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Publication numberUS3752362 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 14, 1973
Filing dateDec 16, 1971
Priority dateDec 16, 1971
Publication numberUS 3752362 A, US 3752362A, US-A-3752362, US3752362 A, US3752362A
InventorsRisener G
Original AssigneeRisener G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liquid handling method and apparatus
US 3752362 A
Abstract
A liquid handling method and apparatus wherein the apparatus includes an outer container having an open top, a closed disposable inner liner containing a predetermined amount of the liquid positioned within the outer container and having a top capable of being ruptured, and a cover for securing over the outer container, the cover having means to rupture the top of the inner liner to provide a means of withdrawing the liquid.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Risener [451 Aug. 14, 1973 LIQUID HANDLING METHOD AND APPARATUS [76] Inventor: George A. Risener, 5675 Rosewell Road, N. E., Apt. 47 E, Atlanta, Ga. t 30342 [22] Filed: Dec. 16, 1971 [211 App]. No.: 208,856

[52] US. Cl. 222/85, ZZZ/400.7 [51] Int. Cl. B67b 7/24 [58] Field of Search ...222/81-85, 86, 88, 325, 400.7

A liquid handling method and apparatus wherein the apparatus includes an outer container having an open top, a closed disposableinner liner containing a predetermined amount of the liquid positioned within the outer container and having a top capable of being ruptured, and a cover for securing over the outer container, the cover having means to rupture the top of the References Cited inner liner to provide a means of withdrawing the liq- UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,710,239 4/1929 Paulson ZZZ/83.5 9 Claims, 2 Drawing Figures 48 44 II I Q (/7 /V I 1 1 27 /9 /5 2/ 2o Patented Aug. 14, 1973 3,752,362

{L FIG2 1 LIQUID HANDLING METHOD AND APPARATUS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a handling system for storing, transporting, and dispensing a liquid which is more particularly adapted to a carbonated liquid.

Transfer tanks are utilized in the beverage industry for storing, transporting and dispensing of a particular liquid, such as beer or syrup or pre-mix. The liquid within the container is usually carbonated, but additional carbonation from an outside source is necessary to enable the dispensing of the liquid from the container.

Typically, the containers are stainless steel, five gallon cylindrical tanks having an inlet for the pressurized gas and an outlet for the liquid. A dispensing mechanism is usually attached to the liquid outlet for incremental removal of the liquid. When the liquid has been evacuated from the container, it is returned to its point of origin where it is cleaned out and reused.

There are a number of drawbacks with these types of transfer tanks. The major disadvantage is their high cost which is primarily due to their being constructed of stainless steel. Also, their recycling period is relatively short. It is estimated that a tank will last for approximately fifty uses or about two years. This short life span is the result of mishandling in transport, use, and in the cleaning stages. This short life span necessitates the construction of around one million new tanks a year.

Many devices, such as the beverage dispenser disclosed in US. Pat. No. 3,195,779 issued on July 20, 1965 to Stanley Nicko, have been developed in the past to overcome these difficulties, but they have proven to be inadequate.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Briefly described, the present invention includes a three-portion liquid handling apparatus. The first portion is a rigid outer cylindrical container which has a closed bottom and an open top. A spring-biased positioning member is disposed within the container on its bottom. The second portion of the apparatus is a disposable inner liner containing the particular beverage or liquid which is positioned within the container in engagement with the spring-biased member. The liner has a top with two penetrable sealing elements disposed therethrough, one sealing element for the entry of pressurized gas from an outside source and the other element for the exit of the liquid from the liner. The third portion of the apparatus is a closure member which is adapted to be secured over the open top of the outer container. The closure member has a lower end surface provided with depending, hollow, perforate puncture elements in alignment with the sealing elements so that when the closure member is secured to the outer container, the puncture elements rupture the respective sealing elements to allow entry of the pressurized gas into the inner liner and to allow withdrawal therefrom of the liquid.

It is therefore a primary object of the present invention to provide a new and improved liquid handling method and apparatus.

Another object of this invention is to provide a liquid handling method and apparatus which utilizes an inner liner for a liquid which can be disposed of when the liquid has been withdrawn therefrom.

A further object of this invention is to provide a liquid handling apparatus employing a disposable inner liner with penetrable sealing elements disposed through its top for liquid exit and pressurized gas entry.

Another object of this invention is to provide a closure member for a liquid handling apparatus which is adapted to be secured over an outer container and having a lower surface with depending rupture elements for penetrating the liquid exit sealing element and the pressurized gas entry sealing element on the top of a disposable inner liner containing the liquid which is positioned within the outer container.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a liquid handling apparatus which eliminates any need for cleaning maintenance since the liquid is contained within a disposable liner.

An object of the present invention is to provide a liquid handling apparatus which eliminates the need of returning any portion thereof to the liquid production plant for liquid refill.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a liquid handling apparatus comprising a disposable inner liner for the liquid having a liquid conduit depending from the top of the liner into the liquid and formed as an integral part of the liner.

An object of the present invention is to provide a liquid handling apparatus with a closure member provided with means for attaching thereto a liquid dispensing means for withdrawing the liquid from the tank and a means for regulating the entry into the tank of pressurized gas from an outside source to provide pressure for dispensing the liquid.

An object of the present invention is to provide a liquid hanling apparatus which employs a handling inner liner within which the liquid is stored and transported and which is secured within a container adapted to dispense the liquid when it is desired to withdraw the liquid.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a liquid handling apparatus which is economical to manufacture, reliable in operation and is durable.

Still other objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent after reading the accompanying description of the selected illustrative embodiment of the invention with refemece to the attached drawing wherein like reference characters have been used to refer to the like parts throughout the figures of drawing, and wherein:

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is an exploded perspective view of the present invention; and

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional elevational view of the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE ILLUSTRATIVE EMBODIMENT The liquid handling apparatus 10 comprises an outer container 11, an inner liner 12 and a top closure member 13. The outer container 11 has a cylindrical side wall 14, an integrally formed bottom wall 15 and an open top 16. The side wall 14 and bottom wall 15 define an inner chamber 17. A first locking means comprising threads 18 are circumferentially disposed around a portion of the side wall 14 adjacent the top 16. The container 11 is preferably constructed of a rigid material, such as stainless steel.

Disposed within chamber 17 is a positioning means for the liner 12 and comprises a convex-shaped dish or engaging element 19 with an annular flange 20 depending from its outer perimeter. Secured to the underside of the dish 19 is a helical coiled spring 21. The spring 21 is not secured to the bottom wall 15 so as to allow the dish' 19 to be freely rotatable within the chamber 17.

The liner 12 has a cylindrical side wall 22 with a diameter which is slightly less than the inner diameter of container 11 so that the liner 12 fits snugly within chamber 17. The liner 12 has a bottom end 23 with an annular depending flange 24 upon its perimeter. Bottom end 23 has a convex cross-sectional shape which is complementary to the shape of dish 19. The liner 12 is further provided with a top 25 which has an upwardly projecting annular flange 26 upon its perimeter.

Side wall 22 is fixedly secured to bottom wall 23 and top 25 by return bending or crimping the lower and upper ends of the wall 22 upon the annular flanges 24 and 26, respectively. This crimping thus provides the liner 12 with an annular bottom ring 27 and an annular top ring 28. The construction of the liner 12 provides for a secure fitting if there is an increase in pressure within the interior of the liner 12.

The side wall 22, bottom wall 23 and top 25 are preferably constructed of layers of cardboard fibers, rope or cording, and wax. Additionally, the inner surfaces of the liner 12 have a foil layer (not shown) for sanitary purposes.

Disposed through openings 29 and 30 in the top 25 are frangible sealing elements 31 and 32 adapted to be penetrated by means which are discussed in detail hereinafter. These elements 31 and 32 are constructed of a resilient material, such as rubber or soft plastic, and are scored or notched on their tops by X-shaped marks 31a and 320, respectively. Sealing element 31 is for the exit of liquid from the inner liner l2 and sealing element 32 is for the entry into the liner 12 from an outside source of pressurized gas, such as carbon dioxide. Each element 31 and 32 is substantially in the form of a circular plug having an annular peripheral groove or collar portion 33 for receiving the top 25 of liner 12 around the corresponding openings 29 and 30. Annular flanges 34 and 35 project outwardly from elements 31 and 32 above and below grooves 33 for retaining the elements 31 and 32 in their respective openings 29 and 30. To aid in insertion of the elements 31 and 32 into openings 29 and 30, the lower portion of the elements 31 and 32 is in the form of a downward tapering, beveled, frustoconical surface 36 adjacent lower flange 35. Surface '37 is provided on the tops of the elements 31 and 32 which project above surface 25, with surface 37 having a bev-- eled, frustoconical shape which tapers upwardly from flange 34. Preferably, the grooves 33 are of a slightly larger outside diameter than openings 29 and 310 so that the elements 31 and 32 are compressed when inserted into their respective openings 29 and 30. In this manner, the elements 31 and 32 form a liquid-tight and gastight seal with the corresponding opening.

The elements 31 and 32 are shown in FIG. 2. as having a one-piece body, but it is understood that they could also be constructed with an imperforate diaphragm or frangible member axially disposed within the elements 31 and 32 in alignment with the grooves 33. Another embodiment of the apparatus 10 could be that top 25 is constructed totally of a frangible material, thereby eliminating the necessity of elements 31 and 32 or their like.

Depending from the bottom end of the surface 36 is a liquid conduit 38, preferably a plastic tube, with an outer diameter which is approximately equal to the diameter of 33. The conduit 38 is cut off at its lower end adjacent the bottom end 23 along a diagonal or inclined surface 39 so as to conform to the slope of bottom end 23.

The closure member 13 is preferably constructed of a rigid material such as stainless steel and comprises an annular outer ring 40 whose inner diameter is slightly greater than the outer diameter of container 1 1. Axially disposed midway within the ring 40 is a top portion 41 with a top surface 42 and a bottom surface 43. A U- shaped groove 44 is circumferentially disposed through the bottom surface 43 adjacent the exterior of ring 40. The width of groove 44 is slightly greater than the combined widths of side wall 14 and top ring 28. The depth of groove 44 is sufficient to fully encompass the top ring 28 so that bottom surface 43 and top 25 are in engaging relationship to form a gas-tight and liquid-tight seal when the closure member 13 is secured over container 11. On the outer wall surface of the groove 44 adjacent to the exterior of ring 40 there is provided a second locking means comprising threads 45 which are complementary to threads 18 on the container 11. It is understood that the locking means could be of any suitable'design, such as clamps or latches.

The bottom surface 43 is further provided with frustoconical-shaped openings 46 which are in alignment with sealing elements 31 and 32 and are of sufiicient dimensions to be complementary to surface 37 on the sealing elements 31 and 32 so as to fully engage and surround the portions of the elements 31 and 32 which project above the top 25.

Disposed through top portions 41 in alignment with openings 46 are openings 47 and 48. Opening 47 is of a larger diameter than opening 48 and is adapted to receive therethrough a rupture or penetrating means for withdrawal of the liquids within liner 12. The liquid rupture means comprises an elongated, hollow, cylindrical tube 49 with an inwardly tapering bottom portion 50 which terminates in a sharp end point 51. Disposed through bottom portion 50 adjacent point 51 are a plurality of openings 52. The portion of the tube 49 which projects above surface 42 is provided with circumferentially extending threads so that the tube 49 may be secured into position by means of a bolt 53. Opening 48 is adapted to receive a rupture or penetrating means which is similar in design to tube 47, i.e., a tube 54 with bottom portion 55, end point 56, openings 57 and being secured into position by bolt 58. It is understood, of course, that tubes 48 and 54 could be of the same dimensions.

As shown in FIG. 1, the top of tube 49 has positioned thereon a piece of plastic tubing 59 which is provided with a double flanged top portion 60 for ready connection of the tube 49 to any liquid dispensing means not shown) which is familiar to the beverage industry. Tube 54 is adapted to receive thereon a suitable pressure regulator means (not shown) to control the flow of carbon dioxide from an outside source (not shown) through tube 54 into the inner liner 12.

OPERATION The apparatus 10 can be adapted for the dispensing of substantially all liquids, including beer, but will be described with reference to the fountain beverage industry. The liner 12 can be fabricated at the beverage filling plant since it can come from the manufacturer without the bottom 23 or top 25 inserted into position. The side wall 14 can be collapsed for easy storage until it is utilized. Once assembled, liner 12 is a rigid construction. It is also understood that another embodiment of liner 12 could be that it is formed in a onepiece design, preferably constructed of a plastic-type material, having a frangible top or having frangible sealing elements therethrough.

The liquid introduced into the liner 12 can be in syrup form or can be a pre-mix. Both of these liquids contain carbonation so that when the liner 12 is filled with the liquid substantially to the level as shown in FIG. 2 and the top 25 is securely inserted, a gas head develops within the space between the liquid top and the top 25. This is usually a -pound head pressure for a syrup when the liquid reaches room temperature. With the top inserted, a gas-tight and liquid-tight container is thus formed for the liquid. if desired, a flat troughed band suitable for crimping can be placed over top ring 28 to insure a proper seal. The liquid can be transported to and stored at its point of destination until such time as it is desired to withdraw the liquid.

At such withdrawal time, the liner 12 is placed within chamber 17 so that the bottom ring 27 engages the top surface of bottom wall 15 and the underside of bottom 23 engages the top of dish 19. The positioning means thus acts as a safety mechanism in that if the liner 12 is accidentally dropped within chamber 17 instead of ,being gently placed therein, the spring-biased dish 19 cushions the liner 12 to prevent its rupture.

The closure member 13 is then positioned over the container 1 1 such that the points 51 and 56 are in alignment with the scores or notches 31a and 32a on the top surface 37 of the sealing elements 31 and 32 and are in stressing engagement with same. The closure member is then firmly and steadily pushed downward to that tubes 49 and 54 rupture or penetrate through sealing elements 31 and 32, respectively. The ring 40 is then turned so as to secure closure member 13 over container 11 by means of threads 18 and 45. As the closure member 13 is rotated, the liner 12 also rotates within chamber 17 since the rupture means has pierced the sealing elements 31 and 32. The freely rotatable dish 19 aids in the rotation of the liner 12.

When the closure member 13 is fixedly secured over container 11, the tubes 49 and 54 will have fully penetrated their respective sealing elements 31 and 32 so that openings 52 are located within the liquid conduit 38 and openings 57 are located over the liquid surface, as shown in FIG. 2. At this time, the liquid dispensing means can be attached to tubing 59 and the pressure regulating means can be secured to tube 54.

Carbon dioxide is introduced into liner 12 through tube 54 and openings 57 to provide pressure for dispensing the liquid. The liner is so constructed so as to withstand from 40-60 pounds per square inch of pres sure, 40 p.s.i. needed to remove beverage syrup and 60 p.s.i. necessary to withdraw a pre-mix from the liner 12. The liquid travels up through conduit 38 into openings 52, out tube 49 and into the dispensing means to incrementally deliver the liquid.

It can therefore be seen that the apparatus 10 provides for a new and improved liquid handling system which is particularly useful in the beverage industry. Since the liquid is contained within liner 12, there is no need for recycling the container 11 back through the liquid filling plant as is now done with the present transfer tanks which do not employ an inner liner. The liquid can be stored in, transported within and dispensed from the same liner l2 and when the liquid has been completely withdrawn, the liner 12 can be thrown away and a new liner 12 can be inserted within container 11. It may be possible to adapt present transfer tanks to the present invention by removing their tops, mounting securing means thereon and thus form a container 11.

The present invention may be modified in the details of the construction without departing from the inventors concept which is set out in varying scope in the ap pended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. An apparatus for dispensing liquid comprising in combination, a first cylindrical container having an open top and a closed bottom, a second cylindrical container adapted to be snugly received in said first container so as to provide a liner therefor, said second container having a closed top provided with two spaced frangible sealing elements, a liquid conduit depending from one of said sealing means to a point adjacent the bottom of said second container and a closure means adapted to be sealingly secured over the top of said first container and having a plurality of depending rupture means adapted to beplaced in registry with said frangible sealing means and when pressed downwardly on said sealing means, to rupture them, said rupture means comprising pointed tubular elements, one of which, after such rupture, will be placed in communication with the interior of said liquid conduit, while the other will be placed in communication with the top portion of said second container, to provide a passage for introducing gas under pressure to expel liquid from said second container.

2. Apparatus as in claim 1 wherein each of said sealing elements is provided with a central marking to facilitate proper positioning of said rupture means with re spect to said sealing elements.

3. Apparatus as in claim 1 wherein said second container has a bottom closure which is outwardly concave and inwardly convex and said liquid conduit has an open lower end which is cut off on an incline so that it generally parallels the inner surface of said bottom closure.

4. Apparatus as in claim 3, further including a dishshaped member fitted between the concave bottom surface of the second container and the bottom of the first container and having its convex outer surface fitting snugly within said concave bottom surface and a compression spring bearing against the bottom of said first container and the interior of said dish-shaped member for cushioning said second container in said first container and for permitting free rotational movement of said second container in said first container.

5. Apparatus as in claim 4 including means for firmly holding said closure means in position and said first container.

6. Apparatus as in claim 5 wherein said lastmentioned means comprises engaging screw threads on said closure and container.

7. Apparatus as in claim 6 wherein said sealing means comprise plugs of elastic material which are compressed and inserted into openings in the top wall of walls of said second container are crimped together to provide an annular ring and said closure means is provided with a downwardly opening groove which embraces said ring and the upper edge of the wall of the first container when said closure and containers are in assembled condition.

* IF J!

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1710239 *Jun 3, 1925Apr 23, 1929Paulson Leo BMilk-can-containing pitcher
US3374927 *May 19, 1967Mar 26, 1968Olympia Brewing CompanyTapping arrangement for containers
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4362256 *Jan 25, 1980Dec 7, 1982Polasek Randolph JBeverage dispenser
US4440319 *Jul 21, 1981Apr 3, 1984Nitchman Harold LSystem, apparatus, and method of dispensing a liquid from a semi-bulk disposable container
US4491247 *Apr 2, 1982Jan 1, 1985Nitchman Harold LSystem, apparatus, and method of dispensing a liquid from a semi-bulk disposable container
US4501383 *Sep 2, 1982Feb 26, 1985Iannelli Frank MUsed in a beverage dispensing machine
US4531656 *Apr 22, 1983Jul 30, 1985Nitchman Harold LSystem, apparatus and method of dispensing a liquid from disposable container and a container therefor
US4558823 *Mar 2, 1984Dec 17, 1985Regina CorporationSpotting control and trigger assembly
US4570856 *Mar 2, 1984Feb 18, 1986Regina CorporationLiquid and detergent mixing chamber and valves
US4575007 *Mar 2, 1984Mar 11, 1986Regina CorporationMixing control for water and cleaning fluid
US4676287 *Apr 16, 1986Jun 30, 1987The Regina Company Inc.Cartridge and docking port for a cleaning device
US4678101 *Jul 25, 1985Jul 7, 1987Nitchman Harold LDispensing container closure
US4712740 *Mar 17, 1986Dec 15, 1987The Regina Co., Inc.Venturi spray nozzle for a cleaning device
US7063238 *Jun 28, 2002Jun 20, 2006Robert HaleCartridge ejector for a beverage dispensing machine
US8016000Apr 19, 2006Sep 13, 2011W. R. Grace & Co.-Conn.Processes and systems for transferring particulate substances from containers
US8307859Jul 27, 2011Nov 13, 2012W. R. Grace & Co.-Conn.Processes and systems for transferring particulate substances from containers
US8307861Jul 27, 2011Nov 13, 2012W R Grace & Co -Conn.Processes and systems for transferring particulate substances from containers
CN101679015BMay 27, 2008Feb 27, 2013皇家飞利浦电子股份有限公司Self supporting closed beverage container containing low-carbonate beverage
EP0070699A2 *Jul 16, 1982Jan 26, 1983Harold L. NitchmanApparatus and method of dispensing a liquid from a semi-bulk disposable container
EP2528852A1 *Jan 24, 2011Dec 5, 2012Lancer CorporationMethod and apparatus for beverage dispensing
WO2008146240A2May 27, 2008Dec 4, 2008Koninkl Philips Electronics NvPaper-based beer container and dispensing apparatus therefor
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/85, 222/400.7
International ClassificationB67B7/48, B67D1/08, B67B7/00, B67D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB67D1/0802, B67D1/0829, B67D1/08, B67D1/0801
European ClassificationB67D1/08A2, B67D1/08B, B67D1/08, B67D1/08A