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Publication numberUS3753293 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 21, 1973
Filing dateApr 15, 1971
Priority dateApr 15, 1971
Publication numberUS 3753293 A, US 3753293A, US-A-3753293, US3753293 A, US3753293A
InventorsDaniel Branda R, Hamilton Branda D
Original AssigneeAutomeasure Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for use in the making or alteration of garments
US 3753293 A
Abstract
An apparatus for automatically measuring dimensions defning the posture of a person upon whom clothing is to be fitted. The apparatus includes a vertical post fitted with a number of shelves which are vertically moveable on the post by means of motors. Each shelf is provided with a slide which is mounted for horizontal in-and-out movement on the shelf. The slide is driven by means of a motor and gear assembly mounted on the shelf. The outward end of the slide contains a sensitive switch which is coupled to the slide drive motor. Upon actuating the apparatus, the slide drive motor causes the corresponding slide to move outward until the sensitive switch is actuated by contact between the end of the slide and the person being fitted. As soon as the switch is so actuated, it shuts off the slide drive motor to halt the outward movement of the slide. A variable resistance mounted on the shelf and coupled to the slide provides a signal indicative of the horizontal position of the slide. A meter is provided to convert the signal developed from the variable resistance to a visual display.
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UnitedStates Patent [191 Branda et al.

[ APPARATUS FOR USE IN THE MAKING OR I ALTERATION OF GARMENTS [75 J Inventors: Daniel Hamilton Branda, Brooklyn,

NY. Richard DanielBranda, Allentown, Pa.

[73 I Assignee: Automeasure, Inc., Brooklyn, NY. [22] Filed: Apr. 15, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 134,513

Related US. Application Data [63] Continuation of Ser. No. 822,129, May 6, 1969,

[451 Aug. 21, 1973 Primary Examiner-Louis R. Prince Assistant ExaminerCharles E. Phillips AttorneyAr thur L. Lessler [5 7] ABSTRACT An apparatus for automatically measuring dimensions defning the postureof a person upon whom clothing is to be fitted. The apparatus includes a vertical post fitted with a number of shelves which are vertically moveable on the post by means of motors. Each shelf is provided with a slide which is mounted for horizontal inand-out movement on the shelf. The slide is driven by means of a motor and gear assembly mounted on the shelf. The outward end of the slide contains a sensitive switch which is coupled to the slide drive motor. Upon actuating the apparatus, the slide drive motor causes the corresponding slide tormove outward until the sensitive switch is actuated by contact between the end of the slide and the person being fitted. As soon as the switch is so actuated, it shuts off the slide drive motor to halt the outward movement of the slide. A variable resistance mounted on the shelf and coupled to the slide provides a signal indicative of the horizontal position of the slide. A meter is provided to convert the signal developed from the variable resistance to a visual display.

4 Claims, 18 Drawing Figures United Statesv Patent [1 1 [1 1 3,753,293 Branda eta]. [451 Aug. 21, 1973 Patented Aug. 21,1973

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arromvtv Patented Aug. 21, 1973 10 Sheets-Sheet 10 APPARATUS FOR USE IN THE MAKING OR ALTERATION OF GARMENTS This is a continuation of copending application Ser. No. 822,129, filed May 6, 1969 and now abandoned.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to apparatus for use in the making or alteration of garments, and more particularly to apparatus for rapidly and accurately taking the measurements of specified characteristics of the person being measured.

, Various devices for measuring the posture of a person for whom a garment is to be made or altered are well known in the art, and generally comprise a frame having horizontally and vertically moveable members, and means for locking the members in position. The frame is situated on or adjacent to the person to be fitted, and each of the members is vertically and horizontally positioned with respect to the point on the persons anatomy which is to be measured. Thereafter, each of the members is locked in position, and the displacement of each member with respect to the frame is measured.

Such prior art devices are exemplified by US. Pats. Nos. 435; 2,052,099; 2,063,922; 2,385,746; and 2,818,648.

These prior art devices all suffer from the deficiency that a substantial amount of time is required to position the frame with respect to the person being measured and to adjust the various moveable members with respect to the person. During this time, which may be on the order of several minutes, the person being measured becomes uncomfortable and usually shifts his position or deviates from his normal posture. As a result, the measurements obtained by these prior art devices are often quite inaccurate.

In addition, in positioning the members of these prior art devices with respect to the person being measured, it is necessary that the ends of the members be in contact with the anatomy of the person. In so positioning the members, the operator of the device often applies sufficient pressure to the persons anatomy, so that the person being measures shifts in position or deviates from. his normal posture upon being contacted by the measuring member.

An object of the present invention isto provide measuringapparatus which rapidly takes the measurements necessary fordetermining the posture of the person being measured.

Another object of the invention is to provide measuring apparatus which accurately measures the posture of a person, while applying minimal contact force between ameasuringmember-and the person being measured.

Still another object of the invention is to provide apparatus which automatically takes. the aforementioned measurements and provides a visual display of the measured' quantities, or of quantities which are related to the measurements in a predetermined manner.

SUMMARY" These and other objects of the invention arerealized by measuring apparatus. which comprises. a vertical member havingia plurality of supports mounted for vertical movement thereon. Acorresponding plurality of substantially parallel elongated elements is provided,

each such element being mounted for horizontal inand-out movements on a corresponding support. Each element has sensing means adjacent the outward'end thereof for detecting the presence of an object at said outward end. Element drive means is provided for causing each element to move outward in response to a first control signal. The element drive means ceases to cause said outward movement in response to a second control signal. Means coupled to the sensing means on each element applies the second control signal to the element drive means, so that the element drive means ceases to cause outward movement of the corresponding element when the sensing means detects the presence of said object.

THE DRAWINGS The various objects, features and advantages of the invention will be more readily understood by reference to the following description taken in conjunction with the appended claims and the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a pictorial view of measuring apparatus according to a preferred embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2 shows a drive assembly gear housing used in the apparatus of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3a shows, in front elevation view, one of the moveable shelves used in the apparatus of FIG. I, and the drive means coupled thereto;

FIG. 3b shows a right side view of a portion of the shelf shown in FIG. 3a;

FIG. 3c shows, in plan view, the shelf drive means shown in FIG. 3a;

FIG. 4a shows a left side sectional view of the outward end of the neck and waist slide assemblies used in the apparatus of FIG. 1, these two assemblies being substantially identical;

FIG. 4b shows an isometric exploded view of the sensor assembly portion of the slide drive assembly shown in FIG. 4a;

FIG. 5a shows, in plan view, the outward end of the blade, seat and calf slide drive assemblies used in the apparatus shown in FIG. 1, these three assemblies being substantially identical;

FIG. 5b shows an isometric view of the slide drive assembly of FIG. 5a;

FIG. 6a shows a front elevation cross-sectional view of one of the shoulder sensor assemblies used inthe apparatus of FIG. 1;

FIG. 6bshowsaside view of a portion of the shoulder sensor assembly shown in FIG. 6a;

FIG. 7 shows the control and display panel utilized for operating the apparatus of FIG. 1;

FIG. Sis an electrical wiring diagram showing the circuit wiring of the vertical drive. motors for the shelves used in the apparatus ofFIG. l, and for the wiring coupling the control panel of FIG. 7to the apparatus'of FIG. 1;

FIGS. 9a and. 9b show anelectrical wiring diagram depicting the circuitwiring of the various slide drive and-sensor assemblies used in the apparatus of FIG. 1;

FIGS. 10a and 10b show a functional blockdiagram according to'an alternative embodiment of the invention, in which the measurements are digitally sensed by the apparatus of FIG. 1' (appropriately modified), and displayed bymeans of digital readouts; and

FIG. 11 shows another form'of a portion of the 'embodiment shown in FIGS. 10a and 10b.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION The structure shown in FIG. 1 comprises a measuring apparatus 1, the various operating parts of which are mounted on a vertical shaft 2, one surface of which comprises a vertical gear rack (not shown in FIG. 1). The apparatus 1 is mounted within a cabinet 3 by securing the upperand lower ends of the shaft 2 to the corresponding surfaces of the cabinet.

A plurality of shelf-like supports 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 (hereinafter referred to asshelves) are mounted for vertical movement on the shaft 2. Each of the shelves 4 through 8 is positioned at the desired point on the shaft 2 by means of corresponding vertical drive assemblies 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13, respectively.

Mounted for sliding horizontal in-and-out movement on the shelf 4 is an elongated neck slide assembly 14, at the outer end of which is located a neck sensor assembly 15.

An elongated shoulder blade slide assembly 16 is mounted for sliding horizontal in-and-out movement on the shelf 5. A shoulder blade sensor assembly 17 is positioned at the outer end of the slide assembly 16.

An elongated waist drive assembly 18 is mounted for sliding horizontal in-and-out movement on the shelf 6. A waist sensor 19 is positioned at the outer end of the waist slide assembly 18.

An elongated seat slide assembly 20 is mounted for sliding horizontal in-and-out movement on the shelf 7. A seat sensor assembly 21 is positioned at the outer end of the seat slide assembly 20.

An elongated calf slide assembly 22 is mounted for sliding horizontal in-and-out movement on the shelf 8. A calf sensor assembly 23 is positioned at the outer end of the calf slide drive assembly 22.

Each of the slide assemblies 14, 16, 18, 20 and 22 are moved inwardly or outwardly by means of corresponding slide drive assemblies 24a, b, c, d and e, each of which contains a motor and gear train. Each of the slide assemblies 14, 16, 18, 20 and 22 has a corresponding gear rack 250, b, c, d or e (represented generally by the number 25) mounted thereon. Each slide assembly is driven by interaction of a gear within the corresponding slide drive assembly, with the gear rack on the slide assembly.

Each of the slide drive assemblies 24a through 24e (represented generally by the number 24) contains a direct current motor 26, which is reversible by reversing the polarity of the voltage applied to the motor terminals. Two limit switches (not shown) are positioned on each of the shelves 4 through 8 to sense the extreme limits of travel of the corresponding slide assemblies l4, 16, 18, 20 and 22. As each slide assembly moves inward or outward to the limit of its travel, the corresponding limit switch is engaged, the limit switch being wired in series with the corresponding motor 26 to halt movement of the slide assembly.

Each of the vertical drive assemblies 9 through 13 is of similar construction to, and operates in generally the same manner as the slide drive assemblies 24. Vertical limit switches (not shown) are provided to prevent each of the shelves 4 through 8 from colliding with an adjacent shelf or with the top or bottom of the cabinet 3 during vertical movement thereof.

Each of the slide drive assemblies 24 may contain a brake solenoid 27, for the purpose of more rapidly halting the horizontal movement of the corresponding slide. Such a solenoid is not necessary where the inertia and friction of the slide drive assembly 24 and the corresponding slide are such that overtravel of the slide is not significant.

Each slide drive assembly 24 also contains a potentiometer (variable resistance) 28, which is coupled to the gear rack 25 of the corresponding slide assembly, so that the resistance between the wiper arm and one end of the potentiometer 28 is a measure of the horizontal position of the slide.

Mechanically secured to the neck shelf 4 is a shoulder sensor support bracket 29, which moves vertically with the shelf 4 in response to operation of the vertical drive assembly 9. Shoulder sensor assemblies 30 and 31 are mounted on the shoulder sensor support bracket 29 and are laterally moveable on the bracket 29 via the bracket grooves 32. Each of the shoulder sensor assemblies 30 and 31 contains a sensor drive (not shown in FIG. 1) which effects vertical movement of the corresponding shoulder sense arm 33 or 34. Potentiometers (not shown in FIG. 1) within the shoulder sensor assemblies 30 and 31 provide electrical signals indicative of the positions of the corresponding sense arms 33 and 34.

While the various parts of the apparatus 1 may be manufactured of any suitable material, the shelves 4 through 8, the housings of the slide drive assemblies 24 and of the vertical drive assemblies 9 through 13, the slides 14, 16, 18, 20 and 22, and the various sensors are preferably constructed of a readily machinable, low cost plastic such as Plexiglas.

While direct current motors are utilized in the preferred embodiment of the invention, alternating current motors could also be employed, if suitable means for reversing the motor drive is provided. While the vertical drive of the shelves 4 through 8 and the horizontal drive of the slides 14, 16, 18, 20 and 22 is preferably effected by means of the interaction between a gear wheel and a gear rack, other suitable means, such as a friction drive arrangement, could also be employed.

While it is preferred that the slide drive assemblies 24 be capable of driving the corresponding slides in both directions, it is sufficient if the slide drive assemblies 24 serve to drive the corresponding slides. in the outward direction only. After the desired measurements have been taken by the apparatus 1, the various slides l4, 16, 18, 20 and 22 may be returned to their retracted positions manually, rather than by reversing the direction of operation of the slide drive assemblies 24.

In FIG. 1, each of the slides 14, 16, 18, 20 and 22 is shown retracted, that is in its furthest inward position.

Suitable casters 35 are provided on the bottom of the cabinet 3 to permit movement of the cabinet and alignment of the apparatus 1 with the person whose measurements are to be taken.

Briefly, and as will hereinafter be described in further detail, the apparatus 1 is operated by positioning the cabinet 3 so that the various sensors 15, 17, 19, 21 and 23 are parallel to the rear surface of the person whose measurements are to be taken. The vertical drive assemblies 9 through 13 are then operated to position the sensors 15, 17, 19, 21 and 23 in alignment with the neck, shoulder blades, waist, seat and calves of the person to be measured, respectively. The various slide drive assemblies 24 are then activated, either simultaneously or sequentially, to move each of the slides 14,

16, 18, 20 and 22 outwardly until the sensor at the end of each slide contacts the anatomy of the person being measured. Upon contact with the person, the corresponding sensor is deflected to actuate a sensitive switch (the switch being part of the sensor assembly) and thus to disconnect the motor 26 of the corresponding slide drive assembly 24 to halt outward movement of the slide.

When the outward movement of all the slides has been terminated by operation of the corresponding sensors, the position of each slide with reference to, for example, the vertical shaft 2, provides a measurement which is indicative of the posture of the person whose measurements are being taken. While the horizontal position of each slide may be manually measured, preferably an electrical indication of the position of each slide may be provided by means of the corresponding potentiometer 28, coupled in circuit with a source of voltage and a meter, so that the horizontal position of the corresponding slide may be directly read out on the meter scale.

With a linear rate of travel of each slide on the order of 2 inches per second, and a maximum slide travel on the order of inches, these being the preferred parameters, the maximum measurement time is on the order of 5 seconds for simultaneous operation of the slides, and 25 seconds for sequential operation thereof.

After the neck sensor has been actuated to halt outward movement of the slide 14, the shoulder sensor assemblies 30 and 31 may be manually or automatically actuated to move the corresponding shoulder sense arms 33 and 34 downward until they engage the corresponding shoulders of the person being measured. When the shoulder sense arms engage the shoulders of the person being measured, they operate corresponding sensitive switches to disconnect the shoulder drive assembly motors, so as to halt further downward movement of the sense arms. The height of each shoulder with respect to the neck sensor 15 may then be measured by rotating each of the sense arms 33 and 34 horizontally to overlie the indicia 36, andreading the corresponding measurement from the indicia markings. Alternatively, the position of each sense arm may be electrically determined by means of a potentiometer coupled to the corresponding shoulder sensor assembly.

The operation of the shoulder sensor assemblies may add about 5 seconds to the measurement time, so that the maximum period of time for which the person being measured must maintain his position and posture is on the order of 10 seconds for simultaneous operation of the slides, and 30 seconds for sequential operation thereof. u

-The difference in height between the shoulders, if any, can be determined by manually subtracting the two shoulder readings, or by electrically subtracting the signals generated by potentiometers coupled to the cor responding shoulder sensor assemblies.

While for some purposes it may be sufficient to obtain data corresponding to the horizontal position of each of the slide drive assemblies, for certain purposes it is necessary to obtain data corresponding to predetermined combinations of these measurements. For example, in order to reduce the manufacturing cost of made to measure clothing, a reference file of clothing patterns has been procured by AUTOMEASURE, INC, the assignee of the instant application, whereby a tile number is assigned to each pattern, the tile number being expressed in terms of a predetermined combination of the neck, blade, waist, seat, calf and shoulder measurements provided by the apparatus 1. In order to reduce the possibility of error and to utilize relatively unskilled labor, the measurements provided by the various sensors of the apparatus 1 are preferably electrically combined to provide the desired composite readings. This system of patterns and of file number designationa does not constitute any part of the present invention.

Each of the sensors 15, 17, 19, 21 and 23, as well as the shoulder sense arms 33 and 34, is preferably coupled to a sensitive switch, so that only a slight force exerted by the person being measured upon the corresponding sensor is required to halt the movement of the corresponding slide or sense arm.

If the required force is too small, the sensor is actuated upon contacting the persons outer garments, thus providing an erroneous reading. If the required force is too large, contact of the sensor with the person being measured may cause the person to shift his position. Preferably, in accordance with the preferred embodiment of our invention, the force required to actuate each sensor is on the order of 4 to 7 ounces.

The operation of the slide drive assemblies 24 and of the vertical drive assemblies 9 through 113 will be more clearly understood upon reference to FIGS. 2, 3a, 3b and 3 c of the drawings.

, FIG. 2 shows the housing which is employed to hold the various parts of the slide drive assemblies 24 and the various vertical drive assemblies. The slide drive assemblies 24 are all identical to each other, except for the resistance values of the potentiometers 28 coupled thereto. The vertical drive assemblies 9 through 13 are identical to each other and to the slide drive assemblies 24, except that the vertical drive assemblies do not contain the solenoid 27 or potentiometer 28. The use of the solenoid 27 in the slide drive assemblies 24 is optional and will depend upon the particular inertia and friction parameters involved in the de sign of any specific embodiment of the invention, as well as upon the amount of slide overtravel which can be tolerated.

The housing 50 comprises two machined pieces of a suitable plastic, preferably an acrylic plastic such as Plexiglas.

The housing 50 comprises a lower piece part 51 and an upper piece part 52, the adjacent surfaces of the piece parts 51 and 52 having'aligned grooves 53 and 54 therein which cooperate to form apertures for receiving rotating shafts. The lower piece part 51 has a longitudinal rectangular aperture 55 therein which is dimensioned to receive one of the slides l4, 16, 18, 20 and 22, or the vertical shaft 2. The lower and upper piece parts 51 and 52 are secured to each other by a number of screws (not shown), after the various gears and associated components have been assembled to the housing 50. A drive motor 26 is mounted on the upper piece part 52 so that the motor shaft extends into a chamber 56 (see FIGS. 3a and 3b) defined by cooperating apertures in the upper and lower piece parts 52 and 51.

The apertures 55 in the lower piece part 51 has an indented portion 57 which is adapted to receive the gear racks 25 of the slide drive assemblies 24 or the vertical gear rack 58 (see FIG. 3a) of the supporting shaft 2. A chamber 59 (see FIGS. 3a and 3b) in the upper piece part 52 and in the upper portion of the lower piece part 51 communicates with the indented portion 57 of the longitudinal aperture 55, so that a drive gear 60 situated within the chamber 59 may engage the gear rack 25.

Referring to FIGS. 30 and 3b, the drive gear 60 is coupled via a shaft to an intermediary gear 61 which in turn is coupled to a worm gear 62 situated on the shaft of the motor 26. Both the intermediary gear 61 and the worm gear 62 are situated in the chamber 56. As the slide 14, 16, 18, or 22 moves outward, the motion of the slide is halted by disconnecting the power supply from the terminals of the motor 26 when the corresponding sensor engages the person whose measurements are being taken.

Due to the inertia of the rotor of the motor 26, as reflected through the gears 62, 61, 60 and 25, and the inertia of the slide, the slide will move outward a small distance after the motor terminals have been disconnected from the power supply by the corresponding sensor. Where the amount of overtravel is objectionable, the overtravel can be substantially reduced by means of the solenoid 27, which may be wired in circuit with the motor 26 and the sensor switch, so that the solenoid 27 is activated at the same time the terminals of the motor 26 are disengaged from the power supply. Upon being activated, the core 63 of the solenoid 27 moves inward, so that the end 64 of the shaft 65 attached to the solenoid core engages the shaft of the motor 26, and the friction between the shaft end 64 and the shaft of the motor 26 causes the motor to rapidly stop. The end 64 of the shaft 65 is preferably constructed of a suitable brake lining material, and the adjacent portion of the motor shaft may be protected by a suitable collar 66, so that the shaft end 64 and the collar 66 cooperate to form a brake assembly.

The horizontal position of the slide 14, 18, 19, 20 or 22 is converted into an electrical signal by means of the potentiometer 28. The potentiometer 28 has a shaft 29 which is coupled to the slide gear rack via the gear train consisting of gears 67, 68, 69, 70 and 71 (see FIG. 3b). Gear 71 engages the slide rack gear 25 and is coupled to gears 70 and 69 by a rotating shaft. Gears 69 and 70 are concentrically mounted on the shaft, and are situated in the well 56. Gear 68 engages gear 70, and gear 67 engages gear 68, gear 67 being mounted for rotation with the potentiometer shaft 29. Gears 67 and 68 are also situated within the well 56, while gear 71 is situated within the well 59.

The solenoid 27 is mounted to the shelf 4, 5, 6, 7, or 8 by means of a mounting block 72, while the potentiometer 28 is secured to the mounting block 72 by a bracket 73.

Instead of the potentiometer 28, other variable impedance devices such as variable capacitors, variable inductors or digital shaft encoders may be employed to convert the horizontal position of the slide to an electrical signal. Alternatively, a pulse generating device may be employed to provide an output pulse corresponding to each increment of horizontal slide movement, as will be hereafter described in connection with an altemative embodiment of the invention.

Each of the shelves 4 through 8 has a vertical support portion 80. A cross-brace 81 provides rigidity of the shelf structure. Each of the vertical drive assemblies 9 through 13 comprises a vertical drive housing consisting of a lower piece part 82 and an upper piece part 83,

the piece parts 82 and 83 being substantially identical to the piece parts 51 and 52, respectively. Each shelf is moved vertically up or down by the interaction of a drive gear 84 with the vertical gear rack 58. A direct current motor 85 is coupled to the drive gear 84 by means of a worm gear 86 and an intermediate gear 87 (see FIG. 3c), the worm gear 86 being mounted on the motor shaft.

The operation of the neck sensor 15 will be better understood by reference to FIGS. 44 and 4b of the drawing. The waist sensor 19 is of substantially identical construction to, and operates in substantially the same manner as the neck sensor 15.

As shown in FIG. 4a, the neck sensor 15 comprises a housing 90 which is mounted to the outer end of the slide 14. As shown in FIGS. 4a and 4b, a sensing lever 91 is pivotally mounted to the upper portion of the sensor housing 90, so that as the slide 14 moves outward in the direction represented by the arrow A, upon engaging the person to be measured, the sensor lever 91 moves inward in the direction designated by the arrow B. A sensitive switch 92 is mounted inside the sensor housing 15. The switch 92 has an actuating pin 93 adjacent the inside surface of the sensor lever 91 so that when, upon engaging the person being measured, the sensor lever 91 moves in the direction designated by the arrow B, the actuating pin 93 is depressed by the lever 91 to actuate the switch 92. The switch 92 is electrically connected to various parts located on the shelf 4 by means of flexible wires 94 which are situated in a longitudinal tunnel" in the slide 14.

The manner of operation of the shoulder blade, seat and calf sensors 17, 21 and 23 will be more clearly understood with reference to FIGS. 5a and 5b of the drawing, which show plan and pictorial views of the sensor assembly 17. The sensor assemblies 21 and 23 are substantially of the same design as the sensor 17. However, the width of the calf sensor 23 is preferably greater than the width of the shoulder blade and seat sensors 17 and 21.

As seen in FIGS. 5a and 5b, the shoulder blade sensor 17 comprises a hollow housing 95 secured to the outer end of the shoulder slide 16. Pivotally mounted at the center portion of the housing 95 are left and right sense levers 96 and 97, respectively. Sensitive switches 98 and 99 are mounted within the housing 95, and have actuating pins 100 and 101 situated adjacent the corresponding sense levers 96 and 97, respectively, so that upon engaging the shoulder blades 102 of the person being measured when the slide 16 is moved outward in the direction represented by the arrow A, the sense levers 96 and 97 are deflected in the direction represented by the arrows B, so that each sense lever depresses the corresponding actuating pin 100 or 101. The sensitive switches 98 and 99 are wired in series, so that the outward movement of the slide 16 is halted when either one of the sense levers 96 and 97 engages the corresponding shoulder blade of the person being measured.

Rather than pivoting the sense levers 96 and 97 at the central portion of the housing 95, these levers may alternatively be pivoted at the outer portions of the housing 95, for example at the points 103.

The sensitive switches 98 and 99 are electrically connected to parts situated on the shelf 5 by means of flexible wires 105 situated within a longitudinal tunnel in the slide 16.

9 'When the sense levers 96 and 97 are not in contact with the person being measured, they are biased in proper position by pressure exerted by the actuating pins 100 and 101 via springs (not shown) internal to the corresponding sensitive switches 98 and 99, respectively, excessive outward movement of the sensor levers being prevented by interaction between the inside corners 106 of the levers and the adjacent portion of the central part 107 of the housing 95.

The construction of the shoulder sensor assembly 31 will be better understood by reference to FIGS. 60 and 6b of the drawing. The shoulder sensor assembly 30 is of substantially the same construction as the shoulder sensor assembly 31.

As shown in FIGS. 6a, the shoulder sensor assembly 31 comprises a hollow housing 1 having an end plate 111, an end bearing plate 112, and internal bearing plates 113 and 114. A drive screw 115 is rotatably mounted at its upper end to the bearing plate 114 and at its lower end to the end bearing plate 112. Situated on and threadably engaged with the drive screw 115 is a vertically moveable sensor platform 116, which has an internally threaded aperture 117 which engages adjacent threads of the drive screw 115. A vertical slot 118 in the housing 110 permits the sensor platform 1 16 to move vertically without interference with the housmg.

The drive screw 1 is rotated by a motor 1 19, which is coupled to the drive screw 115 by means of intermediate gears 120, 121, 122 and 123. As the drive screw 115 rotates, the sensor platform 116 is caused to move vertically up or down, depending upon the direction of rotation of the drive screw. The vertical position of the sensor platform 116, which is related to the number of rotations undergone by the drive screw 115, is converted to an electrical signal by the potentiometer 124, which is coupled to the drive screw by intermediate gears 125 and 126.

Situated outside the housing 110, and secured to the end of the sensor platform 116, is a U-shaped bracket 127. A sensitive switch 128 is mounted within the opening of the U-shaped bracket 127. A sense arm support 129 is pivotally mounted '(by means of pins 130) within the opening of the U-shaped bracket 127, and above the sensitive switch 128. The sense arm support 129 is positioned so that, upon upward deflection of the front portion 131 thereof (see FIG. 6b), the rear portion 132 of the sense arm support is deflected downward to depress the actuating pin 133 of the sensitive switch 128.

The sense arm 34 is pivotally mounted on the sense arm support 129 by means of a hinge pin 134, so that the sense arm 34 may, after the downward movement of the sensor platform 116 has been halted by operation of the sensitive switch 128 when the sense arm 124 engages the shoulder of the person being measured, be rotated so that the shoulder height may, if desired, be read from the indicia 36 (see FIG. 1).

The shoulder sensor assembly 31 is slideably mounted to the shoulder support bracket 29 by means of a washer 135 and a pin 136, as shown in FIG. 6b.

In operation, the direct current motor 119 is initially coupled to the power supply, so that the sensor platform 116 is moved to its uppermost position. The shoulder sensor assembly 31 is then moved laterally on the shoulder support bracket 29 so as to position the sensor arm 34 above the corresponding shoulder of the '10 person to be measured. Alternatively, the shoulder sensor assembly 31 may be mounted in a fixed position on the shoulder support bracket 29, and the sense arm 34 rotated about the hinge pin 134 until the outward end of the sense arm is positioned above the corresponding shoulder of the person to be measured.

When the outward end of the sense arm is properly positioned, the motor 119 is coupled to the power supply to rotate the drive screw 1 15 so that the sensor platform 116 proceeds to move downward, i.e., in the direction represented by the arrow A in FIG. 6a. When the outward end of the sense arm 34 engages the shoulder of the person being measured, the sense arm is deflected upward, i.e., in the direction represented by the arrow B in FIG. 6b, so that the forward end 131 of the sense arm support 129 also moves upward. This upward movement causes the sense arm support 129 to rotate about the hinge pins 130, so that the rearward end 132 of the sense arm support 129 rotates downward, i.e., in the direction represented by the arrow C in FIG. 6b, to depress the actuating pin 133 of the sensitive switch 128. By means of electrical connections between the sensitive switch 128 and the motor 119, the downward movement of the sensor platform 116 is then halted.

Instead of the shoulder sensor assembly 31, a vertically oriented support shelf having a vertically moveable slide mounted thereon, with a suitable sensor at the outward end of the slide, may beemployed to measure the shoulder height. Such an assembly may be similar or identical to the arrangement comprising, for example, the shelf 4, slide 14, slide drive assembly 24, and sensor 15.

The apparatus 1 described in connection with FIGS. 1 through 6b of the drawing, may be operated by means of the control panel shown in FIG. 7.

The control panel 140 contains a switch 141 for turning the power supply to the apparatus 1 on or off, and momentary pushbuttons 143, 144, 145, 146 and 147 for activating the corresponding vertical drive assemblies 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13, respectively, to move the corresponding shelves 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 upward to a desired position. Momentary pushbuttons 147, 148, 149, 150 and 151 are coupled to the corresponding vertical drive assemblies 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13, respectively, to move the corresponding shelves 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 downward to a desired position.

Momentary pushbutton 153 serves to activate the ,motor 119 (FIG. 6a) to move the shoulder sensor platform 116 upward, while momentary pushbutton 154 serves to activate the motor 119 to move the shoulder sensor platform 116 downwward when it is desired to measure the shoulder height.

The position of the left shoulder with respect to the neck slide 14 is indicated by the meter 155, the position of the right shoulder with respect to the neck slide 14 is indicated by the meter 156, and the difference in height between the left and right shoulders is indicated by the meter 157.

The momentary pushbutton 158 operates to retract all of the slides 14, 16, 18, 20 and 22, either sequentially (in accordance with the preferred embodiment of the invention) or simultaneously. Momentary pushbutton 159 operates all of the slides 14, 16, 18, 20 and 22, either sequentially (in accordance with the preferred embodiment of the invention) or simultaneously, to move each slide outward until its forward motion is halted as a result of contact between the corresponding sensor and the anatomy of the person being measured.

After the momentary pushbutton 159 has been operated and the slides 14, 16, 18, and 22 have moved outward horizontally to their proper positions, reference numerals corresponding to those utilized in the pattern reference file previously mentioned, are displayed on the meters 160 (coat indication) and 161 (pants indication). For example, the numerical designations on the coat indication meter 160 may be proportional to the neck slide position plus the seat slide position minus twice the blade slide position. Similarly, the numerical designations on the pants indication meter 161 may be proportional to the waist slide position plus the calf slide position minum twice the seat slide position. Preferably, both positive and negative numerals are incorporated on the faces of the meters 160 and 161.

Although conventional rotating needle panel meters may be utilized, preferably edgewise panel meters are employed for the meters 155, 156, 157, 160 and 161.

The manner in which the various control pushbuttons and panel meters are electrically connected to the apparatus 1 will be best understood by reference to the electrical wiring diagrams shown in FIGS. 8, 9a, and 9b of the drawing.

Direct current for driving the various motors of the apparatus 1 is provided by the power supply 165 (P16. 8) which has terminals 166 adapted for connection to a suitable source of a.c. line voltage. The a.c. input terminals 166 are connected to the primary winding 167 of a stepdown transformer 168, by means of the power control switch 141 and a fuse 169. The center tapped secondary winding 170 of the transformer 168 is connected in a full wave rectifier circuit comprising rectifier diodes 171 and 172, to provide a negative (with respect to ground 173) dc. voltage at the terminal Y, and the points in the circuit connected thereto. The voltage at the terminal Y is filtered to a limited extent, by the capacitor 163, which is connected between terminal Y and ground 173. Each of the neck, blade, waist, seat and calf vertical drive motors 85a, b, c, d and e, respectively, is connected between the power supply terminal Y and ground (173) through the corresponding up and down control pushbuttons and movement limit switches.

As seen in FIG. 8, each of the up and down control pushbuttons 143 through 152 is of the double pole single throw type. The up control pushbuttons 143 through 147 are shown in the actuated position, while the down control pushbuttons 148 through 152 are shown in the normal (not actuated) position. The up and down control pushbuttons 143 and 148 have a pair of electrically common terminals, these buttons being wired to form a polarity reversing switch arrangement, so that when the pushbutton 143 is depressed, the voltage applied to the terminal 175 of the neck vertical drive assembly motor 85a is negative with respect to the voltage applied to the terminal 176 of the motor 85a. The motor 85a is so arranged that when the voltage at terminal 175 is relatively negative with respect to the voltage at terminal 176, the motor causes the neck shelf 4 to move upward. When the pushbutton 143 is released and the pushbutton 148 is depressed, the polarity of the voltage applied to the motor 850 is reversed, so that the voltage at terminal 175 is relatively positive with respect to the voltage at terminal 176, and the motor a causes the neck shelf 4 to move downward.

While the pushbutton 143 is depressed, and the vertical drive motor 85a is operating to move the neck shelf 4 upward, the diode 177a is forward biased and the diode 178a is reverse biased, so that current flows between the contacts of the up limit switch 179a. The up limit switch 179a is mounted on the upper portion of the vertical drive assembly 9, so that when the vertical drive assembly 9 contacts the top of the cabinet 3 (see FIG. 1), the up limit switch 179a is actuated, and disconnects the vertical drive motor 85a from the power supply 165.

Similarly, when only the pushbutton 148 is depressed, so that the vertical drive motor 85a causes the neck shelf 4 to move downward, the diode 177a is reverse biased and the diode 178a is forward biased, so that current flows between the contacts of the down limit switch 180a. The down limit switch 180a is mounted on the lower portion of the vertical drive assembly 9, so that as the motor 1800 is actuated when the lower portion of the vertical drive assembly 9 contacts the upper portion of the shoulder blade vertical drive assembly 10, thus disconnecting the motor 85a from the power supply 165.

By utilizing the diodes 177a and 178a, the number of wires needed to connect the pushbuttons 143 and 148 to the vertical drive assembly 9 is reduced, so that only two interconnecting wires are needed. Since the vertical drive assembly 9 moves up and down on the shaft 2, the interconnecting wires must be quite flexible, and are preferably formed into a loop of sufficient size to accommodate the anticipated vertical movement of the assembly 9. In view of these factors, it is highly desirable to minimize the number of interconnecting wires coupled to the vertical drive assembly 9.

The shoulder blade, waist, seat and calf vertical drive motors 85b, 85c, 85d and 85e are selectively connected to the power supply 165 by their respective up and down control pushbuttons 144/149, 145/150, 146/151 and 147/152, respectively. The vertical movement of each of these drive motors is limited by their up and down limit switches, 179b/180b, 179a/180e, 179a/180d and l79e/ 180e, which operate in substantially the same manner as the up and down limit switches 179a and 180a associated with the vertical drive motor 85a. Small capacitors 181a, b, c, d and e are connected across the terminals of the vertical drive motors 85a, b, c, d and e, respectively, to prevent high voltages from being developed when each motor is disconnected from its power supply, thus protecting the contacts of the various switch elements connected in circuit with the motor.

The negative dc. voltage appearing at the terminal Y is converted to a more adequately filtered, regulated dc. voltage by the resistor 182, capacitor 183 and Zener diode 184. The filtered negative voltage, which appears at the terminal X, is employed to operate the indicating meters 155, 156, 157, and 161 by way of the various potentiometers (variable resistances) coupled to the slides 14, 16, 18, 20 and 22 and to the shoulder sensor assemblies 30 and 31.

The negative dc. voltage at the terminal X is applied to one end of the potentiometer 280, which is mounted on the neck slide drive assembly 240 with its shaft coupled for rotation in synchronism with the horizontal movement of the slide 14. The wiper arm of the neck slide position potentiometer 28a is connected to one end of the seat slide position potentiometer 28d, which is mounted on the seat slide drive assembly 24d with its shaft coupled for rotation in synchronism with the horizontal movement of the seat slide 20. The wiper arm of the seat slide position potentiometer 28d is connected to one end of a fixed resistor 185, the other end of which is connected in series with a calibration potentiometer 186 to ground. With this arrangement, the voltage developed at the terminal 187 of the coat indication meter 160 (with respect to ground) is proportional to the sum of the neck and seat slide positions, the neck and seat slide position potentiometers 28a and 28d being of substantially equal value.

The negative dc. voltage appearing at the terminal X is also applied to one end of the blade slide position potentiometer 28b, which is mounted on the blade slide drive assembly 24b with its shaft coupled for rotation in synchronism with the horizontal movement of the blade slide 16. The wiper arm of the blade slide position potentiometer 28b is coupled through the series combination of a fixed resistor 188 and a calibration potentiometer 189 to ground. The voltage which appears at the terminal 190 of the coat indication meter 160 (with respect to ground) is thereforeproportional to the horizontal position of the shoulder blade slide 16. If the value of the blade slide position potentiometer 28b is made equal to twice the value of the potentiometers 28a and 28b, the potential difference read by the coat indication meter 160 is proportional to the neck slide position plus the seat slide position minus twice the blade slide position, the particular combination which is desired for the purposes previously discussed.

In similar fashion, the waist slide position potentiometer 28c and the calf slide position potentiometer 28s are connected in series with a fixed resistor 191 and a calibration potentiometer 192 between the terminal X and ground, so that the voltage appearing at the terminal 193 of the pants indication meter 161 (with respect to ground) is proportional to the sum of the waist and calf slide positions. An additional seat slide potentiometer 28d, which is mounted on the same shaft as the seat slide potentiometer 28d, is connected in series with a fixed resistor 194 and a calibration potentiometer 195 between the terminal X and ground, so that the voltage appearing at the terminal 196 of the pants indication meter 161 (with respect to ground) is proportional to the horizontal position of the seat slide 20. If the value of the seat slide potentiometer 28d is made equal to twice the value of the potentiometers 28c and 28e, the potential difference read by the pants indication meter 161 is proportional to the waist slide position plus the calf slide position minus twice the seat slide position, the result which is desired for the purposes previously discussed.

As shown in FIG. 8, the left shoulder position poten tiometer 124 (also shown in FIG. 6a) is connected in series with a fixed resistor 197 and a calibration potentiometer 198 between the terminal X and ground, so that the voltage appearing across the terminals of the left shoulder indication meter 155 is proportional to the vertical position of the sensor platform 1 16 with respect to the neck slide 14. Similarly, the right shoulder position potentiometer 1240 is connected in series with a fixed resistor 199 and a calibration potentiometer 200between the terminal X and ground, so that the voltage appearing across the terminals of the right shoulder indication meter 156 is proportional to the vertical position of the right shoulder sensor platform with respect to the neck slide 14.

The zero center reading shoulder difference indication meter 157 is connected in series with a calibration potentiometer 201 between the wiper arms of the left and right shoulder position potentiometers 124 and 124a, so that the voltage appearing across the terminals of the meter 157 is representative of the magnitude and polarity of the difference in height between the left and right shoulders.

The manner in which the inward and outward movement of the slides 14, 16, 18, 20 and 22, and the vertical movement of the sensor platforms of the shoulder sensor assemblies 30 and 31 are controlled, is shown in FIGS. 9a and 9b of the drawing, in which the wires a and a, b and b, c and c'd and d, and e and e are connected to each other.

The left shoulder motor 119 (also shown in FIG. 6a) and the right shoulder motor 119a are selectively connected to the power supply (see FIG. 8) by means of the up control pushbutton 153 and the down control pushbutton 154, each pushbutton being of the momentary double pole single throw type. The pushbuttons 153 and 154 have a pair of common terminals, and are wired so that when the pushbutton 154 is depressed, a voltage of a given polarity is applied across the terminals of the motors 119 and 119a, and when the pushbutton 153 is depressed, a voltage of opposite polarity is applied across the terminals of the motors 119 and 119a.

The wiring is so arranged that when the pushbutton 154 is depressed (this pushbutton is shown in its depressed position in FIG. 9), the polarity of the voltage applied across the terminals of the shoulder drive assembly motors 119 and 119a is such as to cause downward movement of the corresponding sensor platforms. Under this condition, that is when the voltage at the terminal 210 is negative with respect to ground, the diodes 211 and 212 are forward biased, while the diodes 213 and 214 are reverse biased, so that current flows through the down limit switches 215 and 216 and the shoulder sensor switches 128 and 128a.

As the shouldersensor platforms move downward to engage the shoulders of the person being measured, the sensor switches 128 and 128a are actuated, disconnecting the corresponding shoulder drive assembly motors 119 and 119a from the power supply 165, and halting the downward movement of the shoulder sensor platforms. The down limit switches 215 and 216 serve to disconnect the motors 119 and 119a from the power supply 165, in order to prevent damage to the motors or to the power supply, in the event that the sensor platforms reach the lower limits of their travel.

If desired, the operation of the shoulder sensor assemblies 30 and 31 may be automatically initiated by replacing the pushbutton switch 154 with a single pole double throw relay, the coil of which is connected between the terminal Y and the normally open contact of the neck sensor switch 92. With this arrangement, the shoulder motors 119 and 119:: will be activated when the neck slide halts its outward movement upon engaging the neck of the person being measured.

When the down pushbutton 154 is released and the up pushbutton 153 is depressed, the polarity of the voltage applied across the terminals of the motors 119 and 119a is reversed, so that the motors operate to move the corresponding sensor platforms upward. Under this condition, diodes 213 and 214 are forward biased and diodes 211 and 212 are reverse biased, so that the up limit switches 217 and 218 are connected in series with the corresponding motors 119 and 119a, to disconnect the motors from the power supply 165 when the corresponding shoulder sensor platforms reach the upper limit of their travel.

In the wiring diagrams of FIGS. 8, 9a and 9b, the symbols C, NC and NO refer to common, normally closed and normally open switch contacts, respectively.

The neck, blade, waist, seat and calf slide drive motors 26a, 12, c, d and e, respectively, are arranged to operate sequentially in order to permit use of a relatively small power supply 165. Where a sufficiently large power supply is provided, these motors may of course be operated simultaneously.

The measuring process is initiated by depressing the Measure momentary pushbutton 159, which is of the double pole single throw type, to apply a voltage across the relay K1 and the neck slide drive motor 26a of such polarity as to cause outward movement of the neck slide 14. The pushbutton 159 is shown in its depressed position in FIG. 9a.

When the pushbutton 159 is depressed, the relay K1 is energized, so that the Zener diode 220 is connected in series with the resistor 221 between the power supply terminal Y and ground, to provide a regulated dc. voltage at the terminal 222 for operation of the slide drive motors 26:: through 262. Since the Zener diode 220 is arranged to carry current only when the pushbutton 159 is depressed (the pushbuttons 154 and 159 must be held down until all the motors with which they are associated have been disconnected from the power supply 165 by operation of the corresponding sensor switches), power dissipation and resultant heating of the Zener diode 220 is minimized. Depressing the pushbutton 159 also applies the voltage at the terminal 222 to neck slide motor 26a, so that the neck slide 14 moves outward, the diode 223 being forward biased and the diode 224 being reverse biased.

As the slide 14 moves outward, current flows between the common and normally closed contacts of the out limit switch 225 and the neck sensor switch 92. When the neck sense lever of the neck sensor assembly 15 (of which the sensor switch 92 is a part) engages the person being measured, it depresses the actuating pin of the sensor switch 92, to open the connection between the common and normally closed switch contacts and complete the connection between the common and normally open switch contacts. When this happens, the neck slide drive motor 26a is disconnected from the power supply 165, and the voltage of the terminal 222 is applied to the terminals of the shoulder blade slide drive motor 26b, to cause outward movement of the shoulder blade slide 16.

As the shoulder blade slide 16 moves outward, diode 226 is forward biased and diode 227 is reverse biased, so that current flows between the common and normally closed contacts of the out limit switch 228 and the series combination of the shoulder blade sensor switches 98 and 99. When the sense lever of the shoulder blade sensor assembly 17 engages the person being measured, the connection between the common and normally closed contacts of at least one of the sensor switches 98 and 99 is broken, and the common contact of that switch is connected to the normally open contact thereof, thus disconnecting the shoulder blade drive assembly motor 26b from the power supply 165, and energizing the relay K2.

Before the relay K2 is energized, the resistor 229 is connected to the power supply through the connection established between the common and normally closed contacts of the relay K2. When the relay K2 is energized in the manner described above, the resistor 229 is disconnected from the power supply 165, while the coil of the relay K2 is connected to the power supply. The value of theresistor 229 is preferably chosen so that the load presented to the power supply remains substantially constant as the relay K2 switches between its energized and unenergized state.

When the relay K2 is energized, the waist slide drive motor 26c (FIG. 9b) is connected to the power supply 165 through a path including the common and normally open contacts of the relay K2, the normally closed contacts of the out limit switch 230, and the common and normally closed contacts of the waist sensor switch 231 (which is a part of the waist sensor assembly 19), the diode 232 being forward biased and the diode 233 being reverse biased.

The purpose of the relay K2 is to provide a more direct connection between the motors 26c and 26d and the power supply, in order to bypass much of the wiring associated with the motors 26a and 26b. if this were not done, the additional wire placed in series with each motor would cause additional voltage drop, so that each of the motors 26b, 0, d, and e would operate more slowly than the previous motor. Since the wires associated with each of the motors must be flexible and formed into loops to permit vertical movement of the corresponding shelf and horizontal movement of the corresponding slide, small diameter wire must be employed to provide the requisite flexibility, and substantial voltage drop takes place in the wiring. Relay K3 serves a similar purpose, as will hereafter be described.

When the waist slide 18 moves outward so that the sense lever of the waist sensor assembly 19 engages the person being measured, the waist sensor switch 231 is actuated, disconnecting the waist slide drive motor 26c from the power supply 165 and applying voltage to the terminals of the seat slide drive motor 26d by way of the connection provided between the common and normally open contacts of the sensor switch 231, the out limit switch 230, and the connection between the common and normally open contacts of the relay K2.

As the seat slide drive motor 26d causes the seat slide 20 to move outward, current flows between the common and normally closed contacts of the out limit switch 234, the common and normally closed contacts of the seat sensor switches 235 and 236, and the forward biased diode 237, the diode 238 being reverse biased. When either of the sense levers of the seat sensor assembly 21 engages the person being measured, the corresponding seat sensor switch 235 or 236 is actuated, disconnecting the seat slide drive motor 26d from the power supply 165 and energizing the relay K3.

Prior to the relay K3 being energized, current flows through the resistor 239 and the connection between the common and normally closed contacts of the relay K3. When the relay K3 is energized, current flows through the coil of the relay and ceases to flow through the resistor 239. The value of the resistor 239 is preferably chosen so that the load presented to the power

Patent Citations
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US3192627 *Jan 3, 1962Jul 6, 1965Scholl Mfg Co IncFoot measuring and pedograph revealing machine
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4135498 *Apr 13, 1977Jan 23, 1979Mcgee George LDevice for making body measurements of a patient or the like
US4598376 *Apr 27, 1984Jul 1, 1986Richman Brothers CompanyMethod and apparatus for producing custom manufactured items
US4635367 *Jun 3, 1983Jan 13, 1987Proca Consulting AbMethod for taking body measurement and apparatus for performing the method as well as a system for taking body measurement and producing garments
US4928398 *Apr 10, 1989May 29, 1990Michael DelfinerAnthropometer
EP0137612A2 *Aug 3, 1984Apr 17, 1985The Richman Brothers CompanyMethod & apparatus for producing custom manufactured items
EP0227642A2 *Aug 3, 1984Jul 1, 1987The Richman Brothers CompanyMeasuring device for producing custom manufactured items
Classifications
U.S. Classification33/8, 33/504, 33/512
International ClassificationA41H1/00, A41H1/04
Cooperative ClassificationA41H1/04
European ClassificationA41H1/04