compression ignition engine having a combustion chamber, and including: a pump body having closed dual chambers therein, a transfer chamber and a storage chamber, there being restricted fluid communication between the transfer chamber and the storage chamber; fluid displacement means entering into the said storage chamber to change the volumetric displacement thereof; means reciprocating the said fluid displacement means into said storage chamber in timed relation to cycling of the engine; a metered fuel supply means and a metered fuel dilutant supply means both opening into the said transfer chamber and charging the same with fuel and fuel dilutant respectively in proportionate quantities and in timed relation to cycling of the engine; and nozzle means opening from the said transfer chamber and into the combustion chamber of the engme.

2. The fuel pump injection for engines as set forth in claim 1 and wherein the said transfer chamber is of substantially lesser volumetric displacement than the said storage chamber.

3. The fuel pump injection for engines as set forth in claim 1 and wherein the restricted fluid communication between the said transfer chamber and the said storage chamber is by means of a passage opening diagonally into at least one of said chambers for mixing the fluids therein.

4. The fuel pump injection for engines as set forth in claim 1, wherein the said storage chamber has an inner diameter wall, and wherein the fluid displacement means is a ram slideably projecting into said storage chamber to change the volumetric displacement 5. The fuel pump injection for engines as set forth in claim 1, wherein the said pump body has an inner diameter wall common to said dual chambers and has a guide opening into said storage chamber, and wherein the fluid displacement means is a ram slideably projecting through said guide opening and carrying a piston separating said dual chambers.

6. The fuel pump injection for engines as set forth in claim 1, wherein the said pump body has inner diameter wall common to said dual chambers and has a guide opening into said storage chamber, and wherein the fluid displacement means is a ram slideably projecting through said guide opening and carrying a piston hav ing an outer diameter wall of smaller diameter than said inner diameter wall for said restricted fluid communication between the transfer chamber and storage chamber.

7. The fuel pump injection for engines as set forth in claim 1, wherein the said pump body has an inner diameter wall common to said dual chambers and has a guide opening into said storage chamber, and wherein the fluid displacement means is a ram slideably projecting through said guide opening and carrying a piston having a passage therein extending between said transfer chamber.

8. The fuel pump injection for engines as set forth in claim 1, wherein the said pump body has an inner diameter wall common to said dual chambers and has a guide opening into said storage chamber, and wherein the fluid displacement means is a ram slideably projecting through said guide opening and carrying a piston, and wherein the open fluid communication between the said transfer chamber and the said storage chamber is by means of a passage opening diagonally through the piston and into said dual chambers respectively for mixing the fluids therein.

9. The fuel pump injection for engines as set forth in claim 1, wherein the said pump body has an inner diameter wall common to said dual chambers and has a guide opening into said storage chamber, wherein the fluid displacement means is a ram slideably projecting through said guide opening and carrying a piston, and wherein the open fluid communication between the transfer chamber and the said storage chamber is by means of a passage through the pump body and opening laterally into said dual chambers respectively for mixing the fluids therein.

10. The fuel pump injection for engines as set forth in claim 1, wherein the said transfer chamber is of substantially lesser volumetric displacement than the said storage chamber, wherein the said pump body has an inner diameter wall common to said dual chambers and has a guide opening into said storage chamber, wherein the fluid displacement means is a ram slideably projecting through said guide opening and carrying a piston separating said dual chambers, and wherein the open fluid communication between the said dual chambers is by means of a restricted passage in the piston.

11. Full stroke fuel pump injection for a compression ignition engine having a combustion chamber, and including: a pump body having closed dual chambers therein, a transfer chamber and a storage chamber, there being restricted fluid communication between the transfer chamber and the storage chamber; fluid displacement means entering into the said storage chamber to change the volumetric displacement thereof; means reciprocating the said fluid displacement means into said storage chamber in timed relation to cycling of the engine; a pressured fuel supply means and a pressured fuel dilutant supply means and each having valves opened inversely with respect to each other and charging their respective fluids into the transfer chamber in proportionate quantities and in timed relation to cycling of the engine; and nozzle means opening from the said transfer chamber and into the combustion chamber of the engine.

12. The pressured fuel pump injection for engines as set forth in claim 11 and wherein the fuel supply means and fuel dilutant supply means are pressure regulated.

13. The pressured fuel pump injection for engines as set forth in claim 1 1, wherein the fuel supply means and fuel dilutant supply'means are pressure regulated and the said respective valves thereof sequentially opened for variable time intervals by means responsive to cycling of the engine.

14. The pressured fuel pump injection for engines as set forth in claim 1 1, wherein the fuel supply means and fuel dilutant supply means are pressure regulated and the said respective valves thereof opened inversely balanced degrees by means responsive to cycling of the engine.

15. The pressured fuel pump injection for engines as set forth in claim 11, wherein the nozzle means are fixed orifices opening into said combustion chamber, and wherein the fuel supply means and fuel dilutant supply means are pressure regulated and the said respective valves thereof sequentially opened for variable time intervals by means responsive to cycling of the engme.

16. The pressured fuel pump injection for engines as set forth in claim 11, wherein the nozzle means has fixed orifices opening into said combustion chamber, and wherein the fuel supply means and fuel dilutant supply means are pressure regulated and the said respective valves thereof opened in inversely balanced degree by means responsive to cycling of the engine.

17. The pressured fuel pump injection for engines as set forth in claim 11, wherein the nozzle means has valve means restricting flow of mixed fluids into the combustion chamber of the engine, and wherein the fuel supply means and fuel dilutant supply means are pressure regulated and the said respective valves thereof sequentially opened for variable time intervals by means responsive to cycling of the engine.

18. The pressured fuel pump injection for engines as set forth in claim 11, wherein the nozzle means has valve means restricting flow of mixed fluids into the combustion chamber of the engine, and wherein the fuel supply means and fuel dilutant supply means are pressure regulated and the said respective valves thereof opened in inversely balanced degree by means responsive to cycling of the engine.

19. The pressured fuel pump injection for engines as set forth in claim 11, wherein the nozzle means has valve means restricting flow of mixed fluids through fixed orifices opening into said combustion chamber of the engine, and wherein the fuel supply means and fuel dilutant supply means are pressure regulated and the said respective valves thereof sequentially opened for variable time intervals by means responsive to cycling of the engine.

20. The pressured fuel pump injection for engines as set forth in claim 11, wherein the nozzle means has valve means restricting flow of mixed fluids through fixed orifices opening into said combustion chamber of the engine, and wherein the fuel supply means and fuel dilutant supply means are pressure regulated and the said respective valves thereof opened in inversely balanced degree by means responsive to cycling of the engine.

3,749,097 Dated July 31, 1973 Patent No.

Inventor(s) Harlow I'OW It: iscertified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Lettersv Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

In the sheets of drawing and on the Abstract page Pig. 5, should appearas shown on the attached sheet.

Signedand sealed this 9th day of July 1974.

(SEAL) Attest:

MCCOY M. GIBSON, JR. Q C. MARSHALL DANN Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents Q po'wso (m69) uscoMM-oc 60376-F'69 k ".5. GOVERNMENT PRINTlNG QFFICE: I969 0-355-334.

Patent No. 3,749,097 July 31, 1973' Page -'2

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3921599 *Apr 21, 1972Nov 25, 1975Grow Craig HFuel pump injection for compression ignition engines
US4388893 *Aug 4, 1980Jun 21, 1983Cedco, IncorporatedDiesel engine incorporating emulsified fuel supply system
US4481921 *May 19, 1983Nov 13, 1984Nippondenso Co., Ltd.Fuel injection apparatus of internal combustion engine
US4554903 *Mar 2, 1984Nov 26, 1985Robert Bosch GmbhFuel injection apparatus for injecting a fuel mixture comprising at least two components
US4594201 *Apr 16, 1984Jun 10, 1986Oliver V. PhillipsNon-venturi type camburetor
US4699103 *Jan 27, 1986Oct 13, 1987Nippondenso Co., Ltd.Fuel injection system
US4705010 *Aug 24, 1983Nov 10, 1987Baranescu George SInjection system with stratified fuel charge
US4732114 *Jul 3, 1986Mar 22, 1988Daimler-Benz AktiengesellschaftProcess for producing a diesel-fuel/water emulsion for a diesel engine
US5024195 *Jun 7, 1990Jun 18, 1991Pien Pao CMulti-fuel compression-ignition engine and fuel injection pump therefor
US5069186 *Jan 17, 1990Dec 3, 1991Mario IllienFuel injection assembly for internal combustion engine
US5163397 *Dec 27, 1991Nov 17, 1992Pien Pao CHot pilot fuel ignited internal combustion engine and method of operating same
US5239969 *Oct 8, 1991Aug 31, 1993Southwest Research InstituteMechanical fuel injector for internal combustion engines
US5421710 *Oct 1, 1993Jun 6, 1995Nippon Soken Inc.Fuel injection apparatus
US5601067 *Jun 27, 1995Feb 11, 1997Daimler-Benz AgFuel injection system for an internal combustion engine
US5722377 *Sep 26, 1996Mar 3, 1998Mtu Motoren-Und Turbinen-Union Friedrichshafen GmbhFuel injection method and system
US6378489 *May 24, 2001Apr 30, 2002Rudolf H. StanglmaierMethod for controlling compression ignition combustion
USRE34252 *Dec 27, 1991May 18, 1993 Multi-fuel compression-ignition engine and fuel injection pump therefor
WO1983002133A1 *Dec 17, 1981Jun 23, 1983Caterpillar Tractor CoDual fuel mixer-emulsifier
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/304, 123/575, 123/25.00E, 123/25.00F
International ClassificationF02D1/00, F02B75/02, F02M59/02, F02B1/04
Cooperative ClassificationF02M59/02, F02B2075/025, F02B1/04, F02M2700/1352, F02D1/00, F02D2700/0282
European ClassificationF02M59/02, F02D1/00