Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3750961 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 7, 1973
Filing dateJul 16, 1971
Priority dateJul 16, 1971
Publication numberUS 3750961 A, US 3750961A, US-A-3750961, US3750961 A, US3750961A
InventorsFranz N
Original AssigneeFranz N
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Very high velocity fluid jet nozzles and methods of making same
US 3750961 A
Abstract
A very high velocity fluid jet nozzle comprised of a heavy walled vitreous body defining a jet orifice circular in cross section and substantially greater in length than the cross sectional diameter thereof, the orifice being defined by a smooth surface blending into an entry chamber defined by the vitreous body, the nozzle being made by a process including the steps of pressurizing the bore of a heavy walled vitreous capillary tube, softening a portion of the tube so as to form a chamber therein, and severing the tube at the chamber and at points spaced from the chamber.
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

11:11:60 States Patent 1191 1111 3,750,961

Franz 1 Aug. 7, 1973 [54] VERY HIGH VELOCITY FLUID JET 1,042,323 10/1912 Clal'kson 239/602 X NOZZLES AND METHODS OF MAKING 1,837,339 12/1931 Schlick 1 239/D1G. l9 SAME 3,009,655 11/1961 Palmer 1 239/600 X 3,120,284 2/1964 Goodwin 239/600 [76] Inventor: Norman C, Franz, Apt, 902, 4620 3,633,828 1/1972 Larson 239/600 X W. 10th Ave., Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada Primary Examiner-M. Henson Wood, Jr.

Assistant Examiner-John J. Love [22] Fxled' July 1971 Attorney- Frank s Troidl Robert R. Paquin et a1. [21] Appl. No.: 163,435

Related 11s. Application Data [571 ABSTRACT [63] Continuation Of Ser. N0. 875,726, Nov. 12, 1969, A high "F Y fluid jet "P comprised of abandone heavy walled v1treous body definmg a jet orifice circular in cross section and substantially greater in length 1521 11.5.01. 239/600, 239/596 than the cross sectional diameter thereof, the i i 151 111: c1 B05b 1/00 being defined y a Smooth Surface blending into an 58 Field of Search 239/589, 590, 591, entry Chamber defined y the vitreous body, the nozzle 239/596 600 601 being made by a process including the steps of pressur- V izing the bore of a heavy walled vitreous capillary tube,

[56] References Cit d softening a portion of the tube so as to form a chamber UNITED STATES PATENTS therein, and severing the tube at the chamber and at oints s a ed from the chamber. 2,508,874 5 1950 Turnbull 239 591 x p p C 3,202,360 8/1965 OBrien 15 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures PATENIEW SHEEI 1 0f 2 INVENTOR NORMAN c. FRANZ ATTORNEYS W \v 350 50 x h FIG. 6

I INVENTOR NORMAN C. FRANZ %W%W)I%M ATTORNEYS VERY IIIGH VELOCITY FLUID JET NOZZLES AND METHODS OF MAKING SAME This application is a Continuation of Application Ser. No. 875,726 filed Nov. 12, 1969, now abandoned.

This invention relates to fluid jet nozzles and methods of making the same and, more particularly, to improved high velocity fluid jet nozzles and improved methods of making the same.

Heretofore, various methods and apparatus have been proposed for cutting, piercing, separating or otherwise penetrating various materials such as precipitation-hardening stainless steels, titanium and titanium alloys, high strength alloy steels, wood, cardboard and various other materials by means of a supersonic jet of liquid initially pressurized to thousands of atmospheres of pressure and subsequently discharged through a nozzle at supersonic velocities. Representative methods and apparatus are disclosed, for example, in US. Pat. Nos. 2,985,050 and 3,212,378 and in the applicants co-pending application, Ser. No. 733,495, filed May 31, I968, now U.S. Pat. No. 3,524,367. In apparatus of the indicated character, difficulties have been encountered in obtaining satisfactory nozzles capable of forming coherent high velocity fluid jets. For example, heretofore, small nozzles adapted to be used at relatively low pressures have been machined from such materials as sapphire to obtain orifice jewels which have been utilized in spray guns, and small glass nozzles have been drawn for low pressure applications such as are encountered in electro-chemical machining. Nozzles for use with driving pressures in excess of ten thousand pounds per square inch have also been proposed, these last mentioned prior nozzles having been machined from metal alloys and sintered materials. However, the aforementioned nozzles have been unsatisfactory when efforts have been made to utilize such nozzles for forming coherent very high velocity fluid jets by initially pressurizing a working liquid to thousands of atmospheres of pressure and discharging the pressurized fluid through the nozzle. Experimentation has shown that nozzles for obtaining coherent high velocity jets should have a throat length that is much greater than the orifice diameter and that the nozzle orifice should have a large smoothly blended entry into the throat portion, a perfectly circular transverse cross section, a very smooth surface finish and a sharp edged exit. Optimization of the aforementioned characteristics becomes increasingly critical as driving pressures increase and/or orifice diameters decrease. Prior nozzles formed by the removal of material, as for example, those formed from sapphires, metal and sintered materials are extremely difficult and expensive to fabricate into the required configurations. On the other hand, while good configurations have been obtained with prior drawn nozzles, as for example, those formed from glass, such prior drawn nozzles tend to shatter under high driving pressures, have a very short useful life, and are difficult to mount in suitable holders.

An object of the present invention is to overcome the aforementioned as well as other disadvantages in prior nozzles of the indicated character and to provide improved fluid jet nozzles and methods of making the same which enable the development of very high velocity jets of fluid displaying great coherence upon exit from the nozzle orifice.

Another object of the invention is to provide improved high velocity fluid jet nozzles and improved holders therefor which are economical to manufacture and assemble, durable, efficient andreliable in operation.

Another object of the invention is to provide improved high velocity fluid jet nozzles and nozzle assemblies for use in producing high velocity fluid jets by the employment of driving pressures in excess of 70,000 pounds per square inch.

Another object of the invention is to provide improved high velocity fluid jet nozzles which may be easily and inexpensively fabricated and which may be utilized to generate fluid jets of excellent quality exhibiting good coherence at high velocities.

Another object'of the invention is to provide an improved method of making nozzles having orifices as small as 0.002 inches in diameter and operable at driving pressures of 70,000 pounds per square inch or greater to provide high velocity fluid jets for use in cutting, piercing, separating or otherwise penetrating various materials.

The above as well as other objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the following descripti0n, the appended claims and the accompanying drawing.

FIG. 1 is an enlarged cross sectional view .of a high velocity fluid jet nozzle embodying the present invention, showing the same installed in a nozzle assembly embodying the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a longitudinal view, with portions broken away, illustrating one step in the method of making the nozzle illustrated in FIG. I;

FIG. 3 is a longitudinal view illustrating another step in the method of making the nozzle illustrated in FIG.

FIG. 4 is a sectional view of the nozzle illustrated in FIG. 1 showing the same removed from the nozzle assembly;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view of another embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 6 is a sectional view of apparatus which may be employed in practicing the present invention;

FIG. 7 is a sectional view of the apparatus illustrated in FIG. 6, showing the same during another step in a method employing the present invention; and

FIG. 8 is a sectional view of still another embodiment of the invention.

Referring to the drawings, one embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIG. 1 thereof and is comprised of a nozzle assembly, generally designated 10, which is particularly adapted for use in producing very high velocity fluid jets and may be used, for example, in apparatus of the types disclosed in "the aforementioned United States Letters Patent and in practicing the methods disclosed in the aforementioned co-pending application of the applicant, although it will be understood that the present invention is applicable to other uses.

As shown in FIG. 1, the nozzle assembly 10 is comprised of a high pressure tubular member 12 which may be formed of steel or other suitable material having sufficient strength to withstand the high fluid pressures exerted thereon. The tubular member 12 defines an inlet passageway 14 which may be connected to a suitable source of pressure (not shown). The periphery of the end portion of the tubular member 12 is provided with a frusto-conical surface 16 adapted to mate with a complementary tapered surface 18 provided in a bore 20 defined by a nozzle holder 22. The tapered surfaces 16 and 18 provide a fluid tight connection between the tubular member 12 and the holder 22 and at the same time permit assembly and disassembly of the tubular member 12 and the holder 22. It will be understood that other means may be utilized to connect the tubular member 12 to the holder 22, as for example, the connecting means disclosed in the applicants co-pending application entitled Means for Sealing Fittings and Nozzle Assemblies at Extremely High Fluid Pressures.

The nozzle holder 22 is also preferably made of steel or other suitable material having sufficient strength to withstand the pressures exerted thereon and defines a reduced diameter outlet passageway 24 the inner end of which communicates with the bore 20 and the outer end of which communicates with'a flared outlet 26.

A tubular retaining member 28 is provided which is positioned within the bore 20, the retaining member preferably being formed of vinyl or other semi-rigid material. As shown in FIG. 1,the nozzle assembly also includes a precision nozzle 30 which may be formed from heavy wall glass capillary tubing of close dimensional tolerances such as round bore thermometer tubing and marine barometer tubing. It will be understood that the nozzle 30 may be formed of other vitreous materials such as quartz or alumina. The body of the nozzle 30 is preferably circular in transverse cross section and defines an entry chamber 32 communicating with an elongate throat 34, the length of the throat 34 being substantially greater than the diameter of the throat and having a smoothly blended entry with the chamber 32. The chamber 32 and throat 34 are preferably circular in transverse cross section and have a very smooth surface finish. The diameter of the throat 34 may be as small as 0.002 inches but is shown enlarged in the drawings for purposes of clarity. The exit end 36 of the throat 34 terminates in a sharp edged exit 38 as shown in FIGS. 1 and 4, while the chamber 32 is coaxially aligned with the bore 14 of the tubular member 12 and communicates with the bore of the holder 22. The nozzle 30 is positioned within the bore 40 of the tubular retaining member 28 in closely fitting relationship therewith, but as shown in FIG. 1, the nozzle 30 and retaining member 28 are not either directly or indirectly threadedly or otherwise rigidly affixed to the nozzle holder 22.

In this embodiment of the invention the end 42 of the nozzle 30 and the end 44 of the retaining member 28 are firmly seated on one side ofa ring shaped gasket 46 capable of deforming to effect a fluid tight seal under pressure without extruding. The left side of the gasket 46, as viewed in FIG. 1, bears against the shoulder 48 on the holder 22 defining the end of the bore 20. The gasket 46 may be formed of cellulose acetate composite or other suitable material having the desired characteristics. With such a construction, under fluid pressure, the nozzle 30 seats itself and seals in the zone of the gasket 46 due to area differential principles.

In operation, fluid such as water initially pressurized to thousands of atmospheres of pressure, for example, 70,000 pounds per square inch, flows through the inlet passageway 14 of the tubular member 12 and into the bore 20 defined by the holder 22. The highly pressurized fluid enters the chamber 32 of the nozzle 30 and issues from the throat 34 in the form ofa coherent high velocity fluid jet traveling at supersonic velocity. The nozzle 30 is throughout this operation held seated on the gasket 46 by the highly pressurized fluid supplied against the rearward or right hand (as viewed in FIG. 1) end of the nozzle 30; and, as during the operation the nozzle 30 is virtually surrounded by the fluid pressure, the internal forces and stresses remain low thereby preventing shattering of the glass nozzle when it is subjected to the extremely high fluid pressures.

The present invention also contemplates an improved method of making the nozzle 30 illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 4. In accordance with the present invention a length of heavy wall glass capillary tubing 50 of close dimensional tolerances, such as round bore thermometer tubing or marine barometer tubing, is closed at one end with a suitable plug 52, as illustrated in FIG. 2, and slight air pressure is applied through the bore 54 of a tube 56 to the other end of the bore 58 of the capillary tubing 50. Careful heating of a short portion of the tubing 50 softens the vitreous material permitting a spindle shaped bubble to form which may be drawn out as shown in FIG. 3 to form the chamber 60 while maintaining approximately the original outside diameter of the tubing. Separation of the tubing at the bubble chamber 60 and at undisturbed adjacent points of the tubing yields the nozzles 30 and 130 as shown in FIGS. 4 and 5. The shape of the nozzle 30 illustrated in FIG. 4 results when the tubing is cut completely through while the shape of the nozzle 130 shown in FIG. 5 displaying a short projection 62 results when the exit end of the nozzle is cut to form a circumferential groove after which the small core of vitreous material is fractured. The embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIG. 5 has the advantage of producing an ample flat surface or shoulder 64 for subsequent sealing while producing a clean sharp edged exit 138 from the throat 134 of the nozzle 130.

Another method of making high velocity fluid jet nozzles is illustrated in FIGS. 6 and 7 wherein the heavey wall capillary tubing 50 is inserted into a forming die defining a flared bore 72 of the desired configuration. The bore 58 of the capillary tubing 50 is then plugged and pressurized in the manner previously described and the portion of the capillary tubing within the forming die 70 is heated. The pressurized and heated capillary tubing is then expanded to fill the bore of the die 70 as illustrated in FIG. 7 to form the nozzle 230. Such method provides control of the bore contour and allows the diameter of the throad 234 to be enlarged a predetermined amount by providing clearance 74 between the outside diameter of the tubing and the forming die 70 prior to expansion.

The method described in connection with FIGS. 6 and 7 may also be used to produce expansion nozzles 330 of the type illustrated in FIG. 8. Such nozzles have an entry chamber 332 smoothly blending with a minimum diameter throat portion 334, the throat portion 334 in turn smoothly blending with a diverging expansion portion 336 and may be produced by heating a pressurized thick walled capillary tubing in a forming die having the desired configuration.

While nozzles of the types illustrated in FIGS. 1, 4, 5, 7 and 8 may be formed from commercially available glass capillary tubing, it will be understood that such nozzles may be formed of other materials such as quartz or alumina.

Fluid jets developed by nozzles embodying the present invention and made in accordance with the above described methods display great coherence upon exit from the nozzle orifice capable of effectively piercing, cutting, separating or otherwise penetrating materials of the type hereinbefore described. It has also been found that nozzles embodying the present invention and made in accordance with the above described methods are capable of withstanding driving pressures in excess of seventy thousand pounds per square inch without shattering when assembled in nozzle assemblies as hereinbefore described.

While preferred embodiments of the invention and methods of making the same have been illustrated and described, it will be understood that varoius changes and modifications may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. In a nozzle assembly, the combination including a holding element defining a bore and a reduced diameter outlet passageway communicating with said bore, a nozzle disposed in said bore, said nozzle including a heavy walled body formed of vitreous material and defining an elongate capillary orifice circular in cross section and substantially greater in length than the corss sectional diameter thereof, said orifice being defined by a smooth surface and at an end blending into an enlarged entry chamber communicating with said bore at one end of said nozzle body, said orifice being throughout its length of lesser cross sectional diameter than said chamber and the end of said orifice remote from said chamber terminating at the other end of said body in a sharp edged exit and communicating with said outlet passageway, a tubular retaining member disposed in said bore end encompassing said nozzle body, and an annular sealing member surrounding said outlet passageway and bearing against said other end of said nozzle body, said nozzle body being free of rigid connection to said holding element to be maintained in seating relationship with said annular sealing member by fluid pressure applied at said one end of said nozzle body. said one end of said nozzle body.

2. The combination as set forth in claim 1, wherein said sealing member bears against said holder.

3. The combination as set forth in claim 1, wherein said retaining member is formed of a semi-rigid mate rial.

4. The combination as set forth in claim 1, wherein said retaining member is formed of vinyl material.

5. The combination as set forth in claim 1, wherein said nozzle body has an annular shoulder adjacent said sharp edged exit.

6. The combination as set forth in claim 1, wherein said body is formed of glass.

7. The combination as set forth in claim 1, wherein said sealing member bears against said holder, said nozzle body has an annular shoulder against said sharp edged exit, and said retaining member is formed of semi-rigid material.

8. The combination as set forth in claim 7, wherein said retaining member is formed of vinyl material.

9. The combination as set forth in claim 7, wherein said body is formed of glass.

10. The combination as set forth in claim 1, wherein said nozzle body is not rigidly affixed to said holder.

11. In a nozzle assembly, the combination including a holding element defining a bore and a reduced diameter outlet passageway communicating with said bore, a nozzle disposed in said bore, said nozzle including a heavy walled body formed of vitreous material and defining a elongate capillary orifice circular in cross section and substantially greater in length than the cross sectional diameter thereof, said orifice being defined by a smooth surface and blending into an enlarged entry chamber communicating with said bore at one end of said nozzle body, the end of said orifice remote from said chamber terminating at the other end of said body in a sharp edged exit and communicating with said outlet passageway, a tubular retaining member disposed in said bore and encompassing said nozzle body and an annular sealing member surrounding said outlet passageway and bearing against said other end of said nozzle body, said nozzle body being free of rigid connection to said holding element to be maintained in seating relationship with said annular sealing member by fluid pressure applied at said one end of said nozzle body.

12. In a nozzle assembly, the combination including a holding element defining a bore and an outlet passageway communicating with said bore, a nozzle disposed in said bore and comprising a nozzle body provided with nozzle passage means, said nozzle passage means being adapted to receive fluid at one end of said nozzle body and communicating with said outlet passageway at another end of said nozzle body, a tubular retaining member disposed in said bore and encompassing said nozzle body, and an annular sealing member surrounding said outlet passageway and bearing against said another end of said nozzle body, said nozzle body being free of rigid connection to said holding element to be maintained in seating relationship with said annular sealing member by fluid pressure applied at said one end of said nozzle body.

13. The combination as set forth in claim 12, wherein said nozzle is in closely fitting relationship with said tubular retaining member, and said tubular retaining member is free of rigid connection to said holding elemeat.

14. The combination as set forth in claim 12, wherein said ends of said nozzle body are opposite ends thereof, said outlet passageway is of smaller transverse dimensions than said bore, and said nozzle passage means terminates at said other end of said body in a sharp edged exit.

15. The combination as set forth in claim 14, wherein said nozzle is in closely fitting relationship with said tubular retaining member, and said tubular retaining member is free of rigid connection to said holding element.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1042323 *May 5, 1911Oct 22, 1912Alfred ClarksonNozzle.
US1837339 *Mar 1, 1930Dec 22, 1931Schlick GustavAtomizing nozzle
US2508874 *Feb 9, 1946May 23, 1950American Wheelabrator & EquipmCasting screw threads on blast nozzles and the like
US3009655 *Jan 18, 1960Nov 21, 1961John E PalmerSpray nozzle devices
US3120284 *Aug 17, 1959Feb 4, 1964Globe Oil Tools CoJet nozzle for drill bit
US3202360 *Jun 17, 1963Aug 24, 1965Spraying Systems CoSpray head
US3633828 *Jan 19, 1970Jan 11, 1972Graco IncSpray gun
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3997111 *Sep 22, 1975Dec 14, 1976Flow Research, Inc.Liquid jet cutting apparatus and method
US4131236 *Dec 17, 1976Dec 26, 1978The British Hydromechanics Research AssociationHigh velocity liquid jet cutting nozzle
US4150794 *Jul 26, 1977Apr 24, 1979Camsco, Inc.Liquid jet cutting nozzle and housing
US4892463 *Sep 9, 1988Jan 9, 1990Deutsche Gesellschaft Fur Wiederaufarbeitung Von Kernbrennstoffen MbhRail mounted ejector
US5052624 *Dec 1, 1989Oct 1, 1991Possis CorporationUltra high pressure water cleaning tool
US5125425 *Feb 27, 1991Jun 30, 1992Folts Michael ECleaning and deburring nozzle
US5199640 *Sep 16, 1991Apr 6, 1993Ursic Thomas AShock mounted high pressure fluid jet orifice assembly and method of mounting fluid jet orifice member
US5226597 *Dec 16, 1992Jul 13, 1993Ursic Thomas AOrifice assembly and method providing highly cohesive fluid jet
US5251817 *Sep 16, 1991Oct 12, 1993Ursic Thomas AOrifice assembly and method providing highly cohesive fluid jet
US5314545 *May 14, 1992May 24, 1994Folts Michael EMethod of cleaning an internal access opening by a nozzle with wearing contact
US5670112 *Aug 3, 1995Sep 23, 1997Dynamic Mixer, Inc.Multiphase matter introduction with a plasticating screw arrangement
US5945061 *Jun 17, 1997Aug 31, 1999Csongor; Desider G.Method of input for a plasticating machine through a jewel orifice
US6491233Dec 22, 2000Dec 10, 2002Chrysalis Technologies IncorporatedVapor driven aerosol generator and method of use thereof
US6501052Dec 22, 2000Dec 31, 2002Chrysalis Technologies IncorporatedAerosol generator having multiple heating zones and methods of use thereof
US6516796Jan 7, 2000Feb 11, 2003Chrysalis Technologies IncorporatedAerosol generator and methods of making and using an aerosol generator
US6557552Nov 15, 2000May 6, 2003Chrysalis Technologies IncorporatedAerosol generator and methods of making and using an aerosol generator
US6568390Sep 21, 2001May 27, 2003Chrysalis Technologies IncorporatedDual capillary fluid vaporizing device
US6640050Sep 21, 2001Oct 28, 2003Chrysalis Technologies IncorporatedFluid vaporizing device having controlled temperature profile heater/capillary tube
US6681769Dec 6, 2001Jan 27, 2004Crysalis Technologies IncorporatedAerosol generator having a multiple path heater arrangement and method of use thereof
US6681998Dec 22, 2000Jan 27, 2004Chrysalis Technologies IncorporatedAerosol generator having inductive heater and method of use thereof
US6701921Dec 22, 2000Mar 9, 2004Chrysalis Technologies IncorporatedAerosol generator having heater in multilayered composite and method of use thereof
US6701922Dec 20, 2001Mar 9, 2004Chrysalis Technologies IncorporatedMouthpiece entrainment airflow control for aerosol generators
US6715487May 7, 2003Apr 6, 2004Chrysalis Technologies IncorporatedDual capillary fluid vaporizing device
US6715701 *Jan 14, 1999Apr 6, 2004Nitinol Technologies, Inc.Liquid jet nozzle
US6779746Aug 20, 2002Aug 24, 2004Terydon, Inc.Nozzle for use with high pressure fluid cutting systems having arcuate sides
US6799572Dec 22, 2000Oct 5, 2004Chrysalis Technologies IncorporatedDisposable aerosol generator system and methods for administering the aerosol
US6804458Dec 6, 2001Oct 12, 2004Chrysalis Technologies IncorporatedAerosol generator having heater arranged to vaporize fluid in fluid passage between bonded layers of laminate
US6814316 *Aug 20, 2002Nov 9, 2004Terydon, Inc.Two-piece nozzle assembly for use with high pressure fluid cutting systems and bushing for use therewith
US6883516Oct 19, 2001Apr 26, 2005Chrysalis Technologies IncorporatedPreparing solution of first component in liquid component such that after volatilization of liquid by passing solution through flow passage while heating, aerosol is formed having predetermined particle size distribution of first component
US6932285 *Jun 16, 2000Aug 23, 2005Omax CorporationOrifice body with mixing chamber for abrasive water jet cutting
US7077130Dec 7, 2001Jul 18, 2006Chrysalis Technologies IncorporatedDisposable inhaler system
US7117867May 15, 2003Oct 10, 2006Philip Morris UsaAerosol generator and methods of making and using an aerosol generator
US7128067Mar 24, 2003Oct 31, 2006Philip Morris Usa Inc.Method and apparatus for generating an aerosol
US7163014Sep 29, 2004Jan 16, 2007Philip Morris Usa Inc.Disposable inhaler system
US7173222Oct 24, 2002Feb 6, 2007Philip Morris Usa Inc.Aerosol generator having temperature controlled heating zone and method of use thereof
US7237308Jun 10, 2004Jul 3, 2007North Carolina State UniversityComposite hydroentangling nozzle strip and method for producing nonwoven fabrics therewith
US7367334Aug 27, 2003May 6, 2008Philip Morris Usa Inc.Fluid vaporizing device having controlled temperature profile heater/capillary tube
US7373938Jul 14, 2004May 20, 2008Philip Morris Usa Inc.Disposable aerosol generator system and methods for administering the aerosol
DE2544129A1 *Oct 2, 1975Apr 8, 1976Flow Research IncSchneidvorrichtung und -verfahren mit verwendung eines fluessigkeitsstrahls
DE3436424A1 *Oct 4, 1984Apr 10, 1986Straub Johannes Prof Dr IngDevice for producing highly superheated free liquid jets
EP0146252A2 *Nov 5, 1984Jun 26, 1985Flow Industries Inc.Leak-proof, high pressure, high velocity, fluid jet cutting nozzle assembly
EP0160353A1 *Jan 23, 1985Nov 6, 1985Inventive Machine CorporationPressurized abrasive cleaning device
EP0430858A2 *Nov 30, 1990Jun 5, 1991Possis CorporationNozzle assembly for ultra-high pressure water
EP0437168A2 *Dec 21, 1990Jul 17, 1991Possis CorporationCutting head for waterjet cutting machine
EP0602301A1 *Feb 5, 1993Jun 22, 1994Thomas A. UrsicOrifice assembly and method providing highly cohesive fluid jet
WO2000071261A1 *May 2, 2000Nov 30, 2000Aschacher LotharHigh-pressure injection nozzle
WO2004025101A1 *Sep 12, 2003Mar 25, 2004Spraying Systems CoGas turbine power augmenting spray nozzle assembly
WO2004076071A1 *Feb 23, 2004Sep 10, 2004Ales CharvatNozzle assembly
WO2007006509A1 *Jul 7, 2006Jan 18, 2007Max Planck GesellschaftNozzle assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/600, 239/596
International ClassificationB05B1/10, B24C5/04, B05B1/00, B24C5/00, B05B1/02
Cooperative ClassificationB05B1/10, B05B1/00, B24C5/04
European ClassificationB05B1/10, B05B1/00, B24C5/04