Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3750650 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 7, 1973
Filing dateDec 13, 1971
Priority dateDec 15, 1970
Publication numberUS 3750650 A, US 3750650A, US-A-3750650, US3750650 A, US3750650A
InventorsH Ruttgers
Original AssigneeHewlett Packard Gmbh
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Double spiral electrode for intra-cavity attachment
US 3750650 A
Abstract
An electrode device is configured for mounting at or within parts of the human body, especially for obtaining ECG signals from a fetus. The electrode device includes two spiral pointed catcher elements displaced by 180 DEG which are mounted in an insulating carrier. A counter electrode in the form of a tubular metal guiding element surrounds the carrier and protects the vagina and the fetus when the pointed catcher elements are introduced. A cannula may be provided at the electrode device so that liquid medicine or an electrolyte can be supplied to the fetus simultaneously with measuring ECG signals. The electrode device is introduced into the vagina by means of a guiding element.
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

O Umted States Patent 1 1 [111 3,750,650 Ruttgers [4 Aug. 7, 1973 [54] DOUBLE SPIRAL ELECTRODE FOR 3,472,234 /1969 Tachiek 128/418 INTRA CAVITY ATTACHMENT 3,087,486 4/1963 Kilpatrick 128/418 3,533,403 10/1970 Woodson l28/2.06 E Inventor: Helge g H g, 3,474,791 10/1969 Bentov 128/418 Germany 3,120,227 2/1964 Hunter, Jr. et a1 128/2.06 E

[73] Assignee: gewlett-Packard Gmbl-l, Boblinger, Primary Examiner wimam E Kamm ermany Att0rneyStephen P. Fox [22] Filed: Dec. 13, 1971 21 Appl. No.: 207,421 [57] {\BSTRACT An electrode device 18 configured for mounting at or within parts of the human body, especially for obtainl Foreign Application Priority Dam ing ECG signals from a fetus. The electrode device in- Dec. 15, 1970 Germany P 20 61 593.4 eludes two spiral pointed catcher elements displaced by Aug. 10, 1971 Germany P 21 065.7 which are mounted in an insulating carrier. A

counter electrode in the form of a tubular metal guid- [52] US. Cl. 128/2.06 E, 128/418, 128/D1G. 4 ing element surrounds the carrier and protects the va- [51] Int. Cl. A61b 5/04 gina and the fetus when the pointed catcher elements [5 8] Field of Search 128/2.06 E, 2.1 E, are introduced. A cannula may be provided at the elecl28/D1G. 4, 404, 418, 419 C, 419 F, 2.05 R trode device so that liquid medicine or an electrolyte can be supplied to the fetus simultaneously with mea- [56] References Cited suring ECG signals. The electrode device is introduced UNITED STATES PATENTS into the vagina by means of a guiding element. 3,580,242 5/1971 LaCroix 128/2.06 E 4 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures minnow Hm 3.750.650

SHEEI 1 0F 3 0 3 3 a yr 0 0 P/7/7/%/ ////AA 2 2 l g WHHHHIHHHHH IHHHHHHHHHHH HHH n NH HHHHHH HHHHHHHHHHHHH V r /A 1 w 7 PATENTEU WI; 7 I975 SHEET 2 0F 3 Fly 5 II H I1 I ll AFENFED M13 SHEET 3 0F 3 DOUBLE SPIRAL ELECTRODE FOR INTRA-CAVITY ATTACHMENT BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This application relates generally to an apparatus for obtaining measuring signals at or in parts of the human body, for example in cavities of the human body.

It is well known to take physiological measurements such as an electrocardiogram from an unborn child by using a needle electrode on which a second opposite polarity or counter electrode is mounted. Since a wrong positioning of the needle electrode can lead to substantial injuries of the fetus, the adjustment of said electrode has to be effected visibly. Thus, it is necessary to use an endoscope which, for the use in combination with a needle electrode, has an inclined top which permits the needle electrode to be positioned tangentially at the body part of the fetus. The needle electrode is mounted by means of a special pincers having gripping elements formed like a storks bill. Such an electrode is rather complicated and does not exclude the possibility of substantially injuring the fetus.

It is also well known to obtain physiological signals using a so-called clip electrode working according to the principle of the suture clip. The counter electrode of the clip electrode is mounted on the insulating envelope of the signal lead. Practical use of this type of elec trode has shown that it can be used only a few times before its prongs break. Furthermore, after being mounted in place, the electrode is not rigidly positioned at the fetus, and can pivot around an axis defined by the points of fixation. This can lead to the result that the counter electrode may touch the fetus, so that both the clip and counter electrodes have equal potentials and no measuring result can be obtained. A further disadvantage of this type of electrode arrangement is that its removal from a fetus is not easy and often causes substantial injury thereto. Also, this type of electrode has to be positioned visibly, which requires a relatively free entry to the desired point of location because of the size of the electrode. Often this special requirement cannot be met and the electrode is thus not usable.

Finally, it is well known to use an electrode in the form of a spiral shaped gripping device or catcher having two needle-like ends which are displaced by 180. This catcher electrode is positioned at the desired point of fixation on the fetus and is then affixed thereto by a short turn. The counter electrode is separate from the catcher electrode and has its own signal lead. The counter electrode is simply introduced into the same cavity of the body in which the catcher electrode is also present. As a result both electrodes do not have a defined relative position to each other, and the measuring result may be adversely affected. This is especially true if during the measurement the child or the mother is moving. The introduction of the catcher electrode is done manually or by means of a tampon holder. However, such a tampon holder is constructed for a different purpose and does not have the necessary stability to ascertain a precise mounting of the electrode. Also, the catcher electrode can cause injuries when being introduced as there is no exact guidance therefore, and such electrodes cannot be introduced into deep cavities of the body.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention in one embodiment comprises a spiral catcher electrode having two pointed ends displaced from each other by 180. The catcher electrode is contained in a carrier formed of insulating material, and is connected to an electrical signal lead. In or at the carrier there is a metal member being outwardly accessible and being usable as a second opposite polarity or counter electrode. The carrier is mounted at one end of a rod-like guiding element or tube. The metal member used as the counter electrode can extend beyond the carrier. The carrier can comprise grooves or projections which coact with the guiding element and can be detachably mounted on the guiding element.

In another embodiment of the invention, the carrier carries at least one tube or cannula. One end of the cannula is disposed on the side of the front face of the carrier and is pointed, while the other end is connected to a liquid line. The cannula can centrally project from the front face of the carrier between the spiral arms of the catcher electrode. Alternatively, the cannula may be formed from at least one of the arms of the catcher electrode.

One advantage of the novel apparatus is that it allows a safe and simple mounting of the measuring head even with a moving fetus. The removal of the measuring head does not endanger the fetus. As the piercing of the catcher electrode causes only small injuries, the danger of infection is decreased. Finally, the measuring head is fixedly mounted at the point of fixation during the measurement and the two electrodes maintain their relative position to each other even with movement 'of the. fetus. With these conditions accurate measuring signals are obtained.

An advantage of the improved apparatus including the cannula is that it is possible to supply to the location under test an electrolytically conductive liquid in order to improve the measuring results. Furthermore, it is possible to medically treat the fetus or mother by injecting medicine through the cannula. Also,'liquid may be extracted from the cavity by help of the cannula.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIGS. 1 and 2 are partial sectional views of the measuring head and associated guide member in two different embodiments of the present invention.

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of the measuring head shown in FIG. 2 and rotated FIGS. 4-9 are a cross-sectional and outline views of different embodiments of the measuring head of the present invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS I The embodiment illustrated in cross section in FIG. 1 comprises a gripping or catcher electrode 10 which is built such that its two free pointed ends are displaced by relative to each other in a plane which is nor mal to the longitudinal extension of the apparatus. This catcher electrode is surrounded by an electrically insulating material in the form of a carrier 11 in such a manner that its ends project resiliently from this material. The carrier 11 has the shape of a cylinder and comprises at its lower end a cylinder-like extension 1 l of smaller diameter. A second, counter electrode is formed from a metal ring 12 mounted on the carrier 1 l.

The catcher electrode and the metal ring 12 constitute the two electrodes of the measuring head. Accordingly, the catcher electrode is connected with an electrical lead 13 and the ring 12 is connected with an electrical lead 14. The carrier 11 is by means of extension 11' mounted on a rod-like guiding element in the form of a guiding tube 15 which at its lower end is provided with a knurled portion 16 in order to simplify its handling. The two leads 13, 14 are passed through the guiding tube and are connected to the input receptacles of an electronic measuring and processing apparatus, not shown.

The illustrated guiding tube can be made of metal or of a suitable plastic material. If the tube is formed of plastic material .it' can have a certain flexibility which permits that the apparatus can be used in curved cavities of the body.

In FIGS. 2 and 3 there is illustrated another embodiment of the novel apparatus, in which the catcher electrode 10 is mounted in a carrier 18 which simultaneously surrounds a pin-like counter electrodel9 such that the ends of electrode 19 project slightly from carrier l8. Electrodes 10, 19 are connected to the electrical leads 13, 14 respectively. The carrier 18 is mounted on a guiding tube 20 which is split at its upper end so that the conical and resilient tube parts 20' thus formed surround the carrier 18. With this arrangement, the pin-like counter electrode 19 is held in the slits between the tube parts. Another tube 21 is slidably mounted on the guiding tube 20. When displaced upwardly, the tube 21 pushes against the conical tube parts20 and thus fixes the counter electrode 19 rigidly in the slits of the guiding tube 20. For the purpose of simple handling, the guiding tube 20 has a knurled gripping portion l7at its lower end. The tube 21 is also provided with a similar gripping portion 22 at its lower end in order to simplify the actuation of the tube assembly. Thus, by displacing the tube 21 in one or the other direction relative to guiding tube 20, the carrier 18 can be securely clamped in place or unclamped so as to be detached from the guide tube. Because of the length of the tubes, tube 21 does, from a practical point of view, represent a remote actuation of the clamping. It can be actuated within or outside of the body cavity. As shown in FIG. 2, it can be a further advantage to mount a tubular sleeve 23 with rounded edges at its front face on the tube 21 such that the sleeve 23 can only be displaced on the tube 21 by exerting a certain force. Before the introduction of the apparatus into the body cavity, this tubular sleeve is moved into the represented position in which it surrounds the pointed ends of the catcher electrode 10 for the purpose of protection. Upon touching the point of adjustment, the tubular sleeve displaces backwards and thus releases the action of the catcher electrode 10. During the introduction of the apparatus, the body cavity is protected against injury from the catcher electrode by means of the tubular sleeve 23.

FIGS. 4 and 5 illustrate different measuring heads which can be mounted on a guiding element. The measuring head shown in FIG. 4 comprises the catcher electrode 10 and a counter electrode in the form of a metal ring 25 which is sleeve-like, inserted intothe carrier 26. Also, both electrodes are connected with respective electrical leads l3 and 14. At its lower end the carrier 26 comprises recesses 27 into which a complementarily formed guiding element can be engaged. In

lieu of these recesses there can also be provided projections 28 which are schematically illustrated in FIG. 5, where a ring 30 positioned on the carrier forms the counter electrode for the catcher electrode 10.

Another embodiment of the measuring head is shown in FIG. 6. The carrier for the electrodes is not made unitary but is manufactured with a ring 31 of insulating material. The electrodes 10, 34 are mounted by means of an electrically insulating casting material to extend from opposite ends of the ring 31. In the illustrated embodiment, mounting plugs 35 serve for mounting the carrier on the guiding tube.

Although in the illustrated embodiments the guiding elements are always shown to be guiding tubes, it is also possible to replace the tubes by a compact guiding rod. In this case the electrical leads laterally extend from the carriers of the measuring heads and they can be located laterally along the guiding rod.

There can be provided still another ring measuring system, for example for pressure measurement, at or within the carrier of the measuring head. If only pressure is to be measured with this apparatus, the counter electrode is unnecessary and the catcher would serve merely as a mounting element. In the case where the measuring head carries both measuring head systems, measuring data for several parameters may be obtained simultaneously.

In FIG. 7 there is represented a measuring head, wherein the catcher electrode 10 is isolate'dly mounted in a carrier 18 that simultaneously surrounds a pin-like counter electrode 19, the ends of which project slightly at both sides of the carrier. Electrodes 10, 19 are connected with electrical signal leads 13, 14, respectively. Furthermore, the carrier 18 carries a tube or cannula 36 having a pointed end which projects beyond the upper front face of the carrier 18. As shown, the cannula is centrally located between the arms of the catcher electrode 10. The rear end of the cannula is connected with a liquid line 37. When the measuring head is affixed to a fetus, for example, by a short turn, the tubing immerses into the fetus. If desired, the tubing can be mounted in the carrier in a manner such that its length projecting beyond the front face of the carrier is adjustable. This can be achieved, for example, by providing on the external portion of the cannula a screw-threaded portion which coacts with a corresponding internally threaded portion in the carrier.

The embodiment according to FIG. 8 is similar to that of FIG. 6. However, the catcher electrode 10 mounted in insulating material 32 consists of two parts 10a and 10:, of which the latter itself forms a cannula having one end embedded in the carrier in communication with a liquid pipe 37. Both catcher arms 10a, 10c are connected with each other and act as an electrode, which can coact with the caplike counter electrode 34. The outer shape of the carrier is determined by a sleeve 31 having two holding trunnions 35.

In FIG. 9 is illustrated another embodiment ofa measuring head wherein both catcher arms are formed as cannulas. They are embedded in an insulating mass 29 which is surrounded by a ring 30 that serves as a counter electrode. The two cannulas are electrically connected together to form one electrode. Each cannula is connected to a liquid pipe 37. The carrier 29 includes lateral extensions 28 which simplify its handling. In the illustrated embodiments, the liquid pipes are connected to the cannulas within the insulating mass;

however, it is also possible to provide these connections outside of the carrier.

I claim: 1. A measuring head assembly for obtaining measuring signals from cavities of the human body comprising: a spiral catcher electrode having two arms with pointed ends being displaced by 180 relative to each other; a carrier formed of an insulating material surrounding a portion of the catcher electrode; an electrically conductive member extending from the carrier in a fixed spatial relation with the catcher electrode, the conductive member being operable as a counter electrode with the catcher electrode; a pair of electrical signal leads connected respectively to the catcher electrode and the conductive member; and a guiding tube having an end portion of a predetermined configuration for receiving and holding the carrier by engaging the conducting member extending from the carrier, thereby enabling the carrier to be detachably mounted in the guiding tube. 2. The apparatus of claim 1 including a cannula having a pointed end extending centrally from the carrier between the spiral arms of the catcher electrode.

3. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein the length of the pointed end extending from the carrier is adjustable.

4. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein at least one of the arms of the catcher electrode is a cannula.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3087486 *Mar 5, 1959Apr 30, 1963Cenco Instr CorpCardiac electrode means
US3120227 *Jul 8, 1960Feb 4, 1964Robert J BraunlinMethod for obtaining a fetal electrocardiogram
US3472234 *Aug 15, 1967Oct 14, 1969Gen ElectricBody organ electrode
US3474791 *Mar 24, 1966Oct 28, 1969Brunswick CorpMultiple conductor electrode
US3533403 *May 10, 1967Oct 13, 1970Woodson Riley DCombination heart catheter and electrode
US3580242 *Apr 1, 1968May 25, 1971George E La CroixFetal scalp electrode unit
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3827428 *Dec 4, 1972Aug 6, 1974E HonBipolar electrode structure for monitoring fetal heartbeat and the like
US3910271 *May 24, 1974Oct 7, 1975Theodore C NewardMethod of making a bipolar electrode structure
US3971364 *May 16, 1975Jul 27, 1976NasaCatheter tip force transducer for cardiovascular research
US3974834 *Apr 23, 1975Aug 17, 1976Medtronic, Inc.Body-implantable lead
US3989038 *Dec 15, 1975Nov 2, 1976Neward Theodore CFetal electrode and biopsy device
US4010758 *Sep 3, 1975Mar 8, 1977Medtronic, Inc.Bipolar body tissue electrode
US4046151 *Apr 30, 1976Sep 6, 1977Medtronic, Inc.Body implantable lead with stiffening stylet
US4066085 *May 20, 1976Jan 3, 1978Cordis CorporationContact device for muscle stimulation
US4080961 *Dec 22, 1976Mar 28, 1978Eaton Crosby JFetus scalp electrode instrument
US4088138 *Dec 29, 1975May 9, 1978Cardiac Resuscitator Corp.Cardiac resuscitator and monitoring apparatus
US4144890 *Dec 19, 1976Mar 20, 1979Cordis CorporationContact device for muscle stimulation
US4146037 *Dec 12, 1977Mar 27, 1979Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.Cardiac pacer electrode and lead insertion tool
US4149528 *Oct 3, 1977Apr 17, 1979Hewlett-Packard CompanyElectrode assembly for sensing heart activity
US4155353 *Dec 19, 1977May 22, 1979Davis William EElectrode and method for laryngeal electromyography
US4157710 *Feb 13, 1978Jun 12, 1979Abitbol Moise MAbdominal electrode for fetal monitoring
US4180080 *Apr 24, 1978Dec 25, 1979Hewlett-Packard CompanyElectrode assembly for sensing heart activity
US4244375 *Feb 7, 1979Jan 13, 1981Hoffmann-La Roche Inc.Transcutaneous electrode with finger operative attachment assembly
US4254764 *Mar 1, 1979Mar 10, 1981Neward Theodore CClip electrode
US4301806 *Apr 14, 1980Nov 24, 1981American Home Products CorporationRotating mechanism for introducing a fetal electrode
US4321931 *Mar 20, 1979Mar 30, 1982Hon Edward DElectrode structure and applicator therefor
US4355642 *Nov 14, 1980Oct 26, 1982Physio-Control CorporationMultipolar electrode for body tissue
US4501276 *Jul 16, 1982Feb 26, 1985Illinois Tool Works Inc.Fetal electrode apparatus
US4538617 *Oct 13, 1982Sep 3, 1985Arne JensenTransducer for the simultaneous measurement of different physiological quantities
US4644956 *Oct 15, 1984Feb 24, 1987Jurgen MorgensternPhysiological test probe
US4644957 *Apr 8, 1985Feb 24, 1987Ricciardelli Robert HApplicator structure for biological needle probes employing spiral-shaped retaining coils
US4686996 *Aug 1, 1986Aug 18, 1987Paul UlbrichElectrode assembly for sensing heart activity
US4827940 *Apr 13, 1987May 9, 1989Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.Facilitation of insertion and positioning
US4836208 *Aug 14, 1987Jun 6, 1989American Home Products Corporation (Del.)Electrode assembly for sensing heart activity
US4936306 *Nov 27, 1985Jun 26, 1990Doty James RDevice and method for monitoring evoked potentials and electroencephalograms
US5002067 *Aug 23, 1989Mar 26, 1991Medtronic, Inc.Medical electrical lead employing improved penetrating electrode
US5150709 *Feb 11, 1991Sep 29, 1992Neward Theodore CUse in fetal heart monitoring
US5222498 *Aug 3, 1992Jun 29, 1993Neward Theodore CFor use in fetal heart monitoring
US5246014 *Nov 8, 1991Sep 21, 1993Medtronic, Inc.Implantable lead system
US5284141 *Jul 31, 1992Feb 8, 1994Eibling David LElectrode emplacement apparatus for amniotomy and fetal monitoring and method of use
US5423314 *Aug 2, 1993Jun 13, 1995Hewlett Packard CompanyIntroduction apparatus for a fetal scalp electrode
US5474065 *Apr 4, 1994Dec 12, 1995Graphic Controls CorporationNon-invasive fetal probe
US5665477 *Jun 7, 1995Sep 9, 1997Graphic Controls CorporationHydrogel adhesive for attaching medical device to patient
US5833622 *Oct 31, 1996Nov 10, 1998Graphic Controls CorporationNon-invasive fetal probe having improved mechanical and electrical properties
US6773678Mar 12, 2001Aug 10, 2004Endress + Hauser Conducta Gesellschaft Fur Mess Und Regeltechnik Mbh + Co.Connecting apparatus to vessel walll
US6911019 *Oct 22, 2001Jun 28, 2005Medtronic, Inc.Helical needle apparatus for creating a virtual electrode used for the ablation of tissue
US7108710Nov 26, 2002Sep 19, 2006Abbott LaboratoriesMulti-element biased suture clip
US7212870 *Sep 16, 2004May 1, 2007Pacesetter, Inc.Dual helix active fixation stimulation lead
US7313424Mar 6, 2003Dec 25, 2007Critisense Ltd.Diagnosis of body metabolic emergency state
US7416556Jun 6, 2002Aug 26, 2008Abbott LaboratoriesStop-cock suture clamping system
US7537595Dec 21, 2007May 26, 2009Tissuelink Medical, Inc.Fluid-assisted medical devices, systems and methods
US7604635Aug 9, 2004Oct 20, 2009Salient Surgical Technologies, Inc.Fluid-assisted medical devices, systems and methods
US7645277Dec 22, 2005Jan 12, 2010Salient Surgical Technologies, Inc.Fluid-assisted medical device
US7651494Jan 29, 2003Jan 26, 2010Salient Surgical Technologies, Inc.Fluid-assisted medical device
US7727232Feb 4, 2005Jun 1, 2010Salient Surgical Technologies, Inc.Fluid-assisted medical devices and methods
US7806904Feb 24, 2004Oct 5, 2010Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Closure device
US7811282Nov 14, 2005Oct 12, 2010Salient Surgical Technologies, Inc.Fluid-assisted electrosurgical devices, electrosurgical unit with pump and methods of use thereof
US7815634Dec 22, 2003Oct 19, 2010Salient Surgical Technologies, Inc.Fluid delivery system and controller for electrosurgical devices
US7819895Apr 18, 2006Oct 26, 2010Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Vascular sheath with bioabsorbable puncture site closure apparatus and methods of use
US7828817Aug 4, 2005Nov 9, 2010Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Apparatus and methods for delivering a closure device
US7841502Dec 18, 2007Nov 30, 2010Abbott LaboratoriesModular clip applier
US7842068Nov 30, 2001Nov 30, 2010Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Apparatus and methods for providing tactile feedback while delivering a closure device
US7850709Jun 4, 2003Dec 14, 2010Abbott Vascular Inc.Blood vessel closure clip and delivery device
US7850797Mar 12, 2009Dec 14, 2010Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Methods for manufacturing a clip and clip
US7854810Dec 17, 2003Dec 21, 2010Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Methods for manufacturing a clip and clip
US7857828Feb 1, 2005Dec 28, 2010Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Clip applier and methods of use
US7867249Aug 8, 2003Jan 11, 2011Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Clip applier and methods of use
US7879071May 9, 2003Feb 1, 2011Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Closure device and methods for making and using them
US7887555Jul 9, 2003Feb 15, 2011Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Closure device and methods for making and using them
US7887563Jun 14, 2005Feb 15, 2011Abbott Vascular Inc.Surgical staple
US7901428Oct 3, 2002Mar 8, 2011Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Vascular sheath with bioabsorbable puncture site closure apparatus and methods of use
US7905900Jan 30, 2003Mar 15, 2011Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Clip applier and methods of use
US7931669May 17, 2002Apr 26, 2011Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Integrated vascular device with puncture site closure component and sealant and methods of use
US7951148Feb 6, 2004May 31, 2011Salient Surgical Technologies, Inc.Electrosurgical device having a tissue reduction sensor
US7998140Mar 30, 2004Aug 16, 2011Salient Surgical Technologies, Inc.Fluid-assisted medical devices, systems and methods
US8007512Oct 8, 2003Aug 30, 2011Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Plunger apparatus and methods for delivering a closure device
US8038670Dec 22, 2005Oct 18, 2011Salient Surgical Technologies, Inc.Fluid-assisted medical devices, systems and methods
US8048070Feb 11, 2003Nov 1, 2011Salient Surgical Technologies, Inc.Fluid-assisted medical devices, systems and methods
US8075557Oct 30, 2007Dec 13, 2011Salient Surgical Technologies, Inc.Fluid-assisted medical devices and methods
US8083736Sep 5, 2002Dec 27, 2011Salient Surgical Technologies, Inc.Fluid-assisted medical devices, systems and methods
US8128644Sep 19, 2003Mar 6, 2012Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Closure device and methods for making and using them
US8236026Mar 27, 2006Aug 7, 2012Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Closure device and methods for making and using them
US8313497Jun 28, 2006Nov 20, 2012Abbott LaboratoriesClip applier and methods of use
US8361068Oct 12, 2010Jan 29, 2013Medtronic Advanced Energy LlcFluid-assisted electrosurgical devices, electrosurgical unit with pump and methods of use thereof
US8460339Aug 26, 2010Jun 11, 2013Abbott LaboratoriesMulti element biased suture clip
US8475455Oct 28, 2003Jul 2, 2013Medtronic Advanced Energy LlcFluid-assisted electrosurgical scissors and methods
US8486092Mar 11, 2009Jul 16, 2013Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Closure device and methods for making and using them
US8486108Feb 1, 2006Jul 16, 2013Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Closure device and methods for making and using them
US8568409Oct 31, 2007Oct 29, 2013Medtronic Advanced Energy LlcFluid-assisted medical devices, systems and methods
US8579932Feb 24, 2004Nov 12, 2013Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Sheath apparatus and methods for delivering a closure device
US8590760May 24, 2005Nov 26, 2013Abbott Vascular Inc.Surgical stapler
US8603136May 3, 2007Dec 10, 2013Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Apparatus and methods for providing tactile feedback while delivering a closure device
US8632533Feb 23, 2010Jan 21, 2014Medtronic Advanced Energy LlcFluid-assisted electrosurgical device
US8690910Mar 31, 2006Apr 8, 2014Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Closure device and methods for making and using them
US8758396Apr 27, 2006Jun 24, 2014Integrated Vascular Systems, Inc.Vascular sheath with bioabsorbable puncture site closure apparatus and methods of use
US8784447Apr 25, 2005Jul 22, 2014Abbott Vascular Inc.Surgical stapler
US20120191169 *Jan 20, 2011Jul 26, 2012Medtronic, Inc.Trans-Septal Lead Anchoring
USRE28990 *Feb 6, 1975Oct 5, 1976Corometrics Medical Systems, Inc.Bipolar electrode structure for monitoring fetal heartbeat and the like
USRE30750 *May 7, 1980Sep 29, 1981Cardiac Resuscitator CorporationCardiac resuscitator and monitoring apparatus
EP0014341A1 *Jan 15, 1980Aug 20, 1980Quinton Medical Co.Integral medical electrode and skin preparation device
EP0137500A2 *Oct 11, 1984Apr 17, 1985Jürgen Prof. Dr. MorgensternPhysiological sensor
EP1046372A1Apr 22, 1999Oct 25, 2000Hewlett-Packard CompanyElectrical cutting contact, preferably for medical disposables like fetal scalp electrodes
WO2000064340A1Oct 8, 1999Nov 2, 2000Hewlett Packard CoInsulation piercing electric contact, especially for medical disposable articles such as fetal scalp electrodes
Classifications
U.S. Classification600/376
International ClassificationA61B5/0448
Cooperative ClassificationA61B5/0448, A61B5/4362
European ClassificationA61B5/43F6E, A61B5/0448