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Publication numberUS3749311 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 31, 1973
Filing dateApr 10, 1972
Priority dateOct 5, 1970
Publication numberUS 3749311 A, US 3749311A, US-A-3749311, US3749311 A, US3749311A
InventorsHruby J
Original AssigneeRain Jet Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ornamental fountain with multi-tier or horizontal discharge patterns
US 3749311 A
Abstract
The present ornamental fountain nozzle comprises an elongate tubular body which defines therein an internal chamber having a water inlet opening at its lower end. A plug is fixedly disposed across the chamber at its upper end in spaced relation to the water inlet opening. Water outlet means are provided from the chamber to the exterior of the nozzle. The water outlet means comprise a plurality of water outlet holes defined through the body for discharging water radially laterally from the nozzle. The holes are defined between the water inlet opening and the plug at a location more proximate to the plug than to the water inlet opening. The holes are uniformly spaced along the body from the plug and are spaced regularly along the circumference of the body. An annular collar is circumferentially intimately engaged with the body proximate the holes for modulating the flow of water from the chamber through the holes. The effective flow area of the water inlet opening and of the water flow path between the inlet opening and the water outlet means is greater than the effective water flow area of the outlet means.
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United States Patent 11 1 Hruby, Jr.

1111 3,749,311 1451 July 31,1973

ORNAMENTAL FOUNTAIN WITH MULTI-TIER OR HORIZONTAL DISCHARGE PATTERNS Related U.S. Application um Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 102,757, Dec. 30, 1970, Pat. No. 3,690,554, which is a continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 32,333, April 27, 1970, abandoned, and a continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 78,117, Oct. 5, 1970, Pat. No. 3,645,449.

Inventor:

Cl. 239/17, 239/DIG. 16 Int. Cl.....'.....' B05!) 17/08 Field of Search 239/16-19, 1)10. 16

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3/1965 Hruby, n. .l 239/17 rimezuliaqmine diloy L-. K ng Attorney- Robert L. Parker, Hayden A. Carney et al.

[5 7 ABSTRACT The present ornamental fountain nozzle comprises an elongate tubular body which defines therein an internal chamber having a water inlet opening at its lower end. A plug is fixedly disposed across the chamber at its upper end in spaced relation to the water inlet opening.

Water outlet means are provided from the chamber to the exterior of the nozzle. The water outlet means comprise a plurality of water outlet holes defined through the body for discharging water radially laterally from the nozzle. The holes are defined between the water inlet opening and the plug at a location more proximate to the plug than to the water inletopening. The holes are uniformly spaced along the body from the plug and are spaced regularly along the circumference of the body. An annular collar is circumferentially intimately engaged with the body proximate the holes for modulating the flow of water from the chamber through the holes. The effective flow area of the water inlet opening and of the water flow path between the inlet opening and the water outlet means is greater than the effective water flow area of the outlet means.

15 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures 1 July 31, 1973 United States Patent 1 Hruby, Jr.

PATENIED JUL3 1 I975 SHEET 3 OF 4 PATENIED JUL 31 ms SHEET 0F 4 ORNAMENTAL FOUNTAIN WITH MULTI-TIER OR HORIZONTAL DISCHARGE PATTERNS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS The present application is a continuation-in-part of my copending application Ser. No. 102,757 filed Dec. 30, 1970, U.S. Pat. No. 3,690,554, for IMPROVED MULTI-TIER FOUNTAIN NOZZLE. That application was filled as a continuation-in-part of copending application Ser. No. 32,333 filed April 27, 1970, now abandoned, and Ser. No. 78,] 17 filed Oct. 5, I970, U.S. Pat. No. 3,645,449.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION This invention pertains to ornamental water fountains and the like and, more particularly, to an ornamental fountain having a substantially horizontal discharge pattern, which pattern, if desired, may be used to define the lower portion of a multi-tier fountain pattern.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Review of the Prior Art In the art of ornamental fountains, effort is continually being expended to provide improved and novel aesthetic effects so that fountains of increased ornamental appeal may be available to architects, landscape designers and the like. The availability of novel and aesthetically improved fountain effects makes it possible to effectively use fountains in situations in parks, gardens and the like where a fountain might not otherwise be possible.

In many fountain applications, it is desirable that the discharge pattern produced by the fountain nozzle be appealing during both day and night use. During the day, the fountain is lighted by natural light, whereas at night the fountain pattern is artificially lighted. Natural and articial light, for best effectiveness, require different characteristics in the fountain discharge pattern. For best visisbility of a fountain pattern during the day, it is desirable that the discharge pattern be defined of aerated water. On the other hand, in order that a fountain may be effective during night to manifest a crystalline refractive and reflective characteristic, it is desired that at least a significant portion of the discharge pattern be defined by water which is unaerated. Of course, fountain patterns defined by aerated water effective at night as well as in the daytime, but are not as efiective and appealing at night as during the day.

In' many instances, it is desirable that the fountain pattern when litduring the day have an ornamental effect which is different in mood and character from the effect produced by the fountain at night under artificial lighting conditions.

It is desirable that the fountain nozzle structure be so arranged that the nozzle operates with good efficiency in terms of the capacity and power requirements of the pump used to provide water to the fountain nozzle. Also, in order to obtain economies in manufacture, it is desirable that a particular nozzle structure be usable over a substantial range of water flowrates without noticeable change in the aesthetic characteristics of the pattern produced by the water discharged from the nozzle structure. The ability of a fountain manufacturer to provide a single structure, useful over a wide range of flowrates means, that a single nozzle structure may be used with a number of fountain bowls. Also, such a nozzle is particularly desirable to the user since a desired type of discharge pattern can be provided over a wide range of flowrates so that, on windy days, for example, the overall height of the fountain pattern can be reduced, by throttling down the pump or the like, to minimize the blowing of spray or mist into areas occupied by viewers, all without materially affecting the basic aesthetic characteristic of the fountain pattern.

Historically, the basic object of most water fountains is to direct one or more streams of water vertically upwardly into the air where the water streams can be visible. recently, however, particularly with the adjunct of fountains as components of the heating and air conditioning systems of office buildings, the possibility of providing fountains with substantially horizontal discharge patterns has developed. Horizontally discharging fountains may be used in conjunction with sculptures in parks, and office plazas to provide an aesthetically pleasing backdrop and counterpoint to the adjacent sculpture. A significnt need now exists for the development of improved horizontally discharging fountains, particularly such fountains wherein the discharge pattern is of a textured nature.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention provides an improved ornamental fountain nozzle. Portions of the structure of the present nozzle may be used to define a horizontally arranged fountain pattern having a novel and significantly improved textured effect. Such a discharge pattern, as noted above, is particularly effective when used in conjunction with scultpures and the like, as well as in conjunction with heating and air conditioning systems of buildings. The horizontally discharging fountain patterns may also be used to define the lower tier of a multi-tier fountain of improved aesthetic effect. When used used in a multi-tier fountain, the present nozzle produces a discharge pattern which is particularly effective during both day and night under conditions of natural and artificial lighting, particularly where the upper tiers of the fountain pattern are defined by essentially nonaerated water. The use of the improvements of the present invention make possible the provision of a novel ornamental fountain discharge pattern which has notably different aesthetic characteristics when artifi cially lighted at night and when naturally lighted during the day. Furthermore, the present invention provides a nozzle structure which has good efficiency in terms of the capacity and power requirements of the pump used to supply water to the nozzle. Nozzles according to this invention provide a discharge pattern which is substantially unaffected by water flowrate over a substantial range of flowrates. All of these features and advantages are provided in a nozzle which has no moving parts and which therefore is economical and trouble-free to operate and which, in use, is not dependent for its effectiveness upon the niceties of adjustment or the like.

Generally speaking, the present invention provides an ornamental fountain nozzle which comprises an elongate tubular body defining therein an internal chamber having a water inlet opening at its lower end. Plug means are fixedly disposed across the chamber at its upper end in spaced relation to the water inlet opening. Water outlet means are provided from the chamher to the exterior of the nozzle. The water outlet means comprise a plurality of water outlet holes defined through the body for discharging water radially laterally from the nozzle. The holes are defined at a location between the water inlet opening and the plug means, which location is more proximate to the plug means than to the water inlet opening. The holes are uniformly spaced along the body from the plug means and are spaced regularly along the circumference of the body. Means are carried by the body proximate the holes for modulating the flow of water from the chamber through the holes. The effective area of the water inlet opening and'of the waterflow path between the inlet opening and the water outlet means is greater than the effective waterflow area of the water outlet means.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The above-mentioned and other features of the present invention are more fully set forth in the following detailed description of presently preferred embodiments of the invention, which description is presented with reference to the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a multi-tier discharge pattern provided by a nozzle according to this invention;

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional elevation view of a fountain nozzle useful to provide the discharge pattern shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a section view taken along line 3--3 in FIG.

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional elevation view of another nozzle structure useful to provide a discharge pattern of the type shown in FIG. 1; and

FIG. 5 is an elevation view of another discharge nozzle useful to provide a discharge pattern of a type represented by the lower tier of the multi-tier discharge pattern illustrated in FIG. 1.

DESCRIPTION OF THE ILLUSTRATED EMBODIMENTS An improved ornamental fountain discharge pattern is shown in FIG. 1 to be produced by a fountain nozzle l1. Discharge pattern 10 is comprised of an upper tier l2 and a lower tier 13, the water defining both tiers emanating from nozzle 11. Upper tier 12 preferably is defined by a plurality of individual water streams 14 each defined over a major portion of the length of the stream by discrete droplets of essentially unairated crystalline water. In contrast'with upper tier 12, lower tier 13 is defined by water which is substantially aerated. As the water of lower tier 13 emanates from fountain nozzle 11, the water streams are substantially flat on top adjacent the fountain nozzle and have significant width about the circumference of the nozzle so that they appear to blend into each other adjacent the nozzle. In effect, the several water streams emerging from the nozzle appear to resemble fingers of water having a relatively massive effect. As these fingers of water extend radially from nozzle 11, the somewhat sheet-like appearance of the water stream adjacent the nozzle disappears as the streams take on a rounded effect by virtue of the effects of surface tension. Approximately one-third to one-half of the way along each stream from nozzle 11, the several finger-like streams of lower tier 13 break up into individual droplets of water which fall to fountain pool at the various points around a circle within the larger circle at which the droplets defining upper tier streams 14 fall to the fountain pool. Lower tier 13 is particularly effective as an aesthetic contrast to the crystalline appearance of upper tier 12. This contrast renders fountain discharge pattern 10 particularly effective and appealing under conditions of natural lighting during daylight hours as well as under conditions of artificial lighting at night.

For reasons which are not yet completely understood, lower tier 13 functions as a lens for the lighting of upper tier 12 when suitable lighting fixtures are disposed within fountain pool 15 adjacent nozzle 11, preferably within the circle defined by the locations at which the water defining the lower fountain tier falls to pool 15. That is, despite the substantially aerated characteristic of the water defining lower tier 13, a surprising portion of the light directed upwardly to the fountain pattern from the submerged lights passes through lower tier 13 to effectively light the entire upper tier of the pattern. Where the submerged lights are of different colors and are sequentially activated to illuminate fountain pattern 10 with different color light, lower tier 13 effectively diffuses the light to the entire fountain pattern. Thus, asingle light (colored or white) located eccentrically from nozzle 11 is effective to essentially uniformly light both the whole of lower fountain pattern 13 as well as the whole of upper tier 12.

FIG. 2 is a cross-section view of a fountain nozzle 20 which may be used effectively in place of fountain nozzle 11 to define an ornamental fountain pattern identical to or very similar to fountain pattern 10. FIG. 2 is taken along the vertical axis of symmetry of the nozzle. Nozzle 20 includes an elongate tubular body 21 having its lower end connected to a circumferential mounting member 22 which has a mounting flange 23 formed around its exterior. Mounting member 22 is provided to define a portion of the structure of nozzle 20 and also to provide a means by which nozzle 20 may be mounted to a suitable fountain base 24 concentrically of a discharge opening 25 from a water supply chamber 26 formed within the fountain base, Preferably, the fountain base with which nozzle 20 is used is a fountain base according to the disclosures of my prior filed copending application Ser. No. 87,886 filed Nov. 9, I970, Nozzle 20 preferably is secured to fountain base 24 by a plurality of bolts 27 extended through mounting flange 23 and threaded into tapped holes 28 provided for this purpose in the upper'portion of the fountain base concentrically about fountain base discharge opening 25. A suitable gasket 29 is interposed between the bottom surface 40 of the mounting member and the upper portions of the fountain base, as shown.

Nozzle body 21 defines a chamber 30 within its interior, An elongate tubular septum member 31 is disposed coaxially of and within the body tube'to subdivide chamber 30 into a central cavity 32and an annular cavity 33. Plug means 34 are disposed across the interior of body 21 adjacent its open upper end 35 to define the upper ends of the central and annular cavities. Plug means 34 are comprised of a central plug 36, disposed across the upper end of septum member 31, and of an annular ring 37 disposed between the exterior of septum member 31 and the interior surfaces of body 21.

As shown best in FIG. 2, it is preferred that the up turn member be supported within a central bore 38 formed axially through mounting member 22 so that the lower end 39 of the septum member is disposed below the lower surface 40 of mounting member 22. A suitable connection of septum member 31 to mounting member 22 may be by way of a press fit of the septummember within the bore of the mounting member. The

opening defined by the open lower end 39 of septum member 31 constitutes the water inlet opening to nozzle and to chamber 30. The nozzle water inlet opening is communicated with both central cavity 32 and annular cavity 33. Communication between the nozzle water inlet opening and central cavity 32 is provided by the interior of the septum member itself. Communication between the nozzle inlet opening and annular cavity 33 is provided by a plurality of apertures 41 formed through the septum member at regularly spaced locations about its circumference at a location on the septum member adjacent the lower end of annular cavity 33. The lower end of the annular cavity is closed by the upper portion 42 of annular mounting member 22. The upper end of annular cavity 33 is closed by the bottom surface 43 of plug ring 37.

But for the presence of a plurality of grooves 45 defined in its periphery, plug 36 closes the upper end 46 of the septum member, Plug 36 has substantial length along septum member 31 in terms of the diameter of the septum member at the location at which the plug is disposed within the septum member. Preferably, plug 36 is approximately square in that it has a length axially of the septum member which is approximately equal to the diameter of the plug. Preferably the plug is secured in the upper end of the septum member bya press fit at such a location that only approximately one-half the length of the plug is disposed within the septum member below the upper end 46 of the septum member.

As shown best in FIGS. 2 and 3, grooves 45 are disposed at regularly spaced locations about the circumference of plug 36 and are defined in the side walls 47 of the plug. Each groove is disposed in a plane extending radially from the center of the plug, but has a base surface 48 which is inclined upwardly and outwardly relative to the axis 44 of the nozzle; the base surface of each groove is the surface of the groove which lies closest to the center of the plug. preferably, each groove has parallel side walls 49 which. are disposed substantially radially of the plug. It is preferred that grooves 45 be spaced from each other about the circumference of the plug by a distance approximately equal to the spacing between the side walls 49 of each groove, and it is also preferred that all of grooves 45 be essentially identical to each other. Grooves 45 communicate with central cavity 32 through the lower surface 50 of plug 36, and communicate at their upper ends to the exterior of nozzle 20. K

As shown best in FIG. 3, it is preferred that grooves 45 be defined so that their upper ends open through plug side wall surface 47 about the septum member, rather than through the uppersurface 51 of the plug. It is within the scope of this invention, however, that, if desired, grooves 45 may communicate through the upper and lower surfaces of the plug. In any event, each of grooves 45 is open through the side surfaces of the plug, and it is preferred that the upper end 46 of septum member 31 be defined free of burrs with a relatively sharp corner relative to the plug side wall surfaces so that water flowing through the grooves passes cleanly past the upper end of the septum member and does not interact with the upper end of the septum member to produce mist of fine spray in the upper tier 12 of fountain pattern 10.

The flow path of water flowing from the nozzle inlet opening to the upper portion of central cavity 32 is through an annular collar 53 disposed within the septum member proximately above apertures 41. Collar 53 has a central bore 54, and preferably has a lower surface 55 disposed substantially perpendicular to the length of septum member 31 and to the length of bore 54 through the collar. Collar 53 provides a throttling effect upon water flowing through the septum member toward plug 36 to provide a degree of control over the volume of water passing through grooves 45 relative to the volume of water passing through holes 56 formed in body 21 below but adjacent to plug ring 37. Annular collar 53 also serves to eliminate any venturi effect at and across apertures 41 due to the water flowing from the nozzle inlet opening toward central plug 36. The effective waterfiow area through the nozzle inlet opening and through annular collar 53 is greater than the net effective waterflow area from central cavity 33 through grooves 45 to the exterior of nozzle 20.

Because plug 36 has its side walls 47 intimately engaged with the inner diameter of septum member 31 between adjacent ones of grooves 45, the water which emerges from central cavity 32 to the exterior of the nozzle during the operation of the nozzle emerges as discrete streams of essentially non-aerated water. These water streams, corresponding to streams 14 shown in FIG. 1, pass upwardly and outwardly from the axis of the nozzle along trajectories defined initially by the slope of groove base surfaces 48. As these water streams emerge from groove 45, they are coherent, i.e., resemble a continuous stream of water. As the water moves from the nozzle, the coherence of the stream is lost and the stream changes to a plurality of Individual crystalline droplets of water of substantial size. These crystalline water droplets act as prisms to natural and artificial light, with the result that the upper tier of fountain pattern 10 is readily visible and attractive when illuminated both by sunlight and by artificial light.

Grooves 45 comprise water outlet means from nozzle 20. The water outlet means of the nozzle are further comprised of a plurality of holes 56 formed through] body 21 more proximate to plug ring 37 than to the nozzle inlet opening. The holes are uniformly spaced along the body from the 'plug ring and also are spaced regularly along the circumference of the body. In nozzle 20, holes 26 are formed at regular intervals around the entire circumference of the body. It is within the scope of this invention, however, that a nozzle similar to nozzle 20 may be provided for use against a wall or the like, in which case holes 56 may be distributed uniformly along an arc of about the circumference of nozzle body 21. As shown best in FIG. 2, holes 56 preferably are defined as a plurality of identical slots having their length aligned with the elongate extent of tubular body 21. The holes are formed so that their boundary surfaces as defined by body 21 are disposed substantially perpendicular to the axis of the body. The total water flow area defined by the several holes 56 is less than the aggregate water flow area of openings 41 through septum member 31, and less than the water flow area of the nozzle inlet opening defined at the lower end of the septum member.

An annular collar 57 is intimately engaged circumferentially of body 21 approximately adjacent hole 56 for modulating the flow of water from annular cavity 33 through the holes to the exterior of the nozzle. In nozzle 20, annular collar 57 is disposed about the exterior of the body tube. Collar 57 has a lower surface 58 which preferably is disposed in a plane perpendicular to the elongate extent of the body tube. As shown in FIG. 2, the modulating annular collar is positioned on the body tube to overlap a portion of the upper ends of slot holes 56 so that the water streams emerging from the nozzle through holes 56 impinges upon and is affected by the lower surface 58 of the modulating collar. It is this interaction between the collar and the water streams emerging from holes 56 which gives the initial flattop configuration to the water streams of lower tier 13 of fountain pattern 10, as described above. Once the optimum position of modulating collar 57 on body tube 21 relative to holes 56 has been determined for the best aesthetic effect, the collar is fixedly secured to the body tube as by a plurality of pins 59 passed radially through the collar into the body tube.

In a presently preferred nozzle of the type shown in FIG. 2, body tube 21, modulating collar 57, central plug 36 and plug ring 37 are defined of polyvinyl chloride, and lacking pins 59 may take the form of small nails or the like driven through the modulating collar into the body tube. Also, in this nozzle, deptum member 31 is defined by thin-walled brass tubing.

FIG. 2 also illustrates that the upper end 35 of body tube 21 is disposed above the upper surface 51 of central plug 36. In this manner, the upper portion of the body tube serves as an ornamental and masking shroud to the structure of the nozzle defined by central plug 36. The annulus between the side walls 47 of central plug 36 and the inner walls of the body tube, and the spacing between the upper end of the body tube and the upper end of the central plug, are defined in such manner that thewater streams which emerge from plug grooves 45 do not interact with the upper portion of body tube 21. It is within the scope of this invention, however, that, if desired, the upper end of the body tube may be defined at about the location of the upper surface of plug ring 37.

A flow control strainer assembly 60 is carried by the lower end of septum member 31 below mounting member 22 and is of sufficiently small diameter that the strainer assembly may be passed through mounting base discharge opening 25 so that the majority of the structure of the strainer assembly may be disposed within water supply chamber26 of the mounting base. The strainer assembly includes a mounting collar 61 engaged with the outer circumference of the septum member below the mounting member. Gasket 29 is held captive between the upper surfaces of the mounting collar and the lower surface40 of the mounting member. The upper end of a cylinder 62 of perforated metal is connected to mounting collar 61 to depend from the mounting collar coaxially of septum member 31. The lower end of cylinder 62 is closed by a solid closure member 63. The length and circumference of cylinder 62 are selected in conjunction with the size of the individual perforations in the cylinder such that the net effective water flow area through cylinder 62 is at least as great as, and preferably greater than, the area of the nozzle inlet opening defined by the open lower end of the septum member. Strainer assembly 60 is arranged so that the low of water to nozzle from water supply chamber 26 is radially of the nozzle through perforated cylinder 62, rather than axially of the nozzled directly from the water supply chamber.

The presence of perforated cylinder 62 circumferentially of the nozzle inlet opening assures that the supply of water to the nozzle along any radius of the nozzle inlet opening is essentially identical to the way in which water is supplied to the nozzle opening along any other radius. As a result, a velocity profile taken along any plane diametrically of the nozzle adjacent the nozzle inlet opening is uniform and essentially identical to the velocity profile taken along any other plane diametrically of the nozzle, This flow characteristic of water into nozzle 20 assures symmetry in the discharge from the nozzle through grooves and holes 56, thereby assuring, to the maximum extent possible, that the upper and lower tiers of fountain pattern 10 are symmetrical about the centerline axis of nozzle 20. The presence of flow controlling strainer assembly at the lower end of the nozzle also assures reproducibility, in use, of the aesthetic characteristics programmed into nozzle 20 by the manufacturer at a location remote from the site of use. It has also been found that the presence of flow controlling strainer assembly 60 significantly contributes to the ability of nozzle 20 to produce a desired aesthetic pattern over a wide range of water flowrates supplied and passed through the nozzle. The strainer assembly also filters out large particles of solid matter from the water supplied to the nozzle, thereby assuring that solid particles cannot clog the outlet openings of the nozzle either at grooves 45 or at holes 56.

Another nozzle 100, useful for producing a multi-tier fountain pattern similar to fountain pattern 10 shown in FIG. 1, is illustrated in FIG. 4. An inspection of FIGS. 2 and 4 will show that nozzles 20 and are similar to each other. Accordingly, to the extent that elements of nozzle 20, as described above, find counterparts, either structurally or in essential functional identity, in the elements of nozzle 100, the corresponding elements of nozzle 100 have been assigned charac- .ter numbers which are increased by 100 over the corresponding character numbers set forth in FIG; 2. For example, in nozzle 20, the body tube is assigned reference numeral 21; in nozzle 100, the body tube is assigned reference numeral 121. To simplify the description of nozzle 100, it will be understood that to the extent that corresponding structural elements are found in nozzles 20 and 100, the previous description pertinent to nozzle 20 concerning positional relationships and the relative sizes of openings and the like are also pertinent to nozzle 100.

In nozzle 100, nozzle body 121 is secured to a suitable fountain base via a mounting flange 123 which has a plurality of holes 66 formed through it about the circumference of the nozzle body parallel to the length of the nozzle body. The holes adapt the mounting flange for bolting connection to a suitable support and water supply fountain base. Nozzle 100 differs from nozzle 20 in that body. tube 121 is engaged in a central bore 67 through mounting flange 123. The body tube has its lower end 68 disposed below the lower surface of the mounting flange within a flow controlling strainer assembly 160. The inlet opening to nozzle 100 is defined by the open lower end 68 of body tube 121, the interior of which defines chamber 130. The upper portion of the chamber is subdivided into a central cavity 132 and an annular cavity 133 by tubular septum member 131 which has its lower end 139 disposed within the body tube above the mounting flange. The lower end of annular cavity I33 is closed by an annular collar 69 having its outer diameter snugly mated with the inner diameter of the body tube, and having its inner diameter snugly mated to the outer diameter of the septum member. Apertures 141 are provided through the septum member above collar 69 to provide the desired water flow communication between chamber 130 below the collar and annular cavity 133.

Nozzle 100 is essentially a somewhat smaller version of nozzle 20. In a presently preferred form of nozzle 100, body tube 121 as well as septum member 131, is defined of thin-wall brass tubing. It has been found that for best performance of nozzles according to this invention, it is desired that the slot holes 56 or 156 through the nozzle body from the adjacent annular cavity have side walls extending radially of the nozzle for an appreciable distance, thereby to give some definition to the water streams provided by the water emerging from the slot holes.

In the case of holes 56 of nozzle 20, the desired definition of the water stream is assured where body tube 21 is defined by polyvinyl chloride tubing, such tubing being of substantially greater wall thickness than thinwall brass tubing. In nozzle 100, on the other hand, the thickness of the thin-wall brass tubing relied upon to define body tube 121 is insufficient to give the desired definition to the water streams formed by water emerging from slot holes 156. Accordingly, a sleeve 70 is intimately engaged with the exterior circumference of body tube 121 over at least that portion of the length of the body tube through which slot holes 156 are formed; as shown in FIG. 4, it is preferred that sleeve 70'cxtend from a location below, but proximate to, the lower end of the slot holes to a point essentially coextensive with the upper end 135 of the body tube. In a presently preferred form of nozzle 100, sleeve 70 is defined by polyvinyl chloride tubing. Slot holes 156 are I formed through body tube 121 and sleeve 70, as shown best in FIG. 4. Water stream modulating annular ring 157 is engaged with the outer circumference of sleeve 70 at such location along the sleeve that its lower surface 158 is disposed at a desiredposition below the upper ends of slot holes 156. Collar 157 is fixed in its desired position along the length of the nozzle by locking pins 155 driven through the material of the collar into the material of sleeve 70.

It will be observed that nozzle 100 does not include acounterpart of annular collar 53 of nozzle 20. It has been found thatin nozzles of the type represented by nozzle 100 (the same being a smaller version of the nozzle represented by nozzle 20), the anti-venturi effect of collar 53 is not required. The flow regulating functions provided by collar 53 in nozzle 20 are provided in nozzle 100 by appropriate selection of the relative diameters of the body tube and the septum memher, and by the sizing of apertures 141 and slot holes 156 relative to the effective water flow area of grooves 145.

Another nozzle'80, shown in FIG. 5, is arranged to provide a discharge pattern like that of the lower tier 13 of fountain pattern 10. That is, nozzle 80 differs from nozzles 20 and 100, described above, in that nozzle 80 produces a single horizontally disposed discharge tier, whereas nozzles 20 and 100 produce a multi-tler discharge pattern in which the lower tier is similar to the single-tier discharge pattern produced by nozzle 80.

Further, an inspection of FIGS. 2 and 5 will show that nozzle incorporates many of the same structural elements as nozzle 20 in the same positional and dimensional relationship to each other as in nozzle 20. Nozzle 80, however, differs from nozzle 20 by the elimination of certain of the structure described above as components of nozzle 20. Accordingly, for the simplification of the description and illustration of nozzle 80, to the extent that nozzles 20 and 80 incorporate identical or closely similar structural elements, to the same extent like reference numerals are used in both FIGS-2 and 5.

A presently preferred form of nozzle 80 includes a body tube 21 fabricated of polyvinyl chloride tubing and a septum member 31 defined of thin-wall brass tubing.

In nozzle 80, a plug member 81 has its periphery intimately engaged with the inner walls of body tube 21 to close the body tube and chamber 30 therein at the upper end 35 of the body tube. A circular recess 82 is provided concentric to the nozzle axis in the lower surface 83 of the plug and has a diameter corresponding to upper end diameter of septum member 31 to receive the uppe'rend 46 of the septum member. In this manner, septum member 31 subdivides chamber 30 into a central cavity 32 and an annular cavity 33.

The water outlet means from nozzle 80 consists only of slot holes 56 formed through the body tube and with which flow modulating annular collar 57 cooperates in the manner described above as to nozzle 20. A flow controlling strainer assembly 60 is carried by the lower end of the septum member below mounting member 22. The open lower end of the septum member defines the water inlet opening to nozzle 80 and has a water flow area which is equal to or somewhat less than the water fiow area provided through perforated screen cylinder 62 of the strainer assembly, Also, the effective water flow area of the nozzle inlet opening is greater than the effective water flow area of all of slot holes 56. The efi'ective water flow area of holes 4l,.,provided through the septum member above the upper end 42 of the mounting member adjacent the lower portionofannular cavity 33, is also greater than the effective water flow area of all of slot holes 56. I

Nozzle 80 is particularly useful todefine low, horizontally disposed fountain discharge patterns ofrsubstantially aerated opaque water. Such fountain patterns are an effective counterpoint and contrastto pieces of sculpture and the like with which nozzles 8,0 and the discharge patterns produced by them may beusedto advantage. Like nozzles 20 and 100,,nozzle 80 has the characteristic that the discharge pattern produced by the nozzle maintains its desired aesthetic-characteristic over a wider range of water flowrates through the nozzle. If desired, septum member 31 can be deleted in nozzle 80 between the upper end of mounting member 22 and plug member 81.

Workers skilled'in the art to which this invention pertains will appreciate that the foregoing description of certain presently preferred nozzles according to this invention has been by way of illustration and example in furtherance of an explanation of the principles of this invention and of the basic structural characteristics and organizational relationship possessed by such nozzles. The foregoing description has not been presented as. nor should it be interpreted as, an exhaustive exposition of all forms which nozzles according to this invention may take. Workers skilled in the art to which this invention pertains will appreciate that changes, alterations, modifications to the specific structures described above may be practiced without departing from the spirit of this invention. Accordingly, the foregoing description should not be regarded as limiting the scope of this invention.

What is claimed is:

1. An ornamental fountain nozzle comprising an elongate tubular body defining therein an internal chamber having a water inlet opening thereto at the lower end of the chamber, plug means fixedly disposed across the chamber at the upper end of the chamber in spaced relation to the water inlet opening, water outlet means from the chamber to the exterior of the nozzle, the water outlet means comprising a plurality of water outlet holes defined through the body for discharging water radially laterally from the nozzle, the holes being defined at a location between the water inlet opening and the plug means more proximate to the plug means than to the water inlet opening, the holes being uniformly spaced along the body from the plug means and spaced regularly along the circumference of the body, and discharge modulating means carried by the body proximate the holes for modulating the flow of water from the chamber through the holes, the effective area of the water inlet opening and of the water flow path between the inlet opening and the water outlet means being greater than the effective water flow area of the water outlet means.

2. A fountain nozzle according to.claim 1 wherein the discharge modulating means comprises a surface disposed substantially normal to the body in cooperation witheach of said holes.

3. A fountain nozzle accordint to claim 2 wherein the surface is defined by a collar circumferentially intimately engaged with the body proximate the holes.

4. A fountain nozzle according to claim 1 wherein the holes are elongated in the direction of the length of the body, and the collar is engaged with the exterior circumference of the body in cooperation with the upper ends of the holes.

5. A fountain nozzle according to claim 4 wherein the collar has substantial thickness radially of the body and is disposed to partially close the upper ends of the holes.

6. A fountain nozzle according to-claim 1 wherein the plug means closes the chamber at a location spaced along the body from the inlet opening and .the water outlet means consist of said holes.

7. A fountain nozzle according to claim 6 wherein the holes are regularly spaced about the entire circumferential extent of the body.

8. A fountain nozzle according to claim 1 including elongate tubular septum means coaxially disposed within the body and extending from engagement with the plug means toward the chamber inlet opening for dividing the chamber into a central cavity and an annular cavity, means defining a water flow path from the chamber inlet opening to the central and annular cavities, and wherein the water outlet means further comprise a plurality of water flow passages through the plug means from the central cavity to the exterior of the nozzle.

9. A fountain nozzle according to claim 8 wherein the passages are disposed in the plug means at regularly spaced locations proximate the inner circumference of the septum means.

10. A fountain nozzle according to claim 9 wherein the water outlet means from the central cavity consist of said passages.

11. A fountain nozzle according to claim 9 wherein the plug means comprises an annulus engaged between the body and the septum means for closing the upper end of the annular cavity and a central plug disposed across the upper end of the septum means and having substantial thickness relative to the mean transverse dimension of the septum means proximately adjacent the central plug, and wherein the passages are defined by a plurality of grooves formed in the circumference of the central plug.

12. A fountain nozzle according to claim 9 wherein each passage is disposed in a plane parallel to the elongate extent of the body. l

13. A fountain nozzle according to claim 12 wherein each passage is inclined upwardly and outwardly of the body along its extent through the plug means.

14. A fountain nozzle according to claim 8 wherein the annular cavity is closed at its opposite ends between the body and the septum means, and the means defining a water flow path from the chamber inlet opening to the annular cavity comprise a plurality of openings through the septum means adjacent the lower end of the annular cavity, the openings having an aggregate effective water flow area greater than the aggregate effective water flow area of the water outlet holes.

15. An ornamental fountain nozzle comprising an elongate body defining an internal chamber, means at a lower end of the body adapting the body for connection to a source of pressurized water for flow of water from the source into the chamber through a chamber inlet opening, elongate tubular septum means coaxially disposed within the body in water flow communication with the chamber inlet opening for dividing the chamber into a central cavity and an annular cavity, means defining a water flow path from the chamber inlet opening to the annular cavity adjacent one end of the annular cavity, means for closing the opposite endsof the annular cavity, and water outlet means for the chamber having an effective water flow area .less than the effective water flow area of the chamber inlet opening, the water outlet means comprising a plurality ofwater outlet holes defined through the body from tne annular cavity adjacent the other end of the annular the holes and the chamber inlet opening.

i i I i i mg? UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE v I CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3,749,311 Dated July 31, 1973 Inventor(s) v John O. Hruby, Jr.

v It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

r- Column 1, line 9, "filled" should read filed q lines 9 and 10, 'application" should read applications line 38, "articial" should read artificial 5-, line 40, "visisbility" should read visibility line 47, after "water" insert are line 66 flowrates means," should read flowrates, means Column .2, line 12, "recently" should read Recently line '20 'significnt" should read significant Column 3, line 46', "unairated" should read unaerated Column '4, line 20 "asingle" should read a single line 41, for "1970." read 1970, vnow Pat. No. 3,705,686. Column 5, line 38, "preferably" should read Preferably line 51, "about" shouldread' --above line 63, "mist of" should read mist or Column 6, line 28, 'groove" should read grooves line 31, "Individual" should read individual Column 7, line 22, "lacking" should read locking line 24, "deptum" should read septum line 64,. "low" should read flow Column 10, line 23, delete "upper end"; line 24, "upperend" should read 'upper end line 54, "wider" should read wide line 64, "relationship" should read relationships Column ll, line 35, "accordint" should read according line 38, "1'' should read 3 Column 12, line 31, "comprise" should read comprises line 37, after "elongate" insert tubular line 48, "means for the" should read means from the line 52, "tne" should read the Signed and sealed this 2nd day of April l97h.

(SEAL) Attes t: v

MARSHALL DANN Commissioner of Patents EDWARD ELFLETGEER R. Attesting Officer

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3175767 *Jan 28, 1963Mar 30, 1965Rain Jet CorpOrnamental water fountains
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5876995 *Nov 25, 1996Mar 2, 1999Bryan; BruceBioluminescent novelty items
US6113886 *Nov 22, 1999Sep 5, 2000Bruce BryanBioluminescent novelty items
US6152358 *Aug 17, 1998Nov 28, 2000Bruce BryanBioluminescent novelty items
US6247995Feb 6, 1996Jun 19, 2001Bruce BryanBioluminescent novelty items
US6367713 *Feb 14, 1997Apr 9, 2002Wet Enterprises, Inc.High definition rain curtain
US7383764Aug 23, 2004Jun 10, 2008Sephra LlcFountain that flows with fluidic material
US7743698May 5, 2006Jun 29, 2010Sephra L.P.Fountain that flows with fluidic material
US8162234 *Mar 19, 2008Apr 24, 2012Oase GmbhNozzle arrangement for creating a water jet
CN101269357BMar 21, 2008Jun 13, 2012奥阿泽有限公司Nozzle arrangement for creating a water jet
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/17
International ClassificationB05B17/08, B05B17/00
Cooperative ClassificationB05B17/08
European ClassificationB05B17/08
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Aug 16, 1982ASAssignment
Owner name: RAIN JET CORP., 27671 LAPAZ RD. LAGUNA NIGUEL, CA.
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:IRRIGATION ENGINEERING AND MANUFACTURING CO., BY: JOHN DREW; JOHN O. HRUBY, JR. ; GERALD W. FRASIER, PARTNERS;REEL/FRAME:004026/0088
Effective date: 19820719