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Publication numberUS3750871 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 7, 1973
Filing dateFeb 14, 1972
Priority dateFeb 14, 1972
Publication numberUS 3750871 A, US 3750871A, US-A-3750871, US3750871 A, US3750871A
InventorsCook J
Original AssigneeEngin Foam Plastics Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shipping container
US 3750871 A
Abstract
A shipping container in which a pair of rigid foam plastic panels are secured in opposite ends of a paperboard tube and have shallow recesses in their inner faces receiving and positioning spaced parts of contained articles.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[ Aug. 7, 1973 United States Patent [191 Cook X U E 5 6 6 0 2 3,l l L223 ll/l963 3,241,66l 3/l966 Zamzow I 3,416,648 Levi............

[73] Assignee:

Primary ExaminerDonald F. Norton Attorney-Eugene C. Knoblock [22] Filed: Feb. 14, 1972 App]. No.2 226,166

T C A R T S B A HI 5 R6 1 M8 ,6 CB m m l U SHt Um UN 55 A shipping container in which a pair of rigid foam plastic panels are secured in opposite ends of a paperboard tube and have shallow recesses in their inner faces re- R F5 6 AP C5 M m 6 0 2 h c r a e S f o M e i F U 5 ceiving and positioning spaced parts of contained articles.

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,216,339 10/1940 De Reamer....................... 206/65 E 9 Claims, 7 Drawing Figures SHIPPING CONTAINER This invention relates to improvements in shipping containers, and more particularly to shipping containers for fragile products or for products having surface finishes which are subject to damage if not protected.

Herctofore, it has been a common practice in shipping fragile materials, such as glassware or articles having sensitive and readily damaged surfaces, to package them for shipment in corrugated paperboard containers in which are enclosed not only the articles to be shipped but also protective pads, spacers and otherinserts designed and constructed to position the contents and to protect them against damage during shipment, handling and storage. The cost of such containers with article positioning and protecting means therein and of the assembly within a corrugated paperboard container of the spacers or positioning means and the articles being shippedis high,both from the standpoint of the cost of the packaging and positioning materials per se and the labor of assembling in the package the contained articles and the spacers or positioning members.

It is the primary object of this invention to provide a shipping container which is inexpensive and which is easily and quickly assembled and packed and in which the numberof constituentpartsis reduced to a minimum, without sacrifice of full and adequate positioning and shock absorbing characteristics.

A further object is to provide a shipping container of this character which can be constructed in any selected shape, such as cubical, cylindrical, triangular, hexagonal, and the like.

A further object is to provide a shipping container whose shipping weight when loaded is reduced compared to the weight of prior load protecting loaded packages without sacrifice of protection of the package contents.

A further object is to provide a shipping package which eliminates the need for internal package components separate from the package per se heretofore required to position and protect fragile contents, such as glassware and the surface finishes of other articles contained in the package.

A further object is to provide a shipping container of this character in which the need for strapping, taping, stapling or gluing during assembly of the box is eliminated, unless the user requires'or elects to use the same.

Other objects will be apparent from the following specification.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a container constituting one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 2 is an exploded view of the container;

FIG. 3 is a vertical sectional view taken on line 3-3 of FIG. I.

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view of a modified form of the invention. a

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of another embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 6 is a vertical sectional view taken on line 6-6 of FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of another embodiment of the invention.

My new shipping container constitutes a pair of cellular or foam plastic panels, each having an interior configuration to position a part of an article or of each of several articles to be shipped therein, and a paperboard tube encircling marginal portions of both foam panels and anchored to said foam panels to complete said container.

Referring to the drawings which illustrate selected embodiments of the invention, and particularly to FlGS.I-3 which illustrate one embodiment of the invention, the numeral 10 designates the top of the container, the numeral 12 the bottom of the container, and the numeral 14 designates a side forming tube.

Each .of the top 10 and bottom 12 constitutes a panel formed of rigid cellular or foam plastic which may be of open cell or closed cell type, and which preferably is of closed cell type. Foam plastics particularly suitable for use in thisinvention include polystyrene,polyurethane, polyethylene, although any other foam-type plastic found suitable for a particular application may be utilized.

Each of the top 10 and bottom 12 is formed ofrequired configuration and size for the particular item or items to be packed in the container. This entails the formation of the bottom or inner portion of the top 10 with one or more cavities 16 of size, shape and location to receive therein the uppermost portion or portions of contained item or items 18, such asglass tumblers, as illustrated in FIG. 3. The cavities 16 are of shallow depth, preferably less than one-half the total thickness of the top 10. The cavities 16 may be of stepped form 26 of each is larger than the article, thereby reducing the mass or volume of the bottom without sacrifice of strength or thickness of the portion of the bottom upon which each article 18 bears. In the instance illustrated in FIG. 3 where frusto-conical glass tumblers 18 are illustrated, the arrangement is such that the cavities in both the top and bottom are similar. This is illustrative of only one condition, and is not intended to be limitmg.

Each of the top panel 10 and bottom panel 12 may have marginal flanges projecting therefrom. Thus, in the form shownin FIGS. 1 to 3 the top panel 10 has a flange 28 extending substantially full length of each side thereof and projecting outwardly beyond the surface of the remainder of the panel side, and the bottom wall has a marginal flange 30 projecting from a portion of each side thereof. As illustrated, the top flanges 28 extend flush with the top surface of the top panel and the marginal flanges 30 of the bottom extend flush with the bottom surface of the bottom panel. Each of the In theembodiment illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2, each of the top panel and bottom panel has a recess formed at each corner thereof. The recesses 32 of the top panel extend from the top surface thereof to a point intermediate the thickness of the panel so as to provide an integral shoulder portion 34 at the lower part thereof. The flanges 28 preferably extend between the recesses 32. As illustrated in FIG. 2, the recesses are V-shaped so that the top plan view of each shoulder 34 is square. It will be understood that the shape of the recesses is optional and may be arcuate or of other configuration. The bottom panel 12 is provided with a plurality of recesses 36 of a shape substnatially complementary to the shape of recesses 32, the same being formed to extend upwardly from the bottom surface of the bottom panel and for only a portion of the thickness of the panel to provide a shoulder portion 38 at the upper portion thereof.

The side forming tube 14 is formed of paperboard, such as corrugated paperboard of suitable grade and specification according to the strength required. The tube is of an inner dimension such that the margins thereof fit snugly around the major portions of the depths or thicknesses of the top and bottom panels. Thus, the top margins of the walls of the tube 14 illustrated in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, fit snugly around the portion of the top panel below the flanges 28, and the lower marginal portions of the walls of the tub fit snugly around the upper portion of the bottom panel above the bottom flanges 30 thereof. In instances in which the top flanges 28 are provided with grooves 29 and the bottom flanges 30 are provided with grooves 31, the parts are assembled as illustrated in FIG. 3 with the margins of the walls of the tube 14 seating in such grooves.

In constructions in which the top panels are provided with recesses 32 and the bottom panels are provided with recesses 36, the tube 14 may be slit at 40 at spaced parts thereof located adjacent said recesses 32 when the box parts are assembled, and may be slit at 42 adjacent the bottom margin thereof at points adjacent the bottom recesses 36. The spacing of the slits 40 and 42 from the respective top and bottom edges of the tube will correspond to the spacing between the flanges and the shoulder portions of the top and bottom panels. By this arrangement, when the parts are assembled as illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 3, the portions 41 above each slit 4 40 may be bent or displaced to seat in the adjacent recess 32, and the portions 43 below each of the slits 42 may be bent or displaced to seat in a recess 36, as illustrated in FIG. 1. Thus, the tube parts 41 and 43 provide means engaging the shoulder portions 34 and 38 of the top and bottom panels and holding the parts 10, 12 and 14 of the container in assembled or operative relation. This arrangement eliminates the need for the use of tapes, staples, glue or straps to hold a container closed in cases where such additional securing or closure means are not required.

It will be seen from the foregoing that the assembly and packing of the container of this construction is readily accomplished by a few simple manipulations.

For example, a preformed bottom 12 of required upper contour for the articles to be packed may first have tube 14 applied thereto. The articles 18 may be inserted in the recesses 24 of the bottom, and the top panel preformed to receive the same articles 18 is then applied over the top of the tube 14 to engage the top portions of the articles 18. Closure and sealing of the container can be accomplished by application of straps, tapes, staples, or adhesive, if such is required; or, in cases where a construction as illustrated in FIG. 1 is adequate, the assembler may simply bend or deform the tube portions 41 and 43 to position them within the top recesses 32 and the bottom recesses 36. The resulting package is characterized by the strength of the thick foam plastic top and bottom panels and of the side wall tube 14 which are designed for the intended load or content. The thickness of the top 10 and bottom 12 will be such that the portion of each positioned between the article engaging surface or shoulder of each recess and the outer surface thereof will be adequate to absorb shock in a manner to ensure against breakage, of fragile contents 18 upon rough handling. Where multiple articles 18 are packaged, the articles will be held spaced apart and in proper relation to each other and to the outer wall of tube 14 by the recesses in the top and bottom panels into which they fit so that fragile articles contained in the package will not engage each other or be subject to breakage incident to rough handling.

FIG. 4 illustrates a modified construction wherein each of the top and bottom panels, such as top panel 10' illustrated, is of uniform dimension throughout its thickness, and the tube 14 forming the side walls of the container extends for full height or substantially full height of the completed container. By this arrangement, the use of the flanges 28 and 30 of the FIG. 1 embodiment is eliminated. The proper positioning of the parts making up the container is controlled or maintained by securing means, such as staples 44 driven through marginal portions of the tube 14' and anchored in the outermost portion of the foam plastic panel, such as top panel 10' shown. Straps, tapes or adhesive or glue may be substituted for the staples in such modified constructions if desired.

FIG. 5 illustrates a construction of a cylindrical shipping container. In this embodiment, each of the top and bottom foam plastic panels has a plurality of spaced recesses 46 formed therein at spaced points and extending for a portion of the thickness of the foam plastic panel whereby each terminates in a shoulder 48, here shown as arcuate in shape. The tube forming the side wall is slit adjacent each recess 46 and a portion 50 of the tube forming member is bent or deformed inwardly to seat in the recess 46 and bear against the adjacent shoulder 48. In this instance, the tubular part 52 extends substantially full height of the container with its top and bottom edges substantially flush with the outermost surfaces of the top and bottom panels of foam plastic. A container as illustrated in FIG. 5 is particularly suitable for packing and receiving articles such as fragile glass or ceramic bowls 54 which are positioned in the container by snug seating in shallow inverted recess 56 in the bottom surface of the top foam plastic panel and recess 58 in the top surface of the bottom panel.

FIG. 7 illustrates a container of hexagonal configuration in which the tube 60 extends full height of the container with its edges flush with the outermost surfaces of the top and bottom foam plastic panels. The top and bottom panels are provided with spaced recesses into which anchor portions 62 of the tube may be bent or deformed to bear upon shoulders 64 defined by the recesses. This construction also illustrates the use of staples 66 to secure the margins of the tube 60 to the foam plastic top and bottom panels.

It will be understood that the constructions herein described and illustrated are illustrative only of the invention and that other constructions embodying the invention are contemplated.

What i claim is:

l. A shipping container comprising a top panel formed of a rigid foam plastic, a bottom panel formed of a rigid foam plastic, a paperboard tube snugly encir cling at its upper portion at least a portion of said top panel and snugly encircling at its lower portion at least a portion of said bottom panel, the bottom surface of said top panel having a shallow recess therein and the top surface of said bottom panel having a shallow recess therein, said shallow recesses cooperating to receive and position the upper and lower portions of an article within said container, means for connecting to said top panel the upper encircling portion of said tube and means for connecting to said bottom panel the lower encircling portion of said tube.

2. A shipping container as defined in claim 1, wherein each of said top and bottom panels projects beyond the encircling portion of said tube and includes a flange projecting laterally therefrom and engageable by a portion of an edge of said tube.

3. A shipping container as defined in claim 2, wherein each lateral flange has a groove receiving a portion of said tube.

4. A shipping container as defined in claim 1, wherein each of said top and bottom panels is formed of closed cell foam plastic, and said panels are of complementary outer configuration.

5. A shipping container as defined in claim 1, wherein said tube is formed of corrugated paperboard and is of uniform dimension throughout its length.

6. A shipping container as defined in claim 1, wherein the peripheral portion of each of said top and bottom panels has a plurality of spaced recesses each extending from the outer face thereof and terminating spaced from the inner face thereof to define a shoulder at each recess, said tube having slits each adjacent a recess and each outlining a portion of said tube bent to seat in the adjacent recess with its innermost edge confronting the shoulder adjacent said recess.

7. A shipping container as defined in claim I, wherein a plurality of recesses are formed in the marginal portion of at least one of said foam plastic panels and terminate spaced from the inner face of the panel to define a shoulder adjacent each recess, and a portion of said tube seats in each recess and overlies the shoulder adjacent each recess.

8. A shipping container as defined in claim 1, wherein each article receiving recess has an articlecontaining surface spaced from the outermost adjacent surface of a foam plastic panel at least one-half the thickness of said panel.

9. A shipping container as defined in claim 1, wherein said tube encircles a portion of each foam plastic panel of a width exceeding one-half the thickness of the foam plastic panel.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2216339 *May 5, 1937Oct 1, 1940Mapes Cons Mfg CompanyBottle package
US3111223 *Jul 30, 1962Nov 19, 1963Union Bag Camp Paper CorpUnitized shelf loading carton
US3241661 *Jul 21, 1964Mar 22, 1966Bowen Richard BImpact resistant multiple bottle package
US3416648 *Oct 4, 1966Dec 17, 1968Hans L. LeviPlastic foam housing with lock-on cover sleeve
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3837480 *Dec 26, 1972Sep 24, 1974Burroughs CorpWide line ribbon package
US3930579 *Apr 16, 1975Jan 6, 1976Gte Sylvania IncorporatedMultipack means for packaging a plurality of cathode ray tubes
US3955675 *Apr 16, 1975May 11, 1976Gte Sylvania IncorporatedOne-piece internal support for a cathode ray tube multipack container
US4037722 *Mar 29, 1976Jul 26, 1977Donald BremerProtective packaging for bottles
US4293070 *Jul 19, 1979Oct 6, 1981Ohlbach Ralph CFor protecting printed circuit boards and other items against the ravages of a discharge of static electricity
US4482048 *Oct 19, 1983Nov 13, 1984James M. BrownContainer for static-sensitive articles
US4602715 *Nov 8, 1983Jul 29, 1986Aero Mayflower Transit Company, Inc.Shipping container for electronic components
US4823956 *Aug 13, 1986Apr 25, 1989Donaldson Company, Inc.Composite container and its method of manufacture
US4838420 *Sep 24, 1987Jun 13, 1989Bonneville International CorporationPackaging for point of sale display, shipment and storage of cassette recordings and methods
US4882893 *Aug 29, 1988Nov 28, 1989Spencer Herbert CContainer for the transport of diagnostic specimens
US4892193 *Mar 13, 1989Jan 9, 1990Gregg ThomasExpanded plastic packaging system for substantially planar objects
US4953705 *Jan 23, 1989Sep 4, 1990Psychopax LimitedPackage having detent-engaged cushioning lining
US4986419 *Jan 13, 1989Jan 22, 1991Bonneville International CorporationPackaging for point of sale display, shipment and storage of cassette recordings and methods
US5014849 *Feb 5, 1990May 14, 1991Conductive Containers, Inc.Electro-static protective container for electrical components
US5115915 *May 24, 1989May 26, 1992Harris Charles CShipping container including foamed-in-place block
US5378096 *Dec 9, 1993Jan 3, 1995Shippers Paper Products CompanyCollapsible and expandable void filler
US5395191 *Jun 20, 1994Mar 7, 1995Shipper Paper Products CompanyCollapsible and expandable void filler
US5469691 *Jun 2, 1993Nov 28, 1995Resource America, Inc.Process for recycling a shipping container
US5522539 *Dec 16, 1994Jun 4, 1996Bradford CompanyTote box with block insert locking capability
US5538779 *Oct 10, 1995Jul 23, 1996The Dow Chemical CompanyPolyetherurethane from methylene diphenyldiisocyanate
US5595338 *Dec 2, 1994Jan 21, 1997Abler; Frederick F.Reusable container for a stack of coins
US5685431 *Feb 27, 1996Nov 11, 1997L & S Bearing Co.Packaging system for clutch sets
US5794414 *Apr 5, 1996Aug 18, 1998Re-Source America I.P., Inc.Recycle shipping assembly
US6131376 *Jun 3, 1998Oct 17, 2000Re-Source America IpRecycle shipping assembly
US6189330Jan 6, 1999Feb 20, 2001Campbell Soup CompanyContainer, system and process for shipping and storing food products and method for recycling shipping and storage containers
US6817471 *Oct 12, 2001Nov 16, 2004Brookstone Purchasing, Inc.Display container
DE4243508A1 *Dec 22, 1992Jun 23, 1994Werzalit Ag & CoPackage for merchandise with base and lid
DE10026999A1 *May 31, 2000Feb 21, 2002Oetting KunststoffentwicklungsStackable packing system for electrical goods comprises collapsible rectangular frame, lid and base, both of which have fixings which hold assembled frame in place, forming box
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/523, 206/433
International ClassificationB65D81/02, B65D81/107
Cooperative ClassificationB65D81/025, B65D15/04
European ClassificationB65D15/04, B65D81/02B
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Nov 20, 1987AS06Security interest
Owner name: SECURITY PACIFIC BUSINESS CREDIT INC., 140 EAST 45
Owner name: WELLS FARGO BUSINESS CREDIT, (A CA. CORP.)
Effective date: 19870703
Nov 20, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: SECURITY PACIFIC BUSINESS CREDIT INC., 140 EAST 45
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:WELLS FARGO BUSINESS CREDIT, (A CA. CORP.);REEL/FRAME:004789/0422
Effective date: 19870703
Aug 16, 1985ASAssignment
Owner name: EFP ACQUISITION CORPORATION, 223 MIDDLETON RUN ROA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:EFP CORPORATION, A CORP. OF IN.;REEL/FRAME:004444/0061
Effective date: 19850802
Owner name: EFP CORPORATION
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:EFP ACQUISTION CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004444/0058
Effective date: 19850801
Aug 16, 1985AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: EFP ACQUISITION CORPORATION, 223 MIDDLETON RUN ROA
Owner name: EFP CORPORATION, A CORP. OF IN.
Effective date: 19850802
Aug 16, 1985AS01Change of name
Owner name: EFP ACQUISTION CORPORATION
Effective date: 19850801
Owner name: EFP CORPORATION
Aug 12, 1985AS06Security interest
Owner name: EFP ACQUISITION CORPORATION, A CORP OF DE
Owner name: EFP SOUTH CORPORATION, A CORP OF AL
Effective date: 19850802
Owner name: WELLS FARGO BUSINESS CREDIT, XEROX BUILDING, STE.
Aug 12, 1985ASAssignment
Owner name: WELLS FARGO BUSINESS CREDIT, XEROX BUILDING, STE.
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:EFP ACQUISITION CORPORATION, A CORP OF DE;EFP SOUTH CORPORATION, A CORPOF AL;REEL/FRAME:004441/0501
Effective date: 19850802