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Publication numberUS3751620 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 7, 1973
Filing dateDec 30, 1971
Priority dateMar 10, 1970
Publication numberUS 3751620 A, US 3751620A, US-A-3751620, US3751620 A, US3751620A
InventorsT Yuasa
Original AssigneeYuasa Battery Co Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electric garment
US 3751620 A
Abstract
An electric garment having heating elements on the inside surface of the garment, the heating elements connecting to a power source outside the garment through a cord so as to generate heat from the elements. The heating elements comprise an electroconductive fabric knitted of a chemical fiber and a metallic fiber coated on the surface of the fabric with an electroconductive agent prepared from a mixture of thermosetting resin, carbon powder and metal powder, the heating element being further covered with a spongelike heat retaining layer having independent bubbles.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Yuasa 1 Aug. 7, 1973 [5 1 ELECTRIC GARMENT 3,102.1 8/1963 Owcrs 219/529 x 2,873,352 21959 F 2i) 2 Inventor: Teruhlsa Yllasa, Takatsuki, Japan h i H Assigneez Yuasa B tt y C p y Li it d 3,293,405 12/1966 Costanzo t 219/21] Osaka prefficture Japan 7 3,400,254 9/l968 Takemori I, 2l9/543 X [22] Filed: Dec. 30, 1971 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 1 pp No; 214 498 546,812 7/1942 Great Britain 2l9/2ll Related Application Data Primary ExaminerC L Albritton [63] Cmtlijnuaton of Ser. No. 99,833, Dec. 21, 1970, y Watson CO-le.Grindle & Watson 3. an one [30] Foreign Application Priority Data 57 ABSTRACT Mar. 10, 1970 Japan 45 2333? An electric garment having heating elements on the [52] U S Cl 219/211 219/527 338/211 side surface of the garment, the heating elements con- 338/224 338/225 necting to a power source outside the garment through [51] HOSb 1/00 a cord so as to generate heat from the elements. The [58] Field 527 529 heating elements comprise an electroconductive fabric 338/21 1 224 308 knitted of a chemical fiber and a metallic fiber coated l28/379 382 2/2 2 1 on the surface of the fabric with an electroconductive 6 agent prepared from a mixture of thermosetting resin, carbon powder and metal powder, the heating element [56] References Cited being further covered with a spongelike heat retaining UNITED STATES PATENTS layer having independent bubbles.

1,963,554 6/1934, McDill 219/545 X 3 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures PAIENEDAUE 7 W FIG.|

FIG.3

IN-VENTOR:

A MRNEY ELECTRIC GARMENT This is a continuation of application Ser. No. 99,833, filed Dec. 2l, 1970, now abandoned.

This invention relates to a cold protection garment, and more particularly to an electric garment for use in protection from cold by incorporating heating elements into a garment and subjecting the heating elements to generation of heat through electric energy.

The cold protection garment heretofore used in cold districts was of the type in which cotton flock or rayon flock was stuffed between the outer fabric and regular lining of fur or synthetic fiber and was sewn together. But the garments of this type are all designed to keep the temperature of the human body, and have to worn one over another in layers to prevent the transpiration of body heat in a colder climate, and accordingly they are not free from the disadvantage in that the wearer of such a garment is deprived of his quick and easy actions. Furthermore, it may be easy to keep the body warm, but in the case of keeping hands and feet warmv it does not answer the purpose merely to wear one garment over another. Consequently, it is all the more problematic how to keep those regions warm and the type of garments conventionally used has much to be desired as a cold protection garment in that it cannot prevent the frequentoutbreak of frost-bite in frigid districts.

This invention, in view of. the disadvantages of the kind described, has incorporated heating elements into a garment. p

A primary objectof this invention is to provide an electric garment,th'at is thin, yet capable of fully protecting a wearer from cold.

Another object of the invention is to provide a flexible and functional electric garment for cold protection.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide a low-priced electric garment for cold protection.

A detailed description of this invention in one form will be made with reference to'the accompanying drawing in which:

FIG. 1 is a front elevation, broken in part, of an electric garment according to this invention;

FIG. 2 is a front elevation, broken in part, of an embodiment of the inventionin a glove;

FIG. 3 is a front elevation, broken in part, of an embodiment of the invention in a sock; and

FIG. 4 is an enlarged longitudinal sectional front elevation showing the structure of a heat ing element used in the invention. i

, Referring now to FIG. 1, a garment-lismade of a synthetic resin fiber such as polyamide resin or of fur or the like and is a one-piece type. The garment is designed to put on and'off by means of a zip fastener.

This garment is of the construction in which pockets 2 are formed atseveral points in the regular lining and heating elements 3 are inserted in'the pockets 2 or of the construction in which the heating elements are inserted between the outer fabric and the regular lining and sewn thereto so as to prevent movement therebetween. The heating elements are each provided adjacent to their side edges with two small holes 4 and the small holes 4 of other heating elements adjacent to said heating elements are electrically connected to said small holes 4 by means of lead wires 5. Each of the heating elements, as shown in FIG. 4, is made into the clothlike form of .aknitted fabric of a thickness of about 0.5 mm alternately knitted of chemical fiber such as vinyl chloride and metallic fiber on a knitting machine, and coated on the surface with an electroconductive agent prepared from a mixture of thermosetting resin such as epoxy resin and carbon powder and metal powder such as silver powder, whereby the whole of each heating element is formed into a platelike form about 1.5 mm in overall thickness. Also, the heating element is covered on the entire surface with a spongelike heat retaining layer 6 made of polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, rubber, etc. as a chief material and having independent bubbles. As the heat retaining layer is excellent in insulating property, the heating element can sufficiently obtain a cold protection effect with a small amount of heating.

As shown in FIG. 1, when four heating elements in all are used on the upper, lower, left and right portions of the garment, the small holes 4 formed on each heating element are connected by wires 5 to each other, and the last small holes are connected to a cord 7 which is in turn connected to a power source. The cord 7 is connected to both poles of the power source of a cell, battery or the like. The heating elements described above are conected in series but they may be connected in parallel. Furthermore in the drawing, the heating elements 3 are shown as being provided at four places, upper, lower, left, and right, on the front part of the garment, but they may be positioned additionally in the rear part, i.e., on the back part of the garment. In short, the number of the heating elements provided may depend upon the amount of current to be supplied thereto so as to freely control the heating temperature for obtaining optimum temperature.

Referring now to FIG. 2, in which the invention is embodied in a glove, the glove is made of a synthetic resin fiber or leather, and the heating element 3 cov ered with a heat retaining layer is mounted on the inside of the glove and lead wires 5 taken out from the I element 3 are connected through a snap terminal to the power source.

FIG. 3 shows the invention in another form in which it is embodied in a sock. The cold protection sock is knitted of a synthetic resin fiber and the heating element 3 covered with the heat retaining layer is mounted on the inside bottom of the sock and is connected through the cord 7 to the power source.

This heating element is designed to depend-upon a cell'for its portable power source. Namely, when the cell is used, the heating element is enabled to be heated to temperatures in the range of 40 to 60C, which provides an optimum temperature while walking or working out of doors. Also, when riding ona motor cycle or the like, the use. of a 12 voltbattery mounted on the motor cycle as a power source could make the heating elements produce temperatures in the range of to C at the power consumption of 28.9 W and thus could sufficiently protect the rider from even temperatures below zero in the open air.

Since the invention .can dispense with bulkiness as a garment for protection from a cold climate, it has a characteristic feature in that work efficiency can be raised by wearing the garment in the districts where it is extremly cold. Also, the use of socks can not only protect the workman from cold-bite but also, when used in bed, sleeping with the socks on can provide a simple method of keeping warmth. Also, the heating element is readily flexible and free from breaking, and therefore very easy of handling. It should be undera coating on the surface of said fabric, said coating being an electroconductive agent prepared from a mixture of thermosetting resin, carbon powder and metal powder, said heating elements being further covered with a spongelike heat retaining layer having independent bubbles.

2. An electric garment according to claim 1 characterized by gloves being used as the garment.

3. An electric garment according to claim 1 characterized by socks being used as the garment.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1963554 *Jan 4, 1933Jun 19, 1934Mcdill Rex DResistor and process of making same
US2277772 *Mar 8, 1941Mar 31, 1942Us Rubber CoElectricallly heated wearing apparel
US2873352 *Jun 17, 1957Feb 10, 1959Vincraft IncWaterproof plastic heating pad
US3102186 *Jun 15, 1961Aug 27, 1963Dreamland Electrical ApplianceElectric blankets
US3293405 *Sep 13, 1965Dec 20, 1966Raphael J CostanzoElectrically heated footwear
US3400254 *Jul 18, 1966Sep 3, 1968Takemori HiroshiElectric heating device for mounting inside a fabric covering
GB546812A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4186294 *Apr 5, 1978Jan 29, 1980Bender Joseph MRadiant therapeutic heater
US4303074 *Jun 11, 1979Dec 1, 1981Pascal & AssociatesMethod for applying therapeutic heat
US4514620 *Sep 22, 1983Apr 30, 1985Raychem CorporationFor self-regulating heaters for freeze protection
US4534998 *May 24, 1982Aug 13, 1985Hughes Aircraft CompanyCarbon black, wetting agent, thermosetting resins sprayed and cured
US4633068 *Feb 15, 1984Dec 30, 1986Flexwatt CorporationElectrical heating device
US4665301 *Oct 28, 1985May 12, 1987Larry BondyHeated insert for boots
US4700054 *May 17, 1985Oct 13, 1987Raychem CorporationElectrical devices comprising fabrics
US4845343 *Nov 28, 1988Jul 4, 1989Raychem CorporationElectrical devices comprising fabrics
US5008517 *Sep 8, 1989Apr 16, 1991Environwear, Inc.Electrically heated form-fitting fabric assembly
US5032705 *Sep 8, 1989Jul 16, 1991Environwear, Inc.Electrically heated garment
US6078025 *Jun 3, 1999Jun 20, 2000Yeung; Chiu ManArticle of clothing
US6329638Sep 11, 2000Dec 11, 2001Vicky W. BloodworthHeating vest system
US6727469 *Nov 22, 2002Apr 27, 2004April F. ParkerHeated booty
US7693580Feb 4, 2005Apr 6, 2010Ct Investments Ltd.Radiant therapeutic wrist heating pad
US7777156Mar 7, 2007Aug 17, 2010Mmi-Ipco, LlcElectric heating/warming fabric articles
US7783361Sep 3, 2004Aug 24, 2010Ct Investments Ltd.Radiant therapeutic heater
US7816628Nov 22, 2006Oct 19, 2010Products Of Tomorrow, Inc.Heated garment
US8084722 *Sep 16, 2005Dec 27, 2011Haas William SControllable thermal warming devices
US8170685Sep 1, 2005May 1, 2012Ct Investments Ltd.Radiant therapeutic heating apparatus
US20090289046 *May 26, 2009Nov 26, 2009Simon Nicholas RichmondHeated Garment
US20110046703 *Aug 18, 2009Feb 24, 2011Chien-Chou ChenHeating device for low voltage thermal therapy
US20120018418 *Sep 30, 2011Jan 26, 2012Shantha Todata RTemperature controllable shoes
WO1985003832A1 *Feb 15, 1985Aug 29, 1985Flexwatt CorpElectrical heating device
WO1995033358A1 *May 19, 1995Dec 7, 1995Du PontHeating fabric and articles made therefrom
WO2001041593A2 *Dec 5, 2000Jun 14, 2001Milliken & CoHeated garment
WO2005123405A2 *Jun 3, 2005Dec 29, 2005William J HaasControllable thermal warming devices
WO2006024938A2 *Sep 1, 2005Mar 9, 2006Ct Invest LtdRadiant therapeutic heating apparatus
WO2006113918A2 *Apr 21, 2006Oct 26, 2006Satish N ChandraFlexible electrically conductive circuits
Classifications
U.S. Classification219/211, 338/225, 219/527, 338/224, 338/211
International ClassificationA43B7/02, H05B3/34
Cooperative ClassificationH05B3/342, A43B7/025, H05B2203/036, H05B2203/013, H05B2203/017
European ClassificationH05B3/34B, A43B7/02B