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Publication numberUS3752548 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 14, 1973
Filing dateJun 7, 1971
Priority dateJun 7, 1971
Publication numberUS 3752548 A, US 3752548A, US-A-3752548, US3752548 A, US3752548A
InventorsBetts P
Original AssigneeBrowne Co Morse
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Molding
US 3752548 A
Abstract
This is a molding or splashback for counter tops which is extruded of a suitable plastic and includes a panel, a foot at the base of the panel, and a flexible anchor flange depending downwardly from the rear of the foot for insertion between a closely spaced wall and counter top. A toe projects forwardly and slightly downwardly from the front of the foot for engaging the counter top surface. A shoulder depends rearwardly from the top of the panel for abutting engagement with a wall.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Betts Aug. 14, 1973 [73] Assignee: Browne Morse Co., Muslgegon,

Mich.

22] Filed: June 7,1971

21 Appl.No.: 150,581

Related US. Application Data [63] Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 83,860, Oct. 26,

52 us. Cl. 312/1404 51 1m. 01. A47b 96/18, A47f 9/00 [58] Field of Search 812/1404, 137, 140.1; 52/287,288, 29o; 108/27 [56] References Cited 5 UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,613,309 10/1952 Frere 52/287 X 2,646,326 7/1953 Stanitz 108/27 2,845,666 8/1958 Knapp 52/287 3,302,350 2/1967 Brown et a1. 52/287 3,321,878 5/1967 Brown et al. 52/288 X 3,464,177 9/1969 Amato 52/287 FOREIGN PATENTS 0R APPLICATIONS 1,317,930 H1963 France .L 52/287 1,279,333 ll/1961 France 52/288 409,340 10/1966 Switzerland 52/287 Primary Examiner-Paul R. Gilliam Attorney-Price, Heneveld, l-luizenga & Cooper ABSTRACT This is a molding or splashback for counter tops which is extruded of a suitable plastic and includes a panel, a foot at the base of the panel, and a flexible anchor flange depending downwardly from the rear of the foot for insertion between a closely spaced wall and counter top. A toe projects forwardly and slightly downwardly from the front of the foot for engaging the counter top surface. A shoulder depends rearwardly from the top of the panel for abutting engagement with a wall.

In one embodiment, the panel is recessed to define an outwardly opening channel. An electrical outlet panel, having spaced electrical outlets, fits into the channel.

In another embodiment, the panel includes apertures through which outlets project. A channel-shaped member carrying outlets and wiring snaps into position on the back of the panel with its outlets projecting through the panel apertures.

Finally, an adapter clip can be secured to a wall adjacent the floor to facilitate using the molding as a floor-board molding. A portion of the anchor flange is trimmed away and is embraced by an upwardly projecting base flange on the adapter clip.

19 Claims, 13 Drawing Figures PATENTED we 14 I875 SHEEIIBFS PAIENTEnAuc 14 ms sum 2 or 5 'FIGJS" INVENTOR. P901 557715 mmmw: :4 ma A 3; 752.548 SNEEI 3 0f 5 FIG. 9.

BY W

MOLDING RELATED APPLICATIONS This application is a continuation-in-part of US. Pat. Application, Ser. No. 83,860, entitled SPLASI-IBACK.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to moldings generally and to splashbacks for counter tops. Splashback moldings are commonly used in. laboratory and kitchen environments to prevent spilled liquids and the like from running off the back of a counter top, between a wall and the counter.

In the prior art, one of the most common splashback moldings, particularly for laboratory applications, com- 15 prises a rigid upstanding member which is secured to a counter top by screws or bolts extending upwardly from beneath the counter top into the splashback. Caulking is then applied at the junction between the top of the molding and the wall to give the counter a unitary, built-in appearance. Caulking is particularly necessary in view of the fact that the rigid molding member will not followthe slight irregularities and contours of the wall. There are a number of drawbacks to this particular molding, including the fact that it is extremely expensive to install. It is expensive to manufacture, since the counter top must be especially made for securing with the molding member. The necessity for caulking renders the system non-portable, since moving the counter and molding would leave a bead of caulking along the wall which would be difficult to remove. If the floor begins to settle, the molding will tend to tear away from the wall and an unsightly crack between the molding and the caulking will result. Finally, it must be specially cut to accommodate electrical outlets positioned just above the counter.

A second alternative available in the prior art is to first install a counter top, and then secure an elongated splashback molding to the wall and to the counter top by means of mastic. One of the most significant drawbacks to this method is that it is extremely hard to get a good seal at the counter top, without resorting to additional caulking. Secondly, such a system is extremely messy to install since a considerable quantity of mastic is required to insure proper anchoring of the splashback. Finally, as in the above prior art systems, the system lacks portability and the molding will tend to separate either from the wall or from the counter top as the floor on which the counter rests settles.

A third prior art alternative is to build a molding onto the counter top which is not at all secured to the wall. While such a unit is extremely portable, it lacks the attractive built-in look. Additionally, such a specially adapted counter top is a good deal more expensive than a counter top for which no special molding has to be incorporated.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In the present invention, a molding is provided hav ing an elongated panel, a foot at the base of the panel for engaging a counter top, and an anchor flange projecting downwardly from the rear of the foot for positioning between a closely spaced counter and a wall. By sandwiching the anchor flange between the counter top and the wall, the molding is held firmly in place without the need for excessive quantities of mastic or caulking. While a limited use of mastic might be desirable where portability is not a key factor, the anchoring facility provided by this invention greatly reduces the necessity for such application and greatly facilitates installation.

In its preferred embodiment, the downwardly depending anchor member is resilient and must be resiliently deformed for insertion between the counter top and the wall. In yet another aspect of this invention, the foot includes a flexible, forwardly projecting toe portion for resiliently engaging the counter top. This insures that there will be a tight fit between the molding and the counter top without a need for the use of excessive quantities of mastic or caulking.

It is also contemplated that adjacent moldings can be joined together by means of spaced recesses on the rear of the panels which open towards one another for embracing a connector plate. In this manner, the splashbacks can be extruded in reasonable length and can then be joined on location when necessary.

Another feature of the invention is a shoulder which projects rearwardly from the top of the panel for abutting a wall. This shoulder projects. rearwardly a distance slightly greater than does the foot in order to insure a tight fit against the wall. Because the panel is flexible, the shoulder will tend tojfollow the contour of the wall, and the need for any great amount, if any, of caulking is eliminated. a

In yet another aspect of the invention, the panel is recessed to define an outwardly opening channel. Into this channel is inserted an electrical outlet panel having a plurality of spaced electrical outlets.

As a result of this invention, the need for special counter tops and fastening members for securing a splashback to a counter top are eliminated. Yet, the molding is firmly anchored by its anchor member being sandwiched between a counter and a wall. The splashbacks can be installed after the counters have been installed. Because there is no need for screw holes in the molding, it can be made of less material to thereby effectuate an economy in manufacture.

The molding can also be readily installed with a minimum amount of mastic being necessary. The need for less mastic also renders this system amenable to portability. Indeed, if a particularly fast changing environment is contemplated, the molding can be used with absolutely no mastic at all.

Finally, the molding can be used as a floorboard molding by using it in conjunction with a special adapter clip. The molding is made with a shorter anchor flange and the clip includes an upwardly projecting base flange for embracing the anchor flange. An upper flange on the clip projects upwardly to embrace a downwardly depending shoulder flange on the moldmg.

These and other objects and advantages of this invention will be seen and understood by reference to the specification and appended drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a cross section of the splashback;

FIG. 2 is a cross section of the splashback installed between a counter top and wall;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary rear view of adjacent splashbacks joined together;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a counter having a splashback installed thereon;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of an alternative embodiment of this splashback;

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional view of an alternative embodiment of the invention having intelligence for receiving an electrical outlet channel;

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view of the molding of FIG. 6 with the electrical outlet panel inserted therein;

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of the alternative embodiment of the invention shown in FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a rear, elevational view showing the means for joining the alternative embodiment molding of FIGS. 6, 7, and 8 to the molding of FIG. 1;

FIG. 10 is a cross-sectional view of another alternative embodiment of the molding in conjunction with an adapter clip; and

FIG. 11 is a front elevational view of the adapter clip.

FIG. 12 is a perspective view of an alternative embodiment of the splash buck;

FIG. 13 is a cross section of the FIG. 12 embodiment installed between a counter top and wall.

PREFERRED EMBODIMENT In the preferred embodiment, the splashback molding 1 includes a panel 10 having a foot 20 at the base thereof for engaging the top surface of a counter top 3 (FIGS. 1 and 2). An anchor member 30 depends downwardly from the rear of foot 20 for insertion between a closely spaced counter top 3 and wall 4. A shoulder 40 projects rearwardly from the top of panel 10 for abutment with wall 4. Adjacent splashback moldings 1 can be joined together by means of a connector plate 50 as shown in FIG. 3. Installation is achieved by positioning a counter 2 close to wall 4, and then inserting anchor 30 of splashback 1 into the space therebetween (FIGS. 2 and 4).

Splashback molding 1 is preferably extruded of a plastic such as polyvinyl chloride, polypropylene, or polyethylene. Generally, any of the group of extrudable plastics, well-known in the art, can be used in this invention. Preferably, the plastic material used will render splashback 1, or at least specific portions thereof, flexible and resilient. For specific environments, such as laboratories, the plastic can be chosen with specific properties in mind, such as acid resistance.

Panel 10 includes a front face 11 and a rear face 12 (FIG. 1). A top lip flange 13 and a bottom lip flange 14 project rearwardly from the rear face 12 of panel 10. Top lip 13 defines a downwardly opening recess 15 while bottom lip 14 defines an'upwardly opening recess 16. These cooperate to embrace a connector plate 50 which facilitate the joining of adjacent splashbacks 1 (FIG. 3).

Panel 10 terminates at foot whixh extends laterally to the front and to the rear of panel 10 (FIGS. 1 and 2). Toe 21 extends forwardly and downwardly from the front of foot 20 and comprises that portion of foot 20 which actually abuts counter top 3 (FIG. 2). Toe 21 is flexible and resilient such that when splashback 10 is pushed downwardly onto counter top 3, toe 21 engages counter top 3 in a resilient manner to insure a tight seal between toe 21 and counter top 3.

Splashback molding is held in place primarily through the action of anchor member 30 which projects downwardly from the rear of foot 20 (FIGS. 1 and 2). Anchor member 30 comprises a flange which is preferably oriented at an acute angle to the vertical. It is resilient and flexible such that it can be resiliently deformed for insertion between counter top 3 and wall 4. It is important that anchor flange 30 be resiliently deformable and that such deformation is necessary in order to insert anchor 30 between counter top 3 and wall 4. Thus, anchor 30 is at an acute angle to the vertical, and it must be bent towards the vertical in order to insert it between counter top 3 and wall 4. Its resiliency then insures that anchor 30 will be held tightly between counter top 3 and wall 4 and that accordingly, splashback 1 will be held firmly in place.

It is preferable that in addition to being resiliently deformable, anchor 30 is resiliently deformable in such a manner that it holds shoulder 40 tightly against wall 4. Thus, anchor 30 depends downwardly and rearwardly at an acute angle to the vertical and away from the plane of panel 10. In this manner, when it is forced towards a vertical plane for insertion between counter top 3 and wall 4, its resiliency will result in a force being applied at shoulder 40 in a direction opposite to that in which anchor 30 has been bent. Thus, shoulder 40 will be forced tightly against wall 4.

The acute angle of anchor 30 to the vertical must be sufficiently large that substantial pressure will be applied at the junction of shoulder 40 with wall 4. On the other hand, it cannot be so large that cracking or tearing of anchor 30 at its junction with foot 20 will occur as a result of its being bent towards a vertical plane. In the preferred embodiment, the acute angle is approximately 25.

The front face 31 of anchor 30 is at least partially serrated at 33 (FIGS. 1 and 2). These serrated portions engage the edge of counter top 3 to aid in holding splashback I firmly in place. Similarly, anchor 30 terminates at a rearwardly projecting heel portion 34 which is serrated at 35 (FIGS. 1 and 3). The serrations 35 engage wall 4 to further aid in holding splashback 1 securely in place (FIG. 2).

Shoulder 40 extends rearwardly from the top of panel 10 and a smooth nose 41 defines the surface of the junction therebetween (FIGS. 1 and 2). Serrations 42 extend along the rear face of shoulder 40 to facilitate a gripping engagement with wall 4 (FIGS. 1, 2, and 3). In operation, particularly where portability is not essential, it may be desirable to apply a limited amount of mastic to the serrated rear face 42 of shoulder 40 in order to insure a tight fit against wall 4. If this is not done, shoulder 40 may eventually separate slightly from wall 4 as the plastic in flexed anchor 30 begins to lose its memory.

In order to join adjacent splashbacks l, a connector plate 50 can be slipped into position within the facing, spaced recesses defined by top lip flange 13 and bottom lip flange 14 at adjacent ends of the splashbacks (FIG. 3). Connector plate 50 insures proper alignment of the adjacent panels 10.

FIG. 5 shows an alternative embodiment 5 of the splashback which is similar to splashback molding 1 in that it includes a similar panel 10, foot 20, and anchor 30. However, it includes a shoulder 60, projecting rearwardly from the top of panel 10, which is different from shoulder 40, primarily because it includes an upwardly projecting front rib 61 at its front side and an upwardly projecting rear rib 62 at its rear side. The back face 63 of rear rib 62 is partially serrated in order to form a grip with wall 4. These upwardly projecting ribs 61 and 62 make a small tray shelf out of shoulder 60 whereby it can be used to store bottles of liquid or the like. The front and rear ribs 61 and 62, respectively, prevent any liquid which is spilled from pouring onto the counter top. Front rib 61 is also instrumental in preventing bottles from rattling off the front of shoulder 60.

Alternative embodiment molding 7 is similar to splashback molding 1, in that it also includes anchor flange 30 and foot 20 (FIGS. 6, 7, and 8). However, its upwardly projecting face panel 80, which corresponds to face panel 10, has a recessed deviation therein defining a channel 90 (FIG. 6). The purpose of channel 90 is to embracingly receive electrical outlet panel 110 (FIGS. 7 and 8) whereby molding 7 acts not only as a splashback molding but also as a source of electrical oulets for the laboratory or kitchen work surface.

Channel 90 comprises a back wall 91 and a top wall 92 and a bottom wall 93 projecting forwardly therefrom and joining panel 80 (FIG. 6). Top wall 92 includes a downwardly projecting top rib 94, and bottom wall 93 includes an upwardly projecting rib 95. Ribs 94 and 95 cooperate with electrical outlet panel 110 to hold it in place (FIG. 7).

Electrical outlet panel 110 comprises a front wall 111, a rearwardly projecting top flange 1 12, and a rearwardly projecting bottom flange 113 (FIG. 7). The distance between top flange 112 and bottom flange 113 is approximately equal to the width of channel 90. Top flange 112 includes a deviation therein defining a downwardly opening groove 114 which cooperates with downwardly projecting rib 94. Similarly, bottom flange 113 includes a deviation therein defining an upwardly opening groove lwhich cooperates with upwardly projecting rib 95 of bottom wall 93. Channel 90 is sufficiently deep that it holds electrical outlet panel 110 with its face wall 111 approximately flush with the face of panel 80.

Electrical outlet panel 110 includes a plurality of electrical outlets 116 therein (FIGS. 7 and 8). Electrical outlets 116 are spaced at intervals along the length of electrical outlet panel 110. Finally, electrical wiring 117 runs through channel 90 to provide the necessary circuitry for electrical outlets 116.

Due to the presence of channel 90 projecting rearwardly from panel 80, the connector plates 50 which are used to join adjacent abutting segments of molding 1 cannot be used to join abutting segments of alternative embodiment molding 7. Rather, electrical outlet panels 110 are cut and spaced such that a single electrical outlet panel 110 extends from one segment of molding 7 to another. This effectively joins abutting molding 7 together.

However, where it is desired to abut an alternative embodiment molding 7 with a molding 1', a special connector plate 120 is utilized (FIG. 9). Connector plate 120 is C-shaped, having a bite portion 121 and a pair of laterally extending legs, i.e., top leg 122 and base leg 123. When connector 120 is used to join molding 1 to alternative embodiment molding 7, bite portion 121 is positioned behind molding 1 while laterally projecting top leg 122 and bottom leg 123 are positioned behind molding 7. As with molding 1, alternative embodiment 7 includes a top lip flange 13 defining a downwardly opening recess 15 and a bottom lip flange 14 defining an upwardly opening recess 16 (FIG. 6). Thus, while bite portion 121 fits beneath and is embraced by top lip flange 13 and bottom lip flange 14 of molding 1, top leg 122 fits beneath top lip flange 13 of alternative embodiment molding 7 and bottom leg 123 fits beneath bottom lip flange 14 of alternative embodiment 7. The gap between top let 122 and bottom leg 123 is wider than the height of channel such that top leg 122 and bottom leg 123 are disposed on either side of channel 90 when connection between molding l and molding 7 is effectuated.

Finally, the shoulder of molding 7, which corresponds to shoulder 40 of molding l, is somewhat different in configuration, than shoulder 40 (FIG. 6). Whereas shoulder 40 of molding l is somewhat thicker in cross section than the cross section of panel 10, the cross section of the various walls forming shoulder 100 is approximately the same as the cross section of panel 80 and the walls of channel 90. This makes the entire molding 7 easier to extrude. Thus, shoulder 100 in eludes an upwardly sloping wall 101 defining a nose, a rearwardly projecting flat top wall 102, and a downwardly projecting shoulder flange 103. As with the rear wall of shoulder 40, the rear wall of shoulder flange 103 is serrated with serrations 104 to provide a gripping surface.

Embodiment 8, shown in FIGS. 12 and 13, is similar to embodiment 7 in that it includes intelligence for ac commodating electrical outlets 170 (FIG. 12). lnthis embodiment, face panel of molding 8 includes apertures 151 therethrough, spaced along the length thereof. An electrical channel carries outlets and wiring 171 and snaps into top lip flange 13 and bottom lip flange 14 with its outlets 170 projecting through apertures 151.

Electrical channel 160 is an elongated channelshaped member having a back 162 and walls 163 (FIGS. 12 and 13). It is preferably constructed of metal or extruded of some type of fairly rigid plastic.

A flange 161 projects laterally from each wall 163 in a direction away from electrical channel 160. Flanges 161 snap into lip flanges 13 and 14 as shown in FIG. 13 to hold electrical channel 160 in place against the back of face panel 150. In this manner, electrical channel 160 also provides a connecting means in place of connector plate 50 or connector plate 120 to hold adjacent segments of molding 8 together.

In operation, splashback molding 1 or alternative embodiments 5, 7 and 8 can be used in almost any type of splashback situation, so long as there is a small space between a counter top 3 and a wall 4. The counter 2 itself can either be stationary or completely mobile. Counter 2 would be installed first in the laboratory or kitchen. Then, splashback 1 would be installed by pushing it against wall 4, just above the top surface of counter top 3. This would cause anchor 30 to bend forwardly, towards the vertical plane. When anchor 30 is generally vertical, the entire splashback 1 can be slipped downwardly, with anchor 30 extending into the narrow space between counter top 3 and wall 4. Splashback 1 is pushed downwardly with a fair bit of force in order that toe 21 is slightly deformed in making contact with counter top 3 and thereby resiliently contacts counter top 3 to insure a tight fit therebetween. As a result of this tight fit, spilled liquids will not readily flow beneath toe 21 and off the back of counter top 3.

Installation of adjacent splashback molding portions 1 or S can be achieved through the use of connector 50 in the manner heretofore described. It is merely slipped into the spaced, downwardly and upwardly opening recesses l5 and 14, respectively, at each end of adjacent splashback molding segements 1. The molding segments 1 are then slid towards each other until they abut tightly.

Adjacent segments of alternative embodiment 7 are joined together by an electrical outlet panel 110 extending between two abutting segments. However, junction between a segment of molding 7 and a segment of molding 1 is effected in a manner very similar to the joining of adjacent segments of molding l. The only distinction is that connector plate 120 is used in place of connector plate 50.

If the installation is expected to be permanent, a small amount of mastic can be used at various points along the junction between the serrated back face 42 of shoulder 40 and wall 4. Similarly, a small amount of caulking or mastic could be used .at the junction of toe 21 with counter top 3. However, if the installation is intended to be somewhat portable, the use of such mastic and caulking can be eliminated.

Finally, FIG. shows an alternative embodiment 9 which is very similar to alternative embodiment 7, except that the anchor flange 140 of molding 9 is considerably shorter than the anchor flange 30 of molding 7. While the relatively long anchor flange 30 of moldings l, 5, and 7 renders these moldings very useful as splashbacks for counter tops and the like, they interfere with the use of these moldings as floorboard moldings. Since molding 7 would make an excellent floorboard molding as a result of its incorporation of electrical outlet plate 110, alternative embodiment molding 9 constitutes a variation of molding 7 in which a relatively short anchor flange 140 is provided.

Molding 9 can be utilized as a floorboard molding by cooperating with a specially adapted clip 150-(FIGS. l0 and 11). Clip 150 is first bolted to a wall adjacent the floor, and then molding 9 is mechanically connected to the clip150.

Clip 150 includes a back 151 having a pair of vertically spaced screw holes 157 therein (FIG. 11). Extending forwardly from the bottom of back 151 is a base 152. When clip 150 is placed against a wall, it is placed at the base of the wall with base 152 abutting the floor of the room. A base flange 153 then projects upwardly from base 152 to provide a catch for mating engagement with anchor flange 140 of molding 9. Note that toe 21 of base projects downwardly a sufficient distance to hide both anchor flange 140, base 152, and base flange 153.

Back 151 extends upwardly almost to shoulder flange 103. However, before reaching shoulder flange 103, it is bent inwardly to define an upwardly sloping wall 154. Sloping wall 154 projects inwardly a distance approximately equal to the thickness of shoulder flange 103 and then juts upwardly to define a hook flange 155. Hook flange 155 projects upwardly to the inside of shoulder flange 103, Le, to that face of shoulder flange 103 which faces panel 80. Hook flange 155 includes a deviation 156 therein which cooperates with a rib 108 projecting to the inside of shoulder flange 103. Rib 108 snaps into position within groove 156 to thereby prevent molding 9 from being lifted upwardly out of engagement with clip 150 in the absence of the application of a fair amount of force.

As with molding 7, molding 9 includes a recessed channel 90 for receiving an electrical outlet plate 110. Because of the similarities between molding 9 and molding 7, molding 9 can be extruded from the same die as is molding 7. When extruding molding 9, one merely places a plug in the anchor flange forming a portion of the die to thereby shorten the length of the anchor flange, produced. This provides the manufacturer with tremendous versatility and economy of manufacture.

As a result of this invention, installation of splashbacks is simplified, with excessive quantities of mastic and caulking being eliminated. The expense of providing a counter top is reduced because it does not have to be specially made and adapted for use in conjunction with the splashback molding. Furthermore, even though the splashback molding and counter can be completely portable, the unique molding of this invention gives the counter a built-in look which is extremely desirable and attractive. The unique molding of this invention can be readily extruded, since it is designed with a uniform cross section throughout its length. Finally, this invention provides a manufacturer with a molding which has tremendous utility as a counter top splashback, and with a molding which utlizes very similar principles which can be made from the same die, but which can be used as a baseboard molding. Thus, this invention effectuates economies in manufacture, installation, and use.

It is understood that the above is merely a preferred embodiment of this invention and that many changes and alterations can be made thereof without departing from the spirit and broader aspects.

The embodiments 'of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:

l. A molding for counter tops and the like comprising: an elongated upstanding panel; a foot at the base of said panel for engaging a counter top, said foot projecting at least forwardly from said panel; said panel extending a substantial distance above said foot in order to act as a splashback surface or the like; a resilient anchor flange depending downwardly from the rear of said foot for positioning between a counter top and a wall to thereby anchor said molding in place, said anchor flange depending downwardly and rearwardly at an acute angle to the vertical, away from the plane of said panel, whereby said anchor flange has to be flexed towards the plane of said panel in order to be inserted between a counter top and a wall; said anchor flange depending downwardly a distance sufficient to finnly anchor said molding to a counter top without the need for additional securing means.

2. The molding of claim 1 in which a flexible toe portion depends downwardly from the front of said foot for resilient engagement with a top surface of a counter top to insure a tight fit against said counter top surface.

3. The molding of claim 2 in which the front of said anchor flange is at least partially serrated near the top thereof to facilitate gripping of said counter top and in which the rear of said anchor flange is at least partially serrated near the bottom thereof to facilitate gripping of a wall.

4. The molding of claim 1 in which spaced top foot bottom lip flanges project from the rear side of said panel and open towards one another for embracing a connector plate whereby two of said moldings can be joined. including by 5. The molding of claim 2 which comprises a shoulder at the top of said panel, extending rearwardly therefrom for abutment with a wall and to provide a ledge upon which articles can be placed; said foot extending rearwardly from said panel a distance approximately the same as said shoulder does.

6. The molding of claim in which said shoulder includes an upwardly extending rib at the front edge thereof whereby articles stored thereon do not readily fall off.

7. The molding of claim 1 in which said panel ineludes means for securing thereto a plurality of electrical outlets spaced along the length thereof.

8. The molding of claim 1 which comprises: said panel having a plurality of apertures therein, spaced along the length thereof; an electrical channel having a plurality of electrical outlets therein, spaced along its length; means on the rear face of said panel and on said electrical channel cooperating to hold said electrical channel in place on said rear face of said panel with said electrical outlets projecting through said apertures.

9. The molding of claim 8 in which said means coop erating comprises: said electrical channel having forwardly projecting walls; a flange projecting laterally from each of said walls, away from said electrical channel; spaced top and bottom lip flanges projecting from the rear face of said panel and opening towards one another for embracing said flanges of said electrical channel.

10. The molding of claim 1 in which: said elongated panel extends upwardly from said foot, and includes an outwardly opening channel therein; an electrical outlet panel for positioning within said channel; said channel and said electrical outlet panel including means cooperating to hold said electrical outlet panel in said channel; electrical outlets in said channel spaced along the length thereof; wiring extending through said panel behind said electrical outlet panel.

11. The molding of claim 1 in which said panel extends generally upwardly from said foot, and includes a deviation therein defining an outwardly opening channel; said channel including a bottom lateral wall, an upwardly extending back wall, and a top lateral wall; an electrical outlet panel for positioning within said channel; said electrical outlet panel including a face panel; a rearwardly projecting top wall and a rearwardly projecting bottom wall; means on said top and bottom walls of said electrical outlet panel and on said top and bottom lateral walls of said panel cooperating to hold said electrical outlet panel in place in said channel; said panel including spaced electrical outlets therein; wiring extending through said channel, behind said electrical outlet panel for connection with said electrical outletsv 12. A molding comprising: an elongated upstanding panel; a fot at the base of said panel and extending laterally forwardly and rearwardly thereof; an anchor flange projecting downwardly from the rear of said foot; a clip for securing to a wall; said clip including means embracing said anchor flange of said molding to thereby hold said molding against said wall; said foot including a toe portion projecting downwardly from the front thereof a distance at least equal to the height of said anchor flange whereby said anchor flange and said means on said clip embracing said anchor flange are hidden from view; a shoulder projecting rearwardly from the top of said panel for abutment with a wall; said shoulder including a top wall projecting rearwardly from said panel and a shoulder flange projecting downwardly from said top wall; said clip inclucding means embracing said shoulder flange at a point hidden from view bp said panel.

13. The molding of claim 12 in which said clip comprises a back for securing to the wall; a base projecting forwardly from the bottom of said back and then projecting upwardly to define a catch for mating engagement with said anchor flange; an inwardly and upwardly sloping wall extending from the top of said back wall and projecting inwardly a distance approximately equal to the thickness of said shoulder flange; a hook flange projecting upwardly from said inwardly and upwardly sloping wall to a position on the inside of said shoulder flange to thereby hold said shoulder flange against a wall.

14. The molding of claim 13 in which said shoulder flange includes a rib projecting from the inside surface thereof towards said hook flange; said hook flange including a deviation therein for cooperation with said rib to thereby prevent said moldling from being lifted upwardly out of engagement with said clip in the ab sence of the application of a removing force.

15. The molding of claim 12 which comprises: said panel having a plurality of apertures therein, spaced along the length thereof; an electrical channel having a plurality of electrical outlets therein, spaced along its length; means on the rear face of said panel and on said electrical channel cooperating to hold said electrical channel in place on said rear face of said panel with said electrical outlets projecting through said apertures.

16. The molding of claim 15 in which said means cooperating comprises: said electrical channel having forwardly projecting walls; a flange projecting laterally from each of said walls, away from said electrical channel; spaced top and bottom lip flanges projecting from the rear face of said panel and opening towards one another for embracing said flanges of said electrical channel.

17. The molding of claim 12 in which: said elongated panel extends upwardly from said foot, and includes an outwardly opening channel therein; an electrical outlet panel for positioning within said channel; said channel and said electrical outle panel including means cooperating to hold said electrical outlet panel in said channel; electrical outlets in said channel spaced along the length thereof; wiring extending through said channel behind said electrical outlet panel.

18. A molding for counter tops and the like comprising an elongated upstanding panel; a foot at the base of said panel for engaging a counter top; said panel extending generally upwardly from said foot, and including a deviation therein defining an outwardly opening channel; said channel including a bottom lateral wall, an upwardly extending back wall, and a top lateral wall; an electrical outlet panel for positioning within said channel; said electrical outlet panel including a face panel; a rearwardly projecting top wall and a rearwardly projecting bottom wall; means on said top and bottom walls of said electrical outlet panel and on said top and bottom lateral walls of said panel cooperating to hold said electrical outlet panel; in place in said channel; said panel including spaced electrical outlets therein; wiring extending through said channel, behind said electrical outlet panel for connection with said electrical outlets.

19. The molding of claim 18 including means for joining said molding in endwise abutment to a second molding having a generally upwardly extending panel having no deviation therein; said joining means includally C-shaped configuration comprising a vertically extending bite portion and spaced laterally extending leg portions; said connector extending into said top and bottom lip flanges with said bite portion being positioned behind said second molding and said laterally extending leg portions being positioned behind said molding of claim 18.

i t i PO-1050 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 69 CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3 752 i Dated August 14 1973 Paul J. Betts It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

"channel" should be panel Column 8, line 57; claim 4; "foot" shoulii be and m Column 8, line 61; Claim 4; After "joined.", omit "including by".

Column 9, line 32; Claim 10; "panel" should be channel Signed and sealed this 19th day of February 19714..

(SEAL) Attest:

EDWARD M.FLETCHER,J'R. c. MARSHALL DANN Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5733022 *Apr 28, 1995Mar 31, 1998Formica Technology, Inc.Backsplash and countertop assembly
US6131521 *Feb 23, 1999Oct 17, 2000Premark Rwp Holdings, Inc.Modular worktops, method of assembly and method of use therefore
US6352038Aug 30, 2000Mar 5, 2002Premark Rwp Holdings, Inc.Modular worktops, method of assembly, and method of use therefor
Classifications
U.S. Classification312/140.4
International ClassificationA47B77/06
Cooperative ClassificationA47B77/06
European ClassificationA47B77/06
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 1, 1985AS06Security interest
Owner name: BETTS, PAUL J.
Owner name: WADE, JUNE, 5712 DOWNING, PORTAG
Effective date: 19841030
Owner name: WADE, MICHAEL, 5712 DOWNING, PORTAGE, MI 49002
Apr 1, 1985ASAssignment
Owner name: WADE, JUNE, 5712 DOWNING, PORTAGE, MI 49002
Owner name: WADE, MICHAEL, 5712 DOWNING, PORTAGE, MI 49002
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:BETTS, PAUL J.;REEL/FRAME:004382/0278
Effective date: 19841030
Dec 7, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: BETTS, PAUL J., 15487 LINN COURT, SPRING LAKE, MI
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:INTER DYNE, A PARTNERSHIP OF MI CONSISTING OF PAUL J. BETTS AND JOSEPH W. HORNESS;REEL/FRAME:003933/0722
Effective date: 19811117
Dec 7, 1981AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: BETTS, PAUL J., 15487 LINN COURT, SPRING LAKE, MI
Owner name: INTER DYNE, A PARTNERSHIP OF MI CONSISTING OF PAUL
Effective date: 19811117